CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

School of Business and Management

Syllabus for
Bachelor of Business Administration-Bachelor of Law (Honours)
Academic Year  (2023)

 
1 Semester - 2023 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
LAW121 PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT Core Courses 4 4 100
LAW122 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT Core Courses 4 4 100
LAW127 FOUNDATIONAL KANNADA Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses 2 2 50
LAW133 ECONOMICS FOR LAW I Core Courses 4 4 100
LAW144B LEGAL LANGUAGE AND LEGAL WRITING Core Courses 5 4 100
LAW145 LAW, LITERATURE AND JUDICIAL PROCESS Core Courses 5 4 100
LAW156 LAW OF TORT AND CONSUMER PROTECTION Core Courses 15 4 100
2 Semester - 2023 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
LAW221 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING Core Courses 4 4 100
LAW222 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT Core Courses 4 4 100
LAW233 ECONOMICS FOR LAW II Core Courses 4 4 100
LAW244A ENGLISH Core Courses 4 4 100
LAW255 LAW OF CONTRACT I Core Courses 5 4 100
LAW266 DEVELOPMENT AND PUBLIC POLICY Core Courses 5 4 100
3 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
LAW321 GENDER, DIVERSITY, AND INCLUSION IN ORGANIZATIONAL MANAGEMENT Core Courses 4 4 100
LAW322 MARKETING MANAGEMENT Core Courses 4 4 100
LAW333 LAW AND ECONOMICS Core Courses 4 4 100
LAW354 CONSTITUTIONAL LAW I Core Courses 5 4 100
LAW355 LAW OF CONTRACT I Core Courses 5 4 100
LAW366 PHILOSOPHY OF LAW Core Courses 5 4 100
4 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
LAW452 JURISPRUDENCE Core Courses 5 4 100
LAW453 PUBLIC INTERNATIONAL LAW Core Courses 5 4 100
LAW454 CONSTITUTIONAL LAW II Core Courses 5 4 100
LAW455 LAW OF CONTRACT II Core Courses 5 4 100
LAW461 PRINCIPLES OF CRIMINAL LAW Core Courses 5 4 100
LAW476 MOOT COURT Core Courses 5 4 100
5 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
LAW552 CONSTITUTIONAL LAW I Core Courses 5 4 100
LAW553 COMPANY LAW I Core Courses 5 4 100
LAW554 LABOUR AND INDUSTRIAL LAW I Core Courses 5 4 100
LAW555 ENVIRONMENTAL LAW Core Courses 5 4 100
LAW561 PRINCIPLES OF CRIMINAL LAW Core Courses 5 4 100
LAW576 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY - 5 4 100
6 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
LAW651 CRIMINAL LAW I Core Courses 5 4 100
LAW652 CONSTITUTIONAL LAW II Core Courses 5 4 100
LAW653 COMPANY LAW II Core Courses 5 4 100
LAW654 LABOUR AND INDUSTRIAL LAW II Core Courses 5 4 100
LAW665 INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW Core Courses 5 4 100
LAW677 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY Core Courses 5 4 100
LAW686A LAW OF CORPORATE INSOLVENCY Discipline Specific Elective Courses 5 4 100
LAW686B CLIMATE CHANGE: LAW AND POLICY Discipline Specific Elective Courses 5 4 60
LAW686C ENERGY LAWS Discipline Specific Elective Courses 5 4 100
LAW686D ECONOMICS OF INTERNATIONAL TRADE Discipline Specific Elective Courses 5 5 100
LAW686E SECURITIES LAWS Discipline Specific Elective Courses 5 4 100
7 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
LAW751 ADMINISTRATIVE LAW Core Courses 5 4 100
LAW752 PUBLIC INTERNATIONAL LAW Core Courses 5 4 100
LAW763 LAW OF INSURANCE Core Courses 60 4 100
LAW764 LAW OF BANKING Core Courses 5 4 100
LAW785A LAW OF TRADEMARKS Discipline Specific Elective Courses 5 4 100
LAW785B COMPARATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL LAW Discipline Specific Elective Courses 5 4 100
LAW785C LAW OF MERGERS AND ACQUISITIONS Discipline Specific Elective Courses 5 4 100
LAW785D EARTH JUSTICE- DEVELOPING A NEW JURISPRUDENCE Discipline Specific Elective Courses 5 4 100
LAW785E REAL ESTATE AND INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT LAWS Discipline Specific Elective Courses 5 4 100
LAW786A MEDIA LAW Discipline Specific Elective Courses 5 4 100
LAW786B CYBER LAW Discipline Specific Elective Courses 5 4 100
LAW786C LAND LAWS Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 4 100
LAW786D NUCLEAR LAW Discipline Specific Elective Courses 5 4 100
LAW786E DIGITAL EVIDENCE Discipline Specific Elective Courses 5 4 100
8 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
LAW853 CRIMINAL LAW II Core Courses 5 4 100
LAW854 CIVIL PROCEDURE CODE AND LIMITATION ACT Core Courses 5 4 100
LAW861 LAW OF E-COMMERCE Core Courses 5 4 100
LAW862 INTERPRETATION OF STATUTES Core Courses 5 4 100
LAW885A REGULATION OF BIOTECHNOLOGY Discipline Specific Elective Courses 5 4 100
LAW885B SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND HUMAN RIGHTS Discipline Specific Elective Courses 5 4 100
LAW885C LAW OF INJUNCTIONS Discipline Specific Elective Courses 5 4 100
LAW885D INTERNATIONAL INVESTMENT LAW Discipline Specific Elective Courses 5 4 100
LAW885E LAW OF WRITS Discipline Specific Elective Courses 5 4 100
LAW886A AIR AND SPACE LAW Discipline Specific Elective Courses 5 4 100
LAW886B FORENSIC SCIENCE AND LAW Discipline Specific Elective Courses 5 4 100
LAW886C LAW OF COPYRIGHT Discipline Specific Elective Courses 5 4 100
LAW886D CONFLICT OF LAWS Discipline Specific Elective Courses 5 4 100
LAW886E INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL LAW Discipline Specific Elective Courses 5 4 100
9 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
LAW951 LAW OF TAXATION Core Courses 5 4 100
LAW952 LAW OF EVIDENCE Core Courses 5 4 100
LAW963 COMPETITION LAW Core Courses 5 4 100
LAW984A HUMAN RIGHTS AND BUSINESS ACCOUNTABILITY Discipline Specific Elective Courses 5 4 100
LAW984B SPORTS LAW Discipline Specific Elective Courses 5 4 100
LAW984C LAW OF INDIRECT TAXATION Discipline Specific Elective Courses 5 4 100
LAW984D ANTITRUST AND PATENT LAW Discipline Specific Elective Courses 5 4 100
LAW984E INTERNATIONAL REFUGEE LAW AND MIGRATION STUDIES Discipline Specific Elective Courses 5 4 100
LAW985A NEGOTIATION, DRAFTING AND VETTING OF CONTRACTS Discipline Specific Elective Courses 5 4 100
LAW985B LAW OF NEGOTIABLE INSTRUMENTS Discipline Specific Elective Courses 5 4 100
LAW985C ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND LAW Discipline Specific Elective Courses 5 4 100
LAW985D TELECOMMUNICATION LAW Discipline Specific Elective Courses 5 4 100
LAW985E SERVICE LAW Discipline Specific Elective Courses 5 4 100
LAW986A ELECTION LAWS Discipline Specific Elective Courses 5 4 100
LAW986B INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL ARBITRATION Discipline Specific Elective Courses 7 4 100
LAW986C PENOLOGY AND VICTIMOLOGY Discipline Specific Elective Courses 7 4 100
LAW986D MARITIME LAW Discipline Specific Elective Courses 5 4 100
LAW986E LAW OF EXECUTION Discipline Specific Elective Courses 5 4 100
10 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
LAW1071 MOOT COURT AND INTERNSHIP Core Courses 5 4 100
LAW1072 DISSERTATION Core Courses 5 4 100
LAW1073 PARA LEGAL SERVICES AND LEGAL AID Core Courses 5 4 100
LAW1074 DRAFTING PLEADING AND CONVEYANCE Core Courses 5 4 100
LAW1075 PROFESSIONAL ETHICS AND PROFESSIONAL ACCOUNTING SYSTEM Core Courses 5 4 100
LAW1076 ALTERNATE DISPUTE RESOLUTION Core Courses 5 4 100
    

    

Introduction to Program:

BBA, LL.B ( Honours). 
The BBA LL.B ( Honours) is specially designed with a multi-disciplinary approach to cater to Corporate sector, law firms and in-house counsels in companies. This Programme provides a stellar background for foray into Emerging and specialised areas like mergers and acquisitions, securities and investment law, international taxation etc which helps in practice as well as higher education abroad. 

In the First two years of the integrated BBA, LL.B ( honours) programme, Major courses like Accounting and Management are offered which primarily forms the differential element as against the BA, LL.B ( honours)  programme.      

Programme Outcome/Programme Learning Goals/Programme Learning Outcome:

PO1: Contribute to legal scholarship by critical appraisal of laws, legal theories and concepts including its application interdisciplinary issues.

PO2: Effectively articulate legal opinions, to vet and draft legal texts and present arguments appropriate to the context in diverse work environments.

PO3: To identify, predict, mitigate challenges and engage in effective dispute resolution focusing on the individual, institution and societal problems.

PO4: Take initiatives towards social transformation through socio-legal engagement.

PO5: Exhibit ethical and professional behaviour in a team, demonstrating leadership and collaboration.

Programme Educational Objective:

PSO1: Analyse legal problems and suggest concrete measures in compliance with law of the land.
Assesment Pattern

CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation            – 10%

CIA II – Mid Semester Examination                            – 25%

CIA III – Research Topic                                            – 10%

Attendance                                                               – 05%

End Semester Examination                                         – 50%

 

TOTAL 100%

 

Examination And Assesments

Continues internal assessments for theory course 50%, end semester examination 50%

LAW121 - PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

Course Description: The course provides foundation to the principles of management and major managerial functional areas in mamangement . It covers the basic principles of planning, organizing, staffing, motivation, leadership, communication and controlling. It traces the historical evolution of management thought and also focuses on the contemporary challenges faced by managers.

COURSE OBJECTIVES: 

A) To expose students to the theories of management, organizational theory, and the practices of management in contemporary organizations from a conceptual, analytical, and pragmatic perspective.  

B) To enable the students to learn the skills and knowledge on managing the organization and implement the principles of management effectively in the organization. 

C) To orient the students on recent changes and development in the field of management

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will be able to describe and discuss the elements of effective management and apply the planning, organizing and control processes

CO2: : Students will be able to identify, discuss and/or describe various theories related to the development of leadership skills, motivation techniques, teamwork and effective communication

CO3: Students will be able to apply the knowledge about management in the real life business situation

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
NATURE OF MANAGEMENT
 

Definition of Management, Nature of Management – Management as a Science or Art or Profession – Management vs Administration.Types of Organizations Management.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
EVOLUTION OF MANAGEMENT THOUGHT
 

Scientific Management. Contributions of Henry Fayol, Principles of Management Hawthorne Experiments and Human Relations, Contributions of Behavioural Scientist- sQualities and skills of a Manager.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
FUNCTIONS OF MANAGEMENT
 

 

Need for the Principles of Management. Social responsibilities of Business. Factors responsible for the realization of Social Business Social issues of Business. Responsibility towards different interest Groups. For/against Social responsibility Social values and Business Ethics. Social responsibility in India

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
PLANNING
 

 

Nature and Definition of planning - Premises – Principles of Planning-The 6 P’s in Planning- Reasons for Planning Approaches to Planning- Pros & Cons in Planning Steps in Planning Process, Types of Plans.

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
FORMAL INFORMAL ORGANIZATION
 

 

Principles of Organization Importance –Objectives –Steps in organization Organizational Structure - Types of Organization Departmentation Committees - Authority and Responsibility – Differences Centralization vs Decentralization

 

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:8
DIRECTING
 

Power – Sources of Power. Delegation – Characteristics – Principles – Types Difficulties in delegation- Importance – Factors influencing degree of Delegation Leadership – Definition – Nature – Theories Styles of Leadership Functions- Qualities 

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:8
MOTIVATION
 

Nature – Types  - Importance Maslow’s Theory of Motivation- Herzberg’s theory Carrot and stick approach – McGregor’s Theory X & Y Techniques to increase motivation

 

 

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:4
QUALITY CONTROL
 

Certification- Six Sigma – Total Quality Management Systems. Industrial Visit as a part of Service learning.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1) Stoner, Freeman, Gilbert Jr. (2014). Management (6th edition), New Delhi: Prentice Hall India. 

2) Koontz, H., & Weihrich, H. (2010) Essentials of Management, McGraw Hill Publishers. 

3) Daft, R. L. (2009). Principles of Management (1st edition), Cengage Learning. 

4) Gupta, R.S., Sharma, B.D., &Bhalla. N.S. (2011). Principles & Practices of Management (11th edition). New Delhi: Kalyani Publishers. 

5) Ramadorai, S. (2011). The TCS Story and Beyond. India: Penguin Books 

6) Rao, P.S. (2009). Principles of Management, Himalaya Publishing House. 

7) Rao, V.S.P.  & Krishna, V. H. (2009). Management: Text and Cases, Excel Books 

8) Sharma, R.K & Gupta, S.K. (2009). Business Management (3rd edition), New Delhi: Kalyani Publishers.

9)Tripathi, R. (2009) Essentials of Management, Himalaya Publishing House

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.      Stoner, Freemen, and Gilbert Jr. Management, Prentice Hall.

2.      Koontz, Weihrich. Essentials of Management. Mc.Graw Hill.

3.      Gupta, S. L., Anurag Mittal, and Dr. Sunil K. Gupta. Case Studies in Management, Wisdom Publications.

4.      Sharma, R. K, and Shashi Gupta. Business Management, Kalyani Publishers.

5.      Prasad, L. M. Principles and Practice of Management, Sulthan Chand Publishers.

Evaluation Pattern

·         CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation            – 10%

·         CIA II – Mid Semester Examination                          – 25%

·         CIA III – Book Review                                               – 10%

·         Attendance                                                               – 05%

·         End Semester Examination                                     – 50%

                                      TOTAL                             100%

 

 

LAW122 - HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:- Human Resource Management provides an overview of the HR function covering the entire gamut of operations related to employee life cycle management. The course focuses on providing the basic understanding of HR processes and practices followed in a business organisation. A special reference is made to address the ethical and legal issues involved.

Course Objectives

 

  • To familiarize with the fundamental philosophy of having a quality HR department in the organization.

  • To understand the processes and practices in HR functions

  • To analyse legal implications with regard to Human resource management

  • To enable the students to apply the appropriate HR Practices in different business scenarios

Course Outcome

CO1: To familiarize with the fundamental philosophy of having a quality HR department in the organization.

CO2: To understand the processes and practices in HR functions

CO3: To analyze legal implications with regard to Human resource management

CO4: To enable the students to apply the appropriate HR Practices in different business scenarios.

UNIT 1
Teaching Hours:8
Introduction: Human Resources Management
 

Nature of HRM, scope of HRM, evolution of HRM, HRM model, personnel polices and principles- Context of human resources management, HRM and environment scanning, integrating HRM strategy with business strategy, nature of strategic HRM

 

UNIT 2
Teaching Hours:8
Job Analysis
 

Nature and importance of HRP, Factors affecting HRP-Human resources planning and government, barriers of HRP; Analyzing work and designing jobs- nature of job analysis, process of job analysis, job analysis and competitive advantage, job design.

 

UNIT 3
Teaching Hours:8
RECRUITMENT, SELECTION AND INDUCTION
 

Nature and factors affecting recruitment, purpose and importance, planning recruitment process, searching, screening, evaluation and control, Nature of selection, selection as a source of competitive advantage, barriers to selection, Induction, orientation programme, requisites of an effective programme, evaluation of orientation programme, problems of orientation.

UNIT 4
Teaching Hours:15
TRAINING, DEVELOPMENT AND CAREER MANAGEMENT
 

Nature of training and development, inputs and gaps in training, training process, planning training process, career development; Appraising and managing performance – appraisal process, challenges of performance appraisal, job evaluation, legal issues, 360 degree appraisal.

UNIT 5
Teaching Hours:8
MANAGING BASIC REMUNERATION
 

Components of remuneration, devising remuneration policy, – incentive payments, scope of incentive schemes, types of incentives, group incentives, Managing employee benefits and services, recruiting executives

UNIT 6
Teaching Hours:6
MANAGING BETTERMENT WORK
 

Safe and healthy environment, managing separation and rightsizing, downsizing, managing attrition.

UNIT 7
Teaching Hours:7
MANAGING ETHICAL ISSUES IN HRM
 

Contemporary issues in HRM, Ethical Issues  in HRM, E-HRM, Introduction to International HRM

Text Books And Reference Books:

K. Aswathappa (2017), Human Resource Management: Text and Cases, 8th   edition, Tata Mc Graw Hill.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Rao, P.Subba (2016). Personnel and Human Resource Management: Text & Cases 5th Edition Mumbai: Himalaya Publishing Houses Private Limited.

  • Dessler, Gary (2015), Human Resource Management, 14th edition, Prentice Hall

  • Susan Verhulst and David A Decenzo (2018) , Fundamentals of Human Resource Management, 13th edition, Wiley. 

  • Armstrong, Michael (2017), Armstrong’sHandbook of HRM practice, 14th edition, Kogan page.

  • Snell, Morris, Bohlander (2016), Managing Human Resource, 17th Edition, Cengage Learning.
Evaluation Pattern

Course Assessment Methods:

The course assessment will be in the form of CIA-I, CIA-II, CIA-III and End semester exams. One of the CIA assignments will be a Google Classroom / Moodle assignment. Both individual and group assignments as a part of CIA will be assigned and conducted. One CIA will be conducted through Google Classroom and the other CIA will be conducted in the class itself on the specified dates. The CIA marks allocation is mentioned below:

 

Sl No.

Components

Marks

1

CIA-I

 

20 ( 10% weightage)

2

CIA II MID-SEMESTER 

50 (25 % weightage)

3

CIA-III

20 ( 10% weightage)

4

ATTENDANCE

05 

5

END-SEMESTER 

100 (50 % weightage)

LAW127 - FOUNDATIONAL KANNADA (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: It is a thirty hours course. Students will be exposed to the use of Kannada language both in oral and written forms. In the introductory sessions Kannada alphabets, words, simple sentence writing and basic grammar will be taught. At the end of the course students will be able to Read, Write and Speak in Kannada Language

Course Objective:
•    To enable students to communicate in the State Language Kannada.  
•    Helps the students, particularly coming from other states in their day to day conversations.
•    The course mainly focusses on Conversational Kannada and writing Kannada.

Course Outcome

CO1: On completion of the course, students will be able to read and write in Kannada.

CO2: Students will be exposed to Kannada Reading, Writing, and speaking language skills.

CO3: Students will be aware of the culture and heritage of Karnataka.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Lesson-2
 

Vargeeya Vyanjana, Anunasikagalu 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Lesson-3
 

Avargeeya Vyanjana, Ottakshargalu

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Lesson-1
 

Kannada Varnamale- Swargalu, Sandhyakshara, Anuswara & Visarga              

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:4
Lesson-1
 

Kaagunitha

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:4
Lesson-1
 

1. Parts of Speech: Noun, Pronoun, Verb, Conjunction, Interjection,

Exclamatory.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:4
Lesson-1
 

Linga, Vachana, Vibhakti Pratyagalu 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:3
Lesson-1
 

Verb Root, Verb- Past and Non Past

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:9
Lesson-1
 

Sentence making, Translation & Question form, Negation, Opposite words

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:9
Lesson-2
 

Comprehension, Letter Writing

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Kannada Alphabets, Number, Days Chart

2. Thili Kannada - K S Madhusudana, H N  Muralidharan

3. Spoken Kannada for Absolute Beginners - Sanjay D

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Spoken Kannada for Absolute Beginners - Sanjay D

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-1 Alphabets (Vowels and Consonats), Otthakshara, Kagunitha. 10%

CIA-2 Noun, Verb, Number, Gender, Tense, Days, Name of Things. 15%

CIA-3  Conversation Practice, Vachana, Opposite Word, Sentance making (Animals, Birds, Vegetables, things) Translation, Letter Writing. 15% 

Attendance 10%

End Semester Exam:

Question Paper Pattern

·       Section A - Test of linguistic ability through grammar components –15 marks

·       Section B - Test of translating abilities and comprehension, short answers - 15 marks

·       Section C - Test of writing skills /  letter writing skills, dialogues writing and essay

writing – 20 marks 

LAW133 - ECONOMICS FOR LAW I (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course is designed for beginners with no formal background or little acquaintance with economics. The objective is to give the students a clear understanding of the basic concepts, tools of analysis, and terminologies used in economics, to facilitate their understanding of various legal phenomena. Emphasis will be on using graphs, diagrams, and numerical tables/schedules for exposition. The teacher must draw examples from the surrounding world to clarify the concepts.

Course Outcome

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMICS
 

A.Fundamental principles of economics used in the legal analysis: choices, opportunity costs, rationality, and law, marginality, efficiency, and productivity, a trade-off.

B.Pareto and Hicks-Kaldor efficiency

Definitions of economics

Positive and normative analysis, microeconomics, and macroeconomics

C.Economic models and their purposes. 

D.The Production Possibilities Curve, the equity-efficiency debate

E.Interdependence and gains from trade: international trade theories like absolute and comparative advantage. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
THEORY OF DEMAND AND SUPPLY
 
  1. Markets: Definition
  2. Demand: Law of demand, demand schedule, demand curve, individual demand, market demand, factors affecting demand.
  3. Supply: Law of supply, supply schedule, supply curve, individual supply, market supply, factors affecting supply
  4. Equilibrium: Putting demand and supply together
  5. Elasticities of Demand and Supply
  6. Government policies- Price controls: - Rent controls, Minimum wage, Evaluating Price Controls.
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
THEORY OF PRODUCTION, COSTS AND REVENUE
 
  1. Production: definition, short-run and long-run production functions, law of variable proportions, laws of returns to scale
  2. Costs: Economic and Accounting costs, Opportunity costs, Fixed and Sunk costs, Total and variable costs, average and marginal costs, Short-run and Long-run cost functions,
  3. Revenue analysis: total revenue, marginal revenue, average revenue in different market settings
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
THEORY OF MARKETS
 
  1. Firms in a competitive market: price and output determination.
  2. Monopoly: price and output determination.
  3. Monopolistic competition: price and output determination.
  4. Discriminating monopoly: price and output determination
  5. Oligopoly: Sweezy’s kinked-demand model
  6. Duopoly: Cournot and Bertrand models
Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
WELFARE ECONOMICS
 

    

  1. Welfare economics: Meaning and its implications to law
  2. Social welfare functions
  3. Role of value judgments in welfare economics
  4. Economic efficiency and the success of competitive markets
  5. Consumers' and producer’s surplus
  6. Social efficiency and market equilibrium
  7. Market Failure and policy inferences from welfare analysis
Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
FUNDAMENTALS OF MACROECONOMICS AND DEBATES ON MACROECONOMIC POLICIES
 
  1. National Income: basic concepts, real GDP, nominal GDP, per capita GDP.
  2. Aggregate demand, aggregate supply, and the reasons for economic fluctuations
  3. Monetary policy and fiscal policy – pros and cons
  4. Monetary policy influence on aggregate demand: the theory of liquidity preference
  5. Fiscal policy influence on aggregate demand: the multiplier effect and crowding-out effect
  6. Debates over macroeconomic policies
Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Mankiw, G–Principles of Economics-2ndEdition (2004)- South West Publishers.
  2. Samuelson and Nordhaus - Economics –18th Edition (2004)- McGraw Hill. Inc.
  3. Parkin, Michael - Macroeconomics, 7th Edition (2004)- Prentice Hall.
  4. Miller, R.L. – Economics Today -14th Edition (2005) – Addison Wesley.
  5. William Boyes and Michael Melvin- Textbook of economics – 6th edition (2009)-biztantra (Indian edition)
  6. Goodwin. N, Harris. J, Nelson. J, Roach. B and Torras. M- Microeconomics in context, third edition (2017)
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Mankiw, G–Principles of Economics-2ndEdition (2004)- South West Publishers.
  2. Samuelson and Nordhaus - Economics –18th Edition (2004)- McGraw Hill. Inc.
  3. Parkin, Michael - Macroeconomics, 7th Edition (2004)- Prentice Hall.
Evaluation Pattern

 CIA I – Class Test – 10%

 CIA II – Mid Semester Examination – 25%

 CIA III – Research-based valuation – 10%

 Attendance – 05%

 End Semester Examination – 50%

LAW144B - LEGAL LANGUAGE AND LEGAL WRITING (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The ability to communicate clearly and effectively is an essential component of any lawyer’s skill set, both inside and outside the courtroom. The objective of this course is to introduce students to the nuances of legal language and writing, and its use and application through the study of judicial opinions, common legal maxims and legal terminology. It also seeks to familiarize students with the principles governing legal drafting, and equip them with the ability to draft simple legal documents. And with academic legal writing assuming increasing significance in this day and age, both for students and practitioners, emphasis has also been placed on developing and honing students’ research and writing skills through the study of the works of eminent jurists, as also practical writing exercises.

Course Outcome

CO 1: Explain the relationship between language and the law

CO2: Identify the contours of legal writing and develop academic articles based on the practices of effective legal writing.

CO3: Explain and interpret the legal maxims and assess the use of them in the legal context

CO4: Define importantlegal terms and apply the legal terms in legal communication.

CO5: Determine whether a judicial statement is ratio decidendi/obiter dicta and critically analyse the facts and principles enunciated in the judgements as well as write a case comment

CO6: Demonstrate the vocabulary knowledge to draft basic legal documents(employability)

CO 7: Apply basic research skills to different types of academic legal writing (employability)

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to language and the law
 

Introduction to Language in Law, Evolution and History of Legal Language and legal writing, The problem with legalese

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:13
LEGAL COMPREHENSION
 

Parts of a statute, Aid to Interpretation of statutes, Rules of Interpretation of statutes, Finding parts of a decision-Ratio decidendi, Obiter Dicta, Finding out ratio, Article 141 of the Indian Constitution, Discussing contemporary case laws,Law reports of Commission and Committees

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
LEGAL MAXIMS
 

A study of 25 Latin maxims of particular importance, with a view to familiarizing students with principles of law enshrined therein.

1.      Actus non facit reum nisi mens sit rea (The act itself does not constitute guilt unless done with guilty intent).

2.      Actio personalis moritur cum persona (A personal right of action dies with the person).

3.      Audi Alteram Partem (Non man shall be condemned unheard).

4.      Communis error facit jus (Common error sometimes poses current as law).

5.      Delegatus non potest delegare (Delegate cannot further delegate).

6.      Ex nudo pacto non oritur actio (No causee of action arises from a bare promise).

7.      Ex turpi causa non oritur actio (An action does not arise from a base cause).

8.      In pari delicto potio rest condition defendentis (Where the parties are equally at guilt, the defendant is better placed).

9.      Falsus in uno falsus in omnibus (False in one particular in false in general).

10.  Generalia specialibus non derogant (General things do not derogate from special things).

11.  Ignorantia facti excusat, ignorant juris non excusat (Ignorance of fact excuses, ignorance of law does not excuse).

12.  In jure non remote causa, sed proxima spectatur (In law, the immediate, not the remote cause, of any event is regarded).

13.  Omina praesumuntur contra spoliatorem (All things are presumed against a wrong doer).

14.  Qui facit per alium facit per se (He who does an act though another is deemed in Law to do it himself).

15.  Respondeat superior (Let the principal be held responsible).

16.  Res ipsa loquitur (The thing itself speaks).

17.  Sic uteretu utalienum non laedas (Enjoy your property in such a manner as not to injure that of another person).

18.  Ubi jus ibi remedium (Every right has a remedy).

19.  Volenti non fit injuria (Damage suffered by consent is not a cause of action).

20.  Cessante ratione cessat lex ipsa (If the reason of law ceases, the law itself will cease).

21.  Salus populi est suprema lex (Regard for the public welfare is the highest law).

22.  Novus actus intervenius (A new act intervening).

23.  Rex non-potest peccare (The king can do no wrong).

24.  Vigilantibus non dormientibus, jura subeniunt (The laws give help to those who are vigilant and not to those who sleep over their rights).

 

25.  Ut res magis valeat quam pereat (It is better for a thing to have effect than to be made void).

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:7
USE OF WORDS AND PHRASES IN LEGAL WRITING
 

Meaning and use of legal words and phrases in legal writing. 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
GENERAL PRINCIPLES GOVERNING LEGAL DRAFTING FRAMING ISSUES ETC.
 

 Introduction to Legal Drafting, Notices, Pleadings, Contracts and Other Deeds

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:12
ACADEMIC LEGAL WRITING
 

Sources of Legal Material, Literature review, Writing an Abstract, Formulating Research Question, Methodology,Formal Writing  Style, Plagiarism, Citation Methods, Examination Strategies, Written communication including emails and  formal letters

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

  1. B. M. Gandhi, Legal Language, Legal Writing and General English, Eastern Book Company, 2010.
  2. Blacks' Law Dictionary, Universal Publishing Ltd., 2000.
  3.   Broom’s Legal Maxims, Universal Publishing Ltd., 2011
  4. Broom’s Legal Maxims. 11thed. New Delhi: Universal Publishing Ltd., 2011.
  5. C.R. Datta & M.N. Das, DeSouza’s Conveyancing, Eastern Law House, 13th ed., 2004
  6. Dr. A. Prasad, Outlines of Legal Language in India, Central Law Publications, 6th ed., 2011
  7. Dr. S.C. Tripathi, Legal language, Legal Writing and General English, Central Law Publications, 6th ed.,
  8. E. Volokh, Academic Legal Writing, Foundation Press, 4th ed., 2010.
  9. A.K. Sengupta, Maumdar’sLaw Relating to Notices. Kolkata: Eastern Law House Pvt. Ltd., 2005.
  10. Mogha G. C. Mogha’s Law of Pleadindgs in India with Precedents. 17th ed. Lucknow: Eastern Book Company, 2006 (2009).
  11. P. Ramanatha Aiyar’s The Law Lexicon, Dr. Shakil Ahmad Khan, LexisNexis, 3rd ed., 2012
  12. Prof. K. Mony & K. Usha, Legal Drafting, Cochin: Usha Publications, 13th ed., 2010.
  13. Prof. K.L. Bhatia, Textbook on Legal Language and Legal Writing, Universal Law Publishing Co., 2010.
  14. S.P. Aggarwal, Drafting and Conveyancing (Student Series), LexisNexis, 5th ed., 2013.
  15. Shrivastava J. M. Mogha’s Indian Conveyancer. 14th ed. Lucknow: Eastern Book Company, 2009.
  16. Trayner’s Legal Maxims. New Delhi: Universal Publishing Ltd., 2010.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. B. M. Gandhi, Legal Language, Legal Writing and General English, Eastern Book Company, 2010.
  2. Blacks' Law Dictionary, Universal Publishing Ltd., 2000.
  3.   Broom’s Legal Maxims, Universal Publishing Ltd., 2011
  4. Broom’s Legal Maxims. 11thed. New Delhi: Universal Publishing Ltd., 2011.
  5. C.R. Datta & M.N. Das, DeSouza’s Conveyancing, Eastern Law House, 13th ed., 2004
  6. Dr. A. Prasad, Outlines of Legal Language in India, Central Law Publications, 6th ed., 2011
  7. Dr. S.C. Tripathi, Legal language, Legal Writing and General English, Central Law Publications, 6th ed.,
  8. E. Volokh, Academic Legal Writing, Foundation Press, 4th ed., 2010.
  9. A.K. Sengupta, Maumdar’sLaw Relating to Notices. Kolkata: Eastern Law House Pvt. Ltd., 2005.
  10. Mogha G. C. Mogha’s Law of Pleadindgs in India with Precedents. 17th ed. Lucknow: Eastern Book Company, 2006 (2009).
  11. P. Ramanatha Aiyar’s The Law Lexicon, Dr. Shakil Ahmad Khan, LexisNexis, 3rd ed., 2012
  12. Prof. K. Mony & K. Usha, Legal Drafting, Cochin: Usha Publications, 13th ed., 2010.
  13. Prof. K.L. Bhatia, Textbook on Legal Language and Legal Writing, Universal Law Publishing Co., 2010.
  14. S.P. Aggarwal, Drafting and Conveyancing (Student Series), LexisNexis, 5th ed., 2013.
  15. Shrivastava J. M. Mogha’s Indian Conveyancer. 14th ed. Lucknow: Eastern Book Company, 2009.
  16. Trayner’s Legal Maxims. New Delhi: Universal Publishing Ltd., 2010.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation            – 10%

CIA II – Mid Semester Examination                                 – 25%

CIA III – Research Topic                                                     – 10%

Attendance                                                                            – 05%

End Semester Examination                                                – 50%

 

            TOTAL                                                                                  100%

LAW145 - LAW, LITERATURE AND JUDICIAL PROCESS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

A lawyer is most often faced with the primary task of problem solving and advising on the course of action most suited to the interests of the client. The problem may be complex in nature and may involve different branches of law. It will require sieving the material facts from the immaterial ones. Learning where and how to find the law is as important as the substantive study of various laws. The understanding of facts is critical to the process of identifying favourable precedents and distinguishing the case at hand from other authoritative rulings, which are not in direct support of one’s proposition. The strength of a legal argument lies in the thoroughness of the research, which must also be clearly presented, in writing and orally.

 

The objective of the Course is to orient the student to the scheme of law and the essential tools, principles and methods by which the legal system operates to deliver justice. The course will entail the study of sources of law, doctrine of precedents, legal reasoning, case briefing and analogizing and interpretation of statutes and the working of the judicial process. The course will also address basic question such as where and how a start researching on a problem, how to find authorities in support of one’s proposition, how to read a case and prepare a case brief, and how to read a statute

Course Outcome

CO1: Identify, describe, and analyze the concept taught in the respective module.

CO2: List out the important issues from legal system.

CO3: Demonstrate skills of academic based legal writing and legal reasoning.

CO4: Analyse the judgement to understand the principle as laid down by the case.

CO5: Evaluate as against other events of a similar nature and articulate the problem areas.

CO6: Describe the fundamental legal concepts in a legal system.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
LAW: MEANING, CLASSIFICATION AND SOURCES
 

Meaning and definition; Functions of law; Classification of laws: Public and Private Law, Substantive and Procedural Law, Municipal and International Law; Sources of Law: Statute as a Source, Precedent as Source, Customs, International Law as a source of Municipal Law, Justice Equity and Good Conscience, Juristic Writings

 

Learning Outcomes: On completion of this Unit, students will be able to have a conceptual understand on the meaning of law and to distinguish between the different types of laws.

 

On completion of this Unit students will be able to tell the different sources of law and their relationship inter se.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
INTRODUCTION TO READING AND UNDERSTANDING OF LEGAL TEXT
 

Components of a Judgement: Cause Title, Facts, Issues, Prayer and Arguments, Ratio Decidendi, Obiter Dicta; Important Concepts in relation to Case Laws: Different Kinds of opinions (dissenting and concurring opinion), Tests to determine the Ratio, Bench Strength and Implications, Overruling of judgments, Parts of a Statute

 

Learning Outcomes : On completion of this Unit students will be able to identify the different parts of a case and a statute.

On completion of this Unit, students will be able to read and analyse judgments in order to understand the principles laid down in them and to read and interpret statutes using different aids.

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
LEGAL MATERIALS AND TOOLS OF RESEARCH
 

 

Classification of Legal materials – Case law, Case Briefing; Statutes, Reports, Journals, Manuals, Digests etc.; Use of Law Library; New Dimensions in Legal Research- Use of Online Databases and e-resources; Importance of legal research in legal reasoning

 

Learning Outcome: On completion of this Unit, students will be able to read, analyse and understand different legal materials, and to narrate the reasoning employed by judges in their judgements.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
BASIC CONCEPTS OF INDIAN LEGAL SYSTEM
 

Constitution as the Basic Law; Judicial system in India; Hierarchy of Courts in India; Jurisdiction of Adjudicatory Institutions (Territorial, Pecuniary, Subject Matter); Alternative Dispute Resolution Methods

Learning Outcome:On completion of this Unit, students will be able to discuss the fundamental concepts underlying Indian law, and appreciate the working of the judicial system in India.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
LAW, MOTION PICTURES AND LITERATURE
 

Reading and analysis of various landmark judgements in Constitutional Law, Criminal; Law and the Law of Torts; Contextualizing law through movies and literary texts

Learning Outcome: On completion of this Unit, students will be able to contexualise law through movies and literary texts.

Text Books And Reference Books:

  1. A.V. Dicey, An introduction to the Study of the Law of Constitution, Universal Law Publishing Co., 10th ed. 4th Indian Reprint, 2003
  2. B S Hansai, A Critical Study of ADR System: Special Focus on Lok Adalat in India
  3. Benjamin Cardozo, Nature of Judicial Process, Universal Law Publishing Co., 9th Indian Reprint 2011
  4. Bodenheimer, Jurisprudence; , Universal Law Publishing Co., 7th Indian Reprint, 2011
  5. C K Takwani, Lectures on Administrative Law, 4th Edition, 2008, Eastern Book Company.
  6. David Ingram, Law-Key Concepts in Philosophy, Continuum International Publishing Group, 1st edn. 2006
  7. Friedmann, Law in a Changing Society, Universal Law Publishing Co. 4th Indian Reprint 2008
  8. H. Patrick Glenn, Legal Tradition of the World, Oxford University Press, 1st edn., 2000
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. A.V. Dicey, An introduction to the Study of the Law of Constitution, Universal Law Publishing Co., 10th ed. 4th Indian Reprint, 2003
  2. B S Hansai, A Critical Study of ADR System: Special Focus on Lok Adalat in India
  3. Benjamin Cardozo, Nature of Judicial Process, Universal Law Publishing Co., 9th Indian Reprint 2011
  4. Bodenheimer, Jurisprudence; , Universal Law Publishing Co., 7th Indian Reprint, 2011
  5. C K Takwani, Lectures on Administrative Law, 4th Edition, 2008, Eastern Book Company.
  6. David Ingram, Law-Key Concepts in Philosophy, Continuum International Publishing Group, 1st edn. 2006
  7. Friedmann, Law in a Changing Society, Universal Law Publishing Co. 4th Indian Reprint 2008
  8. G. W. Paton, A Textbook of Jurisprudence, Oxford University Press, 2007
  9. H. Patrick Glenn, Legal Tradition of the World, Oxford University Press, 1st edn., 2000
  10. Jacqueline M Nolan Haley, ADR in a Nutshell, 2nd Edition, 2001, West Group
Evaluation Pattern
  • CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation – 10%
  • CIA II – Mid Semester Examination                  – 25%
  • CIA III – Research Topic                                   – 10%
  • Attendance                                                         – 05%
  • End Semester Examination                                – 50%

 

                                                               TOTAL        100%

LAW156 - LAW OF TORT AND CONSUMER PROTECTION (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:15
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This course has been conceptualised to

  1. Introduce students to the law of torts and to the principles of tortuous liability and distinguishes torts from crimes and breaches of contract.
  2. Make the students know and understand various defences available to the defendant in a suit for torts.
  3. Introduce the students to the concept of locus standi and of disability and immunity.
  4. Acquaint the students with the circumstances under which one person may be liable for the wrongs done by another and with the concepts of employer and employee relationship and the concept of individual agency, as well as with the doctrine of sovereign immunity.

     5. Calculate the liability for violation of consumer rights.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Explain the principles of tortious liability and distinguish it from crime and other civil wrongs.

CO2: Demonstrate an understanding of intentional torts, negligence and strict liability.

CO3: Identify and explain the possible defences the defendant can opt for in a suit for damages.

CO4: Apply tort law principles to given tort law problems.

CO5: Critically analyze the tort law concepts and understand their applicability.

CO6: Explain the rights of consumers and state the remedies and the forums available to the consumer for redressal

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
INTRODUCTION TO TORTS
 

Principles of justice equity and good conscience – un-codified character-advantages and disadvantages; a wrongful act – violation of duty imposed by law, duty which is owed to people generally (in rem) – damnum sine injuria and injuria sine damno; Tort distinguished from crime and breach of contract; Changing scope of law of torts: Principles of Liability – Fault; Wrongful intent; Negligence; Liability without fault; Place of motive in torts.

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
STANDING, CAPACITY AND DEFENCES IN ACTIONS FOR TORTS
 

Justification – Volenti non fit injuria; Necessity, private and public; Plaintiffs default; Act of God; Inevitable accident; Private defense; Statutory authority; Judicial and quasi-judicial acts; Parental and quasi-parental authority. Who may sue – aggrieved individual – class action – social action group; Statutes granting standing to certain persons or groups, Who can be sued and who cannot be sued, Extinguishment of Liability in Certain Situation – Actio personalis moritur cum persona – exceptions; Waiver and acquiescence; Release; Accord and satisfaction; Limitation.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
VICARIOUS LIABILITY, STRICT LIABILITY, ABSOLUTE LIABILITY AND LABILITY ARISING OUT OF NEGLIGENCE
 

Basis, scope and justification; Express authorization; Ratification; Abetment; Special Relationships: Master and servant – arising out of and in the course of employment – who is master? – the control test – who is servant? – borrowed servant – independent contractor and servant, distinguished; Principal and agent; Corporation and principal officer. Doctrine of Sovereign Immunity, the rule in Rylands v. Fletcher, Liability for harm caused by inherently dangerous industries. Development of Law beyond Strict Liability Absolute Liability M. C. Mehta vs. UoI. Basic concepts and theories of negligence, Standards of care, duty to take care, carelessness, inadvertence, Doctrine of contributory negligence, Res ipsa loquitor and its importance in contemporary law; Liability due to negligence: different professionals; Liability of common carriers for negligence; Product liability due to negligence: liability of manufacturers and business houses for their products, Nervous shock, Consumer protection principles and regulatory framework, disputes redressal

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:13
TORTS AGAINST PERSONS AND PERSONAL RELATIONS AND WRONGS AFFECTING PROPERTY
 

Assault, battery, False imprisonment; Defamation – libel, slander including law relating to privileges E-defamation; Marital relations, parental relations, master and servant relations; Malicious prosecution; Trespass to Land, Trespass ab initio, Dispossession; Nuisance: Definition, Essentials and Types; Acts Which Constitute Nuisance – Obstructions of Highways, Pollution of Air, Water, Noise, and Interference with Light and Air. Movable Property – Trespass to Goods, Detinue, Conversion; Torts Against Business Interests – Injurious Falsehood, Misstatements, Passing off.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
LEGAL REMEDIES
 

Legal remedies, Award of damages – simple, special, punitive. Unliquidated Damages –Remoteness of damage-foreseeability and directness, Shortened Expectation of Life, Injunction, Specific restitution of property; Extra-legal remedies- self-help, re-entry on land, re-caption of goods, distress damage feasant and abatement of nuisance.

 

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:3
LAW OF CONSUMER PROTECTION
 

Development of consumer law and policy, Caveat emptor to caveat venditor, UN Guidelines on consumer protection, Consumer Protection Laws in India, Consumer Protection Act, 2019 – Objectives, Meaning of consumer, Deficiency in goods and services, Unfair trade practices, product liability, rights of consumer, Mediation Cell, Central Consumer Protection Authority, Consumer Councils, E-Commerce Transactions, Grounds of filing a complaint, Class action, Jurisdiction, violation of rights of consumers, product liability, Limitation and Procedure for filing and hearing of a complaint, District Commission, State commission, National commission, Composition of Commissions, reference to mediation cell, Consumer Law Board, Appeals, Offences and penalties.

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Justice S N Aggarwal, Supreme Court on Consumer Protection Act, Universal Law Publishing Co., 2013.
  2. Wadhwa, Justice D. P. (ed). The Law of Consumer Protection. New Delhi: Wadhwa and Company Nagpur, 2006.
  3. Nayak, Rajendra Kumar. Consumer Protection Law in India: An Eco-legal Treatise on Consumer Justice. Bombay: N. M/ Tripathi Pvt Ltd., 1991.
  4. Sheth, Dilip K. Treatise on Consumer Protection Law (Law & Practice). Mumbai: Snow White, 2003.
  5. Agarwal, Dr V. K. Bharat’s Consumer Protection (Law & Practice) 6 th ed. New Delhi: B. L. H. Publishers and Distributors Pvt. Ltd., 2008.
  6. Singh, Avtar. Law of Consumer Protection (Principles & Practice) 4 th ed. Lucknow: Eastern Book Co., 2005.
  7. Singh, Guru Prasanna. Ratanlal & Dhirajlal’s  Law of Torts, 26 h ed. New Delhi: Wadhwa & Co, 2013.
  8. Jones, Michael A. Text book on Torts. New Delhi: Lawman. 1995.
  9. Lakshminath, A. and Sridhar M. Ramaswamy lyer’s  Law of Torts, 10 th ed. New Delhi: Lexisnexis, 2007.
  10. Weir, Tony. Introduction to Tort Law, 2 nd ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 2006.
  11. Pillai, P. S. A. Law of Tort. 9 th ed. Lucknow: Eastern Book-Co., 2004.
  12. Dugdale, Anthony, ed. Clerk & Lindsell on Torts, 19 th ed. London: Sweet & Maxwell, 2006.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Lakshminath, A. and Sridhar M. Ramaswamy lyer’s  Law of Torts, 10 th ed. New Delhi: Lexisnexis, 2007.
  2. Weir, Tony. Introduction to Tort Law, 2 nd ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 2006.
  3. Pillai, P. S. A. Law of Tort. 9 th ed. Lucknow: Eastern Book-Co., 2004.
  4. Dugdale, Anthony, ed. Clerk & Lindsell on Torts, 19 th ed. London: Sweet & Maxwell, 2006.
  5. Singh, Avtar. Law of Consumer Protection (Principles & Practice) 4 th ed. Lucknow: Eastern Book Co., 2005.
Evaluation Pattern

CIA I- 20 marks - 10%

CIA II - Mid Semester Examination - 25%

CIA III – 20 marks - 10%  

Attendance - 05%

End semester examination – 100 marks - 50%

LAW221 - PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This subject aims at understanding the basics of accounting theory and practice. It is devised to impart the essentials of accounting techniques and standards, along with corporate accounting practices.

UNIT 1 seeks to introduce the students to the foundational aspects of accounting practices and give a brief introduction to Cost accounting, Management Accounting and Financial Accounting and the differences between the three branches o accounting. 

UNIT 2 deals with the basic principles of Financial Accounting, the concepts and conventions, also the difference between Capital and Revenue expenditure.

UNIT 3 is designed to impart the procedural techniques of a normative process of accounting starting with Journal, Ledger and Trial Balance.

UNIT 4 looks into the preparation of Final Accounts.

UNIT 5 harps upon the requisites of cost accountancy and their relevance for the law. 

UNIT 6 looks into the aspects of overhead costs. 

UNIT 7 is an account of marginal costing, concepts like BEP, P/V ratio etc

 

UNIT 8, deals with flexible budgets and the theoretical aspects of the budgets.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will have a board understanding of the 3 branches of accounting and aplly them as per the situation arises

CO2: Students will be able to prepare final accounts and understand the difference in revenue expenditure and Capital expenditure

CO3: students will be able to prepare the cost sheet and know the application of the apportionment of expenses and allocation of overheads

CO4: Students will be able to prepare Flexible budgets and solve Marginal costing problems and apply the same for decision making

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
INTRODUCTION
 

Need for accounting,  Accounting vs Book keeping, Streams of accounting — Financial, Cost and Management Accounting , Objective and scope  limitations of Financial, Cost and Management Accounting,  comparison with Financial Cost and Management  accounting

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
BASICS OF FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING
 

Principles, Convention and Concepts of accounting-Systems of Accounting, Types of expenditure, Double entry system of accounting, Depreciation accounting theory – SLM method and Diminishing Returns method - Journal entries and ledger accounts

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
PROCESS OF ACCOUNTING
 

Journalizing, Ledger posting, Balancing of Ledger accounts, Preparation of final accounts with adjustments to Prepaid expenses-unpaid expenses- Bad debts- income received in advance and clsoing Stock; illustrations and exercises

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
BANK RECONCILIATION STATEMENT AND RECTIFICATION OF ERRORS
 

Preparation of bank reconciliation statement (theory only), Types of errors, effect of errors in Trial Balance. Minor problems in rectiication.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
COST ACCOUNTANCY AND MATERIAL COST
 

Concept of cost, Special types of cost, Elements of Cost, Preparation of Cost Sheet. Direct/Indirect material, procurement/issue of material, Purchase Order, GRN, MRN, Bincard, methods of valuation of stores, receipt FIFO/LIFO method of inventory.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:8
OVER HEAD COST
 

Element wise and function wise classification, procedure of charging the overheads, Primary and Secondary distribution methods, Machine hour rate, under/over absorption, illustrations and exercises . 

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:7
MARGINAL COSTING
 

Concept, Basic assumption, features, form of operating statement, Basic concepts of Marginal costing, Contribution, Profit Volume Ratio, Break Even Point, Margin of Safety, Cost volume, Profit relationship, product,  Limitations of Marginal Costing. illustrations and exercises 

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:7
BUDGETARY CONTROL
 

Budgets and Budgetary control, Advantage, Pre-requisites, Types of Budgets, Flexible Budget problems, illustrations and exercises

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

 

  1. Khan, M. Y., and P. K. Jain. Management Accounting. New Delhi: Tata McGraw-Hill, 2009.
  2. Horngreen C. T. and G. L. Sundlem. Management Accounting. 5Th ed. New Delhi: Prentice Hall India Pvt. Ltd., 1999.
  3. Bhar, B. K. Cost Accounting. Academic Publishers, 1978.
  4. Sharma, R. K., and Shashi K. Gupta. Management Accounting. Kalyani Publishers.
  5. Reddy, Appannaiah, and Srinivasa Putty. Financial Accounting. Mumbai: Himalaya Pub. House, 2010.
  6. Raman, B. S. Financial Accounting. Mangalore: United Publishers, 1998.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

 

  1. Khan, M. Y., and P. K. Jain. Management Accounting. New Delhi: Tata McGraw-Hill, 2009.
  2. Horngreen C. T. and G. L. Sundlem. Management Accounting. 5Th ed. New Delhi: Prentice Hall India Pvt. Ltd., 1999.
  3. Bhar, B. K. Cost Accounting. Academic Publishers, 1978.
  4. Sharma, R. K., and Shashi K. Gupta. Management Accounting. Kalyani Publishers.
  5. Reddy, Appannaiah, and Srinivasa Putty. Financial Accounting. Mumbai: Himalaya Pub. House, 2010.
  6. Raman, B. S. Financial Accounting. Mangalore: United Publishers, 1998.
Evaluation Pattern

·         CIA I – Class Test / Assignment /            – 10%

·         CIA II – Mid Semester Examination                         – 25%

·         CIA III – Class Test / Assignment /                                           – 10%

·         Attendance                                                               – 05%

·         End Semester Examination                                       – 50%

                                                 TOTAL                      100%

 

 

LAW222 - FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course focuses on Finance functions, analysis of  inancial Statments emphasizing the financial aspects of managerial decisions.

Course Objective:

·     To give understanding and perspective on the finance function in the company and its relation to domestic economy.

·     To develop the knowledge on the type and characteristics of problems and the possibility of the occurrence of the financial management problems and to increase the ability to handle the problems through reliable approach and problem solving strategy development.

Course Outcome

CO1: To familiarize students with the basics and scope of financial management and the finance functions and also interpret the Balance sheet

CO2: Employ alternative mechanisms for raising capital at different points in the firm?s growth cycle and Students will be able to prepare Fund flow statements and Cash budgets.

CO3: Understand the process and methods of evaluating a long term project using capital budgeting techniques and appreciate the risks and benefits involve. Students will be prepared to do Capital Budgeting problems.

CO4: Students will be able to understand Dividend policy decisions and Capital requirements.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Introduction to Financial Management
 

Definition of Finance, Approches to Finance, Objectives of Financial Management Role of a inance Manager.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Financial Statement analysis
 

Need for fiancial statement analysis Comparative , Common Size and Trend analysis

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Fund Flow statement
 

Schedule of Changes in Working Capital, Adjusted Profit and Loss Account and Sources and Application of Funds 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Capital Budgeting
 

Pay Back Period, Net Present Value and Internal Rate of Return.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:4
Capitalization
 

Over and Under Capitalization, Causes/ reasons and Remedies

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Capital Structure
 

Leverages- PBIT - PBT- PAT and Calculation of EPS under various Scenarios.

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:5
Working capital Management
 

Importance  of WC, Factors affecting WC and Practical Problems in WC

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:6
Management Of Cash
 

Cash Budgeting- Importance of Cash Management and Cash Budget problems.

Text Books And Reference Books:

      Financial management  by Reddy,Appannaiah and Satya Prasad - Himalaya Publishing House.

 

      Financial Management by R.Chandrasekaran & S.Ramachandaran  – Kalyani Publishers

 

      Essentials of Financial Management  by I.M Pandey- Himalaya Publishing House.

 

Financial Management  by I.M Pandey- Himalaya Publishing House

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Warren buffet advice to young people.

 

 2. Investment vs Savings.

Evaluation Pattern

EVALUATION

·         CIA I – Assignment / Presentation            – 10%

·         CIA II – Mid Semester Examination                – 25%

·         CIA III –  Assignment / Presentation                          – 10%

·         Attendance                                                      – 05%

·         End Semester Examination                              – 50%

 

                                    TOTAL                      100%

LAW233 - ECONOMICS FOR LAW II (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is designed to introduce the frontiers of microeconomics and the issues related to sources of market failures, Institutions. It focuses on institutions and how institutions shape the incentives of economic agents under limited rationality. It also emphasizes how these institutions correct market outcomes in favor of social welfare under various contexts (units 1). The issues which this course specifically focuses on are the economics of information and transaction costs (unit 3), and the issues related to public goods, common resources, and externalities (unit 4). It also covers the advent of Behavioral economics to predict decision-making and prevent market failures (Unit 5). Throughout the course, law students will learn to solve economic problems with the help of formal institutions like laws, Acts, rules, and regulations and with informal institutions like self-imposed conduct and the constraints put by the community. The objective of this course is to introduce the salient features of new economics laws and their analytical tools that could be applied to study various legal issues in the public and private sectors. It also aims to familiarize the student with the sources of market failure and how Institutions and new models of behavioral economics how have proven essential for economic and social development. Also, to make students learn the economic approach of analyzing the importance and significance of institutions for resolving socio-economic issues.

Course Outcome

CO1: Identify different types of institutions and their influence on the economy and society.

CO2: Measure and Identify monopoly power and give solutions to prevent the social cost of monopoly

CO3: Give solutions to the problems of asymmetric information

CO4: Identify the inefficiencies created due to the presence of positive and negative externalities in the market

CO5: Identify the transaction costs in exchange and provide solutions to reduce transaction costs at the micro level

CO6: To analyze the role of institutions in achieving economic growth and development

CO7: To design solutions at the macro level for the economy to reduce transaction costs.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
SOURCES OF MARKET FAILURES AND INSTITUTIONS
 

A.   Assumptions of Mainstream economics and issues

B.    Market Failure: What is market failure? Sources of market failure

C.   Institutions: What are Institutions? Types of Institutions.

D.   Institutions as an Endogenous factor

E.    The Role of institutions in economic growth and development

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
MONOPOLY POWER AND MARKET CONCENTRATION
 

A.   Monopoly: Why does monopoly arise?

B.    Welfare costs of Monopoly

C.   Market power and determinants

D.   Measurement of market power- market share, Lerner Index, HHI

E.    Natural monopoly

F.    Public regulation of natural monopoly

G.   Public policies towards monopoly

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
ECONOMICS OF INFORMATION AND TRANSACTION COSTS
 

A.   Economics of Information: Asymmetric Information

B.    Adverse Selection: the problem of lemon in different markets, lemon laws.

C.   Moral Hazard: Principal-Agent Problem, Efficiency wage theory

D.   Prisoners’ dilemma: dominant strategy and Nash equilibrium

E.    Market Signaling

F.    Transaction Costs and The Theory of Firm by Coase

G.   Elements of Transaction Costs

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
PUBLIC GOODS, COMMON RESOURCE AND EXTERNALITIES
 

A.   Public goods and Common resources

B.    Common Resources: Hardin’s Tragedy of Commons

C.   Externalities: Positive and Negative

D.   Public policies towards externalities: Regulation, fees, standards, taxation, etc. 

E.    Private solution towards externalities: Coase theorem

F.    Concept of Property: Defining property rights

G.   Problems of ill-defined property rights

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
BASICS OF BEHAVIORAL ECONOMICS
 

A.   Meaning, History, and Evolution of BE

B.    Decision-Making under risk and uncertainty

C.   Behavioral Models of Decision Making: prospect theory, mental accounting, Dual System Theory

D.   Nudge Theory

E. Bounded rationality and Irrational Decision Making   

Text Books And Reference Books:

Essentialreferences:

1.     Institutions & Economic Theory by Furubotn & Rudolf.

2.     Conflict and Cooperation: Insitutional & Behavioral Economics, Blackwell, 2004. by Allan Schmid,

3.     New Institutional Economics by Peter G Klein.

4.     Economic Analysis of Institutions by V. Shantakumar

5.     Microeconomics- by Pindyck & Rubenfled.

6.     Samulson and Nordrons - Economics –18th Edition (2004) - McGraw Hill. Inc.

7.     Economics- Mceachern

8.     Economics for Managers-by Mankiw

9.     Managerial Economics- by Mark Hirschey

10.  Parkin, Michael - Macroeconomics, 7th Edition (2004)- Prentice-Hall.

11.  Miller, R.L. – Economics Today -14th Edition (2005) - Addison-Wesley.

12.  William Boyes and Michael Melvin- Textbook of economics – 6th edition (2009)-biztantra (Indian edition)

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

Evaluation Pattern

SCHEME OF VALUATION

CIA 1 – 10% (Class Test, Assignments, Presentation)

CIA II – 25% (Mid semester exam)

CIA III – 10% (Research work)

Attendance – 5%

End Semester Examination – 50%

LAW244A - ENGLISH (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:50
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

The course will focus on strengthening the  grammatical skills of students, which in turn will help them in speaking and writing clearly and effectively, using the English Language. Articles from newspapers and magazines on contemporary issues, will be used as samples for language practice, within the class room. Students will also engage in reading sessions, so as to get acquainted with different styles of writing, comprehend complicated pieces, critique issues and think independently. The course will also use language as a medium to sensitize students and generate discussions about various socio-political issues, through regular discussions. 

 

Course objectives:

 

Tofacilitate the students in enhancing their reading, writing, comprehension and oral communication skills.  The course will also help the students in having a sound grasp over the language and to clearly and effectively communicate using the written language. The oral skills of students too get honed, as they get trained in making power point presentations in a professional way.  Reading exercises and discussions will  facilitate in developing their analytical and critical thinking  skills.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Apply the rules of grammar, while constructing sentences and paragraphs.

CO2: Communicate effectively and do power point presentations in a more professional way.

CO3: Construct meaningful paragraphs adhering to the rules of grammar.

CO4: Contribute creative thoughts and ideas on issues evolving through readings in class.

CO5: Apply analytical and critical thinking skills while reading long passages.

CO6: Draft letters, write essays and Research papers (at a very basic level), adhering to the rules of academic writing.

CO7: Listen, Speak, Read, Write (LSRW skills) effectively

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
BASIC GRAMMAR
 

Parts of speech, tenses, subject-verb agreement, articles.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
SENTENCE STRUCTURE
 

Different types of sentences and their grammatic formats, organizing ideas into grammatically correct sentences, punctuation.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
COMPREHENSION
 

Working on Comprehension passages to develop the reading, comprehending and writing skills of students – factual and inferential passages.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
VOCABULARY
 

Antonyms, synonyms, appropriate use in sentences and paragraphs.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
PARAGRAPH WRITING
 

Rearranging sentences into proper paragraphs, error analysis, expansion of an outline, précis writing, writing short paragraphs on specific topics.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
PRESENTATION SKILLS
 

Characteristics of effective presentations, the voice in presentation, body language, modes of presentation, use of visual aids, their benefits, types of visual aids, how to prepare visual aids, dos and don’ts, coordination between speech and visual aids during presentation, listening skills, role of audience.

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:6
DESCRIPTIVE WRITING
 

Different types of descriptive writing, letters, different types of letters.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.   

1. English Grammar Composition and Usage- J.C Nesfield.  Macmillan India.

2. Objective  English – Edgar Thorpe, Showick Thorpe. Pearson Education.

3. Grammar Builder- Amin. A, Eravelly.R, Ibrahim.F.J. CUP

4. Advanced English Grammar- Hewings, Martin.CUP

5. Essential English Grammar- Murphy, Raymond. CUP

6. Effective Presentation skills – Steve Mandel

7. Powerful  Presentation skills – Debra Smith

8. Powerful  Presentation Skills – Dennis Becker.

9. Communication Skills – Leena Sen

10. English Vocabulary in Use – McCarthy & O’Dell.

11. Explorations –A course in reading, thinking and communication skills – Oranee Jansz

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. English Grammar Composition and Usage- J.C Nesfield.  Macmillan India.

2. Objective  English – Edgar Thorpe, Showick Thorpe. Pearson Education.

3. Grammar Builder- Amin. A, Eravelly.R, Ibrahim.F.J. CUP

4. Advanced English Grammar- Hewings, Martin.CUP

5. Essential English Grammar- Murphy, Raymond. CUP

6. Effective Presentation skills – Steve Mandel

7. Powerful  Presentation skills – Debra Smith

8. Powerful  Presentation Skills – Dennis Becker.

9. Communication Skills – Leena Sen

10. English Vocabulary in Use – McCarthy & O’Dell.

11. Explorations –A course in reading, thinking and communication skills – Oranee Jansz

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1- Written Test for 20mks, based on topics covered in Unit1

Accurate application of the rules of grammar – 10mks

(Parts of Speech-2mks, Tenses-3mks, Articles -2, Subject-verb agreement -3mks

Clarity in the concepts of grammar -5mks

Clear and effective written communication -5mks

CIA 2 – Mid Sem Exams for 50mks

Grammar -25mks

Accurate application of the rules of grammar – 15mks

Clarity in the concepts of grammar -5mks

Clear and effective written communication -5mks

Comprehension Passage – 25mks

Reading and accurate comprehension of ideas -10mks

Analytical, critical thinking and originality of thought -5mks

Rules of Grammar -5mks

Clear and effective written communication – 5mks

CIA 3 -20mks

A.   Power Point Presentations:

Depth of research in content -8mks

Effective use of slides and audio-visual aids -4mks

Audience interaction, ability to clarify doubts, efficient handling of the session – 3mks

Timing – 2mks

Clear and effective oral communication – 3mks

B.  Online Courses:

Written/Oral assignment submissions, based on depth of content, regularity of submissions -10mks

Effective use of language, peer evaluation -5mks

Certificates/grades – 5mks

50-60  - 1mk

61-70  -  2mks

71 - 80 – 3mks

81-90  - 4mks

>90     - 5mks

D.  Essay:

Depth of Content, conceptual clarity -10mks

Adherence to rules of academic writing – 5mks

Creative contribution (ideas, thoughts) – 5mks

D.  Research Paper:

Depth of research, content clarity – 10mks

Originality of thought/analysis – 5mks

Citations and References -3 mks

Adherence to format/clear and effective articulation -2mks

E.   Book Review:

Summary – 2mks

Analysis – 4mks

Critical Appreciation – 7mks

Originality – 4mks

 

Citatations/References – 3mks

 

LAW255 - LAW OF CONTRACT I (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is designed to acquaint the students with the conceptual and operational parameters of these various general principles of contractual relations. Specific enforcement of contract is an important aspect of the law of contract. Analysis of the kinds of contracts that can be specifically enforced and the methods of enforcement forms a significant segment of this study.

To apply the basic principles in contractual relations, there need to be a clear understanding of the basic sources of law of contract. As the major source of contract law being the principles of English common law, we need to discuss the evolution of law of contract and the similarities and dissimilarities with the English law of contract. To attain this objective Unit 1 of the syllabus deals with the historical perspective of law of contract, an introduction to the basic essentials of contract, standard form contract. Unit 2 deals with consideration as an essential requirement of contract. It also analyses the consequence of unlawful consideration and the exceptional instances where consideration is not required. Unit 3 deals with the capacity of parties to enter into a valid and enforceable contract. This mainly discusses about the parties such as minors, persons of unsound mind, persons disqualified by law, who are disqualified to enter into contracts. Unit 4 on the requirement of free consent in a contract discusses the vitiating factors of free consent viz. coercion, undue influence, fraud, misrepresentation and mistake. Emphasis is given on the voidable nature of such agreements. Units 5 and 6 deal with legality of objects, consideration and void agreements respectively. Unit 7 discusses the different ways by which a contract can be discharged and the remedies which are available to the parties aggrieved by breach of contract are included in Unit 8. A practical overview of Specific Relief Act which gives a judicial remedy to enforce performance of contract is included in Unit 9.

Course Outcome

CO1: To identify all the essential elements required for formation of a valid contract such as proposal, acceptance, lawful consideration and object, competent parties.

CO2: To determine whether a contract is void, voidable or illegal based on factors such as incompetent parties, absence of lawful consideration, unlawful object, lack of free consent etc.

CO3: To compare void agreement, voidable agreement, illegal agreements and unlawful agreement and their consequences.

CO4: To recall the various modes of valid discharge and to analyse the effect of novation, alteration, rescission, waiver, accord and satisfaction on discharge of contract

CO5: To distinguish between various relations resembling contractual obligations and contractual relations

CO6: To evaluate practical problem-based situations and select the appropriate remedy for breach of contract

CO7: To critically analyse existing laws and judgments on contract

CO8: To employ research skills such as collecting relevant data from reliable legal sources, retrieving judgments, articles and other material from online legal databases, evaluating judicial reasoning employed by courts

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
INTRODUCTION TO LAW OF CONTRACT
 

History and nature of contractual obligations; Law of Contract or Law of Contracts; Definitions; Proposal and acceptance - forms, essential elements, communication and revocation; Proposal and Invitations for proposal; Floating Offers; Tenders; Standard form contract: principles of protection against the possibility of exploitation, judicial approach to such contracts, exemption clauses; clash between two standard forms of contracts; Law Commission of India 199th Report 2006

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
CONSIDERATION
 

Meaning, Kinds, Essential Elements; Doctrine of nudum pactum; Privity of contract and of consideration; Its exceptions; Adequacy of consideration; Present, past and adequate consideration; Unlawful consideration and its effects; Views of Law Commission of India on consideration; Evaluation of the doctrine of consideration

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
CAPACITY TO CONTRACT
 

Incapacity arising out of status and mental defect; Minor's agreements; Definition of ‘minor’; Restitution in cases of minor's agreements; Agreements beneficial and detrimental to a minor; Agreements made on behalf of a minor; Fraud by a minor; Doctrine of Estoppel to minor's agreements; Evaluation of the law relating to minor's agreements; Other illustrations of incapacity to contract

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
FREE CONSENT
 

Definition of Consent and Free Consent; Factors vitiating free consent: Coercion – Definition, Essential elements, duress and coercion; Doctrine of Economic Duress, effect of coercion; Undue Influence – Definition, essential elements, presumptions relating to Undue Influence – independent advice, pardahanashin women, unconscionable bargains, effect of undue influence; Misrepresentation – Definition, misrepresentation of law and fact, their effects; Fraud – Definition, essential elements, suggestio falsi and suppresio veri, Silence as fraud, Active concealment of truth, importance of intention; Mistake – Definition, kinds, fundamental error, mistake of law and of fact, their effects, unilateral mistake

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
LEGALITY OF OBJECT
 

Void agreements, Object of contract and unlawful object, Unlawful consideration, Forbidden by law; Defeating the provision of any law; Fraudulent; Injurious to person or property; Immoral; Against public policy; Distinction between void, voidable, illegal and unlawful agreements and their effects

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
VOID AGREEMENTS
 

Agreements without consideration; Agreements in restraint of marriage; Agreements in restraint of trade, its exceptions, sale of goodwill, Partnership Act section 11 restrictions, trade combinations, exclusive dealing agreements, restraints on employees under agreements of service; Agreements in restraint of legal proceedings, its exceptions; Uncertain agreements; Wagering agreement and exception

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:5
DISCHARGE OF A CONTRACT
 

By performance- conditions of valid tender of performance, How? By whom? Where? When? In what manner? Performance of reciprocal promises; Time as essence of contract; By breach, anticipatory breach and present breach; Impossibility of performance, theories of frustration, effect of frustration, frustration and restitution; By period of limitation; By agreement, rescission and alteration, their effect, remission and waiver of performance, extension of time, accord and satisfaction

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:5
REMEDIES AND QUASI-CONTRACTS
 

Relations resembling contracts- supplies to person incompetent to contract, benefit received under voidable or void agreement, Damages- remoteness of damages, ascertainment of damages; Restitution; Injunction- when granted and when refused; Specific performance

Unit-9
Teaching Hours:10
SPECIFIC RELIEF
 

Specific performance of contract; Contract that can be specifically enforced; Contract that cannot be specifically enforced; Persons against whom specific enforcement can be ordered; Rescission and cancellation; Injunction: Temporary and Perpetual; Declaratory orders; Discretion of court

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.        Pollock & Mulla, The Indian Contract and Specific Relief Act, LexisNexis, 15th ed., 2017.

2.        Reynell, Sir William, et al. Anson's Law of Contract. 30th ed. Oxford University Press, 2016.

3.        Stephen A. Smith, Atiya’s Introduction to the Law of Contract, 6thedn., New Delhi Oxford University Press, 2006.

4.        Singh Avtar, Textbook on Law of Contract & Specific Relief, 7th Ed., Eastern Book Co., Lucknow, 2019.

5. Srivastava's Commentaries on Contract Act, 12thed, Allahabad Law Publishers, 2014.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.        Akhileshwar Pathak, Contract Law, 1stedn., Oxford University Press, New Delhi, 2011. 

2.        Nilima Bhadbhade, Contract Law in India, Kluwer Law International, Great Britain, 2010.

3.        Jaibhave, Law Relating to Agreements, 2nd Edn., Kamal Publishers, New Delhi, 2011.

4.        G C V Subbarao, Law of Contracts I & II, 10thedn., S. Gosia &Co., Hyderabad, 2010.

5.        Simon Salzedo, Brunner et al, Brief case on Contract Law, London Cavendish 1995.

6.        Stone, Richard, The Modern Law of Contract, New York Routledge 2011.

7.        Laurence Kofman, The Law of Contract, 7thedn., Oxford University Press, New York, 2009.

8.        Richard Austen-Baker and Qi Zhou, Contract in Context, 4thEdition, Routledge, 2015.

9.        D S Chopra, Cases and Materials on Contract Law & Specific Relief,1st Edition, Thomson Reuters,2012.

10.    Sr. John Smith, Smith and Thomas, A Casebook on Contract Law, London Thomson Sweet & Maxwell 2000.

11.    Farnsworth, et al., Cases and Materials on Contracts (8th ed. 2013).

12.    V. Keshava Rao, Contracts I Cases and Materials, Lexis Nexis Butterworths, New Delhi, 2004.

13.    M. Krishnan Nair, The Law of Contracts, 5thedn., Orient Longman, 2004.

14. Trietel, The Law of Contract, 11thedn., Thomson Sweet and Maxwell, London, 2003.

Evaluation Pattern

·         CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation            – 10%

·         CIA II – Mid Semester Examination                                 – 25%

·         CIA III – Research Topic                                                     – 10%

·         Attendance                                                                            – 05%

·         End Semester Examination                                                – 50%

                                                                                   TOTAL 100%

LAW266 - DEVELOPMENT AND PUBLIC POLICY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course has been conceptualized in order to help the students engage with the emerging field of Public Policy. Its helps the student understand the various intersectionality that come to play when a policy is being made. It does so by first disentangling the idea of development and demystifying it, followed by introducing the different typologies that exist in the field of Public Policy. Then the subject takes a deep dive into the field by introducing the policy cycle, and thereafter, introducing the various development related policies that exist. Thereby linking the last Unit with the first and bringing it full circle.

Course Outcome

CO1: Assess the various modalities the a policy making process entails

CO2: Analyze the various inter-linkages that exist between developmental process and Public Policy

CO3: Evaluate the role of institutions like civil society organizations etc in enhancing and enriching the policies

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Unit I: Idea of Development
 

1.Growth vis-à-vis development

2.Poverty and Inequality

3.Theories and Models of Development

4.Changing profile of development administration

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Concept of Public Policy
 

1.Idea of Public and Policy

2.Typologies of Policies

a.Distributive Policy

b.Redistributive Policy

c.Regulatory Policy

d.Constituent Policy

e.Conflict Policy

f.Bargaining Policy

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
The Policy Cycle
 

1.Stages of policy

2.Policy analysis

3.Public Problems and Policy alternatives

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Planning of Developmental Policies
 

1.Public Policy and Institutions

2.Public Policy and Politics

3.Institutions: Government and Non-Government

4.Role of Civil Society

5.Good Governance

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Developmental Policies
 

1.Economic and Financial Policy

2.Healthcare Policy

3.Welfare and Social Security Policy

4.Education Policy

5.Environment and Energy Policy

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.T. Dye, (1984) Understanding Public Policy, 5th Edition. U.S.A: Prentice Hall, pp. 1-44 The Oxford Handbook of Public Policy, OUP, 2006

2. Xun Wu, M.Ramesh, Michael Howlett and Scott Fritzen, The Public Policy Primer: Managing The Policy Process, Rutledge, 2010

3.Mary Jo Hatch and Ann .L. Cunliffe Organisation Theory: Modern, Symbolic and Postmodern Perspectives, Oxford University Press,200

4.Prabir Kumar De, Public Policy and Systems, Pearson Education, 2012 R.V. Vaidyanatha Ayyar, Public Policy Making In India, Pearson,2009

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.Michael Howlett, Designing Public Policies: Principles And Instruments, Rutledge, 2011 The Oxford Handbook Of Public Policy, Oxford University Press, 2006

2.Surendra Munshi and Biju Paul Abraham [Eds.] Good Governance, Democratic Societies And Globalisation, Sage Publishers, 2004

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation – 10%

CIA II – Mid Semester Examination                 – 25% 

CIA III – Research Topic                     – 10% 

Attendance                      – 05% 

End Semester Examination                              – 50% 

TOTAL 100%

 

LAW321 - GENDER, DIVERSITY, AND INCLUSION IN ORGANIZATIONAL MANAGEMENT (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description:

This course on Gender, Diversity and Inclusion in Organizational Management will concentrate on how gender and diversity in the workplace will influence structural inequalities in the organizational practice. This course explores the processes and practices of organizational change in this area. The programme addresses questions about strategy, culture and identity, leadership, and the inclusion of multiple stakeholders in organizational change. The course focuses on research methods to help you diagnose and solve policy problems, and design organizational interventions in the age of increasing migration and extremely heterogeneous workplace. 

 

Course Objectives:   

  1. This course will equip the students with knowledge of current developments in Organizational practices relating to Gender, Diversity and Inclusion.
  2. The course adds value as it strengthens communication & problem solving skill by practice of  persuasive, clear and succinct language developed through role play.
  3. The students will be able to develop an understanding of valuing all talent   and   using   everyone’s   full   potential   for   beneficial   effects   on individuals, organisations and society.

 

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Analyze the challenges women face in workplace

CO2: Examine the need for gender diversity & gender balance as an organizational policy.

CO3: Assess reactions in social interactions in the workplace having acquired conceptual tools and experiential data.

CO4: develop knowledge and skill to address gender balance in organizations.

CO5: build a practical plan in gender balance in organizations through empirical research methods.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
ADDRESSING UNCONSCIOUS BIAS
 

-          Gender Equality, Sexual Diversity and Arbitrary Discrimination

-          Basic Concepts and Definitions

-          Sexual Practices and Orientations

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
HISTORY OF THE FIGHT AGAINST DISCRIMINATION DUE TO GENDER AND SEXUAL ORIENTATION
 

-          History of the fight against Gender discrimination

-          History of the movement of Sexual Minorities

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
WOMEN RIGHTS AND INTERNATIONAL CONVENTIONS
 

 

-          International Rights of Women - A General Overview

o   CEDAW

o   UDHR

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
CRITICAL FORMS OF DISCRIMINATION
 

-          Women and Politics

-          Women and Work

-          Sexual Harassment

-          Femicide

-          Sexual Violence as an International Crime

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:13
DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION IN THE WORKPLACE
 

 

-          Impact of cognitive processes on what we see and how we react to our social environment

-          Diversity and Inclusion concepts

-          Diversity and Inclusion perceptions

-          Disrupting and Diversity

-          Diversity and Inclusion around the World

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

  1. Lloyd's Introduction to Jurisprudence
  2. MY OWN WORDS – by Ruth Bader Ginsburg
  3. Decisions and Dissents of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg
  4. Text, cases, and materials on sex-based discrimination, Responsibility by Kenneth M. Davidson, Ruth Bader Ginsburg [and] Herma Hill Kay.
  5. The Feminine Mystique (Penguin Modern Classics) By Betty Friedan
  6. The Second Sex by Simone De Beauvoir (Author), Constance Borde (Translator), & 1 More
  7. Law and Gender Inequality: The Politics of Women’s Rights in India – Flavia Agnes
  8. What is Patriarchy – Kamla Bhasin
  9. We Should All Be Feminists Paperback by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
  10. THE WAY PAVERS: ELEVEN SUPREME COURT-WORTHY WOMEN, MEG PENROSE- https://harvardjlg.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/19/2018/08/Meg-Penrose-Way-Pavers-JLG-Online-Content.pdf
  11. The Role of Women Judges and a Gender Perspective in Ensuring Judicial Independence and Integrity, By Judge Vanessa Ruizhttps://www.unodc.org/dohadeclaration/en/news/2019/01/the-role-of-women-judges-and-a-gender-perspective-in-ensuring-judicial-independence-and-integrity.html
  12. Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood
  13. Chup: Breaking the Silence About India’s Women – Deepa Narayan
  14. Seeing like a feminist – Nivedita Menon
  15. Mapping Dalit Feminism: Towards an Intersectional Standpoint – Anandita Pan
  16. Writing Caste/Writing Gender Narrating Dalit Women s Testimonios – Sharmila Rege
  17. Me Hijra, Me Laxmi – Laxmi Narayan Tripathi
  18. Why Loiter? – Shilpa Phadke
  19. The Vigil – Sarah Joseph
  20. Women Contesting Culture: Changing Frames of Gender Politics in India – Kavita Panjabi, Paromita Chakravarti

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

1.      Jawad Syed & Mustafa F Ozbilgin, Managing Diversity and Inclusion: An International Perspective, Sage, January 2015

2.      Bond, M. A., & Pyle, J. L. (1998). Diversity dilemmas at work. Journal of Management Inquiry,7(3), 252–269.

3.      Brown, D., Minor, C. W., & Jepsen, D. A. (1991). The opinions of minorities about preparing for work: Report of the second NCDA national survey. The Career Development Quarterly, 40(1), 5–19.

4.      Carrell, M. R., & Mann, E. E. (1995). Defining workforce diversity in public sector organizations. Public Personnel Management, 24(1), 99–111.

5.      Chemers, M. M., Oskamp, S., & Costanzo, M. A. (1995). Diversity in organizations: New

6.      perspectives for a changing workplace. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

7.      Chen, C. C., & Eastman, W. (1997). Toward a civic culture for multicultural organizations. The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science, 33(4), 454–470.

8.      Christian, J., Porter, L. W., & Moffitt, G. (2006). Workplace diversity and group relations: An

9.      overview. Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, 9(4), 459–466.

10.  Coates, J. F. (2006). An increasingly diverse workforce makes traditional diversity programs passe.

11.  Employment Relations Today, 33(1), 1–8., Coleman, V. D., & Barker, S. A. (1992). A model of career development for a multicultural work force. International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling, 15(3), 187–195.

12.  Cox, T., Jr., (1993). Cultural diversity in organizations: Theory, research & practice. San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler.

13.  Cox, T., Jr. (2001). Creating the multicultural organization: A strategy for capturing the power of diversity. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

14.  Dose, J. J., & Klimoski, R. J. (1999). The diversity of diversity: Work values effects on formative team processes. Human Resource Management Review, 9(1), 83–108.

15.  Easley, C. A. (2001). Developing valuing and managing diversity in the new millennium. Organization Development Journal, 19(4), 38–50.

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Scheme:

CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation                – 10%

CIA II – Mid Semester Examination                                      – 25%

CIA III – Research Topic                                                         – 10%

Attendance                                                                                – 05%

End Semester Examination                                                    – 50%

TOTAL                                                                                       100%

 

LAW322 - MARKETING MANAGEMENT (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

·      Course Description:  

    The course examines managerial issues surrounding Marketing Management.

It involves students in specific learning exercises that simulate ‘real world’ activities that marketing managers partake in on a regular basis

 

 To Course Objectives

 TO  understand the basic  concepts of marketing management

 

·       To learn relevant functional areas of marketing management and its application for different types of products and services

·       To understand the tools used by marketing managers in decision situations and in resolving marketing problems.

·       To understand the relationship and impact of product and service decisions with those on pricing, distribution and promotion.

 

·

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will demonstrate strong conceptual knowledge in the concepts of marketing management

CO2: Students will examine the relevant functional areas of marketing management and its application

CO3: Students will be able to analytically identify and analyse the problems pertaining to marketing management.

CO4: Students will be able to integrate and evaluate product and service decisions with those on pricing, distribution and promotion - and why this is necessary.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to Marketing.
 

The Marketing process- Understanding Market place and Customer needs. Designing a customer driven marketing Strategy, Capturing Value from Customers The changing Marketing Landscape.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Company and marketing Strategy
 

Companywide Strategic Planning- BCG Matrix- Partnering to build Customer relationship. Marketing Mix. Managing the marketing Effort

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Marketing Environment
 

Micro Environment, Macro Environment,

Demographic – Economic- Natural,

Technological Political and Social Environment

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Consumer Buyer Behavior
 

Models- Characteristics- Types of Buying Decision Behavior- The Buyer Decision Process- Market Segmentation- Target markets

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
New product development
 

Managing New Product Development- Product Life Cycle- Branding decisions

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
Pricing
 

Factors to be considered- Pricing Strategies- Price Changes- Public Policy and Pricing.-

Products and service decisions-  Service marketing

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:6
Marketing Channels
 

Nature & Importance, Channel Management decisions- retailing and Wholesaling- Product Line

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:6
Promotion
 

Personal selling /Sales Promotion- Direct marketing Model- Customer data Base- Online Marketing

Text Books And Reference Books:

Kotler, Philip and Gary, Armstrong.(2012). Principles of marketing, Pearson publication

Evans,  R.  and Berman,Barry. (2012).Marketing in 21stcentury,Oxford publication.

W. D. Perreault, Jr., J.P Cannon, and E. J. McCarthy (2009). Basic Marketing: A Marketing Strategy and Planning Approach, 17th ed., Irwin/McGraw Hill.

Tong, H., & Taylor, R. J. (2008). Marketing lessons that will help shape the future. Journal of Marketing, 33 (2), 189196.

Tong, H., & Taylor, R. J. (2008). Marketing lessons that will help shape the future.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Kotler, Keller,Koshy,Jha(2014). Marketing Management, 13th Edition,  Pearson publication

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1  Individual Assignment   10%

CIA 2   Mid term Test  25%

CIA 3    Group Presentation10%

Attendance 5%

End Semester 50% 

LAW333 - LAW AND ECONOMICS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Descripton:

The guiding principle of this course is to provide the students with a solid grounding in the economic analysis of law, and pans out into 6 modules. Module 1 is designed with the intention of giving a glimpse of the historical evolution of the Law and Economics movement and introduces certain fundamental concepts of Economics used in legal analysis. Module 2 aims to show that free market economy alone is not solution for efficient allocation of resources. Market economy imperfections are reflected in a monopoly market and the student is made aware of the need for regulation of Monopoly. The module covers much of the economic theory behind antitrust law. Module 3 highlights the need for public utility regulation. It deals with liberalization, privatization and competition. Module 4 presents the basic economic theory linking contract formation with increases in efficiency and whether or not contract doctrine can be squared with economic interests. The premise of Module 5 is to familiarize students with economic reasoning of tort damages, and gives practical insight into the different forms of liability. Module 6 helps in understanding the factors behind increasing crime rate. It brings into light different techniques which can be used to control crime rate.

Course Objectives:

Economic policies and criteria have always been the citadel on which the edifice of law is built. The objectives of the course are multidimensional- to introduce and equip the students with the fundamentals of economic analysis of law, to familiarize students with the “Law and Economics” methodology, to enable them to evaluate the efficiency of legal rules in relation to Property, Contracts, Torts and Criminal Law and to help students analyse public policies for dealing with problems arising in markets where competitive forces are weak. This relationship is more pronounced in our country where welfarism is one of the features of the basic structure doctrine. This course is also designed to introduce the students to this nexus between law and economic regulation and its need in the globalized world.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand and demonstrate the microeconomic tools and concepts used in legal analysis

CO2: Apply the tools of Economics with the aim of enhancing their analytical skills and help them to assess the desirability of laws/rules/regulations.

CO3: Analyze the role of Economics within the legal framework in achieving the larger goal of human well being

CO4: Evaluate and assess the importance of economic analysis in policy making and advisory functions and serve as a subject matter expert on various forums.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Law and Economics
 

Introduction to and a brief history of Law and Economics, The nature of economic reasoning, the economic approach, Ex Post vs Ex ante reasoning, fundamental concepts of economics used in legal analysis, The Theory of Second Best

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
The Economics of Regulation and Antitrust Policy
 

The competitive extremes of Perfect Competition and Monopoly, alternative theories of economic regulation, the deregulation movement, antitrust law and enforcement, characteristics of markets with a predisposition to price fixing, how to identify cartelization, resale price maintenance, mergers that create monopolies or oligopolies, market power, market definition, potential competition, predation, foreclosure, tie-ins, bundling and barriers to entry, antitrust and the new economy

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
The Economics of Intellectual Property
 

The economic rationale, patents and innovation, limiting protection, the doctrine of equivalents, fair use doctrine, duration, remedies, economic function of trademarks

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
The Economics of Enforcing Promises
 

The economics of exchange, the specific functions of Contract Law, the economics of contract formation- capacity, duress, offer and acceptance, The consideration requirement

Contract Law and distributive goals- exculpatory provisions, Unconscionability, contract remedies- the efficient breach, specific performance, liquidated damages, the lost volume seller, Breach and excuses for Non-Performance

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Economics of Tort Law
 
  • The Costs of Accidents and the Economics of Tort Law Liability, the Assignment of Rights and Externalities, The Negligence Standard- the Hand Formula, distributive consequences

    Contributory Negligence and Comparative Negligence, Assumption of the Risk, Strict Liability-efficiency and strict liability, risk-aversion and loss spreading, duty to rescue

    Damages-the collateral source rule, future losses, hedonic losses, punitive damages

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Economic Analysis of Criminal Law
 

Why have Criminal Law- creating an incentive for market exchanges, Criminal Law and externalities

Criminal Law and behavior, administering criminal sanctions- the optimal level of criminal sanctions, deterrence options, criminal procedure

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Posner, Richard A. Economic Analysis of Law 7th ed., New York: Wolters Law & Business, Aspen Publishers, 2007.
  2. Cooter, Robert, and Thomas Ulen. Law & Economics 6th ed. Delhi: First Indian Reprint, Eastern Book Company, 2004.
  3. Polinsky, Mitchell A. An Introduction to Law and Economics 3rd ed, Aspen Publishers, 2003.
  4. Shavell,Steven. Economic Analysis of Law, Foundation Press,2004
  5. Veljanovski, Cento. Economic Principles of Law, Cambridge University Press, 2007.
  6. Jeffrey L Harrison. Law and Economics in a Nutshell, West, 2011
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.     Law or Economics? , George J Stigler

2.     The Problem of Social Cost, Ronald H Coase

3.     The Law and Economics Movement, Richard A Posner

4.     Law and Economics: The Road Not Taken, John J Donohue III

5.     The Applicability of Law and Economics to Policymaking in the Third World, N S Makgetla and R B Seidman

6.     Social Norms, Social Meaning, and Economic Analysis of Law: A Comment, Richard A Posner

7.     Economics and the Law: A Critical Review of the Foundations of the Economic Approach to aw, Jules L Coleman

8.     Monopoly in Law and Economics, Edward S Mason

9.     Individualism, Competitive Economics and The Common Law, James D Bassler

10.  Legal Theory and The Economic Analysis of Torts and Crimes, Alvin K Klevorick

11.  Trial Courts: An Economic Perspective, Robert D Cooter and Daniel L Rubinfeld

12.  Law, Economics and Inefficient Norms, Eric A Posner

13.  Crime and Punishment: An Economic Approach, Gary S Becker

14.  The Law and Economics Approach to Contract Theory, Alan Schwartz

15.  A Law and Economics Perspective on Terrorism, N Garoupa, J Klick and F Parisi

16.  Legalizing Drugs: Lessons from (and about) Economics, Kenneth E Warner

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I

CIA II

CIA III

ESE

Attendance

20 marks

50 marks

20 marks

100 marks

 

10%

25%

10%

50%

5%

LAW354 - CONSTITUTIONAL LAW I (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Constitution is a document having a special legal sanctity which sets out the framework and the principal functions of the organs of the Government within the State and declares the principles by which those organs must operate. The Constitution refers to the whole system of the governance of a country and the collection of rules which establish and regulate or govern the Government. Constitution is the mechanism under which the laws are to be made and not merely an Act which declares what the law is to be. The principle of constitutionalism requires control over the exercise of governmental power to ensure that it does not destroy the democratic principles upon which it is based. These democratic principles include the protection of fundamental rights. India  is  a  democracy  and  its  Constitution  embodies  the  main  principles  of  the democratic Government. It is the founding document and considered as supreme law of nation. For governance of the nation, it creates various organs recognizing the Fundamental Rights of men.

In light of the above, Unit 1 will familiarize the students with the basic concepts and the salient feature of the Constitution of India. Unit 2 discusses the rights guaranteed to the citizens and person and explains the origin of human rights through different historical struggles. This Unit would be mainly dealing with the accountability of the state to protect the sacrosanct fundamental rights. It further deals with the concept of State and Fundamental Right to equality, its origin, development and its place in Indian Constitution. Unit 3 discusses the Fundamental Rights to Freedom of speech and expression etc., Right to life and personal liberty provided in Part III. The students would be acquainted with the principle of liberty, freedom and how these concepts have been balanced vis-a-vis the interest of the State. Unit 4 will narrate the importance of Directive Principles