CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

School of Business and Management

Syllabus for
Post Graduate Diploma (International Education)
Academic Year  (2023)

 
1 Semester - 2023 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
IEDU131 INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION Core Courses 5 4 100
IEDU132 CURRICULUM PROCESSES Core Courses 5 4 100
IEDU133 ASSESSMENT AND LEARNING Core Courses 5 4 100
IEDU134 EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY Core Courses 5 4 100
IEDU135 FUNDAMENTALS OF EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH Core Courses 5 4 100
IEDU136 TEACHING AND LEARNING OF SCHOOL SUBJECT Core Courses 5 4 100
2 Semester - 2023 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
IEDU231 PROFESSIONAL LEARNING Core Courses 5 4 100
IEDU232 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN EDUCATION Core Courses 5 4 100
IEDU233 EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT Core Courses 5 4 4
IEDU234 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY IN EDUCATION Core Courses 5 4 100
IEDU281 INTERNSHIP Core Courses 60 8 100
IEDU282 RESEARCH PROJECT Core Courses 4 4 100
    

    

Introduction to Program:

The Post Graduate Diploma in International Education (PGDIE) and the International Baccalaureate Educator Certificate (IBEC) is an academic programmes designed as dual qualifications for students in schools in India and abroad. The International Baccalaureate Organisation (IBO) recognises the PGDIE offered by CHRIST (Deemed to be University) for the issue of an IB Educator Certificate in Teaching and Learning for the Diploma Programme (IBDP)

The PGDIE is a one-year programme, structured to be delivered in a blended mode. It suits students and teachers who wish to enhance their professional qualifications and career prospects. The curriculum is designed to prepare competent and professional educationists who can perform various roles in the field of education. Experienced university professors, IBEN members, IB School coordinators, teachers, and educational leaders will deliver the academic programme.

Programme Outcome/Programme Learning Goals/Programme Learning Outcome:

PO1: Continues learning: Create new skill sets and knowledge which increases the ability and to boost their profile in different areas with extra training.

PO2: ?Research skills: Apply the knowledge of research in solving social and educational problems?

PO3: Adaptability: Understand principles of learning and teaching and adapt these principles to their own practice

PO4: Facilitation: Identify approaches to teaching and learning and create a variety of learning environments? that support student learning and assessment.

PO5: Clarity and comprehensiveness: Possess clarity of thought and clarity in expression; ably articulate with comprehensiveness

PO6: Social awareness and contribution: Reflect on one?s progress as a reflective and collaborative practitioner and articulate a process of integrating new learning into professional behavior.

Programme Specific Outcome:

PSO: Continues learning: Create new skill sets and knowledge which increases the ability and ? to boost their profile in different areas with extra training. ?Research skills: Apply the knowledge of research in solving social and educational problems? Adaptability: Understand principles of learning and teaching and adapt these principles to their own practice Facilitation: Identify approaches to teaching and learning and create a variety of learning environments? that support student learning and assessment. Clarity and comprehensiveness: Possess clarity of thought and clarity in expression; ably articulate with comprehensiveness Social awareness and contribution: Reflect on one?s progress as a reflective and collaborative practitioner and articulate a process of integrating new learning into professional behavior. ?

Programme Educational Objective:

PSO: Programme Objectives Understand the teaching philosophy and mission of IB that draws on international-mindedness. Understand and apply the principles underpinning the IB curriculum in teaching and learning. Understand principles of learning and teaching and apply these principles to their own practice Articulate their own personal theory of learning Design coherent learning activities that focus on planning for active learning and teaching Describe the curriculum components and framework of the DP programme. Articulate IB DP assessment principles and practices. Recognise the important components of DP assessment principles and practices. Analyze the relationship between learning theories, strategies, and styles of teaching and learning in the DP as it relates to a personal teaching philosophy. Identify approaches to teaching and learning at IB DP. Create a variety of teaching methodologies that support student learning in the DP Recognise and apply IB Learner Profile in t
Assesment Pattern

The department follows a pattern of 70 % marks for Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and 30 % marks for End Semester Submission (ESS).
Break up of continuous internal assessment for 4 credit courses is as follows
CIA 1: 30 marks (25 marks submission + Class participation: 5 marks)
CIA 2: 35 Marks (25 marks submission + Class participation: 5 marks+ continuous assessment of  asynchronous submissions :05 marks)The courses which do not follow the above pattern are discussed below:

Method of Evaluation for

HOL111 and 211 (Holistic Education): ESE

IEDU 281 Internship in IB schools[ Internship Handbook]

IEDU 282 Research Project- [Research Project Handbook]

End semester Examination- conducted by the Department

CIA I -Evaluated out of (20/30)CIA II - Evaluated out of (20/35)Total CIAIs there CIA minimum, if yes give the minimum CIAAtt. MarksESE Evaluated out of (50/100)ESE converted to (50/100)Total Marks (Total CIA + Att + ESE)

3035653355030100

Examination And Assesments

Course modules, assignments and assessments, aligned with the philosophy, mission, standards and practices of IB, will prepare students for international education settings. The blended part comprises hybrid teaching, video conferencing, workshops, online presentations and webinars. Workshops led by international and IB facilitators, and university professors are a rich resource for professional learning and networking. The internship in IB schools provides opportunities for the students to observe, interact, learn and teach in IB Schools

Students are evaluated for each course on the basis of Continuous Internal Assessment written submission and viva. Each course carries a maximum of 100 marks

IEDU131 - INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is offered in the first semester. It creates awarenessabout theeducational systems at the national and international levels. This course will help the students in acquiring the knowledge of educational schools of thought. The student teachers will understand the need for developing a sound understanding of philosophical bases of International Baccalaureate education. Students also acquire the knowledge of principles and processes of teaching, learning and current pedagogical practices in the International Baccalaureate education. Educational thoughts of great thinkers and their influence in the society are also discussed to motivate the teacher trainees to reflect about their roles as teachers.

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate the essential knowledge to perform competently as an IB teacher

CO2: Critically reflect on the Indian and western philosophies of education

CO3: Articulate their personal teaching philosophy that draws from evidence-based practices, policies, ethics, international-mindedness, sustainability, and service

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:18
Philosophy and Education
 

Meaning, nature, and scope of education. – at individual level, national level, and global level.Meaning and Functions of Philosophy; Branches of Philosophy: Metaphysics, Epistemology and Axiology; Relationship between Philosophy and Education with respect to teacher, student, curriculum, and teaching.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:18
Introduction to IB Education
 

History of International Baccalaureate; IB key influential educationalists - John Dewey, A.S Neil, Jean Piaget, Jerome Bruner and their key insights contributing to IB. Theories underpinning IB, IB education, IB mission, IB organization. Educational aim of IB.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:24
Understanding IB Education
 

Ten attributes of IB learner profile, IB DP subject groups, Approaches to learning; Approaches to teaching; Academic honesty practices in IB. Conceptual understanding of international mindedness in IB DP. IB DP Policies for learner, IBDP subject guide, IB DP Policies for teacher, IB learner resources, IB teacher resources, IB teacher job Description. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Anand, C.L. (1993). Teacher and education in the emerging Indian society. NCERT.

Badami, B.S., (2007). Philosophical and sociological foundations of education. Vidhyanidhi Publications

Chartock, R. K. (2004). Educational foundations: An anthology (2nd ed.). Pearson.

Ozmon, H. A., & Craver, S. M. (2003). Philosophical foundations of education (7th ed.). Merrill Prentice Hall.

Siegel, H. (2012). The Oxford handbook book of philosophy of education. (1st ed.). Oxford University Press.

Anand, C.L. (1993). Teacher and education in the emerging Indian society. NCERT.

Badami, B.S., (2007). Philosophical and sociological foundations of education. Vidhyanidhi Publications

Chartock, R. K. (2004). Educational foundations: An anthology (2nd ed.). Pearson.

Ozmon, H. A., & Craver, S. M. (2003). Philosophical foundations of education (7th ed.). Merrill Prentice Hall.

Siegel, H. (2012). The Oxford handbook book of philosophy of education. (1st ed.). Oxford University Press.

Anand, C.L. (1993). Teacher and education in the emerging Indian society. NCERT.

Badami, B.S., (2007). Philosophical and sociological foundations of education. Vidhyanidhi Publications

Chartock, R. K. (2004). Educational foundations: An anthology (2nd ed.). Pearson.

Ozmon, H. A., & Craver, S. M. (2003). Philosophical foundations of education (7th ed.).

Merrill Prentice Hall.

Siegel, H. (2012). The Oxford handbook book of philosophy of education. (1st ed.). Oxford University Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Goldman, A. I. (2008). A causal theory of knowing. The Journal of Philosophy, 64(12).  http://www.jstor.org

IB. (n.d). Diploma Years Programme.  https://resources.ibo.org

IB. (2013). IB Learner Profile. http://www.ibo.org

IB. (n.d). Middle Years Programme.  https://resources.ibo.org

IB. (n.d). Primary Years Programme.  https://resources.ibo.org

IB. (2017). The History of the IB.  http://www.ibo.org

IB. (2017). What is an IB education?  http://www.ibo.org

Ozmon, H. A., & Craver, S. M. (2003). Philosophical foundations of education (7th ed.).

Merrill Prentice Hall.

Wiphi Open Access Philosophy. (2016, Feb 26). The Gettier Problem [Video].  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5lB-XJjmvoE

Wiphi Open Access Philosophy. (2016, Feb 26). Introduction to theory of knowledge [Video].  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r_Y3utIeTPg&t=76s

Hrera, S. R. (2012). Approaches to international mindedness in IB world schools. http://www.ibo.org

IB. (2019). Approaches to teaching and learning in the Diploma Programmehttp://resources.ibo.org

IB. (2020). Diploma Programme Assessment Procedures. http://resources.ibo.org

IB. (2013). IB Learner Profile.  http://www.ibo.org

Tomlinson, C., & Imbeau, M. B. (2011). Managing a differentiated classroom: A practical guide. https://www.researchgate.net

Tomlinson, C. (2014). The differentiated classroom: Responding to the needs of all learners. (2nd ed.). ASCD.

Evaluation Pattern

 

Assessment Pattern

The department follows a pattern of 70 % marks for Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and 30 % marks for End Semester Submission (ESS).

Break up of continuous internal assessment for 4 credit courses is as follows

CIA 1: 30 marks (25 marks submission + Class participation: 5 marks)
CIA 2: 35 Marks (25 marks submission + Class participation: 5 marks+ continuous assessment of 

                                                                                                           asynchronous submissions :05 marks)



Class participation : 5 marks

Marks

 

Asynchronous submissions

Marks

Frequency of participation in class

01 marks

90% -100%

05 marks

Quality of comments

01 marks

80% -89%

04 marks

Relevance of contribution to topic under discussion

01 marks

75% - 79%

03 marks

Engagement & Active Participation in breakout rooms

01 marks

70%-74%

02 marks

Arrives prepared at every session

01 mark

60%-69%

01 mark


Attendance: 5 marks

 Attendance Percentage

Marks

95% -100%

05 marks

90% - 94%

04 marks

85% - 89%

03 marks

80% - 84%

02 marks

76% - 79%

01 mark

 

 

 

 

CIA I -Evaluated out of (20/30)

CIA II - Evaluated out of (20/35)

Total CIA

Is there CIA minimum, if yes give the minimum CIA

Att. Marks

ESE Evaluated out of (50/100)

ESE converted to (50/100)

Total Marks (Total CIA + Att + ESE)

30

35

65

33

5

50

30

100

IEDU132 - CURRICULUM PROCESSES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is offered as a core course in the first semester of the programme. It introduces the students to a variety of theoretical perspectives, principles and philosophies in education. It helps the students acquire knowledge on curriculum designs, development and evaluation. It engages the students in practices of international mindedness and inquiry-based learning.

Course Outcome

CO1: Analyse the importance of philosophical, psychological and sociological bases of curriculum construction at the local, national and international contexts.

CO2: Apply and demonstrate curriculum processes in the International Baccalaureate and the principles, stages and criteria of curriculum construction.

CO3: Develop and practice professional competencies in educational settings

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:14
Introduction to Curriculum
 

Meaning and concept of curriculum, aims, objectives, goals and types of curriculum design. Philosophical foundations of the curriculum. Sociological foundations of the curriculum. Psychological foundations of the curriculum.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:22
Introduction to International Curriculum
 

Curriculum framework in International Baccalaureate (IB) programmes: Primary year programme (PYP), Middle year programme (MYP), and Diploma Programme (DP). IB curriculum as a continuum from PYP to DP. IB DP programme standards and practices. Principles of learning underpinning the IB curriculum. Structure of IB curriculum; DP curriculum framework logo, DP subject logo, IB Diploma Programme model and its constituent parts, Core elements of IB curriculum: Extended essay, Theory of Knowledge, Creativity, Activity and Service, Role of subject groups, learner profile attributes, and DP core elements in developing international mindedness. Working with MYIB for DP curriculum related resources. Impact of IB curriculum on student learning. Critiquing the IB curriculum. IB Language policy.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:24
Curriculum Development and Evaluation
 

Principles of Curriculum Construction, Stages, Criteria of curriculum design. Interdisciplinary, trans-disciplinary and multidisciplinary curriculum. Curriculum Development Models. Evaluation an integral part of the Curriculum - Criteria for evaluating curriculum – Models of curriculum evaluation. Instructional design, Principles of instructional design, Types of instructional design.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Batra, P. (2015). Curriculum in India. In W. Pinar (Ed.). Curriculum studies in India: Intellectual histories, present circumstances, (pp. 35-63). Springer. doi: 10.1057/9781137477156_5

Jain, M. (2015). Curriculum studies in India: Colonial roots and postcolonial trajectories. In W. Pinar (Ed.). Curriculum studies in India: Intellectual histories, present circumstances, (pp. 111–139). Springer. doi:10.1057/9781137477156_5                                                              

Mathews, J. (2018). Curriculum exposed. Routledge Stobie, T. (n.d.). Coherence and consistency in international curricula: A study of the International Baccalaureate Diploma and Middle Years Programmes. The SAGE Handbook of Research in International Education,140–151. doi: 10.4135/9781848607866.n13

Ornstein, A. C., & Hunkins, F. P. (1998). Curriculum: Foundations, principles, and issues. Allyn and Bacon.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Avinash, C. (2006). Curriculum development and evaluation in education. New Delhi: Sterling Publishers 

Benscoter, W. J., King, G.M., King, M., & King, S. B. (2015). An overview of instructional design. In W. J. Rothwell, G.M. Benscoter, M. King, & S. B. King. Mastering the Instructional Design Process (pp. 1-16). doi: 10.1002/9781119176589.ch19.

Harlacher, J. E., Sakelaris, T. L., & Kattelman, N. M. (2013). What is curriculum-based evaluation? In J. E. Harlacher, T. L. Sakelaris, & N. M. Kattelman (Eds.), Practitioner’s Guide to Curriculum-Based Evaluation in Reading (pp. 47–61). Springer Science & Business Media. doi: 10.1007/978-1-4614-9360-0_4

Jurowski, C. (2002). BEST think tanks and the development of curriculum modules for teaching sustainability principles. Journal of Sustainable Tourism, 10(6), 536–545. doi: 10.1080/09669580208667186

Lam, T. S. J. (2012). Curriculum evaluation. In S. S. Yeung, J. T. Lam, A. W. Leung, & Y. C., Lo (Eds.), Curriculum change and innovation. Curriculum change and innovation (pp. 189-214). Hong Kong University Press. doi: 10.5790/hongkong/9789888139026.003.0008

NCERT. (2014). Curriculum in transaction.  https://www.ncert.nic.in/departments/nie/dtee/activities/pdf/syllabus_bed.pdf

Rothwell, W. J., Benscoter, G.M., King, M., & King, S. B. (2015). Planning and managing instructional design projects. In W. J. Rothwell, G.M. Benscoter, M. King, & S. B. King. (pp. 334–340). Mastering the Instructional Design Process. Wiley.

Wiggins, G., & McTighe, J. (2005). Understanding by design (2nd ed.). ASCD. 

Evaluation Pattern

 

Assessment Pattern

The department follows a pattern of 70 % marks for Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and 30 % marks for End Semester Submission (ESS).

Break up of continuous internal assessment for 4 credit courses is as follows

CIA 1: 30 marks (25 marks submission + Class participation: 5 marks)
CIA 2: 35 Marks (25 marks submission + Class participation: 5 marks+ continuous assessment of 

                                                                                                           asynchronous submissions :05 marks)



Class participation : 5 marks

Marks

 

Asynchronous submissions

Marks

Frequency of participation in class

01 marks

90% -100%

05 marks

Quality of comments

01 marks

80% -89%

04 marks

Relevance of contribution to topic under discussion

01 marks

75% - 79%

03 marks

Engagement & Active Participation in breakout rooms

01 marks

70%-74%

02 marks

Arrives prepared at every session

01 mark

60%-69%

01 mark


Attendance: 5 marks

 Attendance Percentage

Marks

95% -100%

05 marks

90% - 94%

04 marks

85% - 89%

03 marks

80% - 84%

02 marks

76% - 79%

01 mark

 

CIA I -Evaluated out of (20/30)

CIA II - Evaluated out of (20/35)

Total CIA

Is there CIA minimum, if yes give the minimum CIA

Att. Marks

ESE Evaluated out of (50/100)

ESE converted to (50/100)

Total Marks (Total CIA + Att + ESE)

30

35

65

33

5

50

30

100

IEDU133 - ASSESSMENT AND LEARNING (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This core course is offered in the first semester. It brings out the relationship between teaching, learning and assessment. It creates an understanding on the assessment of learners' understanding. It trains the trainee teacher in numerous ways of formative and summative assessments with respect to the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme. Furthermore, the student teacher would gain knowledge and computations skills of basic descriptive statistics needed for analysis of assessments

Course Outcome

CO1: Describe the fundamental concepts and practices of educational assessment in national and international schools.

CO2: Develop skills and competencies in constructing and using various assessment of TOK, EE, CAS.

CO3: Evaluate the assessment tools and competencies in constructing and using rubrics and tests

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Fundamental Concepts of Assessments
 

Measurement and Evaluation, Principles of assessment, Assessment for learning, Assessment as learning, and assessment of learning, Formative assessment, Summative assessment, Norm referenced testing, Criterion referenced testing, Internal assessment, External assessment. Assessment based on Bloom’s taxonomy, Peer Assessment, Performance Assessment- GRASPS model.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Designing Assessment Tasks and Feedback
 

Class quiz: Worksheet, Home assignment. Rubrics: meaning, types, and construction. Assessment Portfolios, Using technological tools for assessment: Feedback Practices at IB,

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:26
Assessment in International Baccalaureate Education
 

Concept, Construction, and uses of Teacher made Test (Module test in IB), Assessment of TOK exhibition, Extended essay assessment rubric, EE viva voce, EE grading using sample EE. Academic honesty in assessment. Maximum and minimum points for IB Course certificate, non-regular IB diploma, and IB Diploma certificate. CAS experience authenticating procedure. Subject wise internal and external assessment ratios and points. Subject wise Mark boundaries. Assessment of students for whom language of instruction is not their mother tongue, Assessment of special educational needs students, Subject wise Summative assessment for standard and Higher levels. IB examination regulations.

Text Books And Reference Books:

American Psychological Association. (2022). Style & Grammar Guidelines. https://apastyle.apa.org/style-grammar-guidelines/

Black, P., & William, D. (2010). Inside the black box: Raising standards through classroom assessment. Kappan Magazine, 92(1), 81-90. 

Brookhart, S. M. (2008). Feedback that fits. http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.454.9500&rep=rep1&type=pdf

Cambridge Assessment International Education. (n. d.). Getting started with Assessment for Learning. https://cambridge-community.org.uk/professional-development/gswafl/index.html#afl-checklist-6891

IRIS Center. (2022). What is differentiated instruction? Retrieved from https://iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/module/di/cresource/q1/p01/

Ministry of Education. (2020). National Education Policy. https://www.mhrd.gov.in/sites/upload_files/mhrd/files/NEP_Final_English_0.pdf

Mueller, J. (2016). Authentic Assessment toolbox. http://jfmueller.faculty.noctrl.edu/toolbox/index.htm

Reynolds, C. R., Livingston, R. B., Willson, V., & Jha, K. A. (2017). Measurement and assessment in education, (2nd ed.). Pearson.

University of Reading. (n.d.). Engage in assessment: Using technology. https://www.reading.ac.uk/engageinassessment/using-technology/eia-using-technology.aspx 

Vanderbilt University. (2022). Understanding by Design. https://cft.vanderbilt.edu/guides-sub-pages/understanding-by-design/

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Aggarwal, J.C. (2003). Essentials of examination system evaluation tests and measurement. Vikas Publishing House. 

CAST. (2022). About Universal Design for Learning. Retrieved from https://www.cast.org/impact/universal-design-for-learning-udl

Hattie, J. (2009). Visible learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. Routledge.

IB. (2020). Diploma Programme Assessment Procedures. http://resources.ibo.org

Wagner, T. (2010). The global achievement gap. Basic Books.

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Rules:

Assessment is based on the performance of the student throughout the semester.

Courses with 60 theory hours per semester earn 4 credits.

B. Examinations and Assessments

Assessment Pattern of Theory papers

The department follows a pattern of 70 % marks for Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and 30 % marks for End Semester Submission (ESS).

Break up of continuous internal assessment for 4 credit courses is as follows

CIA 1: 30 marks (25 marks submission + Class participation: 5 marks)
CIA 2: 35 Marks (25 marks submission + Class participation: 5 marks+ continuous assessment of

                                                                                                           asynchronous submissions :05 marks)

 

 

Class participation : 5 marks

Marks

 

Asynchronous submissions

Marks

Frequency of participation in class

01 marks

90% -100%

05 marks

Quality of comments

01 marks

80% -89%

04 marks

Relevance of contribution to topic under discussion

01 marks

75% - 79%

03 marks

Engagement & Active Participation in breakout rooms

01 marks

70%-74%

02 marks

Arrives prepared at every session

01 mark

60%-69%

01 mark


Attendance: 5 marks

 Attendance Percentage

Marks

95% -100%

05 marks

90% - 94%

04 marks

85% - 89%

03 marks

80% - 84%

02 marks

76% - 79%

01 mark

 

 

 

 

CIA I -Evaluated out of (20/30)

CIA II - Evaluated out of (20/35)

Total CIA

Is there CIA minimum, if yes give the minimum CIA

Att. Marks

ESE Evaluated out of (50/100)

ESE converted to (50/100)

Total Marks (Total CIA + Att + ESE)

30

35

65

33

5

50

30

100

IEDU134 - EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

This core course establishes the importance of educational psychology to understand the development of learners—physical, cognitive, social-emotional, and moral. The course will enable the in-service teachers to take appropriate curricular decisions. The course provides in-service teachers with the vocabulary to discuss their academic experiences.

With the focus of the course on topics such as individual differences, intelligence, attention, memory, motivation, the objective of the course is to enable in-service teachers to use these as a basis to effectively plan their lessons for the learners in the class, teach, manage, and assess the students.

Course Objectives

The course will enable the in-service teachers to:

describe the various developmental characteristics of adolescents

- apply the different views of learning suitably to the contexts

- understand individual learner differences to suitably plan lessons, teach, and assess

Course Outcome

CO1: describe the various developmental characteristics of adolescents.

CO2: apply the different views of learning suitably to the contexts

CO3: apply the concepts in motivation suitably to the contexts

CO4: demonstrate that planning lessons, teaching, and assessing are based on an understanding of the learner

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Unit 1: Introduction to: Educational Psychology, Development, Teaching and Learning
 

The role of educational psychology; linking educational psychology and teaching; educational psychology and research-based applications to learning; neuroscience, learning, and teaching; understanding the learners; relationship of understanding the learners to correspondingly plan teaching and assessment strategies; overview of the top 20 principles from psychology applicable for PreK–12 teaching and learning.

General principles of development; nature versus nurture; continuity versus discontinuity; timing: critical versus sensitive periods.

Physical Development: Physical development in the adolescent years; challenges in physical development: obesity; eating disorders; guidelines for supporting positive body images in adolescents.

Cognitive Development:

Piaget’s theory of cognitive development; guidelines for teaching students in the concrete-operational and formal operational stages; Vygotsky’s sociocultural theory of cognitive development; implications of Piaget’s and Vygotsky’s theories for teachers.

Social-Emotional Development:

Identity and self-concept; Erikson: stages of psychosocial development; guidelines for supporting identity formation; self-concept; social-emotional development: self-awareness and self-management; social awareness; relationship skills; responsible decision making; guidelines for promoting social-emotional development in adolescents; guidelines to help adolescents who are in trauma or have post-traumatic stress disorder.

Moral Development: Piaget’s theory of moral development; Kohlberg’s theory of moral development; Carol Gilligan’s morality of caring framework; adolescents and primary emotions linked with moral development: guilt, shame, empathy, and sympathy; moral behaviour and cheating; guidelines for supporting positive emotions in adolescents.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:30
Unit 2: Learning and Motivation
 

Behaviourist Views:Classical conditioning; operant conditioning; current applications: functional behavioral assessment, positive behavior supports, and self-management;

Social-Cognitivist View: Bandura’s challenge and observational learning; modelling.

Cognitivist Views: The role of attention; attention and multitasking; the brain and cognitive learning: the importance of knowledge in cognition; general and specific knowledge: declarative, procedural, and self-regulatory knowledge; memory stores: sensory memory, working memory, long-term memory; information processing and the model of human memory; teaching for deeper learning; reducing cognitive load; retaining information; learning loss; learning strategies.

Motivation: Four approaches to motivation; Behavioral: Skinner; rewards and punishers;

Humanistic: Maslow; self-esteem, self-fulfillment, self-determination; guidelines for supporting self-determination and autonomy; Cognitive: Weiner; attribution; beliefs about knowledge, ability, and self-worth; students who show learned helplessness; mastery-oriented students; failure-avoiding students; failure-accepting students; guidelines for encouraging self-worth; beliefs about ability: Carol Dweck's growth and fixed mindset; guidelines for developing a growth mindset; Social-Cognitive: Bandura; goals, expectations, intentions, self-efficacy; guidelines for encouraging self-efficacy; supporting emotional self-regulation; Duckworth; developing grit; guidelines for building on students’ interests and curiosity; guidelines for coping with anxiety.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Unit 3: Addressing Learner Differences 10 Hours
 

Learning styles; myths about the sensory modality of learning styles; myths about the relationship between learning styles and teaching styles; Howard Gardner’s theory of multiple intelligences; myths about the applications of Gardner’s theory of multiple intelligences; difference between learning styles and multiple intelligences; Sternberg’s triarchic theory of intelligence

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Aggarwal, J. C. (2006). Psychology of learning and development. Shipra. 

American Psychological Association. (2021). Top 20 principles for Pre-K to 12 education. https://www.apa.org/ed/schools/teaching-learning/top-twenty/principles

Mangal, S. K. (2013). Advanced Educational Psychology. Prentice Hall.                    

Somashekar, T. V. (2006). Educational Psychology. Nirmala Prakashana.

Woolfolk, A., & Kapur, P. (2019). Educational Psychology. Pearson.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Csikszentmihalyi, M. (2008). Flow: The psychology of optimal experience. Harper Perennial Modern Classics.

Csikszentmihalyi, M. (2013). Creativity: The psychology of discovery and invention. Harper Perennial Modern Classics.

Duckworth, A. L. (2013). Grit: The power of passion and perseverance. Scribner. 

Dweck, C. (2017). Mindset-updated edition: Changing the way you think to fulfil your potential. Hachette.

Gardner, H. E. (2000). Intelligence reframed: Multiple intelligences for the 21st century. Hachette.

Sharma, R. N., & Sharma, R. K. (2006). Advanced Educational Psychology. Atlantic Publishers.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1: 30 marks (25 marks submission + Class participation: 5 marks)

CIA 2: 35 Marks (25 marks submission + Class participation: 5 marks+ continuous assessment of

asynchronous submissions :05 marks)

CIA I -Evaluated out of (20/30)

CIA II - Evaluated out of (20/35)

Total CIA

Is there CIA minimum, if yes give the minimum CIA

Att. Marks

ESE Evaluated out of (50/100)

ESE converted to (50/100)

Total Marks (Total CIA + Att + ESE)

30

35

65

33

5

50

30

100

IEDU135 - FUNDAMENTALS OF EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This core course is offered in the first semester. The students learn about the underlying purposes of research in general, and specifically about the nature and purposes of action research. They will understand the models of action research; the stages in the action research process; plan an action research: identify a topic, review the literature; develop the research: formulate research questions, design quantitative or qualitative, or mixed methods research; comply with the research ethics protocols; collect and analyse data; reflect upon the interpretation of the data and conclusion; and, based on the reflection, formulate a plan of action for the future. The students must understand the action research processes to write an action research proposal, stemming from a situation from their own classes or school; and they will carry out their proposal as an action research project in the following semester. The students are required to keep in mind that engaging in meaningful research henceforth in their professional careers is a must to enhance their educational practice and professional development.

Course Outcome

CO1: Identify a classroom-based action research problem to systematically inquire using the research process.

CO2: Use a suitable research design to systematically inquire the classroom-based action research

CO3: Apply the necessary knowledge and skills to design and conduct classroom-based action research in order to make their instructional practices more effective and in writing a research proposal

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:4
Introduction to Action Research
 

Introduction to Action Research; The Importance of Action Research; Applications of Action Research; Rigour in Action Research; Models of Action Research

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:4
Overview of the Action Research Process
 

Stages and Steps in Action Research; The Planning Stage; The Acting Stage; The Developing Stage; The Reflecting Stage

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:4
Planning for Action Research and Reviewing Related Literature
 

Identifying a Topic for Research; Gathering Preliminary Information; Reviewing the Related Literature; Writing an action research proposal based on the topics in the module

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:4
Developing a Research Plan
 

Research Questions; Hypotheses; Basic Research Designs; Ethical Considerations in Research; Writing an action research proposal based on the topics in the module

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Data Collection and Analysis: Quantitative Methods
 

Quantitative Data Collection and Analysis Techniques; Writing an action research proposal based on the topics in the module

 

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:12
Data Collection and Analysis: Qualitative Methods
 

Qualitative Data Collection and Analysis Techniques; Writing an action research proposal based on the topics in the module

 

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:4
Developing an Action Plan
 

Developing Action Plans, Levels of Action Plans, Action Planning: A Time for Reflection, Conducting Action Research; Writing an action research proposal based on the topics in the module

 

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:16
Writing an Action Research Report; Sharing and Reflecting
 

Conventions of Academic Writing; A Word About Ethics When Writing Research Reports;  Practical Guidelines for Writing; Communicating the Results of Action Research;  Reflecting on the Action Research Process; Writing an action research proposal based on the topics in the module

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

American Psychological Association. (2023). Style and grammar guidelines. https://apastyle.apa.org/style-grammar-guidelines

Best, J. W., & Kahn, J. V. (2003). Research in education. Prentice-Hall of India.

Costello, P. J. M. (2003). Action research. Continuum.

Khandai, H. K. (2004). Action research in education and adult education. Associated Press.

McAteer, M. (2013). Action research in education. Sage.

Mertler, C. A. (2014). Action research: Improving schools and empowering educators. Sage.

Raghavan, N. (2016). The reflective teacher: Case studies of action research. Orient Blackswan.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Cohen, L. Manion. L & Morrison, K. (2007). Research Methods in Education. Routledge.

Creswell, J. W., & Creswell, J. D. (2017). Research design: Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approaches. Sage.

Denzin, N. K., & Lincoln, Y. S. (2017). The Sage handbook of qualitative research. Sage.

 

Edyta. (2018). Using action research to teach responsively. https://blogs.ibo.org/sharingpyp/2018/10/16/using-action-research-to-teach-responsively

 

Harvard University. (2022). Design Thinking in Education. https://tll.gse.harvard.edu/design-thinking

 

IBO. (2022). International Baccalaureate. https://www.ibo.org/programmes/diploma-programme/curriculum/extended-essay

IBO. (2020). International Baccalaureate. https://www.ibo.org/contentassets/b580b1ecf81f4093813fb21fd53e2363/annotated-bibliography-research-2020.pdf

Kumar R. (2005). Research Methodology: A step by step guide for beginners. Pearson.

 

Patton, M. Q. (2015). Qualitative research & evaluation methods: Integrating theory and practice (4th ed.). Sage.

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Policy:
Assessment is based on the performance of the student throughout the semester.
Courses with 60 theory hours per semester earn 4 credits.

Assessment Pattern of Theory Papers
The department follows a pattern of 70 % marks for Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and 30 % marks for End Semester Submission (ESS)
Break up of continuous internal assessment is as follows:
CIA 1: 30 marks (25 marks submission + Class participation: 5 marks)
CIA 2: 35 Marks (25 marks submission + Class participation: 5 marks + continuous assessment of asynchronous submissions: 5 marks)

Asynchronous Submissions:
90% -100%: 05 marks
80% -89%: 04 marks
75% - 79%: 03 marks
70%-74%: 02 marks
60-69%: 01 mark

Attendance: 5 marks
Attendance Percentage & Marks
95% -100%: 05 marks
90% - 94%: 04 marks
85% - 89%: 03 marks
80% - 84%: 02 marks
76% - 79%: 01 mark

CIA I: Evaluated out of 30
CIA II: Evaluated out of 35
Total CIA: 65
Minimum CIA: 33
Attendance Marks: 5
ESE: Evaluated out of 50
ESE converted to 30
Total Marks (Total CIA + Attendance + ESE) =100

IEDU136 - TEACHING AND LEARNING OF SCHOOL SUBJECT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course introduces students to the aims and objectives of teaching School subject at national and international schools. It introduces the essential elements of School subject teaching and practice needed to teach School subject in an effective and inspirational manner. It develops the skills and competencies required for a School subject teacher to teach School subject in the global context.

Course Outcome

CO1: Apply the underpinning principles of teaching and learning in school subjects.

CO2: Develop Course outlines, Unit plans, and Lesson plans

CO3: Apply approaches to teaching (ATT) and approaches to learning (ATL) in teaching and learning of school subjects

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:18
Setting goals and purpose of Teaching and Learning in School subject
 

Relationship of Inquiry, action, and reflection. Setting up of purpose of a School subject Module: transferable goals, content, skills, application:  Bloom’s and Anderson’s Taxonomy of thinking for teaching and learning, Command terms for setting objectives.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:17
Effective Planning for Teaching and Learning in School subject
 

Lesson Plan: Meaning and importance; Templates and construction of Lesson plan (PYP,MYP and DP), IB course outline;, IB Module unit Plan: Templates and construction,

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:25
Introduction to Teaching School subject in a global classroom
 

Approaches to teaching (ATT) and Approaches to learning (ATL), Inquiry based teaching and learning: Structured inquiry, Guided inquiry, Open inquiry (Staver and Bay ,1987), Differentiated teaching strategies, Theory of Knowledge in School subject teaching; Role of a teacher in theory of knowledge; Stimulate, Facilitate, and Guide. Constructing Linking the learner profile in School subject class.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Bergmann, J. and Sams, A. 2012. Flip your classroom: Reach every student in every class every day. International Society for Technology in Education.

CASEL. 2013. “Social and Emotional Core Competencies”. http://www.casel.org/social-and-emotionallearning/core-competencies.

Chambers, R, Lo, BCY and Allen, NB. 2008. “The impact of intensive mindfulness training on attentional control, cognitive style, and affect”. Cognitive Therapy and Research. Volume 32, number 3. Pp 303–322.

Costa, AL and Kallick, B (eds). 2009. Habits of mind across the curriculum: Practical and creative strategies for teachers. Alexandria, Virginia, USA. ASCD.

Erickson, L. 2012. Concept-based teaching and learning. IB Position Paper. 

Erozkan, A. 2013. “The effect of communication skills and interpersonal problem solving skills on social efficacy”. Educational Sciences: Theory and Practice. Vol 13, number 2. Pp 739–745.

Homer, Bowen-Jones.(2014). IB Physics Course Book 2014 edition: The only DP resources a developed with the IB. Oxford University Press

International Baccalaureate, What is an IB education? August 2013.

Kirk, Tim. (2014) Physics Study Guide 2014 edition: Oxford IB Diploma Programme. Oxford university press.

Lai, ER. 2011. “Collaboration: A Literature Review Research Report”. http://images.pearsonassessments.com/images/tmrs/Collaboration-Review.pdf Retrieved 23 May 2013.

McKinney, P. 2014. “Information Literacy and Inquiry Based Learning: Evaluation of a Five-Year Programme of Curriculum Development”. Journal of Librarianship and Information Science. Vol 46. PP. 148-166 .

Perkins, D. 2010. Making Learning Whole. San Francisco, California, USA. Jossey-Bass. 

Puentedura, R. 2013, SAMR: A Contextualised Introduction (accessed online at http://www.hippasus.com/rrpweblog/archives/2013/10/25/SAMRAContextualizedIntroduction.pdf)

Ribble, M. 2011. Digital Citizenship in Schools (second edition). Washington, DC, USA. International Society for Technology in Education.

Tilke, A. 2011. The International Baccalaureate Diploma Program and the School Library: Inquiry-Based Education. Santa Barbara, California, USA. ABC-CLIO, LLC.

Wiggins, A. 2011. Spider web. http://alexiswiggins.pbworks.com and http://www.authenticeducation.org/alexis. Retrieved 22 May 2013.

Wiggins, G. and McTighe, J. 2011. Understanding by Design® Guide to Creating High Quality Modules. Alexandria, VA. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ACSD)

Wiliam, D. 2011. Embedded Formative Assessment. Bloomington, Indiana, USA. Solution Tree Press.

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Adie, L, van der Kleij, F and Cumming, J. 2018. “The Development and Application of Coding Frameworks to

Explore Dialogic Feedback Interactions and Self‐regulated Learning”. British Educational Research Journal.

Vol 44, number 4. Pp 704–723.

Anderson, LW, Bloom, BS and Krathwohl, D. 2001. A Taxonomy for Learning, Teaching, and Assessing: A

Revision of Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives. New York, USA. Addison Wesley Longman.

Black, P and Wiliam, D. 2018. “Classroom Assessment and Pedagogy”. Assessment in Education: Principles,

Policy & Practice Vol 25, number 6. Pp 551–575.

Evaluation Pattern

 

Assessment Pattern

The department follows a pattern of 70 % marks for Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and 30 % marks for End Semester Submission (ESS).

Break up of continuous internal assessment for 4 credit courses is as follows

CIA 1: 30 marks (25 marks submission + Class participation: 5 marks)
CIA 2: 35 Marks (25 marks submission + Class participation: 5 marks+ continuous assessment of 

                                                                                                           asynchronous submissions :05 marks)



Class participation : 5 marks

Marks

 

Asynchronous submissions

Marks

Frequency of participation in class

01 marks

90% -100%

05 marks

Quality of comments

01 marks

80% -89%

04 marks

Relevance of contribution to topic under discussion

01 marks

75% - 79%

03 marks

Engagement & Active Participation in breakout rooms

01 marks

70%-74%

02 marks

Arrives prepared at every session

01 mark

60%-69%

01 mark


Attendance: 5 marks

 Attendance Percentage

Marks

95% -100%

05 marks

90% - 94%

04 marks

85% - 89%

03 marks

80% - 84%

02 marks

76% - 79%

01 mark

 

CIA I -Evaluated out of (20/30)

CIA II - Evaluated out of (20/35)

Total CIA

Is there CIA minimum, if yes give the minimum CIA

Att. Marks

ESE Evaluated out of (50/100)

ESE converted to (50/100)

Total Marks (Total CIA + Att + ESE)

30

35

65

33

5

50

30

100

IEDU231 - PROFESSIONAL LEARNING (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course purports to prepare a professional teacher. Teacher agency is vital to being a professional teacher. Students will know how to analyze their professional needs, the avenues available for developing professionally, how to communicate, grow and thrive in professional learning commModuleies, research, evaluate and reflect on furthering one’s continuous professional development.

Course Outcome

CO1: Create a professional development plan based on self-analysis of one?s approaches to teaching

CO2: Demonstrate teacher professional behaviour in the classroom, during field experiences, and as in-service teachers.

CO3: Internalize the professional behaviour expected of professional teachers.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:18
Introduction to Professional Development
 

Concept of Profession, Professionalism, and Professional development. Professional development; linear and non-linear, teaching as a profession, Teacher agency, Need for Professional development, Types of professional development programmes. Compulsory Professional development - NEP 2020, Self-directed professional development, continuing Professional development. Support for Professional development.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
National and International Perspectives of TPD
 

National Professional standards for teachers (NPST-NEP 2020), Education in a VUCA world and its implications for teacher education; 21st Century skills and competencies – UNESCO. Code of Professional Ethics, Teachers Oath. Sources for PDPs, School quality assessment and assurance framework (SQAA). Assessment in Teacher Professional development.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:22
Teacher as a Reflective Practitioner: Skills-Development
 

Need for reflection. Process of reflection. Barriers to reflection. Reflective writing; Writing a teaching philosophy statement; creating an e-teaching portfolio, Listening: Types; barriers; improving Listening skills. Speaking: With students, colleagues, administrators, and parents; speech; talk; presentations; engaging in informal dialogue with peers on how to improve teaching. Reading: Professional literature, journals, magazines; reading habit for teachers. Writing: writing for practitioner journals/magazines

Text Books And Reference Books:

Creswell, J. W., & Creswell, J. D. (2017). Research design: Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approaches. Sage.

Ministry of Education. (2020). National Education Policy.https://www.mhrd.gov.in/sites/upload_files/mhrd/files/NEP_Final_English_0.pdf

Priestley, M., Biesta, G.J.J. & Robinson, S. (2015). Teacher agency: what is it and why does it matter? In R. Kneyber & J. Evers (Eds.), Flip the system: Changing education from the bottom up, (pp. 134-148). Routledge.

Schön, D. A. (1987). Educating the reflective practitioner: Toward a new design for teaching and learning in the professions. Jossey-Bass.

Silver, F. (2018). Why is it important for teachers to have good communication skills? https://work.chron.com/important-teachers-good-communication-skills-10512.html

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

ACS Distance Education. (2021). Listening. https://www.acs.edu.au/info/education/trends-opinions/listening-skills.aspx

Aguilar, E. (2013). 10 ways to cultivate a love of reading in students. https://www.edutopia.org/blog/cultivating-love-reading-students-elena-aguilar

 Andrade, D. (n.d.). The importance of communication in education.http://www.techlearning.com/blogentry/8716

 Australian Council of Professions. (n.d.). What is a profession? https://www.professions.org.au/what-is-a-professional/

 Beaton, G. (2010). Why professionalism is still relevant. https://www.professions.org.au/wp-content/uploads/Why_Professionalism_is_still_Relevant_Beaton.pdf

Brookfield, S. (1998). Critically reflective practice. Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions, 18(4), 197-205.

Calvert, L. (2016). The power of teacher agency. The Learning Professional, 37(2), 51-56.

Cambridge Assessment International Education. (n.d.). Getting started with reflective practice. https://www.cambridge-commModuley.org.uk/professional-development/gswrp/index.html

 Centre for Teacher Accreditation. (2018). CENTA standards.https://mycentacertificationsubmissions.nyc3.digitaloceanspaces.com/CENTA_Standards_v3.0.pdf

 Cox. J. (2019).  6 traits of writing: Characteristics, definitions, and activities for each component.https://www.thoughtco.com/six-traits-of-writing-2081681

 Cox, J. C. (2020).  4 teaching philosophy statement examples: Develop your own teaching philosophy.https://www.thoughtco.com/teaching-philosophy-examples-2081517

Creswell, J. W., & Creswell, J. D. (2017). Research design: Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approaches. Sage.

 Darling-Hammond, L., Hyler, M. E., Gardner, M. (2017).Effective teacher professional development.https://learningpolicyinstitute.org/product/effective-teacher-professional-development-report

Dewey, J. (1997). How we think. Courier. https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/37423

Grant, C., & Zeichner, K. (1984). On becoming a reflective teacher. In C. Grant (Ed.), Preparing for reflective teaching: A book of readings, (pp. 1-9). Allyn & Bacon.

 Havighurst, R. J. (2020). Teaching. Encyclopedia Britannica.https://www.britannica.com/topic/teaching

 Impedova, M. A. (2021). Identity and teacher professional development: A reflective, collaborative and agentive learning journey. Springer Briefs in Education.

 Kolb, D. A. (1984). The process of experiential learning. Experiential learning: experience as the source of learning and development. In D. Kolb (Ed.), The experiential learning: Experience as the source of learning and development. (pp. 20-38). Prentice-Hall.https://learningfromexperience.com/research-library/the-process-of-experiential-learning

Ministry of Education. (2020). National Education Policy.https://www.mhrd.gov.in/sites/upload_files/mhrd/files/NEP_Final_English_0.pdf

Moon, J. (2001). PDP working paper 4: Reflection in higher education learning. Higher Education Academy, 1-25.

Muste, D. (2016). The role of communication skills in teaching process. In Selection and peer-review under responsibility of the Organizing Committee of the conference. The European Proceedings of Behavioral and Social Sciences.

 National Board for Professional Teaching Standards. (2021). Early adolescence general standards. https://www.nbpts.org/wp-content/uploads/EA_Gen_2Ed.pdf

Patton, M. Q. (2002). Qualitative research and evaluation methods. Sage.

 Patton, M. Q. (2015). Qualitative research & evaluation methods: Integrating theory and practice (4th ed.). Sage.

Priestley, M., Biesta, G.J.J. & Robinson, S. (2015). Teacher agency: what is it and why does it matter? In R. Kneyber & J. Evers (Eds.), Flip the system: Changing education from the bottom up, (pp. 134-148). Routledge.

Professional Standards Council. (n.d.). What is a profession? https://www.psc.gov.au/what-is-a-profession

Raghavan, N. (2015). The reflective teacher: Case studies of action research. Orient BlackSwan.

Reading Horizons. (2013). 7 ways teachers' reading habits influence students' reading habits.https://www.readinghorizons.com/blog/post/2013/02/04/Love-of-Reading-Makes-You-a-Better-Teacher-of-Reading

Schön, D. A. (1987). Educating the reflective practitioner: Toward a new design for teaching and learning in the professions. Jossey-Bass.

Silver, F. (2018). Why is it important for teachers to have good communication skills?https://work.chron.com/important-teachers-good-communication-skills-10512.html

 Victoria State Government. (2021). Annual teacher audit. https://www.vit.vic.edu.au/professional-responsibilities/for-teacher/annual-teacher-audit

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Rules:

Assessment is based on the performance of the student throughout the semester.

Courses with 60 theory hours per semester earn 4 credits.

B. Examinations and Assessments

Assessment Pattern of Theory papers

The department follows a pattern of 70 % marks for Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and 30 % marks for End Semester Submission (ESS).

Break up of continuous internal assessment for 4 credit courses is as follows

CIA 1: 30 marks (25 marks submission + Class participation: 5 marks)
CIA 2: 35 Marks (25 marks submission + Class participation: 5 marks+ continuous assessment of

                                                                                                           asynchronous submissions :05 marks)

 

 

Class participation : 5 marks

Marks

 

Asynchronous submissions

Marks

Frequency of participation in class

01 marks

90% -100%

05 marks

Quality of comments

01 marks

80% -89%

04 marks

Relevance of contribution to topic under discussion

01 marks

75% - 79%

03 marks

Engagement & Active Participation in breakout rooms

01 marks

70%-74%

02 marks

Arrives prepared at every session

01 mark

60%-69%

01 mark


Attendance: 5 marks

 Attendance Percentage

Marks

95% -100%

05 marks

90% - 94%

04 marks

85% - 89%

03 marks

80% - 84%

02 marks

76% - 79%

01 mark

 

 

 

 

CIA I -Evaluated out of (20/30)

CIA II - Evaluated out of (20/35)

Total CIA

Is there CIA minimum, if yes give the minimum CIA

Att. Marks

ESE Evaluated out of (50/100)

ESE converted to (50/100)

Total Marks (Total CIA + Att + ESE)

30

35

65

33

5

50

30

100

IEDU232 - CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN EDUCATION (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This core course is offered in the second semester. It helps to acquire knowledge on emerging national and international concerns such as Human rights, Peace, health and safety, sustainable development and service learning. It gives an opportModuley for students to debate, negotiate, and resolute contemporary issues in education in global context.

Course Outcome

CO1: Analyse the contemporary global issues in education such as human rights, peace, health and safety, environment, sustainable development

CO2: Develop 21st Century competencies such as critical thinking, creativity, communication, and collaborative skills towards addressing contemporary educational issues.

CO3: Internalize emerging policies to address educational challenges

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:24
Global Issues in Education
 

Recognizing contemporary educational issues, Case studies on cutting edge educational change in teaching and learning. Prime educational issues in China and Finland, Issues and Concerns in International Baccalaureate programme, Barriers to education in the world, Online educational concerns and outcomes to a learner, Educational aid during natural calamities. Social diversity – at the level of the individual, of regions, languages, religions, castes, tribes-how it enriches our life and at the same time poses challenges for universal education,Liberalization / Privatisation / Globalization/ -Factors behind-LPG and Education

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:18
Human Rights Education
 

Human rights education- Concept, Need, Significance, Pedagogy for Human rights education- International and National contexts. Child Rights Education - Concept, Need, Significance, and Child rights in the Indian Constitution, India and Moduleed Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC).

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:18
Policy Framework for Public Education in India
 

Aims of Education in Contemporary Indian society Universalization of Elementary Education — Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan, RTE ACT 2009, RMSA, MHRD and Elementary education, Significant recommendations of commission and committees – National policy on education 2019. Sustainable Development: Meaning, nature, scope, approaches and strategies, Integration in the school curriculum, Role of teacher in promoting sustainable development. Service Learning - Definition, Characteristics, Competencies, Partnership, Impact, Reflection: linking service and learning.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Allaire, J. (n.d.). Five Issues Facing Higher Education in 2018.  https://www.cornerstone.edu/blogs/lifelong-learning-matters/post/five-issues-facing- higher-education-in-2018.

What are the pros and cons of Finland’s education system ... (n.d.)  https://www.quora.com/What-are-the-pros-and-cons-of-Finlands-education-system.

Sugata Mitra. (n.d.).  https://theschoolinthecloud.org/people/sugata-mitra/. Taj, H. (2005). Current challenges in education. Hyderabad: Neelkamal Publications.

Balkrishna K (2009) Human Rights Education in India: Needs and Future Actions

www.hurights.or.jp/archives/human_rights_education_in_asian_schools/section2/1999/03/human-rights-education-in-india-needs-and-future-actions.html

Mehta, D. D. (2009). Education in Emerging Indian Education, Indian Education.Ludhiyana: Tondan Publications, Books Market.

Pathak, K. R. (2007). Education in the Emerging India. New Delhi: Atlantic Publishers. Chandra, U. (2007). Human Rights. Allahabad: Law Agency Publications.

“The Human Rights Education Resource book”, second edition, Human Rights Education Associates (HREA), 2000. Available on-line at <http://www.hrea.org>.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Centre for Environment Education. (2005). Education for a sustainable future: 18-20 January, 2005, Ahmedabad, India: final report of the International Conference on Decade of Education for Sustainable Development. Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India.

Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) (n.d.).  http://www.unesco.org/new/en/education/themes/leading-the- international- agenda/education-for-sustainable-development/

Cortese, A. (2001). Education for a Sustainable Future: The Next Industrial Revolution.  Boston, MA: Second Nature, Inc.

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Pattern

The department follows a pattern of 70 % marks for Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and 30 % marks for End Semester Submission (ESS).

Break up of continuous internal assessment for 4 credit courses is as follows

CIA 1: 30 marks (25 marks submission + Class participation: 5 marks)
CIA 2: 35 Marks (25 marks submission + Class participation: 5 marks+ continuous assessment of 

                                                                                                           asynchronous submissions :05 marks)



Class participation : 5 marks

Marks

 

Asynchronous submissions

Marks

Frequency of participation in class

01 marks

90% -100%

05 marks

Quality of comments

01 marks

80% -89%

04 marks

Relevance of contribution to topic under discussion

01 marks

75% - 79%

03 marks

Engagement & Active Participation in breakout rooms

01 marks

70%-74%

02 marks

Arrives prepared at every session

01 mark

60%-69%

01 mark


Attendance: 5 marks

 Attendance Percentage

Marks

95% -100%

05 marks

90% - 94%

04 marks

85% - 89%

03 marks

80% - 84%

02 marks

76% - 79%

01 mark

 

 

 

 

CIA I -Evaluated out of (20/30)

CIA II - Evaluated out of (20/35)

Total CIA

Is there CIA minimum, if yes give the minimum CIA

Att. Marks

ESE Evaluated out of (50/100)

ESE converted to (50/100)

Total Marks (Total CIA + Att + ESE)

30

35

65

33

5

50

30

100

 

IEDU233 - EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:4
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This paper will help the students acquire knowledge of Educational Management and leadership. Students will understand the importance of decision making building effective teams. Further the Students will understand the concept of Total Quality Management. Students will also understand the various dimensions of Organizational Culture and the various styles of Leadership followed in Educational Institutions.

Course Outcome

CO1: Describe the principles and process of Management.

CO2: Articulate an understanding of Theories of leadership and Management.

CO3: Summarize the concept and importance of decision Making

CO4: Understand the concept and importance and effective team work

CO5: Describe the concept of TQM and its application

CO6: Understand the concept , process and importance of organization Culture

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:24
Introduction to Management
 

Management: Concept, Theories, functions, importance - Principles of Management-Process of Management. Educational Management-purpose and importance. Concept of Teams vs group, Managing team/group processes, relationships and responsibilities.

Concept of human resource management; principles and functions; human resource management in schools, Duties of a IB School Principal as a Teacher, coordinator, Supervisor and Manager. Introduction to Leadership, IB School Principal as a Leader. Classroom Management- Principles of classroom Management-Techniques of classroom management.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:24
Decision Making, Management of Change and Total Quality Management
 

Decision Making- Types; Approaches and Factors influencing Decision Making. Organizational Change- Nature of Change, Dimensions of Change, Causes of Change, Resistance to Change. TQM – Definition - Fundamental principles - Process of TQM - Quality tools of TQM.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Organization Culture
 

Organization- Organizational Culture-Concept-Creating an Organizational Culture and managing an Organizational Culture-Dimensions of Organizational Culture, Organizational Climate-Concept

Text Books And Reference Books:

Chaube, S. P., & Chaube, A. (2004). School Organisation (2nd ed.). Pune: Vikas Publishers.

Davis, B., & West-Burnham, J. (2003). The Handbook of Educational Leadership & Management.                      London: Pearson Education.

Jain, V. (2012). Management Theory and Practice (3rd ed.). New Delhi: International Book House.

Kochhar, S. K. (2005). Secondary School Administration. New Delhi: Sterling Publishers.

Mohanty, J. (1990). Educational Administration and Supervision. New Delhi: Sterling Publishers.

Murthy, S. K. (1995). Essentials of School Organisation and Administration. New Delhi: Tandon                        Publishers.

Myageri, C. V. (1993). Textbook of Educational Management. Gadag: Vidyanidhi Prakashan.

Pandya, S. R. (2007). Administration and Management of Education. New Delhi: Himalaya Publishing   House.

Robbins, S. P., & Matthew, M. P. (2011). Organization Theory: Structure, Design, and                                        Applications (3rd ed.). New Delhi: Pearson.

Sachdeva, M. S. (1997). School Organization and Administration. New Delhi: Prakash Brothers.

Suganthi, L., & Samuel, A. A. (2009). Total Quality Management. New Delhi: PHI Learning Private Limited.

Terry, G. R., & Franklin, S. G. (1997). Principles of Management (8th ed.). New Delhi: AITBS Publishers.

Veer, U. (2004). Modern School Organisation. New Delhi: Anmol Publications Pvt. Ltd.

Weber, C. A., & Weber, M. E. (2007). Fundamentals of Educational Leadership. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Davis, B., &amp; West-Burnham, J. (2003). The handbook of educational leadership &amp;

management. London: Pearson Education.

Jain, V. (2012). Management theory and practice (3rd ed.). New Delhi: International Book

House. 

Luthans, F., Luthans, B.C &amp; Luthans, K.W. (2015). Organizational behavior: An evidence-

based approach. 13th ed. Information Age Publishing.

Suganthi, L., &amp; Samuel, A. A. (2009). Total Quality Management. New Delhi: PHI

Learning. 

Terry, G. R., &amp; Franklin, S. G. (1997). Principles of management (8th ed.). AITBS

Publishers.                                                                                                          

Weber, C. A., &amp; Weber, M. E. (2007). Fundamentals of educational leadership. New

York: McGraw-Hill Book.

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Pattern

The department follows a pattern of 70 % marks for Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and 30 % marks for End Semester Submission (ESS).

Break up of continuous internal assessment for 4 credit courses is as follows

CIA 1: 30 marks (25 marks submission + Class participation: 5 marks)
CIA 2: 35 Marks (25 marks submission + Class participation: 5 marks+ continuous assessment of 

                                                                                                           asynchronous submissions :05 marks)



Class participation : 5 marks

Marks

 

Asynchronous submissions

Marks

Frequency of participation in class

01 marks

90% -100%

05 marks

Quality of comments

01 marks

80% -89%

04 marks

Relevance of contribution to topic under discussion

01 marks

75% - 79%

03 marks

Engagement & Active Participation in breakout rooms

01 marks

70%-74%

02 marks

Arrives prepared at every session

01 mark

60%-69%

01 mark


Attendance: 5 marks

 Attendance Percentage

Marks

95% -100%

05 marks

90% - 94%

04 marks

85% - 89%

03 marks

80% - 84%

02 marks

76% - 79%

01 mark

 

 

 

 

CIA I -Evaluated out of (20/30)

CIA II - Evaluated out of (20/35)

Total CIA

Is there CIA minimum, if yes give the minimum CIA

Att. Marks

ESE Evaluated out of (50/100)

ESE converted to (50/100)

Total Marks (Total CIA + Att + ESE)

30

35

65

33

5

50

30

100

 

IEDU234 - INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY IN EDUCATION (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This is a general paper offered in the fourth semester. The students learn the fundamentals of Educational Technology, WEB 2 Technologies, Programmed learning, Instructional design, ICT in school education and its application in the teaching-learning process. They prepare a technology based lesson on the texts prescribed at the secondary level and present them effectively in the classroom. They also have hands-on experience on use of computers at school for academic and administrative purposes.

Course Outcome

CO1: Interpret the concept and significance of ICT in school education.

CO2: Demonstrate the knowledge, skill of WEB 2 Technologies, and its application to teaching and learning in education

CO3: Appraise current and future trends in ICT and enhance the creativity and imagination of the learners.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
ICT in School Education
 

Meaning - Definition - Scope and Significance of Educational Technology. Objectives-Forms of Educational Technology-Approaches of Educational Technology; Hardware and software approach. Role of technology in modern educational practices and in the classroom. ICT in Education: A Critical Literature Review and Its Implications; Quality Issues in ICT-Based Higher Education; A Monitoring and Evaluation Scheme for an ICT-Supported Education Program in Schools; Developing Thinking and Learning with ICT: Raising Achievement in Primary Classrooms; Meeting the Standards in Using ICT for Secondary Teaching; Learning to Teach ICT in the Secondary School: A Companion to School Experience; Quality Issues in ICT-Based Higher Education       

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Tools in ICT
 

WEB 2.0 Technologies for classroom.

WEB 3.0- Technologies for classroom

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Current and Future Trends in ICT
 

Meaning- ICT- Uses and Advantages. National Policy on Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in School Education- Infrastructure - Digital Resources - Capacity Building- ICT for children with special  needs; skill development;  SWAYAM- Study Webs of Active Learning for Young Aspiring Minds, MOOC     Integrating ICT in teaching and learning, Global context of a teacher, Using ICT to collaborate and consult educators. Cultures of communication and information storage: oral, script, print, digital; Digital Culture; Digital Literacy,  Open Educational Resources, Open-Data, Wikipedia, Wiki source, Wiktionary, Using social media for education: blogs, Facebook, twitter, YouTube

Text Books And Reference Books:

7 Innovative Apps for Parent-Teacher Communication. (2015, January 28).  https://                    teach.com/blog/parent-teacher-apps/

Aggarwal, C. J. (2009). Essentials of Educational Technology (3rd ed.). New Delhi: Vikas Publishing                      House.

Aggarwal, D. D. (2004). Educational Technology. New Delhi: Sarup and Sons.

An Overview of Instructional Design. (2015). Mastering the Instructional Design Process, 1–16. doi:                   10.1002/9781119176589.ch1

Barseghian, T. (2011, April 5). How Learning Environments Are Changing.  https://                www.kqed.org/mindshift/8016/how-learning-environments-are-changing

Clark, C. (2014). Google’s Latest Education Innovation: Google Classroom.  http://                     teach.com/education-technology/google-for-education

Edwards, A. (2012). New Technology and Education (1st ed.). New Delhi: Bloomsbury.

Fallows, S., & Bhanot, R. (2005). Quality in ICT-based higher education. Quality Issues in ICT-Based                   Higher Education, 1–6. doi: 10.4324/9780203416198_chapter_1

Fu, Hayes, M., Whitebread, D., Way, J., Beardon, T., Wong, Sivakumaren. (n.d.). ICT (Information and            Communication Technologies) in Education.  https://www.questia.com/library/            education/curriculum-and-instruction/educational-technology/ict-in-education

Fu, J. S. (2013). ICT in Education: A Critical Literature Review and Its Implications. International                       Journal of Education and Development Using Information and Communication                                          Technology, 99(1).  https://www.questia.com/library/education/curriculum-and-                                   instruction/educational-technology/ict-in-education

Heinecke, W., & Adamy, P. (2010). Evaluating Technology in Teacher Education: Lessons from the Preparing Tomorrow's Teachers for Technology (PT3) Program (Research, Innovation and Methods in                      Educational Technology). Charlotte, North Carolina: Information Age Publishing.

Kaushik, V. K., & Prasad, J. (2002). Advanced Educational Technology. New Delhi: Kanishka                                  Publishers.

Kemp, C. (2014). The current and future trends in Educational Technology.  http://                    mrkempnz.com/2014/09/the-current-and-future-trends-in-educational-technology.html

Kennewell, S., Parkinson, J., & Tanner, H. (2003, August 27). Learning to Teach ICT in the Secondary              School: A Companion to School Experience.  https://www.taylorfrancis.com/                                books/e/9780203218532

Kumar, K. L. (2008). Educational Technology-A Practical Textbook for Students, Teachers,                               Professionals and Trainers. New Delhi: New Age Publishers.

Loveless, A., & Ellis, V. (2001). Ict, pedagogy, and the curriculum: subject to change. London:                                    Routledge Falmer.

Rodriguez, P., Nussbaum, M., Lopez, X., & Sepulveda, M. (n.d.). A Monitoring and Evaluation                                     Scheme for an ICT-Supported Education Program in Schools. Educational Technology & Society, 13(2).  https://www.questia.com/library/education/curriculum-and-instruction/                             educational-technology/ict-in-education

Rubio, A. M. D. (2017). Wiggins, G., & McTighe, J. (2005) Understanding by design (2nd ed.). Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development ASCD. Colombian Applied        Linguistics Journal, 19(1), 140. doi: 10.14483/calj.v19n1.11490

Schwartz, J. E., & Beichner, R. j. (1998). Essentials of Educational Technology: (Part of the Essentials of Classroom Teaching Series) (1st ed.). Boston, Massachusetts: Allyn & Bacon.

Selwyn, N. (2013). Education in a Digital World: Global Perspectives on Technology and Education.                New Delhi: Routledge.

Shaikh, I. R. (2013). Introduction to Educational Technology & Ict. New Delhi: McGraw Hill                                    Education (India) Private Limited.

Skinner, B. F. (2003). The Technology of Teaching.  http://www.bfskinner.org/wp-                              content/uploads/2016/04/ToT.pdf

Venkataiah, N. (2008). Educational Technology. New Delhi: APH Publishing Corporation.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Fu, J. S. (2013). ICT in Education: A critical literature review and its implications.

International Journal of Education and Development Using Information and

Communication Technology, 99(1).

https://www.questia.com/library/education/curriculum-andinstruction/educational-

technology/ict-in education

Rodriguez, P., Nussbaum, M., Lopez, X., &amp; Sepulveda, M. (n.d.). A monitoring and

evaluation scheme for an ict-supported education program in schools. Educational

Technology &amp; Society, 13(2). 

https://www.questia.com/library/education/curriculum-and-instruction/educational-

technology/ict-in-education

Kennewell, S., Parkinson, J., &amp; Tanner, H. (2003, August 27). Learning to teach ICT in the

secondary school: A companion to school experience.

https://www.taylorfrancis.com/books/e/9780203218532

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Pattern

The department follows a pattern of 70 % marks for Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and 30 % marks for End Semester Submission (ESS).

Break up of continuous internal assessment for 4 credit courses is as follows

CIA 1: 30 marks (25 marks submission + Class participation: 5 marks)
CIA 2: 35 Marks (25 marks submission + Class participation: 5 marks+ continuous assessment of 

                                                                                                           asynchronous submissions :05 marks)



Class participation : 5 marks

Marks

 

Asynchronous submissions

Marks

Frequency of participation in class

01 marks

90% -100%

05 marks

Quality of comments

01 marks

80% -89%

04 marks

Relevance of contribution to topic under discussion

01 marks

75% - 79%

03 marks

Engagement & Active Participation in breakout rooms

01 marks

70%-74%

02 marks

Arrives prepared at every session

01 mark

60%-69%

01 mark


Attendance: 5 marks

 Attendance Percentage

Marks

95% -100%

05 marks

90% - 94%

04 marks

85% - 89%

03 marks

80% - 84%

02 marks

76% - 79%

01 mark

 

 

CIA I -Evaluated out of (20/30)

CIA II - Evaluated out of (20/35)

Total CIA

Is there CIA minimum, if yes give the minimum CIA

Att. Marks

ESE Evaluated out of (50/100)

ESE converted to (50/100)

Total Marks (Total CIA + Att + ESE)

30

35

65

33

5

50

30

100

 

IEDU281 - INTERNSHIP (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:240
No of Lecture Hours/Week:60
Max Marks:100
Credits:8

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Internship for PGDIE students at CHRIST’s School of Education, will be carried out in IB schools for a duration of one month which includes, observation, assisted teaching, and teaching with opportunities to reflect on the roles and responsibilities of IB teachers, the structure of the school, school culture, teaching techniques, assessment practices, feedback system, support system, and creating digital reporting systems.  Internship will be conducted during the second semester and will be held under the close supervision of a Faculty member. The intern is expected to maintain all the relevant academic documents (Reflective journal, observation book, lesson plan, teaching aids, unit plan documents) with respect to teaching practice as instructed by the department. Each trainee will be assigned with a mentor for effective monitoring of internship session. 

Learning Objectives

An Intern will be able to

·       Interact and learn from school mentor experienced in relevant field on assessment practices, teaching strategies, campus culture, International mindedness, and student support systems

·       Observe their mentors and peer teaching and reflect on the various element of classroom teaching techniques

·       Create Module plan and Lesson plan

Course Outcome

CO1: Create effective lesson/unit plans to meet the individual needs of diverse learners.

CO2: Deliver effective unit/lesson plans to promote student learning.

CO3: Demonstrate that they are reflective practitioners who will continually evaluate the effect of their choices and actions on students, parents, and professionals.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:1
Internship Policy
 

Orientation of Internship policy

Text Books And Reference Books:

American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education. (1987). Minority teachers'     recruitment & retention: A public policy. Washington, DC: Author.

Burbank, M.D., Ramirez, L.A. & Bates, A. J. (2016). The impact of critically reflective    teaching: A continuum of rhetoric. Action in Teacher Education, 38(2), 104-119.

Council for the Accreditation of Educators Preparation (2014). Standards. http://caepnet.org/standards/

Miller, P.C. & Mikulec, E.A. (2014), Pre-Service Teachers Confronting Issues of Diversity Though a  Radical Field Experience, Multicultural Education, 21(2), 18-24.

“Lesson Study” as Professional Culture in Japanese Schools: An Historical         Perspective on Elementary Classroom Practices, Mohammad Reza Sarkar Arani,  Seijoh University, Aichi, Japan, Fukaya Keisuke, Chūbu University, Aichi, Japan.

Mclntyre, D. J., Byrd, D. M. & Foxx, S. M. (1996). Field and laboratory experiences. In  J. Sikula, T. J. Buttery, & E. Guyton (Eds.), Handbook of Research on Teacher        Education (2nd ed., pp. 171-193). New York: Macmillan.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Darling-Hammond, L. & Bransford, J. (Eds.) (2005). Preparing teachers for a changing      world: What teachers should learn and be able to do. Jossey-Bass Wiley: San    Francisco.

Black, A. & Ammon, P. (1992). A developmental-constructivist approach to teacher     education. Journal of Teacher Education, 13(2), 189-206.

Garibaldi, A. (1992). Preparing teachers. In M. Dilworth (Ed.), Diversity in teacher       education (pp. 23-39). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Graham (2006). Conditions for successful field experiences: Perceptions of cooperating teachers, Teaching and Teacher Education, 22 1118–1129.

Monk, D. (2015). Reflections on teacher preparation, Symposium: 21st Century Ecellence in Education: Part 2. Published online, Springer Science+Business     Media New York: 21 April 2015. 

Zeichner, K. (1982). Reflective teaching and field-based experience in teacher     education. Interchange, 12(4), 1-21.

Bolhuis, S. and  Voeten, M, 2001, Toward self-directed learning in secondary schools: what do teachers do? Teaching and Teacher Education, vol. 17, no. 7  

Evaluation Pattern

Internship will be assessed for 100 marks as per the latest policy available with the department 

IEDU282 - RESEARCH PROJECT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Each candidate in the 2nd semester of the PGDIE program must carry out an action research project on a classroom-related issue. They will systematically apply the theoretical principles of action research learnt in the first semester of the program to a real classroom context. They will complete an Ethics Application Package for research compliance with human participants and submit to their research supervisors. After the supervisors approve the research topic, methodology, tools, the application, consent and assent forms, the candidates will approach the heads of institutions from where they propose to collect data and seek their permission to conduct research. After procuring permission from the parents on the consent forms and from the students on the Assent Form, the candidates will conduct the research. Candidates will collect and analyze the data, and present their research.
During the allotted online class, the candidates will meet with their research supervisors regularly to update them and to also seek feedback.
The course will enable the in-service teachers to:
●    Identify an area of focus around the teaching-learning process or environment
●    Comply with research ethics
●    Collect data
●    Analyze and interpret the data
●    Develop a plan of action
●    Write a Research Report
●    Present their findings

Course Outcome

CO1: Apply the knowledge of research in solving social and educational problems

CO2: Create a research report

CO3: Present the research

CO4: Internalize research ethics and academic integrity

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:60
Research Project
 

Each candidate in the 2nd semester of the PGDIE program must carry out an action research project on a classroom-related issue. They will systematically apply the theoretical principles of action research learnt in the first semester of the program to a real classroom context. They will complete an Ethics Application Package for research compliance with human participants and submit to their research supervisors. After the supervisors approve the research topic, methodology, tools, the application, consent and assent forms, the candidates will approach the heads of institutions from where they propose to collect data and seek their permission to conduct research. After procuring permission from the parents on the consent forms and from the students on the Assent Form, the candidates will conduct the research. Candidates will collect and analyze the data, and present their research.
During the allotted online class, the candidates will meet with their research supervisors regularly to update them and to also seek feedback.

Text Books And Reference Books:

American Psychological Association. (2022). Style & Grammar Guidelines.https://apastyle.apa.org/style-grammar-guidelines/

Best, J. W., & Kahn, J. V. (2014). Research in education. Pearson. 

Cohen, L. Manion. L & Morrison, K. (2007). Research Methods in Education. Routledge.  

Creswell, J. W., & Creswell, J. D. (2017). Research design: Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approaches. Sage.

Sheppard, V. (2020). Methods for the Social Sciences: An Introduction. https://pressbooks.bccampus.ca/jibcresearchmethods

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Denzin, N. K., & Lincoln, Y. S. (2017). The Sage handbook of qualitative research. Sage.

Kumar R. (2005). Research Methodology: A step by step guide for beginners. Pearson. 

Patton, M. Q. (2015). Qualitative research & evaluation methods: Integrating theory and practice (4th ed.). Sage.

Evaluation Pattern

There are no CIAs in this course.
For the final assessment, the students will write a research report and make a presentation of their action research.
The Learning Outcomes are the same as the Course Outcomes.
The Report and Presentation are for 95 Marks (+5: Attendance)

Criteria & Maximum Score:
Introduction: 10
Literature Review: 10
Methodology: 15
Results: 20
Action Plan: 20
Written Report: 10
Oral Presentation: 10
TOTAL: 95

Similarity Index %  Policy:
Over 50%: Mandatory Resubmission
41%-50%: Choice to Resubmit OR -10 Marks
31%-40%: Choice to Resubmit OR -8 Marks
21%-30%: Choice to Resubmit OR -6 Marks
10%-20%: Choice to Resubmit OR -4 Marks
Below 10%: Safe