CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY AND SOCIAL WORK

School of Business and Management

Syllabus for
Master of Arts (Applied Sociology)
Academic Year  (2023)

 
1 Semester - 2023 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
CSC996 VISUALIZING DATA - 2 2 50
MSA131 CLASSICAL SOCIAL THEORIES Core Courses 4 4 100
MSA132 GENDER STUDIES Core Courses 4 4 100
MSA133 SOCIAL RESEARCH METHODS Core Courses 4 4 100
MSA134 APPROACHES TO THE STUDY OF INDIAN SOCIETY Core Courses 4 4 100
MSA135 SOCIAL DEMOGRAPHY Core Courses 4 4 100
2 Semester - 2023 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
CSC996 VISUALIZING DATA - 2 2 50
MAIS291 INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS Interdisciplinary Elective Courses 4 4 100
MCN291 ECOLOGY AND MEDIA DISCOURSES Interdisciplinary Elective Courses 4 4 100
MEL291 BORDERS,MIGRATIONS,IDENTITIES Interdisciplinary Elective Courses 4 4 100
MSA231 ADVANCED SOCIAL THEORIES Core Courses 4 4 100
MSA232 SOCIAL STATISTICS Core Courses 4 4 100
MSA233 QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS Core Courses 4 4 100
MSA234 CORPORATE SOCIOLOGY Core Courses 4 4 100
MSA291 CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY Interdisciplinary Elective Courses 60 4 100
3 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MSA331 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY Core Courses 4 4 100
MSA332 SOCIOLOGY OF CHANGE AND DEVELOPMENT Core Courses 4 4 100
MSA333 SOCIOLOGY OF HEALTH Core Courses 4 4 100
MSA334 CULTURE AND POLITICS Core Courses 4 4 100
MSA335 PUBLIC RELATIONS Core Courses 4 4 100
MSA381 DISSERTATION - I Core Courses 2 2 50
MSA382 INTERNSHIP Core Courses 0 4 100
4 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MSA431 SOCIAL WELFARE ADMINISTRATION AND NGO MANAGEMENT Core Courses 4 4 100
MSA432 SOCIOLOGY OF MEDIA Core Courses 4 4 100
MSA433 SOCIAL GERONTOLOGY Core Courses 4 4 100
MSA441A SOCIAL MOVEMENTS AND SOCIAL CHANGE Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 4 100
MSA441B SOCIOLOGY OF DIASPORA Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 4 100
MSA441C HUMAN RIGHTS AND SOCIOLOGY OF LAW Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 4 100
MSA481 DISSERTATION II Core Courses 2 2 50
    

    

Introduction to Program:

The Masters Programme in Applied Sociology is conceived as one providing a sound theoretical base for the understanding of contemporary social phenomena in conjunction with the skills necessary to apply this knowledge in various fields such as in the Government sector, Human Resources, NGO sector, Research and Project Management. 

 

The programme provides equal importance to classical and contemporary theories on one hand and a number of special fields of empirical Sociological studies on the other. It balances courses which offer a strong grounding in theory and methods with others which impart skills.

 

The programme also incorporates an Internship in either an NGO or in the corporate sector and a Dissertation, completion of which are deemed necessary for successful completion.

Programme Outcome/Programme Learning Goals/Programme Learning Outcome:

PO1: Demonstrate knowledge about the dynamics of social systems.

PO2: Apply sociological theories and perspectives to social reality.

PO3: Analyze and engage with the social surroundings, problematise and raise questions and apply their knowledge for welfare initiatives.

PO4: Demonstrate awareness of local, regional, national and global socio-cultural environmental needs and concerns.

PO5: Engage in lifelong learning.

PO6: Conduct social research by mastering technical skills.

PO7: Exhibit academic writing skills.

PO8: Demonstrate soft skills such as presentation skills, interpersonal skills and exhibit lateral and analytical thinking skills.

Assesment Pattern

 PATTERN FOR CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA)

CIA constitutes a total of 50 marks for a four-credit paper. The distribution is as follows 

CIA I - Mid semester Examination conducted for a total weightage of 25 marks 

CIA II - CIA II carries 10 marks and involves the adoption of any one or two of the following methods: written Assignment, Book/Article review, group presentations, symposium, group task, Individual seminars, Quiz, and class test.   

CIA III - CIA III also carries 10 marks and involves the adoption of any one or two of the above said methods. 

Attendance - Attendance carries 5 marks 

  

The course teacher would decide the internal assessment methods to be adopted for a given semester and would incorporate them in the course plan for validation which will be circulated among the students in the beginning of each semester. 

QUESTION PAPER PATTERN FOR END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE)

 

ESE is conducted as a three-hour paper which carries 50 per cent weightage. Examination is conducted out of 100 marks and later reduced to 50 marks. The exam is conducted for 3 hours.

Model- 1

 

Section 1 Short Answer Questions                                                                                       8 X 5=40

This section will have a total of eight questions out of which five to be answered. Each question carries Eight marks and hence a total of 40 Marks. Attention will be paid to have at least two questions from each module of the syllabus. Students will be expected to answer these questions in not more than 200 words.

 

Section II Essay Questions                                                                                                 15 X 4=60

This section will have a total of six questions out of which four to be answered. Each question carries Fifteen marks and hence a total of 60 Marks. Attention will be paid to have at least one question from each module of the syllabus. Students will be expected to answer these questions in not more than 500 words.

OR

 

Model- 2

 

5 Essays                                                                                                           20 x 5 = 100

 

There will be a total of 8 questions of which any 5 have to be answered. Each question carries 20 marks.

  

OR

 

Model -3

 

Section 1 Essay Questions                                                                                   10 x 5 = 50

This section will have a total of seven questions out of which five to be answered. Each question carries TEN marks and hence a total of 50Marks. This section will have smaller essay questions, with a little of analyses and concepts.

 

Section II Essay Questions                                                                                       15 x 2=30

This section will have a total of three questions out of which two to be answere1d. Each question carries Fifteen marks and hence a total of 30 Marks. This section will have slightly difficult analytical questions.

Section III Compulsory Question                                                                            20 x 1 =20

This section will be a compulsory question as this is an application-based syllabus the questions in this section will be application-based questions on either case studies or live scenarios

Examination And Assesments

ASSESSMENT PATTERN FOR INTERNSHIP:

 1.     Reflective weekly Journal                    040 marks

2.     Report on Internship                              030 marks

3.     Presentation                                           010 marks

4.     Viva                                                       020 marks        

Total                                                            100 marks

 

ASSESSMENT PATTERN FOR DISSERTATION:

 

III SEMESTER

1.                  Proposal                                                       20 marks

2.                  Proposal Presentation                                   10 marks

3.                  Colloquium I                                                20 marks

                     Total                                                             50 marks

 

IV SEMESTER

1.                  Colloquium II                                               10 marks

2.                  Dissertation                                                  30 marks

3.                  Viva                                                              10 marks          

                    Total                                                             50 marks

MSA131 - CLASSICAL SOCIAL THEORIES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

Course Description:This course aims at making students capable of appreciating theory from a historical perspective and trace continuities in the accumulation of knowledge. It helps them to understand theory as systematically organized, law-like propositions about society that can be supported by evidence. This course covers an important phase in the development of sociological theories when the three fundamental traditions i.e. Structural Functionalism, Conflict Theory and Interactionist Theory took shape. It also introduces the students to the major proponents of these traditions.

 

Course Objectives :

  • To orient the students to the broad spectrum of the theoretical discourses in Sociology.

  • To provide foundational understanding of the sociological paradigms

  • To help students comprehend the contemporary world through the lense of theories

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will be able to understand social phenomena from different perspectives.

CO2: Students will be able to look at the contemporary happenings through a sociological eye.

CO3: Students will acquire the skills and knowledge to understand social phenomena systematically without individual bias.

CO4: Students will be able to approach social issues from a scientific perspective rather than taking a common sensical approach.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Nature of Sociological Perspectives
 

1.      Sociological perspectives: Introduction

2.      Concepts, theories and paradigms

3.      Theory and Social Reality

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Structural Functionalism
 

1.      Structural Functionalism: Emergence

a.       Comte, Spencer, Durkheim

2.      The Analytical Functionalism of Talcott Parsons

3.      The structure of Social Action

4.      The Empirical Functionalism of R. K Merton

a.       Merton’s Paradigm for Functional analysis

5.      Applications of functional analysis

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Conflict Theory
 

1.      Conflict as a perspective: the contribution of Karl Marx

2.      The Dialectical conflict theory of Dahrendorf

3.      The conflict Functionalism of Lewis Coser

4.      Conflict Sociology – Randal Collins

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Symbolic Interactionism
 

1.      Introduction

2.      Weber, Social Action, Ideal Type

3.      Cooley- Looking Glass Self

4.      Mead – Development of Self

5.      Blumer – Sociological Analysis of the Variable

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Social Exchange Perspective
 

1.      Structural Exchange theory of Peter M. Blau

2.      Exchange Network Theory of Richard Emerson

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Abraham M, F.(2008).Modern Sociological Theory. New York: Oxford University Press.

Birks, M. (2011). Grounded Theory: A Practical Guide. Los Angeles: Sage.

Collins, R. (1997). Theoretical Sociology. Jaipur: Rawat Publications.

Joas, H. (2009). Social Theory: Twenty Introductory Lectures. New York: CUP

Jonathan, H T. (1987). Structure of Sociological Theory. Jaipur: Rawat Publications.

Parsons, T. (1964). Social Structure and Personality. Free Press.

Ritzer, G. (1988). Contemporary Sociological Theory. New Jersey: MGH.

Smelser, N. J. (1959). Social Change in the Industrial Revolution. London: Routledge

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.      Allan, K. (2011). A Social Lens an Invitation to Social and Sociological Theory. Los Angeles: Sage.

2.      Baldwin, J.D (1986). George Herbert Mead: A Unifying Theory for Sociology. New Delhi:Sage.

3.      Becker, H. (1971). Sociological Work: Method and Substance. Allen Lane.

4.      Furedi, F. (2013). Authority: A Sociological History. New York: CUP

5.      Jones, P. (2005). Introducing Social Theory.  Cambridge: Polity Press.

6.      Visvanathan, S. (2009). Structure and Transformation: Theory and Society in India. New Delhi: OUP.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

  • CIA 1 - 20

    CIA 2 Mid Sem-50

    CIA 3 - 20

    Attendance - 5

    Endsem exam - 100

MSA132 - GENDER STUDIES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

Course Description: This is a programme focused on understanding the impact of gender on the world around us and on power hierarchies that structure it. It is important therefore to build awareness about these issues into the academic curriculum. This will enable students to critically engage with their lived reality and also empower them with the necessary tools for building a more gender just and egalitarian society.

 

Course Objectives: 

 

  • to familiarize students with the dynamics of gender and its related key issues

  • to orient students towards major theoretical perspectives connected with gender

  • to  help them understand the politics of gender in the real world

  • to critically analyse the deeper implications of gender inequality in society

Course Outcome

CO1: To explain the concepts and theories related to gender and sexuality.

CO2: Critically evaluate the historical, cultural and political contexts that shaped our basic understandings of gender and sexuality

CO3: To discuss the structural power dynamics in society through a gender sensitive lens.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Concepts for studying men and women
 

  1. Defining Gender
  2. Feminist Methodology
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Feminist Theories
 

1.      Liberal Feminism and Marxist Feminism

  1. Radical Feminism and Socialist Feminism
  2. Postcolonial/Multicultural Feminism
  3. Existentialist Feminism 
  4. Third Wave Feminism
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Gender Stereotypes
 

  1. Social Constructions of Gender : Natural and Social Inequalities
  2. Femininity and Masculinity
  3. Gender and Social Institutions
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Gender and the Work Sphere (Field Exposure)
 

  1. Gender and Power
  2. Gender and the Economy
  3. The Intersection of Gender and Class
  4.  Gender and Development - Constraints in Development Polices
  5. Gender on the International agenda
Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Gender & Society: Applications of Gender Stereotypes
 

  1. Gender and Religion
  2. Gender and Law
  3. Gender and health
  4. Women, environment and ecology
Text Books And Reference Books:

 Pal.M, P. b. (2011). Gender and Discrimination. New Delhi : Oxford University Press.

Ray, R. (2012). Handbook of Gender. New Delhi : Oxford University .

Tapan, B. (2007). Human Rights and Environment. New Delhi : Viva Books Private Limited.

John, Mary E. (2008). Women’s Studies in India: A Reader. New Delhi:Penguin Books.

      Jackson, Stevi & Jackie Jones (ed). (1998). Contemporary Feminist Theories, Edinburgh: University Press

      Kamla Bhasin. (1994). Patriarchy. New Delhi: Kali for Women.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Kimmel, M S. (2010). The Gendered Society, (4thed.), Oxford University Press.

Kristof, N., & Wu Dunn, S. (2009) Half the Sky, Vintage Press. Chapter 7

Leonhardt, D. (2006), Gender Pay Gap, Once Narrowing, Is Stuck in Place. The New York Times.

Parrot, A. and Cummings, N. (2006) Forsaken females: The global brutalization of women, Rowman and Littlefield. Chapter 1.

Roscoe, W. (1992) Zuni Man/Woman. University of New Mexico Press. Chapter 1

Towle, E. B, & Morgan, L. M (2002) Romancing the Transgender Native: Rethinking the Use of the "Third Gender" Concept GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies, 8, (4) 469-497.

Radha Kumar. (1998). History of Doing, Kali for Women.

Butler, Judith (1990). Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity. New York: Routledge.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 - 10

CIA 2 Mid Sem Exam25 

CIA 3 - 10

Attendance - 5

Endsem exam - 50                                                                        20 X 5=100

MSA133 - SOCIAL RESEARCH METHODS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course seeks to train students to conceptualize and carry out social research. It introduces students to the various stages of research, equipping them with the necessary skills to collect data, analyse data and present the findings in a report format.

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will be aware of the various philosophical standpoints on research.

CO2: They will acquire with the necessary skills to conceive and conduct sociological research.

CO3: Through various assignments, they will be able to demonstrate practical knowledge of conducting research.

CO4: This course will also help them to do their dissertation systematically during the fourth semester.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Social Research: An Introduction
 
  1. Social Research: Meaning  and Objectives
  2. Social Research Paradigms- Positivism, Interpretivism, Critical theory.
  3. Agency Vs determinism; Induction and deduction
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Social Research: Basic Postulates
 

1.      Types of research:

a.       Exploratory – Descriptive –Explanatory-    Experimental.

b.      Quantitative and Qualitative

c.       Pure and Applied, Action and participatory, evaluative

d.      Conceptual research

2.      Types of Data: Primary and Secondary, Quantitative and Qualitative, Sources of Data

3.      Reliability and Validity in Social Research

Ethical concerns in social research

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Steps in Social Research, Research Design and Sampling
 
  1. Research Problem: Identification and Formulation, General Objectives and Specific Objectives –concept-variable - hypotheses
  2. Review of Literature
  3. Research Design: Meaning – Purpose- types : Survey Designs- Cross sectional and Longitudinal, Case Study, Comparative and Experimental  
  4. Sampling: Probability and Non-Probability -Types; Merits & Limitations.
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Data Collection
 
  1. Methods for Data Collection: Census-Survey, Ethnography or Participant observation, Focus Group Discussion
  2. Tools for Data Collection: Questionnaire–Interview-Participant Observation, content analysis. 
  3. The Rashomon effect
Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Data Processing & Presentation
 
  1. Steps in Data Processing: Checking – Editing – Coding –  Tabulation
  2. Methods of Data Analysis: Using Descriptive and Inferential statistics, Qualitative data analysis- Grounded theory and Analytic Induction
  3. Data Presentation: Tables & Diagrams, Narratives 
  4. Research Report: Structure & Components
Text Books And Reference Books:

Andres, L. (2012). Designing and Doing Survey Research. London: Sage.

Babbie, E. (2002). The Basics of Social Research. London: Wadsworth Publications.

Bryman, A. (2012). Social Research Methods (4thed.). New York: OUP.

Creswell, J. (2009). Research Designs.  New Delhi: Sage Publications.

Goode, W. & Paul K. H. (1981). Methods in Social Research. New York: McGraw Hill.

Hammersley, M. (2012). Ethics in Qualitative Research. New Delhi: Sage.

Packer, M. (2011). The Science of Qualitative Research. New York: CUP.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Kerlinger, F.N.(2004). Foundations of Behavioural Research. Delhi, Surjeet Publications.

Wheeldon, J. (2012). Visualizing Social Science Research: Maps, Methods and Meaning. Los   Angeles: Sage.

Young, P. (1996). Scientific Social Survey and Research. New York: Prentice Hall.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 - 10

CIA 2 Mid Sem-25 

CIA 3 - 10

Attendance - 5

Endsem exam - 50

MSA134 - APPROACHES TO THE STUDY OF INDIAN SOCIETY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course focuses on the development of sociology in India, its relationship to colonial anthropology, Orientalism and Indology and the approaches that emerged in Indian sociology over the years. It introduces the learner to the counter influences of power and knowledge especially during the time of colonialism. The paper begins with an introduction to the theoretical foundations of empirical, structural, Marxist and subaltern approaches to the study of Indian society. It then introduces a number of seminal works in various areas of study such as the study of caste, family, village and tribe in India which have utilized these different perspectives. The readings for most of these units will be shared in class.                        

Course Objectives: 

  • To introduce students to the dynamics of Indian Society

  • To help them have thorough knowledge about the different approaches to study Indian Society

  • To familiarize them with the structural and non-structural issues connected with Indian society 

  • To apply this understanding in studying about the contemporary social scenario.

Course Outcome

CO1: Explain the approaches to the study of caste system in India.

CO2: Discuss the approaches to the study of villages in India.

CO3: Analyse the approaches to the study of family, kinship and religion in India.

CO4: Analyse the approaches to the study of tribes in India.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Caste
 
  1. Indological perspective

  2. Structural functionalist perspective: M.N.Srinivas

  3. Conflict perspective: Kathleen Gough, Thorner

  4. Structuralist perspective: Dumont

  5. Subaltern Perspective with reference to Dalit critiques

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Village Studies
 

 

  1. Indological perspective (Concept of self-sufficient little republics)

  2. Structural functionalist perspective: M.N. Srinivas

  3. Conflict perspective: Kathleen Gough, Beteille, Daniel Thorner

  4. Structuralist perspective: Dumont

  5. Subaltern Perspective

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Religion
 

 

  1. Indological perspective: Weber, William Jones and Max Muller,

  2. Structural functionalist perspective: M N Srinivas

  3. Conflict perspective

  4. Structuralist perspective: Veena Das and Uberoi

  5. Subaltern Perspective: Kancha Illiah

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Family and Kinship
 

 

  1. Indological perspective: Morgan, Maine, Rivers

  2. Structural functionalist perspective: Iravati Karve

  3. Conflict perspective with reference to the feminist critiques of the family

  4. Structuralist perspective: Levi Strauss, Trautman and Dumont

  5. Subaltern Perspective with reference to Dalit critiques

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Tribe
 

 

  1. Indological perspective: Rivers

  2. Structural functionalist perspective: N K Bose

  3. Subaltern Perspective: Ramachandra Guha, Tanika Sarkar 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Cohn, B. S. (2017). Notes on the History of the Study of Indian Society and Culture. In Structure and change in Indian society(pp. 3-28). Routledge.

Desai, A. R. (1994). Rural sociology in India. Popular Prakashan.

Desai, A. R. (2005). Social Background Of Indian Nationalism (6Th-Edn). Popular Prakashan.

Guha, R. (Ed.). (1997). A subaltern studies reader, 1986-1995. U of Minnesota Press.

Gupta, D. (Ed.). (1992). Social stratification (p. 15). Bombay, India: Oxford University Press.

Said, E. (1978). Orientalism: Western representations of the Orient. New York: Pantheon.

Srinivas, M. N. (2009). The Oxford India Srinivas. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Cohn, B. S. (2017). Notes on the History of the Study of Indian Society and Culture. In Structure and change in Indian society(pp. 3-28). Routledge.

Desai, A. R. (1994). Rural sociology in India. Popular Prakashan.

Desai, A. R. (2005). Social Background Of Indian Nationalism (6Th-Edn). Popular Prakashan.

Guha, R. (Ed.). (1997). A subaltern studies reader, 1986-1995. U of Minnesota Press.

Gupta, D. (Ed.). (1992). Social stratification (p. 15). Bombay, India: Oxford University Press.

Said, E. (1978). Orientalism: Western representations of the Orient. New York: Pantheon.

Srinivas, M. N. (2009). The Oxford India Srinivas. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

Evaluation Pattern

The evaluation pattern is as follows:

CIA 1: 20 Marks

CIA 2: Mid-semester exam 50 Marks

CIA 3: 20 Marks

Attendance: 5 Marks

End semester exam: 100 Marks

 

MSA135 - SOCIAL DEMOGRAPHY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: Social Demography attempts to study the population, its size, structure, characteristics and the processes operating within it, using a sociological perspective. This course attempts to introduce the students to this discipline and enable them to understand the impact that society and its various institutions have on the population and its demographic processes. The course will cover the characteristics of the population and tools used to measure and study the same, such as the Census of India, theories of population, the various population processes and an examination of the changes in the policies relating to population over the past 50 years in India. It also enables the student to comprehend the significance of demography in diverse areas such as public planning and policy, market research, healthcare and politics.

 

Course Objectives: 

  • To gain an understanding of the demographic processes that impact the growth and development of
  • society
  • To analyse the theoretical orientation of scholars regarding population studies
  • To enable students to understand the dynamics of population processes
  • To develop frameworks suitable for areas like policy framing and development related to population

Course Outcome

CO1: Examine the significance of Social Demography

CO2: Analyse the study of the population in India, population composition, and the various processes involved

CO3: Apply theories related to demography to examine their application to demographic data

CO4: Critically examine current policies relating to social demography

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Social Demography: An Introduction
 

  1. A brief introduction to the discipline
  2. Characteristics of the Population: Size, Structure and Composition
  3. Demographic processes
  4. Sources of Data
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Theoretical Perspectives
 

  1. Pre Malthusian Theories
  2. Malthusian Theory
  3. Marxian Perspective
  4. Demographic Transition
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:25
Population Processes
 

  1. Fertility and Fecundity                                                                   
    1. Measuring Fertility
    2. Theories of Fertility
    3. Differentials with special emphasis on India: Rural-urban, age, gender, class, caste, region and religion
  2. Migration                                                                              
    1. Measuring Migration
    2. Theories of Migration
    3. Migration Patterns – streams of migration
    4. Impact of Migration, both at the place of origin and the place of  destination
    5. Diaspora
  3. Mortality and Morbidity                                                        
    1. Measuring mortality
    2. Differentials with special emphasis on India: Rural-urban, age, gender, class, caste, region and religion.
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Areas of Application
 

  1. Population Policies
  2. Population and Poverty
  3. Healthcare and Planning
Text Books And Reference Books:

  • Bhende, A, and T Kanitkar.(1978/97).Principles of Population Studies. India: Himalaya Publishing House.
  • Srinivasan, K. (2006). Population Policies and Family Planning Programmes in India: A Review and Recommendations. IIPS Newsletter.
  • Weeks, J. (2011). Population: An Introduction to Concepts and Issues. Wadsworth Publishing Company, California.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

  • Census of India Reports- (2011) at www.censusindia.net
  • http://www.chaf.lib.latrobe.edu.au/census/
  • https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/
  • Pathak, L.P. (1998).Population Studies (Chapters 1 and 2). India: Rawat.
  • Sahoo A.K, ed., (2007), Sociology of Diaspora, Jaipur Rawat Publications.
  • Sahoo, A K, Kadekar, L N., ed. (2012), Global Indian Diaspora: History, culture, and identity, Jaipur Rawat Publications. 
  • Tumbe, C. (2016). Missing men, migration and labour markets: Evidence from India. Indian Journal of Labour Economics, 58(2), 245-267.
Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 - 10

CIA 2 Mid Sem-25 

CIA 3 - 10

Attendance - 5

Endsem exam - 50

CSC996 - VISUALIZING DATA (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:15
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

 

Data visualization package for the statistical programming language R. It starts with simple datasets and then graduates to case studies about world health, economics, and infectious disease trends in the United States. This course starts with fundamental computational concepts underlying most programming languages and also the solution of small problems using a programming language.

 

Course Objectives​

 

  1. To teach students about data visualization principles

  2. To learn how to communicate data-driven findings 

  3. To teach how to use ggplot2 to create custom plots

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the applications of tableau

CO2: Apply fundamental concepts in tableau basic reports

CO3: Analyze the applications of tableau calculations and filters.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Introducing Tableau
 

 

Introduction to Tableau: What is TABLEAU? Why Data Visualization - Unique Features compared to Traditional BI Tools - TABLEAU Overview & Architecture - File Types & Extensions - Start Page,  Show Me, Connecting to Excel Files, Connecting to Text Files, Connect to Microsoft SQL Server, Connecting to Microsoft Analysis Services, Creating and Removing Hierarchies - Bins, Joining Tables, Data Blending.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Tableau Basic Reports
 

Parameters - Set - Combined Sets - Creating a First Report - Data Labels - Create Folders - Sorting Data - Add Totals, Subtotals and Grand Totals to Report. Types of charts.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Tableau Calculations & Filters
 

 

Calculated Fields - Basic Approach to Calculate Rank, Advanced Approach to Calculate Rank , Calculating Running Total  - Filters Introduction - Quick Filters - Filters on Dimensions - Conditional Filters - Top and Bottom Filters - Filters on Measures - Context Filters  - Slicing Filters - Data Source Filters  - Extract Filters 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Milligan, Joshua N., and Guillevin, Tristan. Tableau 10 Complete Reference: Transform Your Business with Rich Data Visualizations and Interactive Dashboards with Tableau 10. United Kingdom, Packt Publishing, 2018.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Milligan, Joshua N., and Guillevin, Tristan. Tableau 10 Complete Reference: Transform Your Business with Rich Data Visualizations and Interactive Dashboards with Tableau 10. United Kingdom, Packt Publishing, 2018.

Evaluation Pattern

MCQ: 25

Assignment: 15

Attendance: 10

MAIS291 - INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The goal of this course is to help the students develop a theoretical understanding of international organizations (IOs) and the global problems they attempt to address. Upon completion of the course, students should be able to articulate why IOs exist, its role,  functions and challenges facing IOs. students should bre able to relate to the contemporary issues and debates on international and regional organisations. 

Course Outcome

CO1: To discuss the historical evolution and growth of international organizations

CO2: To give an introduction to the conceptual and theoretical aspects of International Organization

CO3: To familiarize students with the challenges facing the role and working of univerdsal and regional organisations.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction
 

Definition, Characteristics and Classification of international organizations, Theories of International Organizations

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
HISTORICAL PROGRESSION OF IO'S
 

Origins of International Institutions; Treaty of Westphalia, Congress of Vienna, League of Nations, Evolution of Bretton wood Institutions.

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
UNITED NATIONS INSTITUTIONS and WORLD
 

United Nations, Principle structures of United Nations, Reform of United Nation.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Regional Organizations: Beyond the Nation-State
 

EU, BRICS, SCO, GCC, SAARC ASEAN, BIMSTEC.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
Foreign Aid and Development
 

Politics of Foreign Aid and Development by International Financial Institutions, WTO: Issues and Reforms.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:7
FUTURE OF GLOBAL GOVERNANCE
 

Issues of Global Governance: Peace and Security, Human Rights, Environment. Role of Non- State Actors. Challenges to global governance- Legitimacy, Accountability, Effectiveness

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Margaret Karns and Karen Mingst, International Organizations: The Politics and Process of Global Governance. Boulder: Lynne Reinner Publishers. 2009

2. Clive Archer, International Organizations, 3rd edn.London.Routledge.2011

3. Michael Barnett and Martha Finnemore, Rules for the World: International Organizations in Global Politics. Ithaca: Cornell UP. 2004

4. Paul Kennedy, The Parliament of Man: The Past, Present, and Future of the United Nations. Toronto: Harper Collins. 2006

5. Thomas D. Zweifel, International Organizations and Democracy: Accountability, Politics, and Power, Lynne Rienner Publishers.2006.

6. Inis Claude Jr. From Swords into Ploughshares: The Problems and Progress of International Organization, 4th edn, New York Random House.

7. Thomas G Weiss and Sam Daws (eds) The Oxford Handbook on the United Nations, New York, Oxford University Press.2007.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Margaret Karns and Karen Mingst, International Organizations: The Politics and Process of Global Governance. Boulder: Lynne Reinner Publishers. 2009

2. Clive Archer, International Organizations, 3rd edn.London.Routledge.2011

3. Michael Barnett and Martha Finnemore, Rules for the World: International Organizations in Global Politics. Ithaca: Cornell UP. 2004

4. Paul Kennedy, The Parliament of Man: The Past, Present, and Future of the United Nations. Toronto: Harper Collins. 2006

5. Thomas D. Zweifel, International Organizations and Democracy: Accountability, Politics, and Power, Lynne Rienner Publishers.2006.

6. Inis Claude Jr. From Swords into Ploughshares: The Problems and Progress of International Organization, 4th edn, New York Random House.

7. Thomas G Weiss and Sam Daws (eds) The Oxford Handbook on the United Nations, New York, Oxford University Press.2007.

Evaluation Pattern

SCHEME OF VALUATION

1.     CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation – 10%

2.     CIA II – Mid Semester Examination – 25%

3.     CIA III – Research Topic – 10%

4.     Attendance – 05%

 

5.     End Semester Examination – 50% 

MCN291 - ECOLOGY AND MEDIA DISCOURSES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

Rampant exploitation of natural resources, increasing levels of pollution, intensifying human-animal conflicts, climate emergency, etc. have made ecology one of the prime subjects of discussion in recent decades. While engagements with ecology are most often taken up from a life sciences perspective, there is a felt need to approach ecology from a humanities and social sciences perspective. This course addresses that need. After laying the terms and concepts in the field as the foundation, the course progresses to engage with some of the key issues in the domain and ends with some of the media texts on ecology.

Course Outcome

CO1: Engage with ecological concerns from a Humanities and Social Sciences perspective

CO2: Demonstrate interdisciplinary knowledge of Ecology

CO3: Analyse diverse contexts and concerns of ecology

CO4: Exercise ecological consciousness

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Ecology
 
  1. Glossary: Ecology, Environment, Ecosystem, Biosphere, Biome, Habitat, Niche, Vegetarianism, Anthropocentrism, Speciesism, Conservation, Biocentrism, Gia Theory, Deep Ecology, Bioregionalism, Ecopsychology, Virtual Water

  2. The Ecology of Affluence and the Southern Challenge (Excerpts from Environmentalism: A Global History)

 

This unit is a platform that enables the entrant to pick up key vocabulary, and attain conceptual clarity regarding the discourse of ecology.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
The Idea of Nature
 
  1. Four Frames of Relating to Nature: Nature for Itself, Nature despite People, Nature for People, People and Nature 

  2. William Cronon's The Trouble with Wilderness; or, Getting Back to the Wrong Nature

  3. Changing Natures: A Democratic and Dynamic Approach to Biodiversity Conservation by Kartik Shankar, Meera Anna Oommen and Nitin Rai

  4. Excerpts from Nature in the City by Harini Nagendra

 

This unit presents some of the key discourses on nature that circulate both in the popular and in the theoretical domains.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Ecology: Contexts, Concerns
 
  1. The Food Crises: Hunger via Corporate-Controlled Trade chapter from Making Peace with the Earth by Vandana Shiva

  2. Pollution: Addressing Pollution in Urban Rivers: Lessons from the Vrishabhavathy River in Bengaluru by Priyanka Jamwal and Sharachchandra Lele (excerpts from Transcending Boundaries: Reflecting on Twenty years of Action and research at ATREE)

  3. Excerpts from the Madhav Gadgil and Kasturirangan Reports

 

This unit presents some of the prime ecological concerns that haunt our lives and a few contexts that are detrimental in deciding the course of our earth’s ecological well-being.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Limits to Growth
 
  1. The Great Derangement: Climate Change and the Unthinkable - History (Chapter II)

  2. How Much should a Person Consume? (excerpts from How much should a person consume?: Thinking through the environment. )

 

This unit highlights how our finite world is plundered by indiscriminate looting and infinite demands.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Field Visits
 
  1. A one-day trip to a forest (Excerpts from My Husband and Other Animals to be discussed on the occasion)

  2. Visit to ATREE/ Bhoomi College/ Environment specific-NGO/ Ecologically-stressed area in Bangalore 

 

Field visits are to enable the student to gain an experiential sense of biodiversity, forest life, eco initiatives and ecological stress.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Ecology and Media Discourses
 

 

  1. Conservation Conversations E3: Science and Conservation

  2. Human-Animal Conflict: Gaur in My Garden by Rita Banerjee 

  3. The Hunt - BBC Series

  4. Mongabay Explores Sumatra: Omens and optimism for orangutans - Podcast

This Unit exhibits how the media could play a proactive role in promoting ecological awareness. 

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Banerji, Rita. (2013) Gaur in my garden. Film.

  2. Callenbach, E. (2008). Ecology: A pocket guide. Berkeley: University of California Press.

  3. Conservation Conversations E3: Science & Conservation. (n.d.). Retrieved April 06, 2017, from http://www.conservationindia.org/videos/conservation-conversations-e3-science-conservation

  4. Ghosh, A. (2016). Great derangement. Place of publication not identified: John Murray  Lt.

  5. Guha, R. (2014). Environmentalism: A global history. London: Penguin Books.

  6. Guha, R. (2006). How much should a person consume?: Thinking through the environment. Delhi: Permanent Black.

  7. Home. (n.d.). Retrieved April 06, 2017, from http://conservationindia.org/

  8. Lenin, J. (2012). My husband and other animals. Chennai: Westland.

  9. Nagendra, H. (2016). Nature in the city: Bengaluru in the past, present, and future. New Delhi, India: Oxford University Press.

  10. Podcast: Omens and optimism for Sumatran orangutans. (2021, February 02). Retrieved from https://news.mongabay.com/2021/02/podcast-omens-and-optimism-for-sumatran-orangutans/

  11. Rangarajan, M. (2015). Nature and nation: Essays on environmental history. Ranikhet: Permanent Black in association with Ashoka University.

  12. Shiva, V. (2013). Making peace with the earth: Beyond resource, land and food wars. Auckland Park, South Africa: Jacana Media.

  13. U.N. report lays out blueprint to end 'suicidal war on nature'. (2021, February 19). Retrieved from https://news.mongabay.com/2021/02/u-n-report-lays-out-blueprint-to-end-suicidal-war-on-nature/

  14. Vincent, P. (n.d.). Carrying Capacity. Encyclopedia of Human Geography. doi:10.4135/9781412952422.n21

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

  1. ALTERNATIVE FUTURES: India Unshackled. AUTHORSUPFRONT Publishing, 2018.

  2. Students should start following news that is environment-centric. One should also follow websites like conservationindia.org, mongabay.org, etc.
Evaluation Pattern

Students need to take four-levels of evaluation.

 

  • I CIA: Students need to identify a local ecological crisis, document it and identify means of addressing it. (10 marks)

  • II CIA- Mid Sem: Centralised exam (25 marks)

  • III CIA - Students need to identify a problem in the domain of ecology and make a research proposal. (10 marks)

  • End Sem: Centralised exam (50 marks)

MEL291 - BORDERS,MIGRATIONS,IDENTITIES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

 

This course introduces the students to the notions and concepts of borders, bordering, territorialization and its implications on the understanding of nation, identities, geopolitics, and geoeconomics. The course provides a wide range of topics in an interdisciplinary way in order to understand the multiple manifestations of borders at the global, national, and local level. This course combines rigorous theoretical framework to analyze borders with the requirements of empirical research work. Fieldwork is an integral component of the course.

 

Course Objectives

 

·       To introduce learners to the theorizations of borders, migration, and identities in various aspects of socio-cultural practices.

·       To acquaint learners to the diverse areas in which theories and methods of borders, migration, and identities can be analytically applied.

·       To enable learners to develop complex framework of analysis of everyday practices of borders, migration, and identities in a multidisciplinary framework.

 

CourseOutcomes

·       CO 1: Define, describe, summarize, and interpret concepts and theories of borders, migration, and identity.

 

·       CO 2: Contrast, connect, and correlate various concepts and theories of borders, migration, and identity with textual, audio-visual, and empirical data.

 

·       CO 3: Reframe the concepts through analytically criticizing textual, audio-visual, and empirical data on the basis of readings prescribed in the syllabus.

Course Outcome

CO1: Define, describe, summarize, and interpret concepts and theories of borders, migration, and identity.

CO2: Contrast, connect, and correlate various concepts and theories of borders, migration, and identity with textual, audio-visual, and empirical data.

CO3: Reframe the concepts through analytically criticizing textual, audio-visual, and empirical data on the basis of readings prescribed in the syllabus.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Conceptualizing Borders and Global Bordering Practices
 

Unit Description: This unit will introduce the students to the concepts used in the larger field of Border Studies. The unit is designed to acquaint the students of the various approaches in studying borders.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Migration as Border Crossing Practice
 

Unit Description: This unit is designed to make students aware of the phenomena of crossing national and international borders as an everyday practice that redefines the notion and practices of nationhood, subjecthood, and citizenship.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Margins of Identities
 

 

Unit Description: This unit acquaints the students with the complexities that surrounds the issue of identity, care, and welfare when looked through the lens of borders. Identities in this unit is studied as a bordering practice that constitutes caste, race, gender, and biopolitics.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Geopolitics and Geoeconomics in a Bordered World
 

Unit Description: This unit serves as an introduction to the interdisciplinary relation and interface between political economy, international relations, and political theory.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Cultural Representations of Border
 

Unit Description: Borders and bordering practices have left an indelible mark on the culture and art of nations and communities. This unit through analysis of films, literature, and popular culture discusses aesthetic representation of borders.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Fieldwork
 

This unit will be a guided introduction to qualitative research methods in the studying of border at various scales-municipal, city, district, state, and nation.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Unit 1

                                                                                                                         10 hrs

Conceptualizing Borders and Global Bordering Practices

 

Unit Description: This unit will introduce the students to the concepts used in the larger field of Border Studies. The unit is designed to acquaint the students of the various approaches in studying borders.

 

Vaughan-Williams, N. (2016) ‘Borders’, in Ni Mhurchu, A. and Shindo, R. (eds.), Critical Imaginations in International Relations, London: Routledge, pp 11-27

 

Rumford, Chris (2012) ‘Towards a Multiperspectival Study of Borders‘ Geopolitics, 17:4 pp 887-902

 

Mezzadra S, Neilson B (2012). “Between Inclusion and Exclusion: On the Topology of Global Space and Borders.” Theory, Culture & Society. 29(4-5):58-75. doi:10.1177/0263276412443569

 

Stacey K. Sowards (2019) Bordering Through Place/s, Difference/s, and Language/s: Intersections of Border and Feminist Theories, Women's Studies in Communication, 42:2, 120-124, DOI: 10.1080/07491409.2019.1605131

 

Walia, Harsha (2021) Border and Rule: Global Migration, Capitalism, and the Rise of Racist Nationalism

 

 

Unit 2                                                                                                             10 hrs

Migration as Border Crossing Practice

 

Unit Description: This unit is designed to make students aware of the phenomena of crossing national and international borders as an everyday practice that redefines the notion and practices of nationhood, subjecthood, and citizenship.

 

Mountz, A. (2015) ‘In/visibility and the Securitization of Migration: Shaping Publics through Border Enforcement on Islands’, Cultural Politics, Volume 11, Number 2: pp. 184-200.

 

Samaddar, Ranabir (2020). Borders of an Epidemic: Covid-19 and Migrant Workers.

 

Samaddar, Ranabir (1999). “Shefali” in The Marginal Nation: Transborder Migration from Bangladesh to West Bengal

 

Gloria E. Anzaldúa (1987). Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza

 

Foucault, Michel (2003) Society Must Be Defended: Lectures at the College de France, 1975-76, edited by Mauro Bertani and Alessandro Fontana. New York: Picador

 

Unit 3                                                                                                             10 hrs

Margins of Identities

 

Unit Description: This unit acquaints the students with the complexities that surrounds the issue of identity, care, and welfare when looked through the lens of borders. Identities in this unit is studied as a bordering practice that constitutes caste, race, gender, and biopolitics.

 

Mbembe, Achille (2003) ‘Necropolitics’ Public Culture 15.1 11-40.

 

Tyler, Imogen (2018) ‘The hieroglyphics of the border: racial stigma in neoliberal Europe,' Ethnic and Racial Studies, Vol 41 Issue 10, pp. 1783-1801.

 

Ritu Menon (2003). “Birth of Social Security Commitments-What Happened in the West.”

 

Farhana Ibrahim (2005). "Defining a Border: Harijan Migrants and the State in Kachchh." Economic and Political Weekly , Apr. 16-22, 2005, Vol. 40, No. 16 (Apr. 16-22, 2005), pp. 1623-1630

 

Fernandez, B. 2017. “Queer Border Crossers: Pragmatic Complicities, Indiscretions and Subversions”

 

Unit 4                                                                                                             10 hrs

Geopolitics and Geoeconomics in a Bordered World

 

Unit Description: This unit serves as an introduction to the interdisciplinary relation and interface between political economy, international relations, and political theory.

 

Brian Kahin and Charles Nesson (1999). Borders in Cyberspace: Information Policy and the Global Information Infrastructure

 

Michael G. Plummer, Peter J. Morgan and Ganeshan Wignaraja (2016). Connecting Asia Infrastructure for Integrating South and Southeast Asia

 

Hillman, Jonathan E  (2020). The Emperor’s New Road: China and the Project of the Century. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.

 

Schmitt, Carl  (2003) The Nomos of the Earth: In the International Law of the Jus Publicum Europaeum  

 

Unit 5                                                                                                             10 hrs

Cultural Representations of Border

 

Unit Description: Borders and bordering practices have left an indelible mark on the culture and art of nations and communities. This unit through analysis of films, literature, and popular culture discusses aesthetic representation of borders.

 

Saadat Hasan Manto- “Toba Tek Singh” and “The Dog of Tetwal.” (Literature)

 

No Man’s Land (Film)

 

This Side, That Side (Graphic Narratives)

 

Partition Museums (Museum)

 

 

Unit 6                                                                                                             10 hrs

Fieldwork

 

This unit will be a guided introduction to qualitative research methods in the studying of border at various scales-municipal, city, district, state, and nation.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Refer the readings in the unit.

Evaluation Pattern

 

CIA I: For CIA 1, written examination based on prescribed readings, (20 marks).

 

CIA II - Mid Semester Examination: Section A (10X5=50 marks) – Centralized. These will be written examination to test conceptual understanding of the units.

 

CIA III: Presentation followd by Q&A. (20 marks)

 

End Semester Examination: Centralized examination of 100 marks.

MSA231 - ADVANCED SOCIAL THEORIES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: Students are expected to have an understanding of the underlying principles of Neo Marxism, Phenomenology, Ethnomethodology, Structuralism and post structural theories through the contributions of respective theorists. The applicability of these theories in understanding contemporary social reality is also emphasized.

Course Objectives:

        To help students gain an advanced knowledge about sociological concepts and theories

        To apply this knowledge in understanding the contemporary forms of human existence

        To visualize the possibilities of sociological projects in the light of knowledge thus gained

Course Outcome

CO1: To incorporate theories and perspectives in their research projects, dissertations, term papers etc.

CO2: To understand the trends in social theories with respect to their social canvass

CO3: To critically reengage with their surroundings and go past the immediate common sense

CO4: To apply their knowledge of major sociological perspectives to the contemporary social context drawing on appropriate studies and research evidence.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Neo Marxism & Critical Theory
 

1.        Gramsci – Role of Ideology, Hegemony

2.        Lucaks – Reification and class consciousness

3.        Habermas – Public sphere.

4.     Bourdieu – Field, Habitus and Social Capital.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Phenomenology and Ethnomethodology? An Introduction
 

1.      Alfred Schutz – Typification, Common sense world and inter subjectivity

a.       Phenomenology as a theory as well as a methodological approach

2.      Peter Berger &Thomas Luckman - Social Construction of Reality

3.      “Social Construction of What”? Ian Hacking

4.      Ethnomethodology

a.       Harrold Garfinkel

                                                              i.      Conversation analysis

                                                            ii.      Breaching Experiment

b.       Stanley Milgram’s experiment

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Structuralism
 

1.      Levi Strauss: Structural Analysis

 

a.       Study of myth

 

2.       Althusser –  Structural Marxism

 

a.       Ideological and Repressive state apparatus

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Post Structuralism and Postmodernism
 

 

1.      Foucault –

 

a.       Power and Knowledge -  The Panopticon

 

b.      Biopower

 

2.      Baudrillard

 

a.       Simulacra, Simulacrum and the age of Hyper reality

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Appelrouth, S. & Edles, L Desfor. (2011). Sociological Theory in the Contemporary Era. New Delhi : Sage Publications.

Best, S & Kellner, D. (1999). Post Modern Theory: Critical Interrogation. London: Mac Millan Publications.

Foucault, M. (2008). “Panopticism” from “Discipline & Punish: The Birth of the Prison.”  Race/Ethnicity: Multidisciplinary Global Contexts2(1), 1–12. http://www.jstor.org/stable/25594995

Giddens, Anthony. (1987). Social Theory and Modern Sociology. Stanford: Sanford University Press.

Ritzer, G. (2011). Sociological Theory (8th ed.). New York: Mc Grow Hill.

Seidman S. (1994). The Postmodern Turn. London: Cambridge Publications.

Turner, J., Contemporary Sociological Theory (2012) SAGE Publications, Inc.

Ritzer, George. (2000). Blackwell companion to Major contemporary social scientists. USA: Blackwell

Mills, Sara (2007). Michel Foucault. London: Routledge.

Sutton, P. (2015). Endangered Species? In R. G. Smith & D. B. Clarke (Eds.), Jean Baudrillard: From Hyperreality to Disappearance: Uncollected Interviews (pp. 122–131). Edinburgh University Press. http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.3366/j.ctt1g09zct.18

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Lawler S., (2007) Identity: Sociological Perspectives, (1st ed.), Polity Publications.

Morris, L. (2006), Rights : Sociological Perspectives,(1st ed.), Routledge Publications.

Vannini P., Waskul D., Gottschalk S. (2011), The Senses in Self, Society and Culture : A Sociology of the Senses, Routledge Publications.

Wilcox, M. M., (2012), Religion in Today’s World, Routledge Publications.

Baudrillard, Jean. (1994). Simulacra and Simulation, California: The University of Michigan Press

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 - 10

CIA 2 Mid Sem-25 

CIA 3 - 10

Attendance - 5

End sem exam - 50 

 

MSA232 - SOCIAL STATISTICS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:This course seeks to develop the necessary statistical competence with the students in order to make them to acquire with the necessary skills to undertake quantitative analysis of data. Apart from basic statistical tools and measures, students will also be trained in the use of SPSS software for data analysis.

 

Course Objectives:

  • To introduce students to Quantitative Sociology with special emphasis on methods and social statistics

  • To use social statistics to quantify and analyse the different aspects of social reality.

  • To learn technical skills to manage quantitative data

Course Outcome

1: Students acquired basic knowledge about social statistics and the role it plays in quantitative Sociology

2: Students understood the appropriate statistical tests to be applied for a given set of data and interpret the same.

3: Students developed the ability to understand the nuances of the statistical description of data in research and government reports.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Social Statistics
 

1.      Meaning, Nature, Characteristics, Functions

2.      Relevance and Scope of Social Statistics

3.      Limitations of Statistics

4.      Sociology and Social Statistics

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Measures of Central Tendency and Dispersion
 

1.      Meaning, Nature, Purpose

2.      Kinds of Central Tendency: Mean (Arithmetic & Geometric) – Median – Mode

3.      Merits and Limitations

4.      Significance of Central Tendency in Social Research

5.      Measures of Dispersion- Meaning, Nature, Purpose

6.      Kinds of Dispersion: Range, Mean Deviation, Standard

7.      Deviation, Quartile Deviation.

8.      Merits and Demerits of each Measurement.

9.      Significance of dispersion in Social Research

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Correlation and Tests of Significance
 

1.      Correlation:

a.      Types – Means of Computing Correlation and Interpretation.

b.      Karl Pearson’s Coefficient of Correlation, (Spearman’s) Rank Correlation.

2.      Tests of Significance

a.      Chi-Squar, ‘t’ Test, ‘F’ Test.

b.      Importance of Correlation and Tests of Significance in Social Research.

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Social Research & SPSS