CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

School of Business and Management

Syllabus for
Bachelor of Education
Academic Year  (2023)

 
1 Semester - 2023 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
EDU111 COMPUTER TRAINING Skill Enhancement Courses 1 1 100
EDU112 SPORTS AND YOGA Skill Enhancement Courses 1 1 100
EDU131 INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION Core Courses 4 3 100
EDU132 CURRICULUM PROCESSES Core Courses 4 3 100
EDU133 LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT Core Courses 4 3 100
EDU134 EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY Core Courses 4 3 100
EDU135 PHILOSOPHICAL FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION Core Courses 4 3 100
EDU141A TEACHING AND LEARNING OF PHYSICAL SCIENCE Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 3 100
EDU141B TEACHING AND LEARNING OF ENGLISH Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 3 100
EDU141C TEACHING AND LEARNING OF COMMERCE Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 3 100
EDU142A TEACHING AND LEARNING OF SOCIAL SCIENCE Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 3 100
EDU142B TEACHING AND LEARNING OF MATHEMATICS Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 3 100
EDU142C TEACHING AND LEARNING OF BIOLOGY Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 3 100
2 Semester - 2023 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
EDU211 CREATIVITY ACTIVITY SERVICE (CAS) Skill Enhancement Courses 1 1 25
EDU212 PERSONAL SAFETY EDUCATION Skill Enhancement Courses 2 2 50
EDU221 EXTENDED ESSAY Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses 1 1 25
EDU222 THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses 1 1 25
EDU231 FUNDAMENTALS OF EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH Core Courses 4 3 100
EDU232 INCLUSIVE EDUCATION Core Courses 4 3 100
EDU233 GENDER, SCHOOL AND SOCIETY Core Courses 2 50 2
EDU241A TEACHING AND LEARNING OF PHYSICAL SCIENCE Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 3 100
EDU241B TEACHING AND LEARNING OF ENGLISH Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 3 100
EDU241C TEACHING AND LEARNING OF COMMERCE Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 3 100
EDU242A TEACHING AND LEARNING OF SOCIAL SCIENCE Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 3 100
EDU242B TEACHING AND LEARNING OF MATHEMATICS Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 3 100
EDU242C TEACHING AND LEARNING OF BIOLOGY Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 4 100
EDU281 INTERNSHIP IN SCHOOL: PHASE I Skill Enhancement Courses 4 4 100
VEDU212 THEATRE IN EDUCATION Value Added Courses 1 1 25
3 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
EDU311 SERVICE LEARNING AND COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT Skill Enhancement Courses 2 1 50
EDU382 INTERNSHIP IN SCHOOLS PHASE-II Skill Enhancement Courses 25 13 200
4 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
EDU431 EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT Core Courses 4 3 100
EDU432 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY IN EDUCATION Core Courses 4 3 100
EDU433 INCLUSIVE EDUCATION Core Courses 4 3 100
EDU434 SOCIOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES OF EDUCATION Core Courses 4 3 100
EDU435 GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING Core Courses 30 2 50
EDU441A STATISTICS IN EDUCATION Discipline Specific Elective Courses 2 2 50
EDU441B PHYSICAL AND HEALTH EDUCATION Discipline Specific Elective Courses 2 2 50
EDU481 RESEARCH PROJECT Core Courses 2 2 50
    

    

Introduction to Program:

Introduction to the Programme

School of Education is set up as a premier department for teacher training to mould future secondary school teachers. The International Baccalaureate (IB) Educators Certificate (IBEC) in teaching and Learning (DP) offers the IBEC Certificate through the Bachelor of Education and Postgraduate Diploma in International Education. The vision of the department is achieved through the implementation of an innovative curriculum. The curriculum is designed to prepare competent and professional educationists who will be able to perform various roles in the field of education. 

Programme Outcome/Programme Learning Goals/Programme Learning Outcome:

PO1: Academic Excellence Domain Expertise:?Integrate subject-specific content, pedagogical, and technological knowledge in teaching and assessment Research Competence:?Apply the knowledge of research in solving social and educational problems

PO2: Professional Excellence: Practical Skills:? Apply content, pedagogical, and technological knowledge during teaching community and service-learning experiences Employability:?Adapt themselves to the changing times as well as global and local contexts

PO3: Personal Integrity:?Internalize personal, academic, and professional integrity

PO4: Inclusiveness:?Employ principles of inclusion and equity of diverse groups in teaching and assessment

PO5: Clarity and Comprehensiveness: Possess clarity of thought and clarity in expression; ably articulate with comprehensiveness Verbal Skills: Articulate clearly in writing and/or in speech

PO6: Social Awareness and Contribution:? Create well-rounded professionals who are adaptable and committed to a more sustainable future

Assesment Pattern

End Semester Exam (ESE)

50 %

Mid Semester Exam (MSE or CIA II)

25 %

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA I & III)

25 %

Total

100 %

Continuous Internal Assessment

CIA I

CIA II

CIA III

Attendance

10 marks

25 marks

10 marks

5 marks

Examination And Assesments

Examinations and Assessments

Students are evaluated for each course on the basis of Written Examination and Continuous Internal Assessment. Each course carries a maximum of 100 marks (except Internship in School-Phase II) and the pattern of evaluation is as follows:

End Semester Exam (ESE) Mid Semester exam (CIA II) Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

: 50% : 25% : 25% : 100%

50 marks (2 Hours)

 

Written Examination

Mid Semester Exam Total 50 marks (2 Hours)

End Semester Exam: 100 marks (3 Hours)

Mid Semester exam marks will be taken for Internal Assessment. 

End Semester exam will be reduced to 50 for deciding the promotion criteria.

Continuous Internal Assessment

CIA-II MSE marks will be reduced to 25 marks. 

CIA-I and CIA-III: Continuous Internal Assessment

Continuous Internal Assessment I

CIA- I will be Written- Group or Individual and Viva or Presentation 

Continuous Internal Assessment III

The following methods may be adopted Multiple choice-based tests, Practical Activity, Presentation/Viva, Group Discussion, Project, Skill-based assignments/activities

Attendance

The Marks distribution for attendance is as follows

95%-100% : 05 marks
90%-94% : 04 marks
85%-89% : 03 marks

80%-84% : 02 marks

76%-79% : 01 mark 

 

PATTERN OF EVALUATION

End Semester Exam (ESE)

50 %

Mid-Semester Exam (MSE or CIA II)

25 %

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA I & III)

25 %

Total

100 %

Continuous Internal Assessment

CIA I

CIA II

CIA III

Attendance

10 marks

25 marks

10 marks

5 marks

Continuous Internal Assessment: CIA I and CIA III:

These may be individually written or group/individual presentations. 

The faculty may use critical thinking essays, multiple choice questions (MCQ), practical activities, case analyses, group discussions, presentations and viva voce,                                                                                                                                                                                          

The courses which do not follow the above pattern are discussed below: 

VEDU 111: Holistic Education: Follows the norms of the university.

EDU112: Computer Training: It is a graded course. All assignments given during the training sessions will be graded.

 

EDU113: Sports and Yoga: It is a graded course. Participation in all the sessions of the course will be considered for grading.

 

Creativity, Activity and Service: The CAS programme is assessed for 25 marks.

 

EDU212: Personal Safety Education:  50 Marks

 

EDU221: Extended Essay: 25 Marks

MCQ (Knowledge of Extended Essay): 5 Marks

Evaluation & Analysis of 3 Extended Essays (1 General & 2 Subject-Specific) 15 marks: with Reflection: 5 Marks; Total: 20 Marks

 

EDU222: Theory of Knowledge (TOK): 25 Marks

Class and group participation: 10%

Individual Reflective journal entries:15%

TOK one object group exhibition:10%

TOK two object group exhibition:25%

TOK three object group exhibition:40%

 

EDU 233: Gender, School and Society:50 marks

EDU282: Internship in Schools Phase I:100 marks

Simulated Teaching: 40 Marks

School Observation & Reflections: 60 Marks

 

EDU311: Service Learning and Community Engagement: 50 Marks

Fieldwork: 10 Marks

Reflective Journal: 10 Marks

Service-Learning Report: 20 Marks

Viva voce: 10 Marks

 

 

EDU382: Internship in Schools Phase II:200 marks

Internship: 195 Marks

Attendance: 5 Marks

 

EDU435: Guidance & Counselling: 50 Marks

 

EDU441A: Statistics in Education: 50 Marks

 

EDU441B: Physical and Health Education: 50 Marks

 

EDU481: Research Project: 50 Marks

EDU111 - COMPUTER TRAINING (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:15
No of Lecture Hours/Week:1
Max Marks:100
Credits:1

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Computer training is offered as a mandatory activity in the first and second semesters. Fifteen hours of computer training is allotted for each semester. It is a complete hands-on activity. The training would be conducted by peer tutors. Exercises will be given after each session for practice. Students will be well equipped in using many Browsers, search engines, educational software, application software’s and teaching and learning need-based software.

The course will enable the preservice teachers to:

  • acquire knowledge of computers, their accessories and software
  • develop skills in using MS Office and its operations
  • develop skills in using MOODLE and other LMS
  • acquire knowledge of online courses
  • acquire basic skills of web designing
  • acquire a working knowledge of basic photo editors and movie makers
  • acquire working knowledge and skills of developing lesson plans using application software

Course Outcome

CO1: Develop skills in using online platforms and ERP systems in the teaching process

CO2: Demonstrate working knowledge and skills in web 2.0 application software

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Teaching - learning Software
 

Level of Knowledge: Conceptual and Working Knowledge

Email /browsing, MOODLE and Online courses, Advanced MS-WORD, MS PowerPoint, MS-Publisher, MS-EXCEL, Prezi, Blogs, Web Page – HTML, Gold wave – Song editor, PowToon, Go Animate, Picasa – Photo Editor, Basic Movie Maker and other application software. Quiz application software: Kahoot and Hot Potatoes. Video editing software: Adobe Spark and Ulead. (Syllabus will change as per learner needs)

Text Books And Reference Books:

Internet resources

Baker, K. (2019). The ultimate guide to Google Docs. https://blog.hubspot.com/marketing/google-docs

Driscoll, T. (2020, November 21). Kahoot! walkthrough for teachers [Video]. YouTube. https://youtu.be/bWyMNUVJcgw

Driscoll, T. (2020, November 21). Quizizz walkthrough for teachers [Video]. YouTube. https://youtu.be/rUI-bWFg3rc

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Internet resources

Java T Point. (2021). OneNote Tutorial. https://www.javatpoint.com/onenote

Simpletivity. (2021, May 4). How to use Google Keep: Tutorial for beginners (2021). [Video]. YouTube. https://youtu.be/gYwu9nhoWTM

Evaluation Pattern

It is a graded course. All assignments given during the training sessions will be graded.

EDU112 - SPORTS AND YOGA (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:15
No of Lecture Hours/Week:1
Max Marks:100
Credits:1

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

This training is offered in the first semester of the programme. As there is a need for physical exercise and healthy living of a student-teacher, this training is given in the form of yoga workshops and completing interclass sports and games. Many Yoga sessions will be conducted covering: Introduction, Meaning of Yoga, Ashtanga Yoga (8 stages of Yoga), Types of Yoga, Importance of Yoga Asanas and Pranayama, Techniques and Importance of Meditation in school etc. Various Interclass games like basketball, volleyball and throwball will be conducted. An annual sports day covering track and field events will be conducted. Students will be well equipped for various sports activities and Yoga practices.

Course Objectives

The course will enable the preservice teachers to:

  • enable student-teachers to understand the need and importance of Yoga in Education.
  • sensitize the student teachers towards physical and mental fitness and its importance.
  • introduce the philosophical bases, stages and types of Yoga and to apply in their life.
  • introduce meditation and its importance in the classroom.
  • practice and enable them to transact in it the educational institutions.
  • understand the importance of good posture and common postural deformities among students and provide awareness.

Course Outcome

CO1: Internalize the importance of physical and mental fitness

CO2: Practice yoga and physical exercises.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Yoga and Sports
 

Introduction, Meaning of Yoga, Ashtanga Yoga (8 stages of Yoga), Types of Yoga, Importance of Yoga Asanas and Pranayama, Techniques and Importance of Meditation in school etc. Various Interclass games like basketball, volleyball and throwball . Annual sports day : track and field events 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Iyengar, B. K. S. (2012). Light on the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali. HarperCollins.

Lawrence, G. (2018). Teaching Power Yoga for sports. Human Kinetics.

Evaluation Pattern

It is a graded course. Participation in all sessions of Yoga and Sports hours will be considered for grading.

EDU131 - INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This core course is offered in the first semester of the programme. Drawing from their educational experiences, the course will initiate the preservice teachers to critically think about the meaning, nature, scope, aims and functions of education. While pointing out the various disciplines which make up the field of education, the preservice teachers will be provided with an overview of the discipline of teacher education. They will learn about the role of educators in the local and global contexts. Preservice teachers will begin practicing as lifelong activities, the vital tasks of reflection and effective communication. They will also learn what it means to be a professional teacher: practice professional standards, internalize professional core values and ethics, possess professional knowledge and understanding, demonstrate professional practice and competence, as well as to continuously strive for professional development.

The course will enable the preservice teachers to:

  • analyse the meaning, nature, scope, aims and functions of education
  • understand that reflection is an ongoing lifelong activity
  • effectively communicate
  • practice professional standards, internalize professional core values and ethics, possess professional knowledge and understanding, demonstrate professional practice and competence, as well as continuously strive for professional development

Course Outcome

CO1: Evaluate their roles as educators in the local and global contexts

CO2: Demonstrate effective communication

CO3: Create a continuous professional development plan for themselves

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to Education
 

Choosing teaching as a profession; Disciplines in the field of Education, including, Teacher Education; Meaning, nature, scope, aims and functions of education; vision of education in India, issues, and concerns; schools: vision, mission, and values; role of educators in the local and global contexts

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Development of the Professional Self
 

Understand one’s socio-cultural, historical, and political influences in shaping their professional identity; examine one's cultural assumptions, unconscious bias,  discrimination, prejudice, and stereotypes; historically marginalized, disenfranchised, and underrepresented versus privileged populations; cultural deficit and difference perspectives versus cultural strengths perspective; understand the culturally and linguistically diverse society and students; develop international mindedness; teach with the lenses of social justice and care for educational equity and democratic citizenship.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Becoming a Reflective Teacher
 

Teacher-Reflection: Need for reflection; Process of reflection; Barriers to reflection; Reflective writing.

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Teacher-Communication
 

Listening: Types, barriers, improving Listening skills; Speaking: With students, colleagues, administrators, and parents; speech; talk; presentations; engaging in informal dialogue with peers on how to improve teaching; Reading: Different genres; reading professional literature, especially practitioner journals/magazines; reading habits for teachers and students; Writing: On the blackboard, slides, emails, and other genres; writing student feedback; adherence to grammar and spelling; writing for practitioner journals/magazines.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Becoming a Professional Teacher
 

The professional teacher: professional standards; professional core values and ethics; professional knowledge and understanding; professional practice and competence; continuous teacher professional development; types of teacher professional development: educational: workshops, webinars/seminars/conferences; pursue courses: Subject matter or methods and/or other education-related topics; MOOCs; further educational degrees; exploration of professional organizations for teachers or professional learning communities (PLCs); seek mentoring; exploration of educational websites; exploration of educational: books other than textbooks, videos, films, blogs, speeches, talks, podcasts; examine e-teaching portfolios with artifacts on teaching-learning-assessing.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Cambridge Assessment International Education. (2022). Cambridge Pathway. https://www.cambridgeinternational.org/

CBSE. (n.d.). Central Board of Secondary Education. https://www.cbse.gov.in/cbsenew/cbse.html

CISCE. (2022). Council for the Indian School Certificate Examinations. https://www.cisce.org/

IB. (2022). International Baccalaureate. https://www.ibo.org/

Lam, C. (2016). 11 rewards of being a teacher. https://www.edutopia.org/discussion/11-rewards-being-teacher

Kumar, K. (2021). The Routledge Handbook of Education in India. Routledge.

Kumar, K. (2004). What is worth teaching? https://www.arvindguptatoys.com/arvindgupta/worthteaching.pdf

Kumar, K. (1986). The child's language and the teacher: A handbook. https://www.arvindguptatoys.com/arvindgupta/kk.pdf

Ministry of Education. (2020). National Education Policy.https://www.mhrd.gov.in/sites/upload_files/mhrd/files/NEP_Final_English_0.pdf

NCERT. (2014), Basics of education. https://ncert.nic.in/pdf/publication/otherpublications/basic_in_education.pdf

NCTE. (2021, November). National Professional Standards for Teachers, Pre-liminary Draft Version 01.08. https://ncte.gov.in/WebAdminFiles/PublicNotice/English_0_17_11_2021_637727482281820166.pdf

Raghavan, N. (2015). The reflective teacher: Case studies of action research. Orient BlackSwan.

Srinivasan, R. (2022, December). Preparing teachers to nurture wellbeing of children. Learning Curve, 14, 13-17.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bhang, A. (2014). The magical school. https://www.arvindguptatoys.com/arvindgupta/magic-school-bang-e.pdf

Dewey, J. (1997). How we think. Courier. https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/37423

Grant, C., & Zeichner, K. (1984). On becoming a reflective teacher. In C. Grant (Ed.), Preparing for reflective teaching: A book of readings, (pp. 1-9). Allyn & Bacon.

Koshy, M. (n.d.). Talks to teachers. NCERT. http://www.arvindguptatoys.com/arvindgupta/talk-to-teachers-ncert.pdf

Kuroyanagi, T. (1984). Totto-Chan: The little girl at the window. https://www.arvindguptatoys.com/arvindgupta/Tottochan.pdf

 

Larrivee, B. (2000). Transforming teaching practice: Becoming the critically reflective teacher. Reflective practice, 1(3), 293-307.

 

Priestley, M., Biesta, G.J.J., & Robinson, S. (2015). Teacher agency: what is it and why does it matter? In R. Kneyber & J. Evers (Eds.), Flip the system: Changing education from the bottom up, (pp. 134-148). Routledge.

 

Schön, D. A. (1987). Educating the reflective practitioner: Toward a new design for teaching and learning in the professions. Jossey-Bass.

Evaluation Pattern

 

PATTERN OF EVALUATION

End Semester Exam (ESE): 50 %

Mid Semester Exam (MSE/CIA II): 25 %

CIA I & III: 25 %

Total: 100 %

Continuous Internal Assessments (CIA):

CIA 1: 10 Marks

CIA 2: 25 Marks

CIA 3: 10 Marks

Attendance: 5 Marks

EDU132 - CURRICULUM PROCESSES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This core course is offered in the first semester of the programme. It introduces the students to a variety of theoretical perspectives, principles and philosophies in education. It helps the students acquire knowledge on curriculum designs, development and evaluation. It engages the students in practices of international mindedness and inquiry-based learning.

The course will enable the preservice teachers to:

·       analyse the importance of philosophical, psychological, and sociological 

bases of curriculum construction at the local, national, and international contexts.

·       apply and demonstrate the principles, stages and criteria of curriculum construction.

·       illustrate the curriculum processes in the International Baccalaureate PYP, 

MYP and DP programmes.

·       recognize and practice the IB curriculum framework.

·       develop and practice professional competencies in educational settings and practice professional competencies in educational settings.

Course Outcome

CO1: Analyse the importance of philosophical, psychological and sociological bases of curriculum construction at the local, national and international contexts

CO2: Apply and demonstrate the principles, stages and criteria of curriculum construction

CO3: Develop and practice professional competencies in educational settings

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to Curriculum
 

 

Meaning and concept of curriculum, aims, objectives, goals and types of curriculum design; Philosophical foundations of the curriculum; Sociological foundations of the curriculum; Psychological foundations of the curriculum.

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Curriculum: Local, National, & International
 

A glance at the school curriculum of State Board, CBSE, CISCE IGCSE and IB; Curriculum framework in State, CBSE, CISCE, IGCSE and International Baccalaureate (IB) programmes: Primary year programme (PYP), Middle year programme (MYP), and Diploma Programme (DP); IB curriculum as a continuum from PYP to DP; IB DP programme standards and practices; Principles of learning underpinning the IB curriculum; Structure of IB curriculum; DP curriculum framework logo, DP subject logo, IB Diploma Programme model and its constituent parts, Core elements of IB curriculum: Extended essay, Theory of Knowledge, Creativity, Activity and Service, Role of subject groups, learner profile attributes, and DP core elements in developing international-mindedness.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Curriculum Development
 

 

Principles of Curriculum Construction, Stages, sequence and organization; Criteria of curriculum design; Interdisciplinary, trans-disciplinary and multidisciplinary curriculum; Curriculum Development Models: Analysis, design, development, implementation and evaluation; Tyler model of Curriculum Development: Taba model of curriculum development, Differentiated teaching strategies. 

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:7
Curriculum Evaluation
 

Evaluation an integral part of the Curriculum: Criteria for evaluating curriculum: Models of curriculum evaluation; Tyler’s Model, Stufflebeam’s CIPP model, Stake’s Responsive model, Eisner’s model.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Instructional Design
 

Instructional design; Principles of instructional design; Types of instructional design: Backward design, ADDIE, Merrill’s Model, Kirkpatrick, Gagne’s Nine Events of Instruction, ASSURE model; Curricular mapping.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Batra, P. (2015). Curriculum in India. In W. Pinar (Ed.). Curriculum studies in India: Intellectual histories, present circumstances, (pp. 35-63). Springer. doi: 10.1057/9781137477156_5

Jain, M. (2015). Curriculum studies in India: Colonial roots and postcolonial trajectories. In W. Pinar (Ed.). Curriculum studies in India: Intellectual histories, present circumstances, (pp. 111–139). Springer. doi:10.1057/9781137477156_5                                                              

Mathews, J. (2018). Curriculum exposed. Routledge Stobie, T. (n.d.). Coherence and consistency in international curricula: A study of the International Baccalaureate Diploma and Middle Years Programmes. The SAGE Handbook of Research in International Education,140–151. doi: 10.4135/9781848607866.n13

Ornstein, A. C., & Hunkins, F. P. (1998). Curriculum: Foundations, principles, and issues. Allyn and Bacon.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Avinash, C. (2006). Curriculum development and evaluation in education. New Delhi: Sterling Publishers 

Benscoter, W. J., King, G.M., King, M., & King, S. B. (2015). An overview of instructional design. In W. J. Rothwell, G.M. Benscoter, M. King, & S. B. King. Mastering the Instructional Design Process (pp. 1-16). doi: 10.1002/9781119176589.ch19.

Harlacher, J. E., Sakelaris, T. L., & Kattelman, N. M. (2013). What is curriculum-based evaluation? In J. E. Harlacher, T. L. Sakelaris, & N. M. Kattelman (Eds.), Practitioner’s Guide to Curriculum-Based Evaluation in Reading (pp. 47–61). Springer Science & Business Media. doi: 10.1007/978-1-4614-9360-0_4

Jurowski, C. (2002). BEST think tanks and the development of curriculum modules for teaching sustainability principles. Journal of Sustainable Tourism, 10(6), 536–545. doi: 10.1080/09669580208667186

Lam, T. S. J. (2012). Curriculum evaluation. In S. S. Yeung, J. T. Lam, A. W. Leung, & Y. C., Lo (Eds.), Curriculum change and innovation. Curriculum change and innovation (pp. 189-214). Hong Kong University Press. doi: 10.5790/hongkong/9789888139026.003.0008

NCERT. (2014). Curriculum in transaction.  https://www.ncert.nic.in/departments/nie/dtee/activities/pdf/syllabus_bed.pdf

Rothwell, W. J., Benscoter, G.M., King, M., & King, S. B. (2015). Planning and managing instructional design projects. In W. J. Rothwell, G.M. Benscoter, M. King, & S. B. King. (pp. 334–340). Mastering the Instructional Design Process. Wiley.

Wiggins, G., & McTighe, J. (2005). Understanding by design (2nd ed.). ASCD. 

Evaluation Pattern

Students are evaluated for each course on the basis of Written Examination and Continuous Internal Assessment. Each course carries a maximum of 100 marks, and the pattern of evaluation is as follows:

PATTERN OF EVALUATION

End Semester Exam (ESE)

50 %

Mid Semester Exam (CIA II)

25 %

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA I & III)

25 %

Total

100 %

 

Written Examination

Mid Semester Exam

50 marks (2 Hours)

End Semester Exam

100 marks (3 Hours) 

Mid Semester Exam marks will be taken for Internal Assessment.

The End Semester Exam marks will be reduced to 50 for deciding the promotion criteria. 

 

Continuous Internal Assessment

CIA I

CIA II

CIA III

Attendance

10 marks

25 marks

10 marks

5 marks

CIA II MSE marks will be reduced to 25 marks. 

CIA I and CIA III: Continuous Internal Assessment                                                                      

Continuous Internal Assessment I:                                                                                                   

CIA I may have one or two components:

Written (reports)                                                               

Group or Individual: Viva Voce or Presentation

 

Continuous Internal Assessment III:                                                                                            

The following methods may be adopted:

Multiple choice-based tests                                                                                                       

Practical Activity                                                                                                             

Presentation/Viva                                                                                                                 

Group Discussion

EDU133 - LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This core course is offered in the first semester of the programme. The course prepares students to know, understand, and apply evidence-based practices of assessment as teachers. Students will be able to design different types of assessments, including authentic assessments, guided by backward design learning outcomes; provide feedback; analyse and report assessment data with a view to improving teaching and the curriculum. The use of technology is integral to the course.

Course Outcome

CO1: Create effective assessments

CO2: Analyse the results of assessments using technological tools

CO3: Synthesize assessment data (report results) for instructional and curricular decision-making

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Fundamental Concepts in Assessments
 

Measurement and Evaluation; Principles of Assessment; Assessment for Learning; Assessment of Learning; Assessment as Learning; Formative & Summative Assessments; Norm-referenced and Criterion-referenced Tests; Internal and External Assessments; Backward Design assessment based on Anderson & Krathwohl’s Taxonomy of the Cognitive Domain, Krathwohl & Bloom’s Affective Domain, and Simpson’s Psychomotor Domains; Peer-, Self-, and Group- Assessments.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Designing Assessments & Tools
 

Construction of Worksheets; Home Assignments; Teacher-made Unit Test; Standardized Tests; Diagnostic Tests; Characteristics of a Effective assessments: Validity, Reliability, Objectivity, and Utility;

Construction, Strengths, and Limitations of:

(A) Constructed-Response Questions: Essays and Short Answer;

(B) Selected-Response (Objective) Questions: Multiple Choice, Fill in the Blanks, True or False, Matching;

Quantitative Tools: Rating Scales and Checklist;

Qualitative Tools: Observation, Anecdotal Record, and Interviews.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Designing Differentiated Assessments
 

Guidelines for constructing the following assessments, along with strengths and limitations:

GRASPS; Cubing; Think Dots; RAFT; Tic-Tac-Toe; Structured Academic Controversy; Performance/Authentic Assessment: Observation, Portfolio, and Project-Based Learning,

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Analysis of Scores
 

Rubric; Answer Key & Marking Scheme; Moderation;

Analyzing Scores using MS Excel: Data entry, Sorting, Data multiplication, addition, Lookup, Insert functions, Pivot tables; Statistical Functions: Descriptive Statistics: Measures of Central Tendencies: Mean, Median, Mode; Measures of Variability-Range, Standard Deviation, Quartile Deviation. Charts: Histogram, Pie, Column, line, & Bar graph; Item analysis; Correlation.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:7
Feedback & Reporting Results
 

Learning Analytics; Use of Assessment Data;

Providing Feedback: Feed up, Feedback, Feed Forward;

Reporting Results to the Head of Institution; Parents; Students.

Text Books And Reference Books:

American Psychological Association. (2022). Style & Grammar Guidelines. https://apastyle.apa.org/style-grammar-guidelines/

Black, P., & William, D. (2010). Inside the black box: Raising standards through classroom assessment. Kappan Magazine, 92(1), 81-90. 

Brookhart, S. M. (2008). Feedback that fits. http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.454.9500&rep=rep1&type=pdf

Cambridge Assessment International Education. (n. d.). Getting started with Assessment for Learning. https://cambridge-community.org.uk/professional-development/gswafl/index.html#afl-checklist-6891

IRIS Center. (2022). What is differentiated instruction? Retrieved from https://iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/module/di/cresource/q1/p01/

Ministry of Education. (2020). National Education Policy. https://www.mhrd.gov.in/sites/upload_files/mhrd/files/NEP_Final_English_0.pdf

Mueller, J. (2016). Authentic Assessment toolbox. http://jfmueller.faculty.noctrl.edu/toolbox/index.htm

Reynolds, C. R., Livingston, R. B., Willson, V., & Jha, K. A. (2017). Measurement and assessment in education, (2nd ed.). Pearson.

University of Reading. (n.d.). Engage in assessment: Using technology. https://www.reading.ac.uk/engageinassessment/using-technology/eia-using-technology.aspx

Vanderbilt University. (2022). Understanding by Design. https://cft.vanderbilt.edu/guides-sub-pages/understanding-by-design/

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Aggarwal, J.C. (2003). Essentials of examination system evaluation tests and measurement. Vikas Publishing House.

CAST. (2022). About Universal Design for Learning. Retrieved from https://www.cast.org/impact/universal-design-for-learning-udl

Hattie, J. (2009). Visible learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. Routledge.          

Wagner, T. (2010). The global achievement gap. Basic Books.

Evaluation Pattern

Students are evaluated for each course on the basis of Written Examination and Continuous Internal Assessment. Each course carries a maximum of 100 marks, and the pattern of evaluation is as follows:

PATTERN OF EVALUATION

End Semester Exam (ESE)

50 %

Mid Semester Exam (CIA II)

25 %

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA I & III)

25 %

Total

100 %

 

Written Examination

Mid Semester Exam

50 marks (2 Hours)

End Semester Exam

100 marks (3 Hours) 

Mid Semester Exam marks will be taken for Internal Assessment.

The End Semester Exam marks will be reduced to 50 for deciding the promotion criteria. 

 

Continuous Internal Assessment

CIA I

CIA II

CIA III

Attendance

10 marks

25 marks

10 marks

5 marks

CIA II MSE marks will be reduced to 25 marks. 

CIA I and CIA III: Continuous Internal Assessment                                                                      

Continuous Internal Assessment I:                                                                                                    

CIA I may have one or two components:

Written (reports)                                                               

Group or Individual: Viva Voce or Presentation

 

Continuous Internal Assessment III:                                                                                           

The following methods may be adopted:

Multiple choice-based tests                                                                                                        

Practical Activity                                                                                                            

Presentation/Viva                                                                                                                 

Group Discussion


 

Attendance                                                                                                                           The Marks distribution for attendance is as follows

Percentage 

Marks 

95 – 100 %

05 marks 

90 – 94 %

04 marks 

85 – 89 %

03 marks 

80 – 84 %

02 marks 

76 – 79 % 

01 mark 

 

EDU134 - EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

 

This core course is offered in the first semester of the programme. The course establishes the importance of educational psychology to understand the development of learners—physical, cognitive, social-emotional, and moral. The course will enable the preservice teachers to take appropriate curricular decisions. The course provides preservice teachers with the vocabulary to discuss their academic experiences.

 

With the focus of the course on topics such as individual differences, intelligence, attention, memory, motivation, the objective of the course is to enable preservice teachers to use these as a basis to effectively plan their lessons for the learners in the class, teach, manage, and assess the students.

Course Objectives

The course will enable the preservice teachers to:

  • describe the various developmental characteristics of adolescents
  • apply the different views of learning suitably to the contexts
  • understand individual learner differences to suitably plan lessons, teach, and assess

Course Outcome

CO1: describe the various developmental characteristics of adolescents

CO2: apply the different views of learning suitably to the contexts

CO3: apply the concepts in motivation suitably to the contexts

CO4: demonstrate that planning lessons, teaching, and assessing are based on an understanding of the learners

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:4
Unit 1: Introduction to: Educational Psychology, Development, Teaching and Learning
 

The role of educational psychology; linking educational psychology and teaching; educational psychology and research-based applications to learning; neuroscience, learning, and teaching; understanding the learners; relationship of understanding the learners to correspondingly plan teaching and assessment strategies; overview of the top 20 principles from psychology applicable for PreK–12 teaching and learning.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 2: Development
 

General principles of development; nature versus nurture; continuity versus discontinuity; timing: critical versus sensitive periods. 

Physical Development: Physical development in the adolescent years; challenges in physical development: obesity; eating disorders; guidelines for supporting positive body images in adolescents.

Cognitive Development: 

Piaget’s theory of cognitive development; guidelines for teaching students in the concrete-operational and formal operational stages; Vygotsky’s sociocultural theory of cognitive development; implications of Piaget’s and Vygotsky’s theories for teachers.

Social-Emotional Development:

Identity and self-concept; Erikson: stages of psychosocial development; guidelines for supporting identity formation; self-concept; social-emotional development: self-awareness and self-management; social awareness; relationship skills; responsible decision making; guidelines for promoting social-emotional development in adolescents; guidelines to help adolescents who are in trauma or have post-traumatic stress disorder.

Moral Development: Piaget’s theory of moral development; Kohlberg’s theory of moral development; Carol Gilligan’s morality of caring framework; adolescents and primary emotions linked with moral development: guilt, shame, empathy, and sympathy; moral behaviour and cheating; guidelines for supporting positive emotions in adolescents.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Unit 3: Behaviourist, Social Cognitivist, and Cognitivist Views of Learning
 

Behaviourist Views: Classical conditioning; operant conditioning; current applications: functional behavioral assessment, positive behavior supports, and self-management; 

Social-Cognitivist View: Bandura’s challenge and observational learning; modelling.

Cognitivist Views: The role of attention; attention and multitasking; the brain and cognitive learning: the importance of knowledge in cognition; general and specific knowledge: declarative, procedural, and self-regulatory knowledge; memory stores: sensory memory, working memory, long-term memory; information processing and the model of human memory; teaching for deeper learning; reducing cognitive load; retaining information; learning loss; learning strategies.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Unit 4: Motivation and Learning
 

Motivation; Four approaches to motivation; Behavioral: Skinner; rewards and punishers; 

Humanistic: Maslow; self-esteem, self-fulfillment, self-determination; guidelines for supporting self-determination and autonomy; Cognitive: Weiner; attribution; beliefs about knowledge, ability, and self-worth; students who show learned helplessness; mastery-oriented students; failure-avoiding students; failure-accepting students; guidelines for encouraging self-worth; beliefs about ability: Carol Dweck's growth and fixed mindset; guidelines for developing a growth mindset; Social-Cognitive: Bandura; goals, expectations, intentions, self-efficacy; guidelines for encouraging self-efficacy; supporting emotional self-regulation; Duckworth; developing grit; guidelines for building on students’ interests and curiosity; guidelines for coping with anxiety.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Unit 5: Addressing Learner Differences
 

Learning styles; myth of the sensory modality of learning styles; myths about the relationship between learning styles and teaching styles; Howard Gardner’s theory of multiple intelligences; myths about the applications of Gardner’s theory of multiple intelligences; difference between learning styles and multiple intelligences; Sternberg’s triarchic theory of intelligence.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Aggarwal, J. C. (2006). Psychology of learning and development. Shipra. 

American Psychological Association. (2021). Top 20 principles for Pre-K to 12 education. https://www.apa.org/ed/schools/teaching-learning/top-twenty/principles

Mangal, S. K. (2013). Advanced Educational Psychology. Prentice Hall.                    

Somashekar, T. V. (2006). Educational Psychology. Nirmala Prakashana.

Woolfolk, A., & Kapur, P. (2019). Educational Psychology. Pearson.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Csikszentmihalyi, M. (2008). Flow: The psychology of optimal experience. Harper Perennial Modern Classics.

Csikszentmihalyi, M. (2013). Creativity: The psychology of discovery and invention. Harper Perennial Modern Classics.

Duckworth, A. L. (2013). Grit: The power of passion and perseverance. Scribner. 

 

Dweck, C. (2017). Mindset-updated edition: Changing the way you think to fulfil your potential. Hachette.

 

Gardner, H. E. (2000). Intelligence reframed: Multiple intelligences for the 21st century. Hachette.

Sharma, R. N., & Sharma, R. K. (2006). Advanced Educational Psychology. Atlantic Publishers.

Evaluation Pattern

Question Paper Format for End semester examination

Part A-15 Marks x 4 questions: Answer any 4 out of 6 = 60 Marks Part B-05 Marks x 8 questions: Answer any 8 out of 10 = 40 Marks

 

 

 

CIA-II MSE marks will be reduced to 25 marks. CIA-I and CIA-III: Continuous Internal Assessment

 

CIA I

CIA II

CIA III

Attendance

(10 marks)

(25 marks)

(10 marks)

(5 marks)

EDU135 - PHILOSOPHICAL FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This core course is offered in the first semester of the programme. The course will enable preservice teachers to understand that philosophical knowledge has a fundamental role in helping them to systematically reflect and to clarify questions that are important in education, about teaching, learning, curriculum, and assessment. The four branches of philosophy, epistemology, metaphysics, axiology, and logic, speak directly to the preservice teachers about the process of education. Preservice teachers will discover their emerging personal philosophy of teaching via the schools of philosophy. They will articulate their formative personal philosophy of teaching, which would evolve during their educational careers. The philosophies of both Indian and western educational thinkers are expected to influence the preservice teachers and to assist them in refining their personal philosophy of teaching. 

The course will enable the preservice teachers to:

● think with clarity about issues in education

● appreciate the contributions of educational thinkers

● articulate their personal philosophy of teaching

Course Outcome

CO1: Apply the methods and language of philosophy to issues in education.

CO2: Articulate the philosophy/philosophies of educational thinkers.

CO3: Develop their personal philosophy of teaching.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Philosophy and Education
 

Philosophy; Overview of the Branches of Philosophy: Epistemology, Ontology; Axiology; Logic; Interrelationships between Philosophy and Education; Philosophy and Aims of Education; Philosophy and Curriculum; Philosophy and Methods of Teaching; Relationship between Teachers and Learners; Personal Philosophy of Teaching 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Indian Thinkers on Education
 

Rabindranath Tagore; Swami Vivekananda; Mahatma Gandhi; Aurobindo Ghosh; Gijubhai Badheka; J. Krishnamurti 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Western Thinkers on Education
 

Plato; Immanuel Kant; Jean Jacques Rousseau; Johann Pestalozzi; Friedrich Fröbel; Maria Montessori; John Dewey; Rudolf Steiner; Loris Malaguzzi 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Western Schools of Philosophy
 

Empiricism; Idealism; Realism; Naturalism; Humanism; Existentialism; Pragmatism; and relation to aims of education, curriculum, discipline, and the role of teachers. 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Ancient Indian Schools of Philosophy
 

Nyaya; Vaisheshika; Samkhya; Yoga; Purva-Mimamsa; Vedanta; Charvaka; Buddhism; and Jainism 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Brubacher, J. S. (2018). Modern philosophies of education. Sarup.

Durant, W. (2022). The story of philosophy. Dover Publications.

Hendricks, S. (2017). 10 schools of philosophy and why you should know them. https://bigthink.com/thinking/10-schools-of-philosophy-and-why-you-should-know-them

Hiriyanna, M. (2005). Outlines of Indian philosophy. Motilal Banarasi Das. Ministry of Education. (2020).

National Education Policy.https://www.mhrd.gov.in/sites/upload_files/mhrd/files/NEP_Final_English_0.pdf NCERT. (2014), Basics of education.https://ncert.nic.in/pdf/publication/otherpublications/basic_in_education.pdf

Perez, D. (2022). Foundational philosophies in education. In D. Perez, (Ed.), Social foundations of K-12 education. https://kstatelibraries.pressbooks.pub/dellaperezproject/

Peters, R. S. (1967). The concept of education (International Library of the Philosophy of Education Volume 17). Routledge.

Radhakrishnan, S., & Moore, C. A. (2014). A source book in Indian philosophy. Princeton University Press.

Zalta, E. N. (2006). The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. https://plato.stanford.edu/ 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Badheka, G. B. (1990). Divasvapna: An educator’s reverie. https://www.arvindguptatoys.com/arvindgupta/ds.zip

Bailey, R. (Ed.). (2010). The philosophy of education: An introduction. Bloomsbury Academic. http://dx.doi.org/10.5040/9781472541307Encyclopædia Britannica. (2022). Philosophy and Religion. https://www.britannica.com/browse/Philosophy- Religion

Gandhi, M. K. (n. d.). The story of my experiments with truth. http://www.arvindguptatoys.com/arvindgupta/gandhiexperiments.pdf

Ghose, A. (2003). Volume 1-The complete works of Sri Aurobindo. https://www.sriaurobindoashram.org/sriaurobindo/downloadpdf.php?id=19

Krishnamurti Foundation India. (2022). K on Education. https://www.jkrishnamurti.in/k- on-education/

McInerney, R. (2021). Philosophy and the metaphysical achievements of education: language and reason. Bloomsbury Academic. http://dx.doi.org/10.5040/9781350183544

Parkay, F. W. (2020). Becoming a teacher. Pearson.

Ramakrishna Math. (n.d.). Education: Swami Vivekananda. Author.

Reggio Children. (2022). Reggio Emilia approach. https://www.reggiochildren.it/en/ Rishi Valley School. (2018). Aims of Education. https://www.rishivalley.org/aims-of-education

Ryan, K., Cooper, J. M., Bolick, C. M., & Callahan, C. (2021). Those who can, teach. Cengage Learning.

Siegel, H., Phillips, D.C., & Callan,E. (2018, Winter). Philosophy of education. In E. N.

Zalta (Ed.). The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. https://plato.stanford.edu/archives/win2018/entries/education-philosophy

Sri Aurobindo International Centre of Education. (2021). Centre. https://www.saice.in/ Sykes, M. (1987). The story of Nai Talim. https://www.arvindguptatoys.com/arvindgupta/naitalem.pdf

Visva-Bharati. (n.d.). About. https://visvabharati.ac.in/Santiniketan.html 

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment. Each course carries a maximum of 100 marks, and the pattern of evaluation is as follows:

PATTERN OF EVALUATION

End Semester Exam (ESE)

50 %

Mid Semester Exam (CIA II)

25 %

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA I & III)

25 %

Total

100 %

 

Written Examination

Mid Semester Exam

50 marks (2 Hours)

End Semester Exam

100 marks (3 Hours)

Mid Semester Exam marks will be taken for Internal Assessment.
The End Semester Exam marks will be reduced to 50 for deciding the promotion criteria.

 

Continuous Internal Assessment

CIA I

CIA II

CIA III

Attendance

10 marks

25 marks

10 marks

5 marks

CIA II MSE marks will be reduced to 25 marks. CIA I and CIA III: Continuous Internal Assessment Continuous Internal Assessment I: CIA I may have one or two components:

Written (reports)
Group or Individual: Viva Voce or Presentation

Continuous Internal Assessment III:

The following methods may be adopted: Multiple choice-based tests
Practical Activity
Presentation/Viva

Group Discussion

EDU141A - TEACHING AND LEARNING OF PHYSICAL SCIENCE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This discipline-specific elective course is offered in the first semester. The course introduces students to the aims and objectives of teaching physical science at local, regional, national, and international schools. It discusses the essential elements of teaching and practice needed to teach physical science in an effective and inspirational manner. It develops the competencies required for a teacher to teach physical science and hones their employability skills.

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate the mastery of physical science content for secondary school level

CO2: Apply the underpinning principles of teaching and learning in physical science

CO3: Develop course outlines, unit plans, and lesson plans

CO4: Apply Approaches to Teaching (ATT) and Approaches to Learning (ATL) in teaching and learning of physical science

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Essentials of Physical Science for the Learner
 

States of matter; physical change and chemical change; structure of atom: discovery of subatomic particles: Dalton’s atomic theory; Rutherford’s model; Bohr’s model; Heisenberg‘s uncertainty principle; Pauli’s exclusion principle; Aufbau’s principle; Hund’s rule of maximum multiplicity: Electronic configuration; periodic classification of elements; early classification and modern classification; periodic properties: atomic radii; ionization energy and electron affinity: chemical bonding: ionic bond; covalent bond; co-ordinate bond: hybridization. metals and non-metals: differences; important chemical reactions of metals: extraction of iron and copper: extraction of silicon; uses of silicon compounds; phosphorous; allotropic forms: extraction of phosphorus; chemical properties: uses of phosphorous: Sulphur: occurrence and extraction; allotropic forms; uses.

 

Magnetism and electricity: Properties of the magnetic field; electromagnetic induction; solenoid; Fleming’s LHR AC generator; Fleming’s RHR DC motor; Ohm’s law; resistance; factors affecting resistance; problems on resistance involving series and parallel circuit. Dynamics: motion is relative; speed; velocity; acceleration; problems on equations of motion; centrifugal and centripetal forces; principle of moments and problems based on uniform meter rule. calorimetry: heat capacity; specific heat capacity; latent heat; law of calorimetry; problems based on calorimetry; optics: lens; types of lenses; real and virtual images; ray diagrams; prisms; types of prisms and its ray diagrams. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Teaching Physical Science
 

Meaning; nature; and scope of physical science; significance of physical science in daily life; practical and recreational values of physical science; scientific attitude: meaning; characteristics of a person with scientific attitude; techniques of developing scientific attitude; connectedness of physical science with other school subjects; international mindedness through physical science; linking the learner profile to teaching of physical science.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Aims and Objectives of Teaching and Learning Physical Science
 

Objectives of teaching physical science; John Biggs’s constructive alignment; Bloom’s Taxonomy and revised Bloom’s Taxonomy; list of command terms; Constructing instructional objectives. Significance of introduction; state of aim; opening and concluding statements; blackboard work; evaluation; recapitulation; and homework in delivering a lesson.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Effective Planning for Teaching and Learning Physical Science
 

Lesson Plan: Meaning and importance; Herbartian lesson plan, evaluation-based lesson plan, IB unit plan: templates and construction, Flanders’ classroom interaction analysis.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Approaches to Teaching and Learning Physical Science
 

Pedagogy vs. andragogy Approaches to Teaching (ATT); teaching through inquiry; teaching through concepts; teaching developed in the local, regional, national, and global contexts; teaching focused on effective teamwork and collaboration; teaching differentiated to meet the needs of all learners; collaborative teaching techniques: Socratic Seminar; flipped class; fishbowl discussion method; think-pair-share; jigsaw technique; concept mapping; discussion method. process-oriented guided inquiry learning; experiential learning; problem and project-based learning; case-based learning; discovery learning.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
Essential skills for a Physical Science teacher
 

Approaches to Learning (ATL); thinking skills, research skills, communication skills, self-management skills and social skills. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Anderson, L. W., & Krathwohl, D. R. (2001). A taxonomy for learning, teaching, and assessing: A revision of Bloom’s taxonomy of educational objectives. Longman.

Audet, R. H., & Jordan, L. K. (2005). Integrating inquiry across the curriculum. Corwin Press.

Bergmann, J. & Sams, A. (2012). Flip your classroom: Reach every student in every class every day. International Society for Technology in Education.

Bloom, B. S. (1956). Taxonomy of educational objectives, Handbook I: The Cognitive Domain. David McKay.

Goldman, A. I. (2008). A causal theory of knowing. The Journal of Philosophy, 64(12).  http://www.jstor.org                                                                                     

Hreha, S. R. (2012). Approaches to international mindedness in IB world schools. https://docplayer.net/54605031-Approaches-to-international-mindedness-in-ib-world-schools-dr-steve-r-hreha.html

International Baccalaureate. (2022). The IB learner profile. https://ibo.org/benefits/learner-profile

International Baccalaureate. (2022). Diploma Years Programme. https://www.ibo.org/programmes/diploma-programme/

Mohan, R. (2007). Innovative science teaching for physical science teachers: Prentice Hall of India.

Trilling, B., & Fadel, C. (2009). 21st century skills: Learning for life in our times. John Wiley & Sons.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Costa, A. L., & Kallick, B. (2009). Habits of mind across the curriculum: Practical and creative strategies for teachers. ASCD.            

Fahey, J. (2012). Ways to learn through inquiry: Guiding children to deeper understanding. International Baccalaureate Organization.   

Hutchings, W. (2007). Enquiry-Based learning: Definitions and rationale. http://www.ceebl.manchester.ac.uk/resources/papers/hutchings2007_definingebl.pdf

IBO. (2019). Approaches to Teaching and Learning in the Diploma Programme. https://resources.ibo.org

IBO. (2019). Approaches to Teaching and learning in the Diploma Programme. https://resources.ibo.org

Tilke, A. (2011). The International Baccalaureate Diploma Program and the School Library: Inquiry-Based Education. ABC-CLIO.

Tomlinson, C., & Imbeau, M. B. (2011). Managing a differentiated classroom: A practical guide. https://www.researchgate.net     

Lee, V. S. (2004). Teaching and learning through inquiry: A guidebook for institutions and instructors. Stylus.

Wiliam, D. (2011). Embedded formative assessment. Solution Tree Press.

Evaluation Pattern

Students are evaluated for each course on the basis of Written Examination and Continuous Internal Assessment. Each course carries a maximum of 100 marks, and the pattern of evaluation is as follows:

PATTERN OF EVALUATION

End Semester Exam (ESE)

50 %

Mid Semester Exam (CIA II)

25 %

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA I & III)

25 %

Total

100 %

 

Written Examination

Mid Semester Exam

50 marks (2 Hours)

End Semester Exam

100 marks (3 Hours) 

Mid Semester Exam marks will be taken for Internal Assessment.

The End Semester Exam marks will be reduced to 50 for deciding the promotion criteria. 

 

Continuous Internal Assessment

CIA I

CIA II

CIA III

Attendance

10 marks

25 marks

10 marks

5 marks

CIA II MSE marks will be reduced to 25 marks. 

CIA I and CIA III: Continuous Internal Assessment                                                                      

Continuous Internal Assessment I:                                                                                                    

CIA I may have one or two components:

Written (reports)                                                               

Group or Individual: Viva Voce or Presentation

 

Continuous Internal Assessment III:                                                                                           

The following methods may be adopted:

Multiple choice-based tests                                                                                                        

Practical Activity                                                                                                            

Presentation/Viva                                                                                                                 

Group Discussion


 

 

Attendance                                                                                                                           The Marks distribution for attendance is as follows

Percentage 

Marks 

95 – 100 %

05 marks 

90 – 94 %

04 marks 

85 – 89 %

03 marks 

80 – 84 %

02 marks 

76 – 79 % 

01 mark 

EDU141B - TEACHING AND LEARNING OF ENGLISH (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This discipline-specific course is offered in the first semester of the programme. It introduces students to the principles of teaching and learning English and comprehends the importance and role of English in National and International spheres. It helps in assessing learners’ understanding for and of learning, making connections with TOK, CAS and the extended essay. It develops the linguistic skills, planning and implementation of lesson plans through different approaches.

The objectives course will enable the preservice teachers to:

  • illustrate the pedagogical principles underpinning the IBDP programme
  • differentiate the role of English in National and International spheres and create opportunities to learn and teach
  • research and design appropriate learning activities
  • create and experiment with course plans, unit plans and lesson plans and provide meaningful learning opportunities
  • demonstrate independent implementation of Approaches to Teaching and learning
  • construct meaningful opportunities for content analysis and transaction.
  • present effective use of resources in the English classroom.
  • discuss and demonstrate professional competencies.
  • examine the application of TOK, EE and CAS in teaching and learning English

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate mastery of English content at the secondary school level

CO2: Apply the underpinning principles of teaching and learning in English

CO3: Develop Course outlines, Unit plans, and Lesson plans

CO4: Apply Approaches to Teaching (ATT) and Approaches to Learning (ATL) in teaching and learning English

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Essentials of English language & Literature for English language & Literature learner
 

Language and communities (nation/region, subcultures)
Language and the individual (multilingualism/bilingualism, language profile/identity) Language and knowledge (science and technology, argot and jargon)
Language and social relations (social and professional status, race)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Teaching English in a classroom
 

 

Meaning, definition, functions of language; Fundamental principles of language learning; Need and importance of teaching and learning English; Importance of English in school; Challenges of teaching English; Significance of English language & Literature in daily life; Theory of Knowledge, Role of a teacher in the theory of knowledge; Stimulate, Facilitate, and Guide; Knowledge framework; International mindedness with respect to English language & Literature, Linking the learner profile.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Aims and Objectives of Teaching and Learning of English
 

Relationship of Inquiry, action, and reflection; Setting up the purpose of an English language & Literature unit; Aims and objectives of teaching English; Writing objectives for classroom teaching based on content; Listing of Specifications under General Objectives, Criteria for Writing Instructional Objectives.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Effective Planning for Teaching and Learning in English
 

 

The teaching of Prose and poetry; Anderson’s Revised Taxonomy; Unit plan and Lesson Plans: Meaning and importance; Herbartian Lesson Plan, Evaluation Approach to Lesson plan, IB course outline; Templates and construction, IB Unit Plan: Templates and construction; Anderson's Revised Taxonomy; Evaluation Approach to Lesson plan, Unit Plan: Meaning, importance, format and Uses; Unit planning in International Baccalaureate.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Approaches to Teaching and learning the English language
 

Approaches to Teaching (ATT) Approaches to Learning (ATL) as per IB, Inquiry-based teaching; Structural Approach; Communicative Approach; Humanistic Approach; Community Language Learning; Differentiated teaching strategies, Teaching in local and global contexts; Effective use of Technology for teaching and learning, Collaborative Teaching techniques: Socratic Seminar, flipped classroom, fishbowl discussion method, Think-pair-share, Jigsaw technique, graphic organizers, Spider web discussion method; Process-oriented guided inquiry learning, Experiential learning, Problem and Project-Based Learning, Case-based learning, Discovery learning.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:8
Essential Skills for an English teacher
 

 

Listening Skills, Speaking Skills, Reading Skills, Writing Skills, Study Skills, Thinking skills, Communication skills, Social skills, Self-management Skills, Research Skills, Oral and Written Communication Skills, Critical Thinking Skills, Problem-Solving Skills, Teamwork and Collaborative Skills, Metacognitive Skills.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Binkley, M, Erstad, O, Herman, J, Raizen, S, Ripley, M and Rumble, M. (2010). Defining 21st-century skills. 

Brinton D. (2014). Integrating language and Content: Issues and Options. https://www.tesol.org/connect/tesol-resource-center

Daniels, H., Steineke, N., and Moses, S. (2014). Teaching the social skills of academic interaction: Step-by-step lessons for respect, responsibility, and results. Corwin.

Harry, B., Waterman, R. (2008). Building collaboration between schools and parents of english language learners: Transcending barriers, creating opportunities. National Institute for Culturally Responsive Educational Systems. http://www.colorincolorado.org/research/effectiveness

McWilliam, E. (2008). Unlearning how to teach. Innovations in Education and Teaching International, 45(3), 263–269. doi: 10.1080/14703290802176147

National Council of Teachers in English (2011). Lesson plans and teaching resources. http://www.ncte.org/lessons

Richards C.J and Renandya A. W. (2002). Methodology in language teaching: An anthology of current practice. Cambridge University Press.

Rokhaniyah, H. (2016). The implementation of collaborative learning to enhance the students’ critical thinking in writing. at Tadib, 11(1). doi: 10.21111/at-tadib. v11i1.627

Vallabi, J. E. (2011). Teaching of English: Principles and practices. Neelkamal.

Venkateswaran, S. (2008). Principles of teaching English. Vikas Publishing House.

Wei L. (2011). Formative Assessment in classrooms: Operational procedures. Journal of Language Teaching and Research. https://www.academypublication.com/issues/past/jltr/vol02/01/12.pdf

Woodward T. (2001). Planning lessons and courses. Cambridge University Press. 

Woodward, T. (2004). Planning lessons and courses. Cambridge University Press.

Wren., & Martin. (2008). High School English Grammar & Composition. Chand Publishing.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Arora, N. (2012). English Language teaching: Approaches and methodologies. MacMillan India 

Bergmann, J., & Sams, A. (2012). Flip your classroom: Reach every student in every class every day. International Society for Technology in Education.

Himmele, P., & Himmele, W. (2009). The language-rich classroom: A research-based framework for English language learners. ASCD.

Lake, D., Baerg, K., & Paslawski, T. (2015). Teamwork, leadership and communication: collaboration basics for health professionals. Brush Education.

McWilliam, E. (2008). Unlearning how to teach. Innovations in Education and Teaching International, 45(3), 263–269. doi: 10.1080/14703290802176147

Richards, C. J., & Rodgers, S.T. (2001). Approaches and Methods in language teaching. Cambridge University Press.

Summers, J., & Smith, B. (2009). Communication skills handbook: How to succeed in written and oral communication. Wiley.

Evaluation Pattern

 PATTERN OF EVALUATION

End Semester Exam (ESE) 50 %

Mid Semester Exam (MSE or CIA II) 25 %

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA I & III) 25 %

Total 100 %

Continuous Internal Assessment

CIA I CIA II CIA III Attendance

10 marks 25 marks 10 marks 5 marks

EDU141C - TEACHING AND LEARNING OF COMMERCE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This discipline-specific elective course is offered in the first semester. The course introduces the students to the aims and objectives of teaching commerce at local, regional, national, and international schools. It discusses the essential elements of teaching and practice needed to teach commerce in an effective and inspirational manner. It develops the competencies required for a teacher to teach commerce and hones their employability skills.

The course will enable the preservice teachers to:

  • solve problems of the content of commerce operating at the national and international boards of schooling suitably at the secondary school level
  • apply the underpinning principles of teaching and learning in Commerce
  • formulate goals and objectives in Teaching and Learning in Commerce
  • develop Course outlines, Unit plans, and Lesson Plans
  • apply Approaches to Teaching (ATT) and Approaches to Learning (ATL) in everyday teaching of Commerce

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate the mastery of Commerce content for secondary school level

CO2: Apply the underpinning principles of teaching and learning in Commerce

CO3: Develop Course outlines, Unit plans, and Lesson plans

CO4: Apply Approaches to Teaching (ATT) and Approaches to Learning (ATL) in teaching and learning of Commerce

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:4
Essentials of Commerce for the Commerce learner
 

Level of Knowledge – Working Knowledge

Business organization and environment- Introduction to Commerce, Types of organization, Organizational objectives, stakeholders, External environments, Growth and evolution, Organizational planning tools Human Resource Management-Functions and evolution of human resource management, Organizational Structure, Leadership and management, Motivation, Organizational/ Corporate culture, Industrial/employee relationship, Finance and Accounts -Sources of finance, Costs and revenues, Break-even analysis, Final Accounts, Profitability and liquidity ratios, Efficiency ratio analysis, Cash flow, Investment appraisal, Budgets.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Teaching Commerce in a Classroom
 

Level of Knowledge – Conceptual and Basic

Commerce Education: Meaning, definition and need of commerce education in present days, Qualities of a Commerce teacher, Significance of Commerce in daily life, Recent developments in commerce. 

Theory of Knowledge in Commerce; Ways of knowing; Sense perception, Reasoning, Language, Emotion, Imagination, Faith, Intuition, and Memory. Role of a teacher in the theory of knowledge; Stimulate, Facilitate, and Guide. Constructing Theory of knowledge questions in Commerce; International mindedness with respect to Commerce. Linking the learner profile in Commerce class.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Aims and Objectives of Teaching and Learning Commerce
 

Level of Knowledge – Conceptual and Basic

Meaning of the terms Aim, Objective, Learning outcome, and Specification; Objectives of Teaching Commerce. aims of teaching commerce, Values of teaching commerce Relationship of Inquiry, action, and reflection. Setting up of the purpose of a Commerce unit: transferable goals, content, skills, application: Anderson & Krathwohl’s Taxonomy for teaching and assessing , Listing of Specifications under General Objectives, Criteria for Writing Instructional Objectives. Correlation of Commerce and accountancy with other subjects.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Effective Planning for Teaching and Learning in Commerce
 

Level of Knowledge – Conceptual and Working Knowledge

Year Plan, Lesson Plan: Meaning and importance; Herbartian Lesson Plan, Evaluation Approach to Lesson plan, IB course outline; Templates and construction, IB Unit Plan: Templates and construction.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Approaches, Methods & techniques of Teaching and learning Commerce
 

Level of Knowledge – Conceptual and Working Knowledge

Pedagogy vs. andragogy, Approaches to Teaching (ATT) Approaches to Learning (ATL). Methods of Teaching- Inquiry-based teaching and learning: Structured inquiry, Guided inquiry, Open inquiry, Process-oriented guided inquiry learning, laboratory method, Fishbowl discussion method, Spider web discussion method, Flipped classroom, Think-pair-share, Jigsaw technique, graphic organisers; Specific methods of teaching in Commerce: Lecture, Industrial Visit, Group Discussions, Demonstration, Role-play, Workshop, Surveys and market study, Symposium, Panel discussion, Heuristic method, Problem and Project-Based Learning, Case based learning. Collaborative learning strategies.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
Essential skills for a Commerce teacher
 

Level of Knowledge-Conceptual and Working Knowledge

Social skills, Self-management skills, Research skills, Oral and written communication skills, Critical thinking skills, Teamwork and collaborative skills, reflective skills. Non-verbal skills, public relations.

Technical or Specific skills—Skills needed in drafting correspondence and preparing the business reports, accounting skills, Marketing and Salesmanship, Entrepreneurship skills, Leadership and Motivation skills.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Anderson, L. W., & Krathwohl, D. R. (2010). Quick flip questions for the revised Bloom's taxonomy. Edupress.

Anderson, L. W., & Krathwohl, D. R. (2001). A taxonomy for learning, teaching, and assessing: A revision of Bloom’s taxonomy of educational objectives. Longman.

Erasmus, B., Strydom, J. W., & Rudansky-Kloppers, S. (2016). Introduction to Commerce. Oxford University Press.

Gershon, M. (2015). How to use Bloom’s taxonomy in the classroom: the complete guide. Createspace.

Heydorn, W., & Jesudason, S. (2014). Decoding theory of knowledge for the IB diploma: Themes, skills and assessment. Cambridge University Press.

Pizzey, A. (2001). Accounting and finance: A firm foundation. Continuum.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Alvarado, A. E., & Herr, P. R. (2003). Inquiry-Based learning using everyday objects hands-on instructional strategies that promote active learning in grades 3-8. Place of publication not identified: Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse.

Bergmann, J., & Sams, A. (2012). Flip your classroom: reach every student in every class every day. International Society for Technology in Education.

Compayré, G., & Payne, W. H. (2002). The history of pedagogy. University Press of the Pacific.

IB Business and Management. (n.d.). Daily Lesson Plans. https://sites.google.com/site/ibbusinessandmanagementmitchem/daily-lesson-plans

Hamilton, B. (2018). Integrating technology in the classroom: Tools to meet the need of every student. ISTE.

Interactive Education. (2005). Lesson plan. Whangaparaoa, N.Z.

Mishra, R. C. (2009). Lesson planning. A.P.H. Publication.

Paulson, D. (1970). Unit planning: A guide for effective teaching. Lutheran Church Press.

Reidsema, C., Kavanagh, L., Hadgraft, R., & Smith, N. (2017). The flipped classroom practice and practices in higher education. Springer.

Evaluation Pattern

Students are evaluated for each paper on the basis of Written Examination and Continuous Internal Assessment. Each paper carries maximum 100 marks and the pattern of evaluation is as follows:

End Semester exam (ESE):          50%

Mid Semester exam (CIA II):          25%

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA): 25%

                                       Total :          100%

Written Examination

Mid Semester Exam          :     50 marks (2 Hours)

End Semester Exam           :    100 marks (3 Hours)

 

Mid Semester exam marks will be taken for Internal Assessment. End Semester exam will be reduced to 50 for deciding the promotion criteria.

 

Continuous Internal Assessment

CIA I

CIA II

CIA III

Attendance

(10 marks)

(25 marks)

(10 marks)

(5 marks)

 

CIA-II MSE marks will be reduced to 25 marks.

 

EDU142A - TEACHING AND LEARNING OF SOCIAL SCIENCE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This discipline-specific elective course is offered in the first semester. The course introduces the students to the aims and objectives of teaching social science at local, regional, national, and international schools. It discusses the essential elements of teaching and practice needed to teach social science in an effective and inspirational manner. It develops the competencies required for a teacher to teach social science and hones their employability skills.

The course will enable the preservice teachers to:

  •   acquire Social Science content knowledge suitably at the secondary school level

  •   reflect on the IB knowledge framework

  •   identify elements of the Theory of knowledge (TOK) with respect to the Social

    Science subject

  •   recognize and practice IB learner profile attributes

  •   analyze Approaches to Teaching (ATT) as per IB curriculum

  •   analyze the Approaches to Learning (ATL) as per IB curriculum

  •   appreciate the role of Social Science in the local and global context

  •   develop international-mindedness

  •   create a Course outline, Unit plan, and Lesson plan as per IB Learner profile, CAS

    and TOK

  •   critically evaluate the student-centric approaches of teaching Social Science

    subjects

  •   demonstrate skills of incorporating collaborative and cooperative teaching

    techniques with respect to Social Science subjects 

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate the mastery of Social Science content for secondary school level

CO2: Apply the underpinning principles of teaching and learning in Social Science

CO3: Develop Course outlines, Unit plans, and Lesson plans

CO4: Apply Approaches to Teaching (ATT) and Approaches to Learning (ATL) in teaching and learning of Social Science

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:4
Essentials of Social Science for a Social Science Learner
 

 

The Ancient Civilizations/Cultures of India: Vedic Period, Dynasties: Maurya, Gupta, Vardhan; Religions: Buddhism, Jainism, Islam & Christianity World Civilizations: Harappa, Egypt, China, Mesopotamia-origin, development, features and its contributions. Physical Features of India: Major geographical divisions and their importance (Himalayan Mountain Ranges, River plains, Desert, Deccan Plateau and Coastal Plains). The Earth- Structure, size & shape, continents and oceans, latitudes and longitudes, layers of earth, structure, composition, internal and external forces. Constitution-constituent assembly, drafting and framing of the constitution, salient features, fundamental rights and duties, directive principles of the state policy, its importance to state and citizen. Basics of economics-meaning. Importance, resources and economic activities. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Teaching Social Science
 

Meaning and nature of Social Science, the scope of Social Science, Geography, Economics and Political Science, Significance of Social Science in daily life, Importance of Social Science as a school discipline, Practical, disciplinary and recreational Values of teaching Social Sciences, Social Science as an art and science, Difference between Social Science, Natural Science and Social Studies, Theory of Knowledge in Social Science; Ways of knowing; Sense perception, Reasoning, Language, Emotion, Imagination, Faith, Intuition, and Memory. Role of a teacher in the theory of knowledge; Stimulate, Facilitate, and Guide. Constructing Theory of knowledge questions in Social Science. International mindedness with respect to social science. Linking the learner profile in social science class. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Aims and Objectives of Teaching and Learning of Social Science
 

 

Aims and objectives of Teaching Social Science-History, Economics, Geography and Political Science Relationship of Inquiry, action, and reflection. Setting up of the purpose of a Social Science unit: transferable goals, content, skills, application: Anderson & Krathwohl’s Taxonomy for teaching and assessing, Criteria for Writing Instructional Objectives. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Effective Planning for Teaching & Learning of Social Science
 

 

Designing-meaning, importance, steps and formats of Lesson Plan: Herbartian Lesson Plan, Evaluation. Approach to Lesson plan, Unit Plan Meaning, importance, format and Uses; Approach to Lesson plan, IB course outline; Templates and construction, IB Unit Plan: Templates and construction, Flanders’ classroom interaction analysis. 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Approaches to Teaching Social Science
 

 

Pedagogy vs. andragogy, Approaches to Teaching (ATT) Approaches to Learning (ATL) as per IB, Inquiry-based teaching and learning: Structured inquiry, Guided inquiry, Open inquiry, Differentiated teaching strategies, Technology for teaching and learning, Collaborative Teaching techniques: Socratic Seminar, Flipped classroom Fishbowl discussion method, Think-pair-share, Jigsaw technique, graphic organisers, Spider web discussion method 

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
Essential Skills for a Global Social Science Teacher
 

 

Thinking skills, Communication skills, social skills, Self-management skills, Research skills, Oral and written communication skills, Critical thinking skills, Problem-solving skills, Teamwork and collaborative skills, Metacognitive skills, Self-regulated learner. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

Anderson, L. W., & Krathwohl, D. R. (2001). A taxonomy for learning, teaching, and assessing: A revision of Bloom’s taxonomy of educational objectives. Longman.

Audet, R. H., & Jordan, L. K. (2005). Integrating inquiry across the curriculum. Corwin Press.

Bergmann., J. & Sams, A. (2012). Flip your classroom: Reach every student in every class every day. International Society for Technology in Education.

Smith, D., & Saha, S. (2020). Oxford IB Diploma Programme: IB prepared: History. Oxford.

Carr, E. H. (1961). What is History? Macmillan.
Goldman, A. I. (2008). A causal theory of knowing.
The Journal of Philosophy, 64(12).

http://www.jstor.org

Jadav, N. (2001). Teaching of history. Anmol Publication.
Kochhar, S. K. (1998). The teaching of Social Studies. Sterling Publishers.

Kohli, A. S. (2004). Teaching of Social Studies. Anmol Publications. Richards, J. F. (2005). The Mughal Empire, English. Foundation Books. Singh, M. V. (2009). Delhi Sultanate. Centrum Press. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

Fahey. J. (2012). Ways to learn through inquiry: Guiding children to deeper understanding. International Baccalaureate Organization.

Tomlinson, C., & Imbeau, M. B. (2011). Managing a differentiated classroom: A practical guide. https://www.researchgate.net

Lee, V. S. (2004). Teaching and learning through inquiry: A guidebook for institutions and instructors. Stylus.

Wiliam, D. (2011). Embedded Formative Assessment. Solution Tree Press. 

Evaluation Pattern

 

Students are evaluated for each course on the basis of Written Examination and Continuous Internal Assessment. Each course carries a maximum of 100 marks, and the pattern of evaluation is as follows:

PATTERN OF EVALUATION

End Semester Exam (ESE)

50 %

Mid Semester Exam (CIA II)

25 %

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA I & III)

25 %

Total

100 % 

Written Examination

Mid Semester Exam

50 marks (2 Hours)

End Semester Exam

100 marks (3 Hours)

Mid Semester Exam marks will be taken for Internal Assessment.
The End Semester Exam marks will be reduced to 50 for deciding the promotion criteria.

Continuous Internal Assessment

CIA I

CIA II

CIA III

Attendance

10 marks

25 marks

10 marks

5 marks

CIA II MSE marks will be reduced to 25 marks. CIA I and CIA III: Continuous Internal Assessment

Continuous Internal Assessment I: CIA I may have one or two components:

Written (reports)
Group or Individual: Viva Voce or Presentation

Continuous Internal Assessment III:

The following methods may be adopted: Multiple choice-based tests
Practical Activity
Presentation/Viva

Group Discussion

EDU142B - TEACHING AND LEARNING OF MATHEMATICS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This discipline-specific elective course is offered in the first semester. The course introduces the students to the aims and objectives of teaching mathematics at local, regional, national, and international schools. It discusses the essential elements of teaching and practice needed to teach mathematics in an effective and inspirational manner. It develops the competencies required for a teacher to teach mathematics and hones their employability skills.

The course will enable the preservice teachers to:

  • To solve problems of the content of mathematics operating at the national and international boards of schooling suitably at the secondary school level
  • To apply the underpinning principles of teaching and learning mathematics
  • To formulate goals and objectives in teaching and learning mathematics
  • To develop course outlines, unit plans, and lesson Plans
  • To apply Approaches to Teaching (ATT) and Approaches to Learning (ATL) in everyday teaching of Mathematics

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate the mastery of mathematics content for secondary school level

CO2: Apply the underpinning principles of teaching and learning in mathematics

CO3: Develop course outlines, unit plans, and lesson plans

CO4: Apply Approaches to Teaching (ATT) and Approaches to Learning (ATL) in teaching and learning of Mathematics

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:4
Essentials of Mathematics for Mathematics learner
 

Level of Knowledge: Working Knowledge

Arithmetic: Number System-Integers, fractions, number line, rational and irrational numbers; Sets-types, Venn diagrams; Matrices-types, operations; Statistics-mean, median, mode, Std. deviation and quartile deviation; Square roots and Cube root; Profit and loss, Discount, Brokerage; Ratio, Proportion and percentage, Playing with numbers and Patterns. Algebra: HCF, LCM; Factorization; Speed, time and distance; Variations. Geometry: Axioms and postulates; Triangles-Theorems, construction; Mensuration-square, rectangle, cube, cuboid; Graphs; Polygons-types; Quadrilaterals- cyclic quadrilaterals; Parallelogram- theorems.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:7
Introduction to Teaching Mathematics in a classroom
 

Level of Knowledge: Conceptual and Basic

Meaning and nature of Mathematics, the scope of Mathematics, Significance of Mathematics in daily life, Importance of Mathematics as a school subject, Practical, disciplinary and recreational Values of Mathematics; Scientific attitude: Meaning, characteristics of a scientific attitude person, techniques of developing scientific attitude, International mindedness concept and techniques of developing international-mindedness, understanding the learner profile of a Mathematics student.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Aims and Objectives of Teaching and Learning of Mathematics
 

Level of Knowledge: Conceptual and Basic

Meaning of the terms: Aim, Objective, Learning Outcome, and Specification; Objectives of Teaching Mathematics, Relationship of inquiry, action, and reflection. Setting up of the purpose of a Mathematics unit: Transferable goals, content, skills, application: Bloom’s and Anderson’s taxonomy of cognitive objectives; Listing of specifications under general objectives, Criteria for Writing Instructional Objectives.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Effective Learning for Teaching and Learning of Mathematics
 

Level of Knowledge: Conceptual and Working Knowledge

Lesson Plan: Meaning and importance; Herbartian Lesson Plan, Evaluation Approach to Lesson plan, ENGAGE model; IB course outline; Templates and construction, IB Unit Plan: Templates and construction, Flanders classroom interaction analysis.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Approaches, Methods & Techniques of Teaching and Learning Mathematics
 

Level of Knowledge: Conceptual and Working Knowledge

Pedagogy vs. andragogy, Approaches to teaching (ATT) Approaches to learning (ATL) as per IB. Methods of Teaching- Inquiry-based teaching and learning: Structured inquiry, Guided inquiry, Open inquiry, Process-oriented guided inquiry learning, laboratory method, Experiential learning, Problem and Project-Based Learning, Case-based learning, Discovery Learning, Fishbowl discussion method, Spider web discussion method. Collaborative Teaching techniques; Differentiated teaching strategies, Socratic Seminar, Flipped classroom, Think-pair-share, Jigsaw technique, graphic organisers.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
Essential Skills for a Mathematics Teacher
 

 Level of Knowledge: Conceptual and Working Knowledge

 

Thinking skills, Communication skills, Social skills, Self-management skills, Research skills, Oral and written communication skills, Critical thinking skills, Problem-solving skills, Teamwork and collaborative skills, Metacognitive skills, Self-regulated learner.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Anderson, L. W., & Krathwohl, D. R. (2001). A taxonomy for learning, teaching, and assessing: A revision of Bloom’s taxonomy of educational objectives. Longman.

Bergmann, J. & Sams, A. (2012). Flip your classroom: Reach every student in every class every day. International Society for Technology in Education. 

CASEL. (2013). Social and emotional core competencies. http://www.casel.org/social-andemotionallearning/core-competencies

Chambers, A. (n.d.). Tok maths resources. https://ibmathsresources.com/ibtokmaths

Chambers, R., Lo, B. C. Y, and Allen, N. B. (2008). The impact of intensive mindfulness training on attentional control, cognitive style, and affect. Cognitive Therapy and Research, 32(3), 303–322.

Costa, A. L. & Kallick, B. (2009). Habits of mind across the curriculum: Practical and creative strategies for teachers. ASCD.        

Clarke, D., Clarke, B., Sullivan, P. (2012). Teaching with tasks for effective mathematics learning. Springer.           

Erickson, H. L. (2012). Concept-based teaching and learning. http://www.ibmidatlantic.org/Concept_Based_Teaching_Learning.pdf

Erozkan, A. (2013). The effect of communication skills and interpersonal problem solving skills on social efficacy. Educational Sciences: Theory and Practice,13(2). 739–745.

Fasko, D. (2003). Critical thinking: Origins, historical development, future direction. Critical thinking and reasoning: Current research, theory and practice, 3–20.

Howard, J. P., & Beyers. J.F.  (2020). Teaching and learning mathematics online. CRC Press.

Harcet, J., Heinrichs, L., Seiler, P. M., & Skoumal, M. T. (2016). IB mathematics higher level. Oxford University Press.

Hattie, J. (2009). Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. Routledge.

Hutchings, W. (2007). Enquiry-Based Learning: Definitions and rationale. http://www.ceebl.manchester.ac.uk/resources/papers/hutchings2007_definingebl.pdf

International Baccalaureate. (2017). What is an IB education?https://www.ibo.org/globalassets/what-is-an-ib-education-2017-en.pdf

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Chambers, A. (n.d.). Lesson Plans. https://ibmathsresources.com/category/lesson-plans

Managebac. (n.d.). DP Unit Planner sample. https://www.managebac.com/ib-diploma/sample-dp-unit-planner

Smith, M. K. (2013). David A. Kolb on experiential learning. The encyclopedia of pedagogy and informal education. https://infed.org/mobi/david-a-kolb-on-experiential-learning

Theoryofknowledge.net. (n.d.). TOK Areas of Knowledge: Mathematics. https://www.theoryofknowledge.net/areas-ofknowledge/mathematics/

Evaluation Pattern

Students are evaluated for each paper on the basis of Written Examination and Continuous Internal Assessment. Each paper carries maximum 100 marks and the pattern of evaluation is as follows:

End Semester exam (ESE):          50%

Mid Semester exam (CIA II):          25%

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA): 25%

                                       Total :          100%

Written Examination

Mid Semester Exam          :     50 marks (2 Hours)

End Semester Exam           :    100 marks (3 Hours)

 

Mid Semester exam marks will be taken for Internal Assessment. End Semester exam will be reduced to 50 for deciding the promotion criteria.

 

Continuous Internal Assessment

CIA I

CIA II

CIA III

Attendance

(10 marks)

(25 marks)

(10 marks)

(5 marks)

 

CIA-II MSE marks will be reduced to 25 marks.

 

 

EDU142C - TEACHING AND LEARNING OF BIOLOGY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description and Objectives 

This discipline-specific elective course is offered in the first semester. The course introduces the students to the aims and objectives of teaching Biology at national and international schools. It introduces the essential elements of Biology teaching and practice needed to teach Biology in an effective and inspirational manner. It develops the skills and competencies required for a biology teacher to teach Biology in a global context.

 

The course will enable the preservice teachers to:

·       demonstrate the mastery of biology content suitable for secondary school level

·       demonstrate IB knowledge framework logo and subject logo

·       describe the theory of knowledge (TOK) with respect to Biology

·       recognise and practice IB learner profile attributes

·       apply and practice approaches to teaching (ATT) and approaches to learning (ATL)

·       acquire the knowledge and use of command terms in developing teaching and learning plans

·       demonstrate the skill of preparing a Course outline, Unit plan, and Lesson plan 

·       demonstrate and practice inquiry-based teaching and learning

·       initiate collaborative teaching techniques

·       demonstrate Biology experiments in Laboratory

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate the mastery of Biology content for secondary school level

CO2: Apply the underpinning principles of teaching and learning in Biology

CO3: Develop Course outlines, Unit plans, and Lesson plans

CO4: Apply approaches to teaching (ATT) and approaches to learning (ATL) in teaching and learning of Biology

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:4
Essentials of Biology for Biology Learner
 

Classification of living organisms-Two-kingdom system, Five-kingdom system, Study of Cell- types, characteristics and differences, Structural Organization in Plants and Animals; Cell cycle (various phases): Mitosis and Meiosis; Life processes in plants and animals; Sexual Reproduction in Flowering Plants, Human health and disease; Microbes in Human Welfare; Plant physiology; Genetics and Evolution

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:7
Introduction to Teaching Biology in a Classroom
 

Meaning and nature of Biology, the scope of Biology, Significance of Biology in daily life, Importance of Biology as a school subject; Practical, disciplinary and recreational values of Biology; Scientific attitude: Meaning, characteristics of a scientific attitude person, techniques of developing scientific attitude. Integration of Biology with other school subjects.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Aims and Objectives of Teaching and Learning of Biology
 

Meaning of the terms: Aim, Objective, Learning Outcome, and Specification; Objectives of Teaching Biology, Relationship of inquiry, action, and reflection. Setting up of the purpose of a Biology unit: Transferable goals, content, skills, application: Bloom’s and Anderson’s taxonomy of cognitive objectives; Listing of specifications under general objectives, Criteria for Writing Instructional Objectives.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Effective Planning for Teaching and Learning in Biology
 

Lesson Plan: Meaning and importance; Herbartian Lesson Plan, Evaluation Approach to Lesson plan, IB course outline; Templates and construction, IB Unit Plan: Templates and construction, Flanders’ classroom interaction analysis.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Approaches, Methods & Techniques of Teaching and Learning Biology
 

Pedagogy vs. andragogy, Approaches to teaching (ATT) Approaches to learning (ATL) as per IB. Methods of Teaching- Inquiry-based teaching and learning: Structured inquiry, Guided inquiry, Open inquiry, Process-oriented guided inquiry learning, laboratory method, Experiential learning, Problem and Project-Based Learning, Case-based learning, Discovery Learning, Fishbowl discussion method, Spider web discussion method. Collaborative Teaching techniques; Differentiated teaching strategies, Socratic Seminar, Flipped classroom, Think-pair-share, Jigsaw technique, graphic organisers.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
Essential Skills for a Biology Teacher
 

Thinking skills, Communication skills, Social skills, Self-management skills, Research skills, Oral and written communication skills, Critical thinking skills, Problem-solving skills, Teamwork and collaborative skills, Metacognitive skills, Self-regulated learner.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Alchin, N., & Henly, C. P. (2014). Theory of knowledge: For the IB Diploma. Hodder.

Anderson, L. W., & Krathwohl, D. R. (2001). A taxonomy for learning, teaching, and assessing: A revision of Bloom’s taxonomy of educational objectives. Longman.

NCERT. (2022). Biology textbook for class XII. Author. https://ncert.nic.in/textbook.php?kebo1=0-22

Sprague, J. (2017). Theory of knowledge for the IB Diploma: Skills for success. Hodder.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bergmann, J. & Sams, A. (2012). Flip your classroom: Reach every student in every class every day. International Society for Technology in Education.

Choudhary, S. (2007). Teaching of Biology. A.P.H. Publishing House.

Coffman, T. (2017). Inquiry-based learning: designing instruction to promote higher level thinking. Rowman & Littlefield.

Croser, N., & Smith, M. (2009). The Jigsaw. Era Publications.

Goyal, S. (2007). Teaching of Biology. Rajat Publications.

Hattie, J. (2010). Visible learning: a synthesis of over 800 metaanalyses relating to achievement. London: Routledge.

Heick, T. (2018, February 9). The difference between pedagogy, andragogy, and heutagogy.  https://www.teachthought.com/pedagogy/aprimer-in- heutagogy-and-self-directed-learning

Kelly, K. B. (1997). Evolution role of lesson plans in instructional planning. https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED414261.pdf

Kolb, D. A. (2015). Experiential learning: experience as the source of learning and development. Pearson.

Managebac. (n.d.). DP Unit Planner sample. https://www.managebac.com/ib-diploma/sample-dp-unit-planner

Rosén A., & Salmén Matilda. (2002). Approaches to learning. Sigtuna: Sigtuna Acad.

Rosen, A. (2007). Approaches to teaching Wiesels Night. New York: Modern Language Association of America.Approaches to teaching and learning in the Diploma Programme. (n.d.).  https://www.umt.edu/sell/cps/mcps-ibw/imx/DP-IBO-GUIDE-ATL.pdf.

Evaluation Pattern

Students are evaluated for each course on the basis of Written Examination and Continuous Internal Assessment. Each course carries a maximum of 100 marks, and the pattern of evaluation is as follows:

PATTERN OF EVALUATION

End Semester Exam (ESE)

50 %

Mid Semester Exam (CIA II)

25 %

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA I & III)

25 %

Total

100 %

 

Written Examination

Mid Semester Exam

50 marks (2 Hours)

End Semester Exam

100 marks (3 Hours) 

Mid Semester Exam marks will be taken for Internal Assessment.

The End Semester Exam marks will be reduced to 50 for deciding the promotion criteria. 

 

Continuous Internal Assessment

CIA I

CIA II

CIA III

Attendance

10 marks

25 marks

10 marks

5 marks

CIA II MSE marks will be reduced to 25 marks. 

CIA I and CIA III: Continuous Internal Assessment                                                                      

Continuous Internal Assessment I:                                                                                                   

CIA I may have one or two components:

Written (reports)                                                               

Group or Individual: Viva Voce or Presentation

 

Continuous Internal Assessment III:                                                                                            

The following methods may be adopted:

Multiple choice-based tests                                                                                                       

Practical Activity                                                                                                             

Presentation/Viva                                                                                                                 

Group Discussion

 

EDU211 - CREATIVITY ACTIVITY SERVICE (CAS) (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:15
No of Lecture Hours/Week:1
Max Marks:25
Credits:1

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 The skill enhancement course expects students to plan and demonstrate:

 

Creativity: Exploring and extending ideas leading to an original or interpretive product or performance; 

 

Activity: Physical exertion contributing to a healthy lifestyle.

 

Service: Collaborative and reciprocal engagement with the community in response to an authentic need.

In this course, students will be mentored and taught the concept and processes of CAS by the CAS mentor. 

The course will enable the preservice teachers to:

  • gain knowledge and awareness of their strengths and weakness
  • adapt to new challenges
  • initiate, plan and execute experiences
  • be committed and persevered in completing the experiences
  • work collaboratively with peers and community
  • engage with issues of local and global importance
  • develop ethical competence

Course Outcome

CO1: Initiate, plan and execute and collaborate community service experiences

CO2: Develop ethical competence

CO3: Engage with issues of local and global importance

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
Creativity, Activity and Service
 

Creativity : (arts and other experiences that involve creative thinking)

This may include improvised teaching aids, performing arts, digital designing, literary writing, arts and crafts. Students are stimulated to involve in creative endeavours that move them beyond the familiar, broadening their scope from conventional to unconventional thinking. There are many departmental, institutional, local and global competitions the students can participate in to show their creativity, such as Improvised teaching aids for practice teaching, BookMark, Blossoms, In-Bloom, Dharpan, Kalasaurabha, Broucher designing for seminars/workshops/panel discussions, articles in newsletters and any other competitions State/national/global.

Activity: (physical exertion contributing to a healthy lifestyle)

This may include participation in individual and team sports, Yoga, aerobic exercise, dance, fitness training, and any other form of physical exertion that contributes to a healthy lifestyle. Students could be involved in the departmental Annual Sports day, University Annual Sports day, timetabled sports sessions, students could organise sports day at various schools and NGO based organisations. 

Service: (An unpaid and voluntary exchange that has a learning benefit for the student)

There are three types of service experiences possible, they are:  (engaging with different types of service is recommended.

 Direct service: Students can render teaching service for the underprivileged through NGOs, one-on-one tutoring with peers or any other non-paid teaching assignment. They can even frame curriculum as per the needs of the organisations, conduct workshops/seminars/talks for the underprivileged. Implementation of Service-learning projects offered by CSA and Organization and participation in the social responsibility week and CSA activities of the university. Organization and participation in Social issues drives.  Indirect service: Students can be a part of designing websites, designing presentations, teaching material etc for other teachers or advisers to use.   Research: Students can plan, collect, analyze, and report on issues in particular schools or colleges. Students can engage in action research projects for the benefit of schools or colleges as per the requirement of the institutions.

 CAS experiences can be conducted in collaboration with the Centre for Social Action of the University or they can be done individually, however, the experiences should be done in consultation with the CAS Coordinator/Advisor.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

IBO. (2023). Creativity, Activity, Service: For students graduating in 2017 and after. Author. https://www.ibo.org/contentassets/5895a05412144fe890312bad52b17044/cas-2016-english-1st-final-web.pdf

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

IBO. (2023). Creativity, Activity, Service: For students graduating in 2017 and after. Author. https://www.ibo.org/contentassets/5895a05412144fe890312bad52b17044/cas-2016-english-1st-final-web.pdf

Evaluation Pattern

 

Particulars

Valuator

Marks

CAS Project (minimum one)

CAS Coordinator/Advisor

25

Grades to be awarded based on University norms.

EDU212 - PERSONAL SAFETY EDUCATION (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

This skill enhancement course is offered in the second semester. It is designed to enable preservice teachers to facilitate sessions on life skills and personal safety education for primary, elementary and secondary school students.

Course Objectives

The course will enable the preservice teachers to:

·       explain, discuss and transact the necessary skills and information needed to facilitate sessions on life skills and personal safety education

·       analyse the content related to sexuality, emotions and feelings in children and adolescents from social, biological, and psychological perspectives

.    research and formulate policies in an educational setting

Course Outcome

CO1: Evaluate policies on personal safety education in educational settings

CO2: Examine the language used in personal safety education in educational settings

CO3: Disseminate personal safety education with professionalism

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Unit 1: Building Self Esteem, Self-Respect & Managing Feelings
 

Meaning, importance and formation of self-esteem; body image and self-esteem, the effect of media on self- esteem of children; Gender, identity and indicators of high or low self-esteem; Feelings and emotions - identifying, accepting, managing and expressing; Importance to address: Queer identities and body image dissatisfaction.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Unit 2: Physical Changes in the Body
 

Secondary sexual characteristics, Myths, doubts and facts about the reproductive system; Exploring sexual behaviours and alternate sexuality; Beliefs around the body: empowering v/s disempowering; Sexual Orientations, Gender Identities, Gender Expressions and Sex Characteristics (SOGIESC diversity): Understanding allyship.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Unit 3: Personal Safety
 

Safe and unsafe touch, Body safety rules; Relationship, infatuation, love and consent; Internet Safety, Child sexual abuse, Pedophilia, Sexual violence against children and adults, POCSO Act, Support systems.

Text Books And Reference Books:

American Psychological Association. (2008). Report of the APA Task Force on the sexualization of girls. https://www.apa.org/pi/women/programs/girls/report

Borba, M. (2003). Esteem builders: a K-8 self-esteem curriculum for improving student achievement, behavior and school climate. Jalmar Press.

Enfold Proactive Health Trust. (2021). Demystifying sexuality reference book: Looking at sexuality with a rights-based, restorative and gender transformative lens. http://enfoldindia.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/Demystifying-Sexuality-Reference-Book-by-Enfold-2021.pdf

Khalsa, S. S. (2007). Teaching discipline & self-respect: Effective strategies, anecdotes, and lessons for successful classroom management. Corwin.

Westin, D. C. (2011). Impressions of self: A framework for building self-esteem. Trafford.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Annadurai, A. (2015). A different approach for pedagogical teamwork practices in college classrooms. International Journal of Science and Research, 4(12), 2241-2244.https://www.ijsr.net/archive/v4i12/NOV152512.pdf

Faller, A., Schunke M., & Schunke G. (2007). The human body: An introduction to structure and function. Thieme.

Ministry of Women and Child Development. (2012). The Protection of Children from Sexual Offences Act. https://wcd.nic.in/sites/default/files/POCSO%20Act%2C%202012.pdf

Sechler, J. (2012). Internet safety for kids and young adults. Createspace Independent Pub.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA overall Submission for 50 marks.

The overall CIA will be split as follows:

CIA I - 10

CIA II - 10

CIA III - 10

Attendance  - 5

Class participation  - 5

Final written test - conducted for 25 and converted to 10

EDU221 - EXTENDED ESSAY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:15
No of Lecture Hours/Week:1
Max Marks:25
Credits:1

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This is an ability enhancement compulsory course offered in the second semester. The students will learn the procedural knowledge of writing an extended essay at IBDP and its assessment. Each student will be mentored and guided to have hands-on experiences in analysing and assessing the sample extended essays.

Course Outcome

CO1: Evaluate sample extended essays as per the IB DP Extended Essay assessment criteria

CO2: Demonstrate critical and reflective thinking in evaluating Extended Essays

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Extended Essay
 

Extended Essay: Overview; expectations and timeline for IBDP Extended Essay; Extended Essay at the School of Education; Writing process for IBDP students; Reflection; Samples, navigation, and reading materials; Assessment criteria; Policies related to Extended Essay: Academic integrity, ethical guidelines, animal experimentation policy; Evaluating an Extended Essay.

Text Books And Reference Books:

IBO. (n.d.). International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme Subject Brief Diploma Programme Core: Extended essay.

https://www.ibo.org/contentassets/5895a05412144fe890312bad52b17044/extended-essay-brief-2016-en.pdf

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

IBO. (2023). International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme Subject Brief Diploma Programme Core: Extended essay. https://www.ibo.org/contentassets/5895a05412144fe890312bad52b17044/extended-essay-brief-2016-en.pdf

Evaluation Pattern

As per the EE policy document

EDU222 - THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:15
No of Lecture Hours/Week:1
Max Marks:25
Credits:1

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

This ability enhancement compulsory course, offered in the second semester fosters a critical approach to the sources of human knowledge and encourages students to reflect upon their learning. This is vital if the student is to achieve the objective of becoming an open-minded, creative thinker, equipped for the demands of life-long learning. TOK is a course about critical thinking and inquiring into the process of knowing rather than about learning a specific body of knowledge. TOK and the elective courses should support each other in the sense that they reference each other and share some common goals. Examination of ways of knowing (language, perception, reason and emotion) together with a consideration of areas of knowledge, such as Natural Sciences, Ethics, History and Mathematics. The approach will be cross-curricular and questioning, to perceive links between different elements in the spectrum of knowledge.

 

The course will enable the preservice teachers to:

  • distinguish and make connections among a critical approach to the construction of knowledge, the academic disciplines and the wider world.
  • demonstrate how individuals and communities construct knowledge and how this is critically examined.
  • integrate and reflect on their own beliefs and assumptions, leading to more thoughtful, responsible and purposeful lives.
  • examine how knowledge brings responsibility which leads to commitment and action

Course Outcome

CO1: Critically analyze how knowledge is constructed in various disciplines

CO2: Evaluate the implications of arguments and conclusions

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Theory of Knowledge (TOK)
 

 

Overview of the TOK course; Nature of the subject; Aims; Assessment Objectives; Knowledge questions; Optional Themes; Areas of Knowledge; Introduction to TOK Exhibition; TOK Exhibition Process; IA Prompts; Objects. Assessment of TOK Exhibition; Reflective Process & Writing.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Canfield, J. V. (2016). Philosophy of Meaning, Knowledge and Value in the 20th Century: Routledge History of Philosophy. Retrieved from https://books.google.co.in/books? id=HtmJM0WUUFgC

 

IBO. (2023). Diploma Programme Theory of Knowledge. https://www.ibo.org/programmes/diploma-programme/curriculum/theory-of-knowledge/what-is-tok

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

IBO. (2023). Diploma Programme Theory of Knowledge. https://www.ibo.org/programmes/diploma-programme/curriculum/theory-of-knowledge/what-is-tok

Evaluation Pattern

 

Method of Evaluation  Theory of Knowledge

Theory of Knowledge (TOK): 25 Marks

Class and group participation: 10%

Individual Reflective journal entries:15%

TOK one object group exhibition:10%

TOK two object group exhibition:25%

TOK three object group exhibition:40%

TOK Exhibition = 25 Marks

EDU231 - FUNDAMENTALS OF EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This core course is offered in the second semester.  The course fosters in the students, the School of Education’s Programme Outcome for Research Competence: Apply the knowledge of research in solving social and educational problems. Towards achieving this outcome, the course prepares students to know and understand the fundamental concepts and processes in research methods. Students become familiar with both quantitative and qualitative research methods. Research Ethics is introduced to the students. The course culminates in students writing a manuscript with a view to present at a conference and/or submit to a journal for publication.

 

The course will enable the preservice teachers to:

·         understand the importance of research in solving educational and social problems

·         begin internalizing the research skills

  • make presentations at conferences and publish in journals

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of educational research: methods, approaches and types.

CO2: Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of quantitative methods and tools

CO3: Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of qualitative methods and tools

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
Introduction to Research
 

Research: Definition; Systematic Research process; Research Methods: Deductive, Inductive, and Deductive-Inductive Method; Educational Research: Meaning and Purpose; Approaches to Educational Research: Quantitative, Qualitative, and Mixed-Methods; Research Paradigms: Positivist, Interpretivist/Constructivist, Critical. Purposes of Fundamental/Basic, Applied, and Action Research; Types of Educational Research: Historical, Experimental Research, Descriptive-Quantitative & Descriptive-Qualitative; Research Ethics.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Research Problem and Review of the Literature
 

The Research Problem: 

Finding a research problem in education; researchable and non-researchable problems in education; sources to locate a research problem; evaluating a research problem; 

Selecting and stating the Research Problem. Stating Research Objectives; Stating Research Questions; Stating Directional, Null, and Alternate Hypotheses. 

Review of the Literature in Education: Literature Review: What. Why, When, and How?

Types of Educational Reviews: Conceptual, Empirical, Narrative/Traditional, Systematic, and Meta Analysis; PRISMA; Stating the Rationale and Purpose of the Study with literature-support; reviewing, summarizing and synthesizing literature to support the problem and allied areas of the problem.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Quantitative Research Methods & Tools     
 

Describing the characteristics of the Research Participants; Population, Sample and Sampling Techniques; Primary and Secondary Sources of Data; Conceptualization, operationalization and measurement; Definition and nature of variables; operationally defining variables; Types of variables; formulation of research problems and hypothesis; Different types of hypothesis; Methods of data collection: observational methods, surveys, questionnaires, interviewing methods, case study methods, and psychometric tests; Research Tools: Inventories; Surveys; Likert Scales; Data Analysis: Basics of Descriptive and Inferential Statistics.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Qualitative Research Methods & Tools     
 

Qualitative Research: Characteristics; Researcher Identity, Positionality and Reflexivity; 

Research Paradigms: Positivist, Interpretivist/Constructivist, Critical;

Qualitative Methodologies: Ethnography, Phenomenology, Action Research, Feminist Standpoint Research, Discourse Analysis, Questionnaire Research; 

Qualitative Methods, Their Advantages, & Limitations: Observation; Interviews: Patton’s Typology, Strauss et al.’s typology; Focus group; Case study; Questionnaire; Life history; Document analysis; Qualitative Research Questions; Sampling; Maxwell’s Interactive Model of Research Design; Qualitative Data Recording Methods: Observation Protocols; Interview Protocols; Audio & Video Recording; Qualitative Data Analysis Methods: Coding; Memoing; Validity: Triangulation; Member Checking, & other.

Writing a Research Proposal; Writing Findings, Discussion, Limitations, & Conclusion.

Text Books And Reference Books:

American Psychological Association. (2021). APA style blog. https://apastyle.apa.org/blog

Best, J. W., Kahn, J. V., & Jha, A. K. (2016). Research in education. Pearson. 

Cohen, L. Manion. L & Morrison, K. (2007). Research methods in education. Routledge.  

Creswell, J. W., & Creswell, J. D. (2017). Research design: Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approaches. Sage.

Hedges, L.V. Ashley, L.D. Waring, M. & Coe, R. (2021). Research methods and methodologies in education. Sage Publications.

Lambert, M.  (2019). Practical research methods in education: An early researcher's critical guide. Taylor & Francis.

Pini, B., & Moss, J. (2016). Visual research methods in educational research. Palgrave Macmillan.

Voegtle, K. H., Lodico, M. G., & Spaulding, D. T. (2010). Methods in educational research: From theory to practice. Wiley.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Kumar R. (2005). Research Methodology: A step by step guide for beginners. Pearson.

Denzin, N. K., & Lincoln, Y. S. (2017). The Sage handbook of qualitative research. Sage.

Martin, C., & Polly. D. (2016).  Handbook of research on teacher education and professional development. IGI Global.

Patton, M. Q. (2015). Qualitative research & evaluation methods: Integrating theory and practice (4th ed.). Sage.

Evaluation Pattern
  • Continuous Internal Assessment

    CIA I

    CIA II

    CIA III

    Attendance

    10 marks

    25 marks

    10 marks

    5 marks

    CIA II MSE marks will be reduced to 25 marks.  

    CIA I and CIA III: Continuous Internal Assessment                                                                       

    Continuous Internal Assessment I:                                                                                                    

    CIA I may have one or two components: 

    Written (reports)                                                                

    Group or Individual: Viva Voce or Presentation

     

    Continuous Internal Assessment III:                                                                                            

    The following methods may be adopted: 

    Multiple choice-based tests                                                                                                        

    Practical Activity                                                                                                             

    Presentation/Viva                                                                                                                  

    Group Discussion

    PATTERN OF EVALUATION

    End Semester Exam (ESE)

    50 %

    Mid Semester Exam (CIA II)

    25 %

    Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA I & III)

    25 %

    Total

    100 %

EDU232 - INCLUSIVE EDUCATION (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This is a core course in the second semester. It will help the students in acquiring knowledge of the concept of inclusive education, diversity in the classrooms, and the skills to teach different kinds of learners. Preservice teachers will develop the skills to understand each learner, the strengths and limitations of learners, and transact curriculum considering the needs and nature of the learners. 

The course will enable the preservice teachers to:

·       develop a clear understanding of students with disabilities, their characteristics, and the needs in a general education system

·       identify students with learning difficulties and provide intervention or referral services

·       use formal assessment, and/or prepare informal assessment (Teacher-made tests) to understand the ability level of the students with learning issues in basic academic skills as well as in subject-specific skills

·       demonstrate skills to plan inclusive lesson plans, based on the principles of Universal Design for Learning and Differentiated Instruction, and appropriate teaching-learning materials and implement effectively in the classroom

·       work collaboratively with the school community members, and community to promote inclusive education 

·       demonstrate skills to plan alternative ways of evaluation for students with special needs

Course Outcome

CO1: organise their skills to plan effective learning experiences in both curricular and co-curricular activities, in and outside the classroom, which are based on the existing learning difficulties faced by the students to achieve the objectives of the curriculum

CO2: demonstrate understanding of the ability level of the students with learning issues in basic academic skills as well as in subject-specific skills, use formal and informal assessments, and practice alternative ways of academic evaluation

CO3: apply the policy framework of inclusive education

CO4: critically practice the skills to work collaboratively with the school community members and society to promote inclusive education

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Inclusive Education
 

Concept of Inclusive Education: Meaning, Definition, and historical development of special education services; Labelling; Using person-first language; Changing Practices in Education of Students with Disabilities: Segregation, Integration & Inclusion, Whole School Approach; Diversity in classrooms: Learning Styles, Linguistic & Socio-Cultural Multiplicity; Principles of Inclusive Education: Access, Equity, Relevance, Participation and Empowerment; Barriers to Inclusive Education: Attitudinal, Physical & Instructional

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Facilitating Inclusive Education: Policies and Frameworks
 

International Declarations: Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948), World Declaration for Education for All (1990); International Conventions: Convention against Discrimination (1960), Convention on Rights of a Child (1989), United Nations Convention of Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD) (2006); International Frameworks: Salamanca Framework (1994), Biwako Millennium Framework of Action (2002); 

National Commissions & Policies: Kothari Commission (1964), National Education Policy (1968), National Policy on Education (1986), Revised National Policy of Education (1992), National Curricular Framework (2005), National Policy for Persons with Disabilities (2006), National Education Policy (2020); National Acts & Programs: IEDC (1974), RCI Act (1992), PWD Act (1995), National Trust Act (1999), SSA (2000), RTE (2006), RMSA (2009), IEDSS (2013), RPWD Act (2016)

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Characteristics of Learners with Special Needs
 

Characteristics of students with Sensory Disabilities: Visual Impairment, Hearing Impairment, Speech Impairment, Deaf-blindness; Characteristics of students with Neuro-Developmental Disabilities: Intellectual Disabilities, Autism Spectrum Disorders, Specific Learning Disabilities, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Epilepsy; Characteristics of Students with Locomotor Disabilities: Cerebral Palsy, Muscular Dystrophy; Characteristics of students with multiple disabilities, Gifted Students; Characteristics of students with Mental Health issues: Mental illness, psychosocial issues.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Classroom Management for Successful Inclusive Education
 

Formal and Informal Assessment of academic skills; Disability-Specific Adaptations, Accommodations and Modifications: curriculum adaptation, educational policies & schemes, teaching learning materials; Inclusive Lesson Plans; Universal Design for Learning: Multiple Means of Access, Expression, Engagement & Assessment; Differentiated Instruction: Content, Process, & Product; Peer Mediated Instructions, Remedial teaching:  Individualized Education Program, Strategies for academic skills enhancement; Positive Behaviour Management. Use of Assistive Technologies.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Advocacy & Collaboration for Inclusive Education
 

Collaborative approach: Teachers, Special Educators, Peers, Therapists, Counsellors; Community Involvement for Inclusive Education; Advocacy and Leadership for Inclusion in Education; Role of Special Schools in Inclusive Education; Resource Mobilization for Inclusive Education.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Dash, N. (2022). Inclusive education for children with special needs. Atlantic.

Mangal, S. K. & Mangal, S. (2017). Creating an inclusive school. Shipra.

Sharma, Y. (2021). Inclusive education: Perspectives, praxis and pedagogy. Pearson.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Smith, T. E. C., Polloway, E. A., Patton, J. R., Dowdy, C. A., & Doughty, T. T. (2011). Teaching students with special needs in inclusive settings. PHI Learning.

Evaluation Pattern

Students are evaluated for each course on the basis of Written Examination and Continuous Internal Assessment. Each course carries a maximum of 100 marks, and the pattern of evaluation is as follows:

PATTERN OF EVALUATION

End Semester Exam (ESE)

50 %

Mid Semester Exam (CIA II)

25 %

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA I & III)

25 %

Total

100 %

 

Written Examination

Mid Semester Exam

50 marks (2 Hours)

End Semester Exam

100 marks (3 Hours) 

Mid Semester Exam marks will be taken for Internal Assessment.

The End Semester Exam marks will be reduced to 50 for deciding the promotion criteria. 

 

Continuous Internal Assessment

CIA I

CIA II

CIA III

Attendance

10 marks

25 marks

10 marks

5 marks

CIA II MSE marks will be reduced to 25 marks. 

CIA I and CIA III: Continuous Internal Assessment                                                                      

Continuous Internal Assessment I:                                                                                                   

CIA I may have one or two components:

Written (reports)                                                               

Group or Individual: Viva Voce or Presentation

 

Continuous Internal Assessment III:                                                                                            

The following methods may be adopted:

Multiple choice-based tests                                                                                                       

Practical Activity                                                                                                             

Presentation/Viva                                                                                                                 

Group Discussion

EDU233 - GENDER, SCHOOL AND SOCIETY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:2
Credits:50

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This core course is offered in the second semester. The course has been conceptualized in order to raise critical awareness in the preservice teachers about the gender inequities that exist globally and in India and to critically engage in the discourse on gender socialization, power and knowledge construction. Preservice teachers are introduced to several concepts around gender and feminist theories. While learning about the historical background of social and educational reform movements of the 19th and 20th centuries in India, preservice teachers will also examine gender issues in contemporary Indian curriculum documents and textbooks.

The course envisages teachers as agents of change who would encourage students to reflect on their socialization and critique practices that perpetuate stereotypes and biases. It also intends to enable the preservice teachers to become inclusive in their attitudes, speech, actions, teaching, and assessment of all genders in a nonbinary world.

The course will enable the preservice teachers to:

  • differentiate between sex and gender.
  • describe with examples the concepts of patriarchy, gender roles, gender stereotypes, gender bias, gendered allocation of power, resources and opportunities, gender discrimination.
  • define gender socialization.
  • evaluate gender socialization practices via social institutions that perpetuate gender roles, gender discrimination, gender stereotypes, and gender biases.
  • explain nonbinary genders.
  • evaluate gender representations and reinforcement of gendered images and identities in Indian social institutions-family, religion, caste, education, place of residence, economy and polity.
  • describe the contributions of Indian social and educational reformers of the 19th and 20th centuries
  • critically examine the constitutional provisions for gender equality, gender issues in the curriculum, the construct of gender in the National Curriculum Framework and the National Education Policy 2020.

Course Outcome

CO1: Evaluate gender socialization practices via social institutions that perpetuate gender roles, gender discrimination, gender stereotypes, and gender biases

CO2: Evaluate gender representations and reinforcement of gendered images and identities in social institutions in India

CO3: Critically examine the constitutional provisions for gender equality, gender issues in the curriculum, the construct of gender in the national policies

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Gender: Concepts and Practices
 

Key Concepts in Gender Studies of (X): Sex and Gender; Genders: Males, Females, LGBTQ; Patriarchy, Gender stereotypes, Gender bias; Understanding the diversity and heterogeneity within gender; A Brief Introduction to Feminist Theories: Cultural, Liberal, Marxist, Post-modern, Radical, Psychoanalyst, Socialist; Three waves of Feminism.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Social Construction of Gender