CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

DEPARTMENT OF PERFORMING ARTS, THEATRE STUDIES AND MUSIC

School of Business and Management

Syllabus for
BA (Theatre Studies, Psychology/Honours/Honours with Research)
Academic Year  (2023)

 
1 Semester - 2023 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BLS142 PRINCIPLES OF FORENSIC SCIENCE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
CSC991 ESSENTIALS FOR HANDLING IMAGES - 2 2 50
CSC996 VISUALIZING DATA - 2 2 50
DMT141 DANCE MOVEMENT THERAPY Multidisciplinary Courses 2 3 100
ENG183-1 PHONETICS AND COMMUNICATION SKILLS Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses 2 2 50
EST145 POETICS , POLITICS AND PIVOTAL PEOPLE OF ROCK N ROLL Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
EST148 THE OCEANS IN CINEMA: A BLUE HUMANITIES READING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
HIS141 HISTORY AND CINEMA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
LAW144 ENVIRONMENTAL LAW Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
MED143 CELEBRITY PR Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 50
MED144 HARRY POTTER AND CONTEMPORARY ISSUES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
MED145 SOCIAL MEDIA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
PHY142 ANALOG AND DIGITAL ELECTRONICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
POL141 DEMOCRACY AND ETHICAL VALUES Multidisciplinary Courses 2 2 100
POL143 SUBALTERN STUDIES: NARRATIVES OF THE COMMUNITIES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY101-1 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
SOC141 WOMEN'S ISSUES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
SOC143 SOCIOLOGY THROUGH CINEMA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
THE101-1 INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
THE161-1 VOICE AND MOVEMENT Skill Enhancement Courses 3 3 100
2 Semester - 2023 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BLS143 PRINCIPLES OF HORTICULTURAL TECHNIQUES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 4 100
ECO147 THINKING THROUGH THE ENVIRONMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 50
ENG183-2 WRITING SKILLS Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses 2 2 50
EST153 PARTITION NARRATIVES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
EST156 RETELLING OF EPICS IN INDIAN LITERATURE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
LAW144 ENVIRONMENTAL LAW - 3 3 100
MED147 MIDDLE CINEMA IN INDIA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
MED148 LANGUAGE OF CINEMA: A VISUAL APPROACH Multidisciplinary Courses 45 3 100
MED149 INTRODUCTION TO SEMIOTICS Multidisciplinary Courses 45 3 100
PHY141A INTRODUCTION TO ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
POL141 DEMOCRACY AND ETHICAL VALUES Multidisciplinary Courses 2 2 100
POL143 POLITICS AND SOCIETY OF INDIA SINCE INDEPENDENCE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY201-2 PERSONALITY AND INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES Major Core Courses-II 4 4 100
PSY202-2 BRAIN AND BEHAVIOUR Major Core Courses-II 4 4 100
SW141 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK AND SOCIAL WELFARE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
SW142 INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISATIONAL BEHAVIOUR Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
THE101-2 THEATRE HISTORY Major Core Courses-I 3 3 100
THE102-2 ART OF ACTING LEVEL I Major Core Courses-I 4 2 100
    

    

Introduction to Program:

The Department of Theatre Studies holds the vision of providing ‘Integrity through Aesthetic performance’. Its mission is to inspire and mentor the birth and sustained growth of artists who, through cultural ethos, will embody respect, humanity, and discipline. The Performing Arts are a universal language that goes beyond the physical and geographical boundaries of the world. They bring people closer to themselves and a glimpse into the lived experiences of others and the shared experiences of humanity. The primary aim of the programme is to introduce the students to the possibilities of the art form and help them to gain an integrated sense of it through the application of theory via practical means.

Programme Outcome/Programme Learning Goals/Programme Learning Outcome:

PO1: Academic expertise: Explore, create and experience Western theatre through academic and praxis to develop a holistic theatre professional.

PO2: Critical Thinking: Use plays as a resource material about the time, space, weight and flow of people. Understanding the mentality of human archetypes using exercises specific to the theatre.

PO3: Effective Communication: Increase kinaesthetic discipline using accurate posture, delivery and stage presence. Making oneself truly humble, knowledgeable and easy to approach by prompting and accepting feedback from the audience.

PO4: Social Interaction: Aiming to create effective group leaders through a conservatoire method with an ensemble focus.

PO5: Effective Citizenship: Help students understand the fundamental processes underlying human behaviour, development and change from biological and psychosocial perspectives.

PO6: Ethics: Guiding them to create productions on their own making them understand the importance of accountability and responsibility. Respecting the academic integrity of the institution and course.

PO7: Environment and Sustainability: Engage with socio-cultural psychological contexts along with environmental needs and concerns.

PO8: Continue a dedicated path to the thespian disciplines without dousing the spark of curiosity.

Programme Specific Outcome:

PSO1: Develop holistic theatre skills through workshops and tutorials with relevant guest speakers.

PSO2: Develop a professional portfolio to apply for different kinds of specialisations under the the broad umbrella of theatre studies.

PSO3: Allow students to direct, stage manage, script-write, compose and act on their own in student-led productions.

PSO4: Apply aesthetics to practical skill sets using a mix of different schools and styles of theatre studies.

PSO5: Present research at a conference in the field of Performing Arts.

PSO6: Network with industry professionals to experience and engage in relevant theatrical career paths.

PSO7: Devise performance and rehearsal exercises directed towards developing character behaviour, psychology and mannerisms.

Programme Educational Objective:

PEO1: Professional Skills: Demonstrate personal integrity with domain expertise and practical skills.

PEO2: Emotional Self-Regulation: Demonstrate empathy by listening with respect for others.

PEO3: Communication Skills: Demonstrate creative thinking using verbal and non-verbal skills.

PEO4: Co-Creation: Demonstrate consultative decision-making using analytical thinking and assertiveness.

PEO5: Entrepreneurship: Demonstrate leadership and team-building skills through facilitation.

PEO6: Research Skills: Demonstrate a global perspective using critical thinking and knowledge application.

PEO7: Cultural Competency: Demonstrate respecting diversity with cross-cultural understanding and humility.

PEO8: Autonomy: Demonstrate adaptability through self-awareness and continuous learning.

Assesment Pattern

Theory Written exams: 

CIA I & III Assessments - 20 Marks each  

CIA II - Written midsemester examination -  50 Marks  

ESE Centralised End-of-semester Examination  50 Marks

 

Practical and submission-based exams are evaluated at the end of the semester out of 100 marks.

Examination And Assesments

In the Department of Theatre Studies, examinations and assessments are designed to evaluate students' proficiency in both practical skills and theoretical knowledge. These assessments serve as a comprehensive measure of students' understanding, application, and mastery of the subject matter.

Practical Skills Assessments:

Practical skills assessments focus on evaluating students' ability to apply their knowledge in a practical setting. This may involve various aspects of theatre performance, such as acting, directing, stage design, or technical production. Students are typically evaluated through performances, rehearsals, presentations, or practical demonstrations of their skills. These assessments provide opportunities for students to showcase their creativity, technical proficiency, and stagecraft abilities.

Theory Knowledge Examinations:

Theory knowledge examinations are aimed at assessing students' understanding and comprehension of the theoretical aspects of theatre studies. These assessments cover a wide range of topics, including theatre history, dramatic literature, dramatic theory, critical analysis, and theatrical concepts. Students are tested through written exams, essays, research papers, or other written assignments that assess their ability to analyze, interpret, and articulate their knowledge of theatrical concepts and ideas.

BLS142 - PRINCIPLES OF FORENSIC SCIENCE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Forensic science is the application of scientific principles and techniques to the investigation of crimes and legal issues. This course covers the fundamental principles of forensic science, including various scientific analysis techniques used in criminal investigations, legal and ethical issues, and types of evidence collected at crime scenes.

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will be able to Understand the principles and techniques used in forensic science investigations

CO2: Students will be able to describe the legal and ethical considerations associated with forensic science.

CO3: Students will be able to identify and analyze different types of evidence collected at crime scenes

CO4: Students will be able to evaluate scientific evidence in a legal context using proper documentation and reporting techniques

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Forensic Science
 

 

Introduction to forensic science; Historical development of forensic science; Branches and applications of forensic science; Legal and ethical issues in forensic science

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Physical Evidence
 

 

Types of physical evidence; Collection and preservation of physical evidence; Analysis of physical evidence; Interpretation and evaluation of physical evidence

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Biological Evidence
 

 

Types of biological evidence; DNA analysis; Serology analysis; Analyzing and interpreting biological evidence

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Digital Forensics
 

 Digital forensic investigations; Evidence collection in digital forensics; Analyzing and interpreting digital evidence; Legal and ethical considerations in digital forensics

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

  1. Saferstein, R. (2019). Forensic science: From the crime scene to the crime lab. Pearson Education.

  2. Criminal Justice & Forensics. (2017). Cengage.

  3. Fisher, B. A. (2019). Techniques of crime scene investigation. Taylor & Francis Group.

  4. Richard Saferstein, R. (2018). Criminalistics: An Introduction to Forensic Science. Pearson Education.

  5. Houck, M. M., & Siegel, J. A. (2010). Fundamentals of forensic science. Academic Press.

  6. Casey, E. (2018). Digital evidence and computer crime: Forensic science, computers, and the internet. Academic Press.

  7. Nelson, B., Phillips, A., & Steuart, C. (2016). Guide to computer forensics and investigations. Cengage

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

  1. Lee, H. C. (2016). Forensic science : an illustrated dictionary. CRC Press.

  2. Barry, J., & Cooper, J. (2018). Introduction to forensic science. Routledge.

  3. Houck, M. (2018). Trace evidence analysis: More cases in mute witnesses. Academic Press. 

  4. Brown, T. W. (2018). Handbook of Forensic Pathology, Second Edition. CRC Press.

  5. Barbara, J. (2011). Forensic anthropology: An introduction. CRC Press.

  6. Hall, M. (2017). Current practice in forensic medicine. John Wiley & Sons.

  7. Sammons, J., & Jenks, M. (2017). Digital forensics trial graphics: Teaching the jury through effective use of visual aids. Academic Press.

Evaluation Pattern

Attendance and Class Participation- 10%

Midterm Examination- 30%

Review paper/Research Paper- 20%

Seminar presentation – 10%

 

Final Examination - 30%

CSC991 - ESSENTIALS FOR HANDLING IMAGES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:15
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

Graphic Designing will enable students to develop advertisements, logos and other digital entities for creating brand equity for assortment of products, services and organizations.

 

Course Objectives​

 

 This course will help the learner to

 

  • Provide an overview of the Graphic designing.

  • To familiarize the methods and techniques of Graphic designing.

  • To enhance the skill set of the students in designing digital entities for businesses.

  • To imbibe the concepts of graphics designing to strengthen the campaigns of digital marketing.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the applications of photoshop.

CO2: Analyze various graphical tools used for digital marketing.

CO3: Create various creative models using graphical elements.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:4
Photoshop
 

Photoshop Basics: History of Photoshop - About Photoshop, Photoshop Features - Opening and Importing images, Creating Documents with different sizes - Digital Marketing – Digital Branding.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Designs
 

Importance of Designs, Logos, Mascots and other Digital Entities in Marketing & Branding - Basic Concepts of Designing, Design principles, Basics of design elements, Typography, Colour theory.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Graphics
 

Introduction to Graphics, Introduction to Photoshop, Bitmap and Vector Images, Understanding Image Size and Resolution

Text Books And Reference Books:

Adobe Photoshop CC – Classroom in a Book, Adobe system incorporation, Adobe Press, 2017

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

ptgmedia.pearsoncmg.com/images/9780134665351/.../9780134665351.pdf

Evaluation Pattern

MCQ: 25

Assignment: 15

Attendance: 10

CSC996 - VISUALIZING DATA (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:15
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

 

Data visualization package for the statistical programming language R. It starts with simple datasets and then graduates to case studies about world health, economics, and infectious disease trends in the United States. This course starts with fundamental computational concepts underlying most programming languages and also the solution of small problems using a programming language.

 

Course Objectives​

 

  1. To teach students about data visualization principles

  2. To learn how to communicate data-driven findings 

  3. To teach how to use ggplot2 to create custom plots

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the applications of tableau

CO2: Apply fundamental concepts in tableau basic reports

CO3: Analyze the applications of tableau calculations and filters.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Introducing Tableau
 

 

Introduction to Tableau: What is TABLEAU? Why Data Visualization - Unique Features compared to Traditional BI Tools - TABLEAU Overview & Architecture - File Types & Extensions - Start Page,  Show Me, Connecting to Excel Files, Connecting to Text Files, Connect to Microsoft SQL Server, Connecting to Microsoft Analysis Services, Creating and Removing Hierarchies - Bins, Joining Tables, Data Blending.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Tableau Basic Reports
 

Parameters - Set - Combined Sets - Creating a First Report - Data Labels - Create Folders - Sorting Data - Add Totals, Subtotals and Grand Totals to Report. Types of charts.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Tableau Calculations & Filters
 

 

Calculated Fields - Basic Approach to Calculate Rank, Advanced Approach to Calculate Rank , Calculating Running Total  - Filters Introduction - Quick Filters - Filters on Dimensions - Conditional Filters - Top and Bottom Filters - Filters on Measures - Context Filters  - Slicing Filters - Data Source Filters  - Extract Filters 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Milligan, Joshua N., and Guillevin, Tristan. Tableau 10 Complete Reference: Transform Your Business with Rich Data Visualizations and Interactive Dashboards with Tableau 10. United Kingdom, Packt Publishing, 2018.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Milligan, Joshua N., and Guillevin, Tristan. Tableau 10 Complete Reference: Transform Your Business with Rich Data Visualizations and Interactive Dashboards with Tableau 10. United Kingdom, Packt Publishing, 2018.

Evaluation Pattern

MCQ: 25

Assignment: 15

Attendance: 10

DMT141 - DANCE MOVEMENT THERAPY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description:

This course has been conceptualized in order to Understanding and exploring theory and practice as two sides of the same coin for academic 

excellence in Performing Arts. Benchmarking quality, understanding and exploring adaptability to situations and taking leadership tasks.

Maintaining emotional and aesthetics sensitivity in verbal and non-verbal communication

Course Outcome

CO1: To work on the body schema, body image and physical self-concept To examine the concept of creativity and imagination.

CO2: To understand and gain practical understanding about the human body expression through the Gross Motor Skills Development, the Global Motor Coordination Schemes according Bartenieff, the Effort/Shape system of movement analysis according Laban.

CO3: To gain the ability to express emotions To improved confidence and self-esteem

CO4: To analyse and to gain practical understanding about the concept of Dance: from ancient social function to performance, from performance to therapy. To learn how Dance Movement Therapy dances with life: instances of different social areas in which Dmt is practised.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Introduction on Dance Movement
 

  Definition of Dance and its history 

 Definition of creativity 

 History of Dance Movement Therapy theory 

 

To understand and to gain practical understanding about the human body expression 

the Gross Motor Skills Development,

the Global Motor Coordination Schemes according Bartenieff,  

the Effort/Shape system of movement analysis according Laban.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:25
Practice
 

Explore the body: The warm –up in Dance Movement Therapy 

The social function of the dance 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Essential references: (in APA format)

- Bellia , V. (2020). A body among other bodies. Relational Expressive Dance Movement Therapy. Catania A&G

- Hackney, P. (1998). Making connections. Total body integration through Barrtenieff Fundamentals. Routledge, New York.

- Laban R. (1950). The mastery of movement on the stage. McDonald & Evans, London

- Laban R., Lawrence F.C. (1947). Effort. McDonald & Evans, London

- Schilder P., (1935) The image and appearance of the human body. Taylor & Francis

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Essential references: (in APA format)

- Bellia , V. (2020). A body among other bodies. Relational Expressive Dance Movement Therapy. Catania A&G

- Hackney, P. (1998). Making connections. Total body integration through Barrtenieff Fundamentals. Routledge, New 

- Schilder P., (1935) The image and appearance of the human body. Taylor & Francis

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation patterns  - final assessment 100 marks

ENG183-1 - PHONETICS AND COMMUNICATION SKILLS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The ‘English Phonetics and Communication’ course focuses on the vital knowledge and skill area of the pronunciation of English sounds and speech for the students of Theatre and Music. It also focuses on platform speeches to support the platform roles integral to the program involving theatre. Topics of universal concern, appeal, and relevance have been included to sustain the interests of all students. The selection of topics also progresses in complexity with each semester, enabling the students to gradually move into more severe and sustained reading patterns and become increasingly wise and conscious of themselves and the world they see around them. In a nutshell, we aim to bring out a text that will empower the holistic development of every student. 

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will be able to understand the nature of British Standard English Pronunciation concerning sounds, stress, and intonation and use the understanding in everyday and formal spoken communication in English

CO2: Students will be able to transcribe words from RP to IPA

CO3: The curiosity and appreciation for languages will elevate in general

CO4: Ability to communicate effectively in speech.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Phonemes and words
 

Mother Tongue influence in India

British and American Language and Power

 English and Social Mobility in India

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Public Speaking-Platform Roles
 

Public Speeches

Type of Speeches

Talks and Presentations

Seminar/Conference Presentation

Group Discussion

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Stress and Rhythm
 

Syllable

 Morphemes

 Assimilation and Elision

 Word Accent

 Intonation

 Tag

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Language and Society
 

Mother Tongue influence in India

British and American Language and Power

English and Social Mobility in India

Text Books And Reference Books:

sociolinguistics (I.V. Arnold, V.D. Bondaletov, I.R. Galperin, N.K. Garbovskiy, V.I. Karasik, M.M. Makovsky, V.A. Khomyakov, A.D. Schweitzer, and others)

LAVER, J. (1994). Principles of Phonetics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

LADEFOGED, P. (1999). A Course in Phonetics. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.

Reppen, R. (2010). Using corpora in the language classroom. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Evaluation Pattern

written exam

EST145 - POETICS , POLITICS AND PIVOTAL PEOPLE OF ROCK N ROLL (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

 

 Rock Music is a sound and dissonance rich discourse with its own socio-cultural practices and aesthetics. This course is an academic introduction to this space and its role in the identity formation of a generation, of a people and a Nation in motion.

 

Course Objectives

 

  • To engage with popular music as aural texts 
  • To study the popular music practitioner as an activist and artist
  • To appreciate the significance of  social critique and a counter cultural aesthetic

Course Outcome

CO1: ? To critically appreciate characteristics and concerns of popular music

CO2: To read popular music as cultural artefact and socio-political entities

CO3: ? To regard popular music as the voice and identity of a generation and locate its historical trajectory

CO4: ? To engage with artists and performances as cultural texts

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
A brief history of Popular Music before the Beatles
 

Tin Pan Alley and song pluggers, World War II

Sheet Music

Swing and ragtime

Vaudeville

Frank Sinatra: My Way. Strangers in The Night, New York, New York

Nashville, Music Row, Elvis Presley

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Birth of a Genre (From Gospel to Rock)
 

 Bill Haley 

Chuck Berry

  Buddy Holly   

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Classic Rock and the British Invasion
 

The Beatles and Beatlemania

Establishing an aesthetic of Mod

  TV and bands 

The Rolling Stones  

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Art Rock and the Album Era: Concept Albums and Album Art
 

 

Bands as Artists                                                                                                                 

Beatles / Sgt Pepper’s  

Pink Floyd /The Wall

The Who / Tommy

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
The Politics of Rock n Roll Folk rock: People power; Guerrilla Minstrels Folksong as Protest
 

 

Counter Culture: Vietnam, Draft, Gender, the Mystic East, Woodstock, Ban the Bomb   

Woody Guthrie

Bob Dylan

Joan Baez

Janis Joplin

Simon and Garfunkel

Jimi Hendrix

Pearl Jam

Riot bands

Text Books And Reference Books:

Whats that sound? An introduction to Rock and its history .

 

Jon CovachUniversity of Rochester

and the Eastman School of Music

Andrew Flory

Carleton College

 

W. W. NORTON AND COMPANY

NEW YORK • LONDON

fifth Edition

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Baugh, Bruce. “Prolegomena to Any Aesthetics of Rock Music”. The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, Vol. 51, No. 1 (Winter, 1993): 23-29. JSTOR. The American Society for Aesthetics. Web. 26Jul, 2016. < http://www.jstor.org/stable/431967>

Camilleri, Lelio. “Shaping Sounds, Shaping Spaces”.  Popular Music, Vol. 29, No. 2 (May 2010): 199-211. JSTOR.  Cambridge University Press. Web. 16August, 2016. <http://www.jstor.org/stable/40926918>

Chrysalis, Thanos. “Spatio-Aural Terrains”. Leonardo Music Journal, Vol. 16, Noises Off: Sound Beyond Music (2006):40-42. JSTOR. The MIT Press. Web. 29 April, 2015. http://www.jstor.org/stable/4540592

Denisoff R.S. The Sounds of Social Change: Studies in Popular USA Culture. 1972. Rand Mcnally& Co.

Denisoff, R. S.  Great Day Coming.  1991. Ann Arbor, MI: U-M-I Out-of-Print Books on Demand.

Denisoff, R. S. "Sing a Song of Social Significance": Political Consciousness and the Song of Persuasion.  1972.  Ohio: Bowling Green State University Popular Press.

Denisoff, R. S. Solid Gold Popular Record Industry.  1975. New Brunswick, New Jersey Transactions Inc

Ewen, D. Great Men of American Popular Song: The History of the American Popular Song told through the Lives, Careers, Achievements, and Personalities of its Foremost Composers and Lyricists--from William Billings of the Revolutionary War through Bob Dylan, Johnny Cash, Burt Bacharach.  1972. Englewood Cliffs, NJ, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall.

Forcucci, S. L. A Folk Song History of America: America through its Songs.  1984. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall

Fox, Aaron A.. “The Jukebox of History: Narratives of Loss and Desire in the Discourse of Country Music”. Popular Music, Vol. 11, No. 1 (Jan,1992): 53-72. JSTOR, Cambridge University Press. Web. 18March, 2011. < http://www.jstor.org/stable/853227 >

Ganchrow, Raviv. “Perspectives on Sound-Space: The Story of Acoustic Defense”. Leonardo Music Journal, Vol. 19, Our Crowd—Four Composers Pick Composers (2009): 71-75. JSTOR. The MIT Press. Web. 29April, 2015. <http://www.jstor.org/stable/40926354>

Hamm, C.  Music in the New World. 1983. New York: W.W. Norton and Company.

Hampton, W. Guerrilla Minstrels.  1986. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Kingman, D.  American Music: A Panorama. 1979. New York: Schirmer books.

Klonsky, M. “Down in The Village: A Discourse on Hip”. New American Review, 13. 1971. New York: Simon and Schuster.

Kostelanetz, Richard. “Text-Sound Art: A Survey (Concluded)”. Performing Arts Journal, Vol. 2, No. 3 (Winter, 1978): 71-84. JSTOR. Performing Arts Journal, Inc. Web. 16 August,2016. <http://www.jstor.org/stable/3245364 >

 

Kramer, Lawrence. “Music, Metaphor and Metaphysics”.  The Musical Times, Vol. 145, No. 1888 (Autumn, 2004): 5-18. JSTOR.  Musical Times Publications Ltd. Web. 26 March,2011. < http://www.jstor.org/stable/4149109>

Kun, Josh D. “The Aural Border”. Theatre Journal, Vol. 52, No. 1, Latino Performance (March. 2000): 1-21. The John Hopkins University Press. Web. 18March, 2011. < http://www.jstor.org/stable/25068738 >

Poulin, A. The American Folk Scene: Dimensions of the Folksong Revival.  1967. New York: Dell Pub. Co.

Qureshi, Regula Burckhardt. “Music Anthropologies and Music Histories: A Preface and an Agenda”. Journal of the American Musicology Society, Vol. 48, No. 3 (Autumn 1995): 331-342. JSTOR. University of California Press. Web. 18March, 2011. < http://www.jstor.org/stable/3519830 >

 

Račić, Ladislav. “On the Aesthetics of Rock Music”. International Review of the Aesthetics and Sociology of Music, Vol. 12, No. 2 (Dec.1981): 199-202. JSTOR. Croatian Musicological Society. Web. 1Dec., 2017. < http://www.jstor.org/stable/836562>

Ricks, C.  The Force of Poetry. 1995. Oxford University Press.

Rodnitzky, J. L.  Minstrels of the Dawn: The Folk-Protest Singer as a Cultural Hero. 1976. Chicago: Nelson-Hall.

Tagg, Philip. “Analyzing popular music: theory, method and practice.” Popular Music 1 (1979): 68-70. Web.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment: (20 marks).

Choose a song that has been an effective anthem for a cause or genre and analyse it in about 500-750 words.  

CIA II: (Mid Sem 50 marks) Choose a pivotal figure from Rock history and trace their career and impact on society. Consider image and sound in the construction of this image.

CIA III:(20marks) The class in groups of 5-6 will anthologise a series of songs, artists and their work.

 

Archiving:

End Semester:

 Identify a Bangalore based band or genre of popular music with approval of your course instructor . Conduct a study of their work and evolution and impact on the city and vice versa. Use data beyond library sources and provide due evidence. Your archive entry must include a 750-1000word reflective essay that validates your choice of artist, understanding of the form and significance of the work. You must also identify, interview and record these interactions. Provide clips from concerts duly cited. Include memorabilia like tickets, album art, newspaper or magazine clips  

 

EST148 - THE OCEANS IN CINEMA: A BLUE HUMANITIES READING (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Moving from land to ocean marks a shift in our understanding with fluidity as the focal point. ‘Blue Humanities’ or ‘Blue Cultural Studies’ uses the ocean as the lens to foreground diverse historical, social, cultural, economic and political aspects. The expansive field of Blue Humanities adopts a multidisciplinary approach, weaving together insights from environmental studies, oceanography, marine studies, cultural studies, film studies, history, etc. The course specifically focuses on revisiting the cliched conceptualization of the ocean as vast, alien, terra nullis and ahistorical. The ‘Oceanic Turn’ transitions from the surface to the depths below to explore the three-dimensional ocean through socio-cultural representations. Reading the ocean and the sea through cinema from across the world will help understand how the ocean is portrayed in myriad ways ‘foregrounding and problematizing issues connected to gender, race, pollution, social justice, maritime activities, privatization, globalization, capitalism ontologies’ to revisit our established thought regimes. 

Course Outcome

CO1: ? Appreciate and interpret the ocean in the light of Blue Humanities

CO2: ? Analyze and understand the changing relationships between societies and the ocean through the cinematic representations

CO3: ? Rethink and initiate action towards oceanic thinking and sustainability

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Knowing the Ocean: Re-visiting History and Origins
 

The unit will provide an alternative reading of our established understanding of ‘Origins’ with reference to the ocean – formation of the earth, the oceans, plants and animals and human beings. Destabilizing the pre-set reading of the formation of the world and prioritizing the land over the sea, the unit will help refocus the establishment of life in the Universe.

 

·       Excerpts from Rachel Carson, The Sea Around Us

·       Steve Mentz, “Two Origins: Alien or Core?”

·       Philip E. Steinberg and Kimberley Peters, “Wet Ontologies, Fluid Spaces: Giving Depth to Volume Through Oceanic Thinking”

 

 

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:13
Mapping the Ocean: Reading through Blue Humanities
 

The unit will throw light on the field of Ecocriticism with specific focus on Blue Humanities and its emerging engagement with the oceans around the world. The unit will help position the study of the oceans in the field of Humanities with specific reference to Cultural studies to frame the Blue Cultural Studies.

·       Excerpts from Sidney I. Dobrin, “Unearthing Ecocriticism”

·       John R.  Gillis – “The Blue Humanities”https://www.neh.gov/humanities/2013/mayjune/feature/the-blue-humanities

 

·       Helen M Rozwadowski, Oceans in three Paradoxes: Knowing the Blue through Humanities – Virtual Exhibition https://www.environmentandsociety.org/exhibitions/oceans-three-paradoxes

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Seeing the Ocean: Re-viewing the ocean through cinema
 

The unit will probe into pivotal aspects surrounding the construction of the ocean space through filmic representations of the ocean. The intent is to analyze through a range of issues informing the oceanic representations in films to unearth the pluri-focussed politics, both explicit and otherwise, manoeuvring through them - Maritime histories and activities, Aquatic world, Disasters, Conquests, Wars, Exploration, Adventure, Folk Tales and Myths, Colonialism and Postcolonialism, Gender, Race, Capitalism, International Relations, Globalization, Ecology and Medical Humanities.

·       James L. Smith and Steve Mentz - Learning an Inclusive Blue Humanities: Oceania and Academia through the Lens of Cinema

·       Stefan Helmreich, “Massive movie waves and the Anthropic Ocean”

·       Dilip M Menon, “Sea-Ing Malayalam Cinema”

·       Rie Karatsu, The Representation of the Sea and the Feminine in Takeshi Kitano's A Scene at the Sea (1991) and Sonatine (1993)” (SLA)

 

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Carson, Rachel. The Sea Around Us. Canongate, 2021

Dobrin, Sidney I. Blue Ecocriticism and the Oceanic Imperative. Routledge, 2021.

Mentz, Steve. An Introduction to Blue Humanities. Routledge, 2023.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

·       Blum, Hester. “Introduction: Oceanic Studies.” Atlantic Studies, vol. 10, no. 2, June 2013, pp. 151–55. 

·       Chen, Cecilia, Janine MacLeod, and Astrida Neimanis, editors. Thinking with Water. McGill-Queens Univ. Press, 2013. 

·       DeLoughrey, Elizabeth. “Toward a Critical Ocean Studies for the Anthropocene.” English Language Notes, vol. 57, no. 1, Apr. 2019, pp. 21–36.

·       Di Leo, Jeffrey R., editor. “Blue Humanities,” Symploke, vol. 27 no. 1, 2019, pp. 7-10· 

·       Gillis, John R. “The Blue Humanities.” HUMANITIES, vol. 34, no. 3, May/June 2013.

·       Jue, Melody. Wild Blue Media: Thinking through Seawater. Duke Univ. Press, 2020.

·       Mentz, Steve. “Toward a Blue Cultural Studies: The Sea, Maritime Culture, and Early Modern English Literature.” Literature Compass, vol. 6, no. 5, Sept. 2009, pp. 997–1013. 

·       Mentz, Steve. Ocean. Bloomsbury Academic, 2020.

·       Mentz, Steve. Shipwreck Modernity: Ecologies of Globalization, 1550-1719. Univ. of Minnesota Press, 2016.

·       Raban, Jonathan, editor. The Oxford Book of the Sea. Oxford Univ. Press, 1993.

·       Roorda, Eric. The Ocean Reader: History, Culture, PoliticsDuke Univ. Press, 2020. 

·       Steinberg, Philip E. The Social Construction of the Ocean. Cambridge Univ. Press, 2001.

 

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

As the course is multidisciplinary, the assessments will be done periodically to gauge the student’s level of understanding and learning. Review writing, weaving together a scrapbook, review tests and photo essays will form part of the assessment.

 End semester evaluation will be based on students setting up an online archive. They shall create an online archive selecting topics and presenting them by blending texts, theory and research. The submission will also have a viva component.  

HIS141 - HISTORY AND CINEMA (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course attempts to map out the connection between history and cinema. It aims to look at how cinema can be treated as a visual text and a source for understanding history. 

Course Outcome

CO1: To enhance and deepen the understanding of history through cinema.

CO2: To enable the students to develop their understanding and awareness of the rich possibilities of cinema and its connection with history.

CO3: To enhance the analytical skills of students and develop an understanding of how cinema engages with socio-cultural and political concerns, by placing the cinema in their historical context and engage with the current debates and future challenges with cinema as a medium.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Unit 1
 

a)   History as a narrative – History and Truth Contested Notions –Ideology, Sources and Historian

b)   Multiple Identities and Histories – History as a point of reference – Issues of Legitimacy & Justification.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Unit 2
 

a)     Cinema as a narrative – Words and Images – Genre- Representation Vs. Reality – Propaganda – selling History. 

b)    Language of Cinema- Color – Angles – Movement

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
UNIT 2
 

a)     Cinema as a narrative – Words and Images – Genre- Representation Vs. Reality – Propaganda – selling History. 

b)    Language of Cinema- Color – Angles – Movement

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Unit 3
 

a)     Between History and Cinema:  The problem of linear narratives and flash back – questions of authenticity – definition of authenticity.

b)    Cinema as a political, social and historical text.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Chapman, J. (2003). Cinemas of the World: Film and Society from 1895 to the Present. Reaktion Books.

Chapman, J., Glancy, M., & Harper, S. (Eds.). (2007). The new film history: sources, methods, approaches. Springer.

Ferro, M. (1988). Cinema and history. Wayne State University Press.

Chapman, J. (2005). Past and present: national identity and the British historical. London: IB Tauris.

Miskell, P. (2004). Historians and film. In Making History (pp. 253-264). Routledge.

Nowell-Smith, G. (Ed.). (1996). The Oxford history of world cinema. OUP Oxford.

Raghavendra, M. K. (2014). Seduced by the Familiar: Narration and Meaning in Indian Popular Cinema. Oxford University Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Chapman, J. (2013). Cinema, propaganda and national identity: British film and the Second World War. In British Cinema, Past and Present (pp. 213-226). Routledge.

Miskell, P. (2005). Seduced by the silver screen: Film addicts, critics and cinema regulation in Britain in the 1930s and 1940s. Business History47(3), 433-448.

Sedgwick, J., Miskell, P., & Nicoli, M. (2019). The market for films in postwar Italy: Evidence for both national and regional patterns of taste. Enterprise & Society20(1), 199-228.

Raghavendra, M. K. (2011). Bipolar identity: Region, nation, and the Kannada language film. Oxford University Press.

Raghavendra, M. K. (2014). The Politics of Hindi Cinema in the New Millennium: Bollywood and the Anglophone Indian Nation.

Sanyal, D. (2021). MK Raghavendra, “Locating World Cinema: Interpretations of Film as Culture” (Bloomsbury Academic India, 2020).

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1:  10 Marks            

CIA 2:  Mid Semester Examinations 25 Marks

CIA 3:  10 Marks

End semester examination: 50 Marks

Attendance: 5 Marks

MED143 - CELEBRITY PR (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course attempts to understand the nature, process and issues related to celebrity actors and their presence, which inadvertently contribute to the success of films.

Course Outcome

CO1: Will be able to understand the concept of celebrity PR

CO2: Will be able to understand the role of celebrity presence in the success of a film

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Understanding PR as Strategic Communication
 

PR concept, role and relevance in selling goods/services; Brief history & evolution of PR. Competing forces for PR-Advertising, Publicity, Marketing/Sales. PR as distinct from spin, hype & exaggeration. Top Bollywood PR firms in India-Dale Bhagwagar PR, Raindrops, Spice PR, Aspire PR.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Celebrity PR and Bollywood
 

Bollywood and the need and emergence ofCelebrity PR, early beginnings, and present status. Acquiring and sustaining celebrity status through PR, Celebrity brand building & nurturing. PR in celebrity reputation management. Building the celebrity profile through analysis and research. Case Study-The making of Shilpa Shetty (UK's Big Brother Reality TV), Amitabh Bachchan and KBC, Aamir Khan and Satyameva Jayate

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Celebrity PR Responsibilities & Activities
 

Interviews, Press conferences,Rejoinders,Official comments/no comments. Organising events-Public 'meet and greet', Social events of significance, Public gatherings-award functions, airport meets.  Helping to manage crisis--damaging details from celebrity past, social media criticism and backlash, dealing with success and failure with grace and dignity, Helping deal with paparazzi encounter

Text Books And Reference Books:

Barron, Lee. (2015). Celebrity Cultures: An Introduction. SAGE Publications Ltd. Bräu, Marlena. (2013), Twitter Kills The Publicity Star? How social media is influencing the business of Celebrity PR. Grin Verlag Publishing, Germany. Jonas, C Priyanka. (2021). Unfinished: A Memoir. Penguin Viking.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Raju, J Jeetu. (2020). Escape the rat race. Google Books, Thames Publication. Stewart, B James and Abrams, Rachel. (2023). Unscripted: The Epic Battle for a Hollywood Media Empire. Penguin Books.

Evaluation Pattern

Single assessment of 50 marks

MED144 - HARRY POTTER AND CONTEMPORARY ISSUES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course will provide students the opportunity to apply a variety of interdisciplinary approaches on popular young adult narratives. Students will be exposed to the real -world culture and physical environment that produced, shaped, and continues to inform the Harry Potter series, giving students greater insight into the importance of textual awareness and analysis.

Course Outcome

CO1: Explore the socio-cultural, historical, and technological perspectives behind Harry Potter phenomenon.

CO2: Develop critical thinking skills

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
History of wizards in cinema
 

History of wizards in cinema – P L Travers, Disney era, rise of Nanny McPhee, Arrival of Harry potter in bookstores, narrative development of book 1 – Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, Deconstruction of characters, significance of four houses, potions, beasts and spells.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Hogwarts a world class school
 

Hogwarts a world class school – dynamics of homework, relationship, bullying, teachers, team spirits and opponents, wizards and other, Debates on Morality, Technology and Media in Potter world, Privacy concerns with magical objects, Cultural Hegemony, Case Study on Snape and Dumbledore

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Sociological perspective
 

Sociological perspective – idea of home, community, clan and society, class struggle and dynamics, Aurora and Azkaban, Representation of Gender, Idea of family and institution, construction of power structures

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Film Screening
 

Screening of First and Last Harry Potter films

Text Books And Reference Books:

Harry Potter and Sorcerer’s Stone, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0590353427)

Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0439064873)

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0439136365)

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0439139601)

Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0439358071)

Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0439785969)

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0545139700)

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

Whited, L A & Grimes, K. (2015). Critical Insights: The Harry Potter Series. Salem Books.

Bell, C E (2018). Inside the World of Harry Potter: Critical Essays on the Books and Films.McFarland Publishers.

Evaluation Pattern

Assignments will be done through Google Classroom

CIA -1 – Class Test– 20 marks

CIA 2 –  – 50 marks

CIA 3 – Group Assignment – 20 marks

End Semester - Project – 50 marks

MED145 - SOCIAL MEDIA (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

The Social Media course is designed as an engaging and comprehensive undergraduate elective that explores the dynamic and influential world of social media. In this course, students will gain a critical understanding of the social media , their impact on society, and their role in shaping communication and democracy.

Course Outcome

CO1: Develop a comprehensive critical understanding of social media.

CO2: Identify the strengths and weaknesses of social media platforms.

CO3: Critically create social media content.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Social Media
 

Definition and characteristics of social media

Evolution and historical context of social media for democracy

 

Key technological features and functionalities.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Social media for democracy
 

Cultural implications of social media use

Social media's impact on political mobilization and activism

 

Utilizing social media for positive social change and advocacy

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Social media and individual
 

Agency and social media

Personal data and issues

 Identity and Social media

Text Books And Reference Books:

Digital Disconnect: How Capitalism Is Turning the Internet Against Democracy  by Robert W. McChesney

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

The Social Media Reader by Michael Mandiber

Evaluation Pattern

 

CIA 1 – Submission of social media platform introduction video (5 marks)

CIA 2 –Submission of 3 Instagram posts and reels based on the class discussions (15Marks)

CIA 3 – Submission of 3 Snaps based on a critical view of social media. (15 Marks)

CIA4- Submission of 3 Tweets, A Facebook post, and Instagram Live on social media & democracy (15 Marks)

All CIAs   – Department level only; All submissions.

PHY142 - ANALOG AND DIGITAL ELECTRONICS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This multidisciplinary course on Basic Electronics and Gadgets is aimed at giving a feel of electronics to non science/core students. It helps them in knowing the fundamentals of various electronic gadgets they use in daily life and related technologies. The course covers  categories of consumer electronic systems, electronic audio systems, basic colour television and video systems, communication systems covering telephone , mobile phone fundamentals and basics of computerhardware. This programme also tries to create awareness about e-waste and its effective management.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand basics of electronic devices and circuits

CO2: Describe the working principles of audio , video and communication systems

CO3: Discuss the fundamentals of computer hardware and e-waste management.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Electronics
 

Electronics and its applications. Electronic components: Resistors, Capacitors, inductors- types, uses. Conductors, insulators, semiconductors- definitions. Semiconductor materials- Silicon, Germanium, semiconductor devices: Diode- working and application of diode as rectifier, Transistor- working, transistor as an amplifier, electronic switch. Electronic DC power supply- basic block diagram. Basics of measuring instruments- DMM and CRO. Hands on with tinkercad tool.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Fundamentals Of Electronic Communication Systems
 

Basic principle of electronic communication-. Basic operation of transmitter and receivers. AM and FM radio receivers- qualitative description. Frequency allotment. Basics of Microphone, Loud speakers Principle of TV transmission and reception, Colour TV principle,. Digital TV principle- set top converter box, Optical fiber cables- principle of operation, advantages. Fundamentals of cellular mobile phone- Cells, coverage area, roaming, operation (qualitative description). Latest trends in mobile phones, smart phones, generations.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Basics of Computer Hardware and e waste management
 

Fundamentals of Digital computer, microprocessors, motherboards, power supply - SMPS,  mouse, keyboard, memory devices, Modems, monitors, printers, latest trends in computers, specifications. Internet fundamentals

Electronic waste- brief description, qualitative discussion of hazards of e-waste, the materials responsible, management of e-waste, Indian and global current scenario of e-waste and its management.

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1]. V K Mehta and Rohit Mehta (2011),Principles of Electronics, S Chand and Co, New Delhi.

[2]. B R Gupta (2008) Consumer Electronics, 4th Edition, Kataria &sons, New Delhi.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[3]. Bob Goodman (2002. ),How electronic things work, TMH

[4]. https://www.tinkercad.com 

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation will be based on internal assessment components and a written exam at the end of the course.

Internal assesment : 50 marks

Written exam : 50 marks

PSY101-1 - INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This first-semester course introduces undergraduate psychology majors to the scientific study of human nature. The student would be able to understand how psychologists ask questions from several different perspectives. Students will learn about the various scientific methods psychologists use to study behaviour and become acquainted with many of psychology's important findings and theoretical approaches. Further, students will be able to appreciate the shape that contemporary psychology has taken. The aim is to build a familiarity with psychology’s intellectual origins and to foster an awareness of its many false steps, dead-ends, and alternative pathways to appreciating the social, cultural, and psychological influences on theorising in psychology. The course will equip the student with knowledge and scope for careers in psychology and develop an understanding of the professional skills required for such a career. Students will have learned to think critically about psychological evidence through journal clubs and class discussions embedded in the course.

Course Outcome

CO1: Explain the fundamental concepts, principles, and scientific approaches in psychology.

CO2: Evaluate the history of psychology and how it has impacted today?s society.

CO3: Reflect on the different career paths, roles, challenges, and responsibilities of a psychologist

CO4: Critically analyse psychological research and different psychological issues with evidence-based reasoning.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
CO1. Explain the fundamental concepts, principles and scientific approaches in psychology.
 

Definition, Goals, Principles of psychology. Psychology as a science: Objectivity versus subjectivity. mind-body connection; Why study behaviour; Thinking like a psychologist about psychological information; Myths and misconceptions about psychology

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
CO2. Evaluate the history of psychology and how it has impacted today?s society.
 

Roots of psychology: Schools and perspectives of psychology, including Structuralism, Functionalism, Psychodynamic, Biological, Behaviouristic, Gestalt, Cognitive, Humanistic, Cross-cultural and Evolutionary. Eastern philosophies broader perspectives– Confucius and Taoism, Indian - Buddhism, (special comparing Eastern and Western principles in major concepts like consciousness and meditation). Psychology in modern India (Indigenous nature) 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
CO3. Reflect on the different roles, challenges and responsibilities of the psychologist
 

Why study psychology? what is the scope Describe the value of psychology and possible career paths for those who study psychology? Specific focus on opportunities after BA; Allied professionals -social work, public health Broad focus on professional skills (especially as a practitioner and researcher) essential to be a psychologist and discuss the temper required to pursue psychology as a career. What can students do at BA to pursue a career in psychology? Multicultural and ethical issues; professional responsibility- Personal and professional roles.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
CO4: Critically analyse psychological research and different psychological issues with evidence-based reasoning
 

Methods – use of scientific methods in psychology; scientific temper. How to review literature- discuss current issues and trends- Mental health literacy, psychological literacy, Current trends in Psychology, and issues discussed in CO 1,2 or 3

Writing and communicating using APA standards -Critically reviewing academic texts (books, journal articles etc.). APA style of writing Basic APA formatting for articles, APA referencing style, Academic writing skills.  

Text Books And Reference Books:

Feldman, R. S. (2011). Understanding Psychology. Tata McGraw Hill.

Weiten, W. (2014). Psychology: Themes and Variations (Briefer Version, 9th edition). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/Cengage Learning. 

American Psychological Association. (2020). Publication manual of the American Psychological Association (7th Ed.).https://doi.org/10. 1037/0000165-000

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Ciccarelli, S.K. & White, J. N. (2012). Psychology (3rd edition). Pearson Education. 

Dalal, A. K., & Misra, G. (2010). The core and context of Indian psychology. Psychology and developing societies, 22(1), 121-155.

Brennan, J.F. (2003). History and systems of psychology (6thEdn.).New Delhi: Pearson Education Inc.

Hergenhahn, B.R. & Henley, T. (2013). An Introduction to the History of Psychology. Belmont, CA: Cengage Learning.

Hockenbury, D. H. & Hockenbury, S. E. (2011). Discovering Psychology (5th edition). Worth Publishers 

 Showman, A., Cat, L. A., Cook, J., Holloway, N., & Wittman, T. (2013). Five essential skills for every undergraduate researcher. Council on Undergraduate Research Quarterly, 33(3), 16+. https://link.gale.com/a pps/doc/A324399343/ AONE?u=monash&sid =googleScholar&xid= a3697d9b

Evaluation Pattern

5 marks for attendance as per University Policy

CIA 1 & 3 will be individual assignments

CIA2- will be a mid-semester exam- with case study-based questions

End Semester Pattern- 2 hrs- 50 Marks

Section A (Very Short Answer). 2 Marks X 5Qs= 10 Marks

Section B (Short answers). 5 Marks X 2Qs= 10 Marks

Section C (Essay questions). 10 Marks X 2Qs= 20 Marks

Section D (Case study). 10 Marks x 1Q= 10 Marks

SOC141 - WOMEN'S ISSUES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course aims at enabling the student to study and understand the problems and issues relating to women in Indian society in the context of wider social forces. This course will sensitize students on the issues of subjugation of and oppression prevalent against women in Indian society and enhance their understanding of the various social problems that women face in the society.

Course objectives :

●        To introduce the students to social issues relating to women

●        To explore gender relations from an interdisciplinary perspective 

Course Outcome

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Unit I: Sociological Understanding of Social Problem with a Gender Perspective
 
  1. Conceptualization of a social problem                                         
  2. Structural and functional perspective, cultural roots, and critical analysis of social issues under power, ideology, and hegemony.
  3.  Understanding Gender and subjugation of gender.
Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Unit I: Sociological Understanding of Social Problem with a Gender Perspective
 
  1. Conceptualization of a social problem                                         
  2. Structural and functional perspective, cultural roots, and critical analysis of social issues under power, ideology, and hegemony.
  3.  Understanding Gender and subjugation of gender.
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Unit II: Problems of Inequality
 
  1. Poverty - Concept of poverty, its multidimensional manifestations, Feminization of Poverty.
  2. Caste Inequality - Concept of caste, nature of inequality and position of women within it.
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Unit II: Problems of Inequality
 
  1. Poverty - Concept of poverty, its multidimensional manifestations, Feminization of Poverty.
  2. Caste Inequality - Concept of caste, nature of inequality and position of women within it.
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit III: Problems of Violence and Discrimination
 
  1. Violence against Women: Cultural setting, Dowry, acid attacks, physical and sexual abuse, Global Sex Market.
  2. Missing Millions- Skewed sex ratio, son preference
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit III: Problems of Violence and Discrimination
 
  1. Violence against Women: Cultural setting, Dowry, acid attacks, physical and sexual abuse, Global Sex Market.
  2. Missing Millions- Skewed sex ratio, son preference
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Unit IV: Problem of Personal Well-being
 
  1. Women and Health : Reproductive health
  2. Aging and women
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Unit IV: Problem of Personal Well-being
 
  1. Women and Health : Reproductive health
  2. Aging and women
Text Books And Reference Books:

Bhasin, K. (1994). What is Patriarchy? New Delhi: Kali for Women.

Beteille, A. (1990). Race, Caste and Gender. Man, 25(3), 489–504. https://doi.org/10.2307/2803715

John, Mary E. (2008). Women’s Studies in India: A Reader. New Delhi:Penguin Books.

Krishnaraj, M. (2007). Understanding Violence against Women. Economic and Political Weekly, 42(44), 90–91. http://www.jstor.org/stable/40276750

Kotiswaran, P. (2008). Born Unto Brothels: Toward a Legal Ethnography of Sex Work in an Indian Red-Light Area. Law & Social Inquiry, 33(3), 579–629. http://www.jstor.org/stable/20108776

KUMAR, A. K. S. (2013). The Neglect of Health, Women and Justice. Economic and Political Weekly, 48(23), 25–27. http://www.jstor.org/stable/23527205

 

Karkal, M. (1999). Ageing and Women in India. Economic and Political Weekly, 34(44), WS54–WS56. http://www.jstor.org/stable/4408566

 

Merton, R and Nisbet. (1966). Contemporary Social Problems, New York: Harcourt, Brace and World.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bhasin, K. (1994). What is Patriarchy? New Delhi: Kali for Women.

Evaluation Pattern

Internal Assessment:

CIA 1  10 marks (conducted out of 20 )- Class Presentations

CIA 2 10 marks (conducted out of 20 )- Article Review

CIA 3 25 marks (conducted out of 50 ) - Prferably an exam

Attendance 5 marks 

 

SOC143 - SOCIOLOGY THROUGH CINEMA (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course will begin with a session on the Sociology of Cinema and the tools and techniques necessary to analyze the films that will be used in this course as a vehicle to examine society sociologically. This course introduces the student to the discipline of Sociology through cinema from India and elsewhere. It aims to allow students to critically examine society through cinema and its representation.

Course objectives:

  • To enable students to view cinema as a text for sociological analysis
  •  To gain an introduction to the discipline of sociology through cinema

Course Outcome

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Introduction to Sociology
 
  1. Sociology as a discipline
  2. Sociological Imagination
  3. Theoretical perspectives
Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Introduction to Sociology
 
  1. Sociology as a discipline
  2. Sociological Imagination
  3. Theoretical perspectives
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Social Structure
 
  1. Community, Association and Institution  
  2. Status and role
  3. Power and authority

Films: Dor (2006), Prem Rog (1982), Roja (1992)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Social Structure
 
  1. Community, Association and Institution  
  2. Status and role
  3. Power and authority

Films: Dor (2006), Prem Rog (1982), Roja (1992)

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Culture and Socialization
 
  1. Culture
  2. Socialization
  3. Conformity and Deviance

Films: Taare Zameen Par (2007)

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Culture and Socialization
 
  1. Culture
  2. Socialization
  3. Conformity and Deviance

Films: Taare Zameen Par (2007)

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Social Stratification
 
  1. Sex and gender
  2. Race and Ethnicity
  3. Caste and Class 

 Films: Lajja (2001), India Untouched: Stories of a People Apart (2007)

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Social Stratification
 
  1. Sex and gender
  2. Race and Ethnicity
  3. Caste and Class 

 Films: Lajja (2001), India Untouched: Stories of a People Apart (2007)

Text Books And Reference Books:

Burton, E. (1988 ). Sociology and the feature film. Teaching Sociology 16: 263-271.

Dudrah, R K. (2006).  Bollywood: Sociology goes to the Movies. New Delhi: Sage Publications.

Prendergast, C. (1986 ). Cinema Sociology: Cultivating the Sociological Imagination through Popular Film. Teaching Sociology 14: 243-248.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Mills, C. W. (2023). The sociological imagination. In Social Work (pp. 105-108). Routledge.

Evaluation Pattern
CIA 1  10 marks (conducted out of 20 )
 
CIA 2 10 marks (conducted out of 20 )
 
CIA 3 25 marks (conducted out of 50 ) 
 
Attendance 5 marks 

THE101-1 - INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

·      This course aims at giving basic in the Theatre and its elements.

·      Orientation to the Theatre Ensemble.

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the basic elements of theatre

CO2: Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the nature of Theatre as different from other forms of arts

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:45
Introduction to Aspects of Theatre
 

Introduction to Playwriting, Acting, Directing, Setting, Costume, Makeup, Lighting &Sound

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Theatre Space and Technology
 

·      Introduction to Theatre spaces- Amphitheatre, Proscenium, Theatre in the round (Arena), Thrust stage, Found space, Environmental space.

·      Poster, Leaflet/Brochure development

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. The Art of Theatre by Downs, William Missouri, Lou Anne Wright, and Erik Ramsey  Edition: Fourth Edition Publisher: Boston: Cengage Learning, 2018
  2. Backwards and Forwards: A Technical Manual for Reading Plays by David Ball Publisher: Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1983.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Acting: Onstage and Off by Barton, Robert Edition: Seventh Edition Publisher: Boston: Cengage Learning, 2016
  2. The Creative Habit by Tharp, Twyla Publisher: New York: Simon & Schuster, 2006
  3. Outstanding Short Plays by Pospisil, Craig Publisher: New York, Dramatists Play Service, 2012
  4. Rhinoceros and Other Plays by Ionesco, Eugene translated by Derek Prouse Publisher: New York: Grove Press, 1960 
Evaluation Pattern

Practical designs work with models, and the Poster/Brochure exhibition will be the End Semester Examination.

THE161-1 - VOICE AND MOVEMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of movement and voice training for theatre. Students gain skills to improve their physical awareness, body alignment, and movement. The voice training part of the course is based on the phonopedic method of voice development. The students will learn to safely perform fight choreography.

Course Outcome

CO1: Confidently perform a choreographed fight, using unarmed combat techniques, within the context of a dramatic scene.

CO2: The ability to describe, notate, and perform basic movement and voice qualities.

CO3: Increased physical concentration in performance

CO4: An understanding of how movement and vocal qualities are utilized to develop character.

CO5 : An understanding of how movement and vocal qualities are utilized to develop character.

CO6 : The ability to intertwine movement and voice with text.

CO7: Ensemble awareness.

CO8: Be able to pronounce texts by effectively using natural human resonators.

CO9: To determine the appropriate practical voice techniques for solving dramaturgical tasks within the framework of the performance in the play.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Stage combat
 

·        Safety in choreography and performing the stage fight sequence.

·        Receiving the kicks and punches with a ‘knap’.

·        Performing slaps, punches, kicks, and wrestling on a stage.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Voice
 

·        Developing clarity, articulation, and voice modulation.

·        Voice projection

·        Creating voice for building a character

·        Resonances in singing

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Stage Movement
 

• Exercises to develop the flexibility and endurance of a body.

• Removing physical ‘blocks’.

• Body language as a part of ‘building’ a character.

• Creating an ensemble

Text Books And Reference Books:

Murray, Simon David, Jacques Lecoq.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Ken Rea,  The outstanding actor: seven keys to success.

Evaluation Pattern

The students will be tested on the learnt skills of movements, voice and stage combat through demonstration.

BLS143 - PRINCIPLES OF HORTICULTURAL TECHNIQUES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course introduces students to the principles and techniques of horticulture. Students will learn the basics of plant growth, propagation, and cultivation. The course will cover soil management, irrigation, pruning, pest control, and greenhouse production. Students will also explore sustainable horticultural practices and their applications in various horticultural settings.

Course Outcome

CO1: Explain the principles and practices of plant growth and development.

CO2: Demonstrate proficiency in plant propagation techniques.

CO3: Apply soil management and irrigation techniques to promote plant growth and health

CO4: Design and implement a pest management plan for a horticultural operation.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Horticulture
 
  • Principles and practices of horticulture
  • Plant anatomy and physiology
  • Plant propagation techniques: seed, cuttings, and grafting
  • Introduction to sustainable horticulture practices
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Soil Management and Irrigation
 
  • Soil properties and nutrient management
  • Soil fertility and composting
  • Irrigation principles and techniques
  • Greenhouse production and management
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Pruning and Pest Control
 
  • Pruning techniques and tools
  • Insect and disease management
  • Integrated pest management (IPM)
  • Biological control of pests
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Sustainable Horticulture Practices
 
  • Sustainable practices in horticulture
  • Environmental stewardship in horticulture
  • Marketing sustainable horticulture products
  • Horticultural entrepreneurship
Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Hartmann, H. T., Kester, D. E., Davies Jr, F. T., & Geneve, R. L. (2014). Plant propagation: Principles and practices (9th ed.). Prentice Hall.
  2. Grubinger, V. (2002). Introduction to sustainable horticulture. University of Vermont Extension.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Lambers, H., Chapin III, F. S., & Pons, T. L. (2008). Plant physiological ecology (2nd ed.). Springer.
  • Stanghellini, C. (2004). Greenhouse production science in horticulture. CRC Press.
Evaluation Pattern

Attendance and Class Participation- 10%

Midterm Examination- 30%

Review paper/Research Paper- 20%

Seminar presentation – 10%

Final Examination - 30%

ECO147 - THINKING THROUGH THE ENVIRONMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The natural environment necessarily lends itself to multiple disciplinary inquiries. While science and economics provide data, systems of information, knowledge, and models of management about the earth and its resources, environmental ethics enables one to ask ‘How then, should we live?’ This course aims to provide a holistic and deeper understanding of the environment, its varied interpretations, and ways of relating to it. This course also seeks to cultivate moral and ethical thinking about the environment to develop the basics of sustainable living. 

 To sensitize the students and make them think critically about the environment, especially when technology and infrastructure projects rule over the environmental spaces.

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate an understanding of the various environmental consciousness and movements across global as well as national boundaries

CO2: Critically evaluate ways by which an economist could be explained environment

CO3: Explain the nexus between gender and the environment

CO4: To value ethics as the heart of the environmental consciousness.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Environmentalism
 

Environmentalism – tracing the history of global environmental consciousness and movements – Varieties of environmentalism – English love of the country – Wilderness thinking in America – Chipko and Silent Valley movements in India

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Economics of the Environment and its Critique
 

Environmental Economics – resource economics – ecological economics; How economists see the environment; Economics of renewable and exhaustible resources; Carbon trading; Economist’s perspective on Sustainability; Concepts of environmental values – Total economic value; Standard methods to value the environment; Reconsidering Economics; Bounded rationality and the environment

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Ecofeminism and Ecocriticism
 

Gender and environment; Ecofeminism; androcentrism; Deep ecology – ecofeminism debate; Ecocriticism; Romantic ecology; Nature writings; Thinking like a mountain; The forgetting and remembering of the air 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Environmental Ethics
 

Environmental Ethics; An autobiography of your relationship with the earth; Environmental justice; Discounting; Climate change debates; Environmental refugees; The inconvenient truth; Basics of sustainable living; Know your carbon footprints

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.     Abram, D. (1996). The Spell of the Sensuous: Perception and Language in a More-than-human World. New York: Vintage Books

2.     Bhattacharya, R.N. (2004). Environmental Economics. Oxford University Press

3.     Clark, T. (2011). Literature and the Environment. Cambridge University Press

4.     Garrard, G. (2011). Ecocriticism. Routledge

5.     Guha, R. (2000). Environmentalism. Oxford University Press

6.     Leopold, A. (1949).  A Sand County Almanac. Oxford: Oxford University Press

7.     Sankar, U. (ed.) (2000). Environmental Economics. Oxford University Press

8.     Stavins, R.N. (Ed.) (2012). Economics of the Environment. New York, London: W.W. Norton

9.     Carson, R. (1963). Silent Spring. London: Hamish Hamilton

10.  Martinez – Alier, J. (2002). The Environmentalism of the Poor: A Study of Ecological Conflicts and Valuation. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar

11.  Plumwood, V. (1993).  Feminism and the Mastery of Nature. London: Routledge

 

12.  Warren, K.J. (ed), (1994).  Ecological Feminism. London: Routledge.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 Bhattacharya, R.N. (2004). Environmental Economics. Oxford University Press

Sankar, U. (ed.) (2000). Environmental Economics. Oxford University Press

Guha, R. (2000). Environmentalism. Oxford University Press

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1A-10 MARKS

CIA1B-15 MARKS

CIA2-20 MARKS

ATTENDANCE-5 MARKS

ENG183-2 - WRITING SKILLS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The ‘Writing Skills’ course introduces the students of Theatre and Music to the various forms of writings in a workplace.  Communication in a workplace depends on clear, effective written words. It emphasizes the importance of writing at work; helps the students to observe, to think, to plan, to organize and to communicate. 

Course Outcome

CO1: Awareness of how to read, think and write

CO2: Ability to explore and idea, concept

CO3: Ability to think and write clearly, critically, persuasively and ethically to a deadline

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
Rhetoric of Writing
 

a.   Writer

b.   Purpose

c.   Audience

d.   Tone

e.   Context 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
The Writing Process
 

1.  The different kinds of Essays

a. Planning

b. Drafting

c. Revising

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Research
 
  1. The Purpose of Research

a.     Basic Skills of Researching

b.     Collecting Information from People

c.     Collecting Published Information

d.     Designing Pages

e.     Design for Readers

f.      Elements of Page Design

 Basic Design Guidelines

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:3
Documentation
 
  1. MLA style, APA style, Chicago Manual Style
Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Using Visual Aid
 
  1. Creating and Discussing Visual Aids
  2. Using: Tables; Line graphs; Bar graphs; Pie charts; Flow charts
  3. Using illustrations: Photographs; Drawings; Guidelines
Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
Reports and Proposals
 
  1. Memorandums
  2.  Informal Reports -

a.     IMRD Reports

b.      Progress Reports

c.     Formal Reports

d.     Recommendation Reports

e.     Feasibility Reports

f.       Oral Reports

  1.  Proposals
Text Books And Reference Books:

Will be provided by the course instructor

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Will be provided by the course instructor

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1: 20

CIA 2: 50

CIA 3: 20

ESE: 50

Assessment pattern:

 

Attendance

 

CIA (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

10%

40%

50 %

EST153 - PARTITION NARRATIVES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

Partition is a significant and recurring theme in the history of many nations. It represents not just a division of land but also a rupture in the lives of people, impacting their identities, cultures, and relationships. Through a diverse selection of literature, this course seeks to examine the complex, multifaceted, and often painful narratives that emerge from partition events around the world. It is an engaging and thought-provoking exploration of literary works that delve into the multifaceted and often traumatic experiences of partition in various countries. This course delves into the human, emotional, and societal consequences of dividing nations and communities, providing a comprehensive view of this historical phenomenon. The course will journey into different regions (with a focus on Indian Partition), exploring literary responses to partition, both in the form of creative works such as novels, short stories, and poetry, as well as critical essays that provide theoretical frameworks for understanding these narratives.

Course Objectives:

CO1: To develop a nuanced understanding of the historical, cultural, and human dimensions of partition through the study of literature from various affected countries.

CO2: To analyze and critically engage with the ways in which literature serves as a medium for reflecting the impact of partition on individuals and societies.

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will demonstrate an in-depth understanding of the complex historical, social, and cultural contexts of partition in various countries.

CO2: Students will be able to critically analyze and interpret literary works that explore the emotional, psychological, and societal ramifications of partition.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:3
Unit 1 - Introduction
 

Introduction to Partition and connected themes - Identity and Belonging, Displacement and Migration, Violence and Trauma, Loss and Grief, Family and Relationships, Nationalism and Politics, Cultural and Social Changes, Memory and Remembrance, Reconciliation and Healing, Borders and Geopolitics, Nation-Building, Resistance and Resilience

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Unit 2 - Short Stories
 

“Toba Tek Singh” – Saadat Hasan Manto

“Cranes” – Hwang Sun-Won

East-West Tale of a Sundered City” – Jill Smolove (non-fiction)

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Unit 3 - Visual/Audio Text
 

Earth – Deepa Mehta (movie)

Dekh Tere Sansaar ki Haalat kya ho gayi Bhagwan”- Nastik ­– Pradeep (song)

The Migration Series – Jacob Lawrence (select paintings)

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 4 - Poetry
 

“Blind Smoke” – Arjan ‘Shad’ Mirchandani

“To Waris Shah” – Amrita Pritam

“Migrations” – Keki Daruwalla

“Neither an Elegey nor a Manifesto” – John Hewitt

“A Poem that Came Easily” - Yun Tongju

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Unit 5 - Critical Works
 

"Sri Lanka: The Last Phase in Eelam War IV" - SinhaRaja Tammita-Delgoda (Case-study)

Introduction to Remembering Partition: Violence, Nationalism, and History - Gyanendra Pandey

“Berlin Wall anniversary: Stories from the wall from those who remember” – BBC (video)

Text Books And Reference Books:

Lynch, Robert. The Partition of Ireland 1918-1925. Cambridge, United Kingdom, Cambridge University Press, 2019.

Anindya Raychaudhuri. Narrating South Asian Partition : Oral History, Literature, Cinema. New York, Ny, Oxford University Press, 2019.

Pandey, Gyanendra. "Remembering Partition: Violence, Nationalism, and History." Modern Asian Studies, vol. 31, no. 3, 1997, pp. 763-810.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bhalla, Alok. “Memory, History and Fictional Representations of the Partition.” Economic and Political Weekly, vol. 34, no. 44, 1999, pp. 3119–28. JSTORhttp://www.jstor.org/stable/4408572. Accessed 29 Oct. 2023.

Demick, Barbara. Nothing to Envy: Ordinary Lives in North Korea. Spiegel & Grau, 2009.

Khan, Yasmin. The Great Partition: The Making of India and Pakistan. Yale University Press, 2007.

Laffan, Michael. "The Partition of Ireland: 1911-25." Irish Historical Studies, vol. 36, no. 141, 2008, pp. 36-54.

Nico Medina, What was the Berlin Wall. Penguin Books, 2019.

Puri, Kavita, editor. Partition Voices: Untold British StoriesBloomsbury Publishing, 2019.

Rushdie, Salman. Midnight's Children. Random House, 1981.

Schneider, Peter. The Wall Jumper. University of Chicago Press, 1983.

Sen, Sanghita and Neeta Gupta, editors. Partition: Stories of Separation. HarperCollins India, 2017.

Sidhwa, Bapsi. Ice-Candy Man. Penguin Books, 1991.

Singh, Khushwant. Train to Pakistan. Penguin Books, 2008.

Taylor, Frederick. The Berlin Wall: A World Divided, 1961-1989. Harper, 2006.

Partition Museum - The Partition Museum

Un-Divided Identities: Unknown Stories of the Partition | Retihaas| ReReeti

BBC Radio 4 - Partition Voices

 

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA I – 20 Marks

Creative Writing – Partition Memoir – Write a fictional memoir/journal entries/short story from the perspective of someone who has lived through any historical partition

CIA II (Mid Semester)20 Marks

1.     Partition and Popular Culture – Group presentation

These are suggested examples of CIAs. However, during the course of teaching, there could be other suggestions, and CIAs could be slightly modified based on class dynamics and caliber of students.

End Semester Project – 50 Marks

Partition-inspired/themed Visual Art or Multimedia Project: Choose a partition event or theme and create a visual art piece or multimedia project (video, photography exhibit, or digital storyboard) that conveys the impact of partition.

 

EST156 - RETELLING OF EPICS IN INDIAN LITERATURE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

This course will explore the diverse traditions of Indian epics through retellings in Indian literature and other art forms well into the twenty-first century. The primary interest will be understanding the social, cultural, and political stakes attached to individual retellings of each epic. We will also engage with the new adaptations of the epics like Indian television serials, film versions and invocations of the epic stories in contemporary art and culture. Students will gain exposure to the diversified social structures in India that these stories reproduce, as well as resistance to those structures.

Course Objectives

CO1     To demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the major Indian epics and their historical and cultural significance.

CO2     To critically analyse and compare multiple retellings of Indian epics in different literary forms, such as prose, poetry, drama, and visual media, highlighting variations in themes, interpretations, and artistic choices.

CO3     To place these epics within the broader cultural and historical context of India, considering how they have influenced and been influenced by various aspects of Indian society, including religion, philosophy, art, and politics.

CO4     To apply their knowledge by creating their creative adaptations of Indian epics. This includes writing, performance, or other forms of artistic expression that reflect an in-depth understanding of the source material.

 

CO5     To engage in critical discourse by participating in class discussions, presenting research findings, and writing essays demonstrating their ability to analyse, interpret, and critically evaluate retellings of Indian epics while considering their cultural and literary implications.

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will gain a deeper understanding of Indian culture, traditions, and values as they explore the retelling of epics. They will recognise the importance of these narratives in shaping Indian identity and societal norms.

CO2: By critically examining various retellings of Indian epics, students will develop advanced literary analysis skills, enabling them to dissect complex narratives, themes, and stylistic elements in both classical and contemporary literature.

CO3: Students will acquire an interdisciplinary perspective by connecting the retellings of Indian epics to fields such as history, philosophy, religion, and sociology. They will appreciate how these narratives have influenced and been influenced by multiple aspects of Indian society.

CO4: Through creating their retellings of Indian epics, students will demonstrate proficiency in adapting and reimagining classical narratives in a culturally sensitive and creative manner.

CO5: Students will develop critical thinking skills as they engage in discussions and produce written assignments that require them to reflect on the diverse interpretations and adaptations of Indian epics. They will learn to express their ideas and arguments coherently and persuasively.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Essays
 

Rohit Sharma: The Art of Rewriting Indian Epics” (National)

A.K. Ramanujan: “Three Hundred Ramayanas: Five Examples and Three Thoughts on

          Translation” (Regional)

Pradip Bhattacharya: “The Mahabharata on Screen (National) (Skill Development)

Satya Chaitanya: “Bheel Bharath: When the Mahabharata Incarnates Down Under (National)

 

Sharayu Shejale: “The Ramayana and its Retellings: Deconstructing the Myth” (National)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Literary Texts
 

Toru Dutt: “Lakshamana” (Poem) (National)

Sreekantan Nair: “Kanchana Sita” (Play) (Regional) (Skill Development)

 

M.T. Vasudevan Nair: “Bhima Lone Warrior” (Novel) (Regional)

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Visual Media
 

Ramanand Sagar: “Ramayan” (1987 TV series) (National)

Ravi Chopra:Mahabharat” (1988 TV series) (National)

Peter Stephen Paul Brook:The Mahabharata” (Play) (Global) (Skill Development)

G.Aravindan: “Kanchana Sita” (Film) (Regional) (Skill Development)

 

Kottayam Thampuran: “Bakavadham” (The Slaying of Baka) (Kathakali) (Regional)

Text Books And Reference Books:

·       Sharma, Rohit. “The Art of Rewriting Indian Epics.” Indian Literature, vol. 60, no. 2 (292), 2016, pp. 147–58. JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org/stable/44478971. Accessed 29 Oct. 2023.

·       Ramanujan, A K. "Three Hundred Ramayanas: Five Examples and Three Thoughts on Translation." The Collected Essays of A K Ramanujan. Ed. Vinay Dharwadker. New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 1999. Print, pp 131-60.

·       Pradip Bhattacharya. “The Mahabharata on Screen” Kalyan Kumar Chakravarthy (ed.), Text and Variations of the Mahabharata: Contextual, Regional and Performance Traditions,Delhi, National Museum for Manuscripts & Indira Gandhi Centre for the Arts, 2009. Print, pp. 247-270.

·       Satya Chaitanya: “Bheel Bharath: When the Mahabharata Incarnates Down Under” Kalyan Kumar Chakravarthy (ed.), Text and Variations of the Mahabharata: Contextual, Regional and Performance Traditions, Delhi, National Museum for Manuscripts & Indira Gandhi Centre for the Arts, 2009. Print, pp. 185-220.

·       Sharayu Shejale: “The Ramayana and its Retellings: Deconstructing the Myth” http://intersections.anu.edu.au/issue45/shejale.html

·       Dutt, Toru. “Ancient Ballads and Legends of Hindustan”. 1882. Open Knowledge Foundation Network, India, 2013, https://in.okfn.org/files/2013/07/Ancient-Ballads-and-Legends-of-Hindustan.pdf.

·       Nair, Sreekantan, &Joseph, Sara. (2005). “Retelling the Ramayana: Voices from Kerala: “Kanchana Sita” &’ Five Ramayana Stories”. OUP India.

·       Nair, M. T. “Bhima Lone Warrior.” Harper Collins, 2013.

·       Ravi Chopra: “Mahabharat” (1988 TV series) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HnXkv_ozPQw&list=PLa6CHPhFNfadNcnVZRXa6csHL5sFdkwmV

·       Ramanand Sagar: “Ramayan” (1987 TV series) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vIh99bkSc_w&list=PL-nbe4FPvDBElyW0Iww5suxJqqmuGBgIH&index=3

·       Peter Stephen Paul Brook: “The Mahabharata https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=Peter+Stephen+Paul+Brook%3A+%E2%80%9CThe+Mahabharata

·       Kottayam Thampuran: “Bakavadham” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LTR1nbhLPzE&t=11491s

·       G.Aravindan, Kanchanasita (film),  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d2m9n0aKgn4

·       Karve, Irawati.Yuganta: The End of an Epoch. Mumbai: Orient Blackswan, 2008. Print.

·       Mukherjee, Meenakshi. “Epic and Novel in India.” The Novel: Volume 1 History, Geography and Culture. Ed. Franco Moretti. Princeton: Princeton UP, 2006. 596-631. Print.

·       Weimann, Robert. “History, Appropiation, and the Uses of Representation in Modern Narrative.” The Aims of Representation: Subject/Text/History. Ed. Murray Krieger. Stanford: Stanford UP, 1987. 175-215. Print.

·       Chandra, Rai Govind. 1996.Indian Symbolism. Symbols as Sources of our Customs and Beliefs. New Delhi: Munshiram Manoharlal.

·       Cooper, J.C. 1978. An Encyclopedia of Traditional Symbols. London: Thames and Hudson.

·       Dutt, Romesh Chander. 1961.The Ramayana and Mahabharata. London: J.M. Dent and Sons.

·       Ganguli, Kisari Mohan, trans. 2008. The Mahabharata. Delhi: MunshiramManoharlal

·       Kosambi, D D. 1983. Myth and Reality: Studies in the formation of Indian Culture. Bombay: Popular Prakashan. (1962)

·       Levi- Strauss, Claude. 1995. Myth and Meaning: Cracking the Code of Culture. Foreword by Wendy Doniger. New York: Schocken Books. (1979).

·       Segal, Robert. 2012.Myth: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford: OUP. (2004).

·       Frye, Northrop. 1976.Spiritus Mundi: Essays on Literature, Myth and Society. Bloomington: Indiana UP.

·       Paula Richman, Many Ramayanas: The Diversity of a Narrative Tradition in India. Oxford University Press. 1997.

·       Satchidanandan, K. (2003). Myth in Contemporary Indian Literature. New Delhi: Sahitya Akademi.

·       Abhichandani, Param, (2005) Encyclopedia of Indian Literature 6, New Delhi: Sahitya Akademi.

·       Agrawal, K. A. (2000) Indian Writing In English, New Delhi: Atlantic Publishers Ltd.

 

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

·       Sharma, Rohit. “The Art of Rewriting Indian Epics.” Indian Literature, vol. 60, no. 2 (292), 2016, pp. 147–58. JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org/stable/44478971. Accessed 29 Oct. 2023.

·       Ramanujan, A K. "Three Hundred Ramayanas: Five Examples and Three Thoughts on Translation." The Collected Essays of A K Ramanujan. Ed. Vinay Dharwadker. New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 1999. Print, pp 131-60.

·       Pradip Bhattacharya. “The Mahabharata on Screen” Kalyan Kumar Chakravarthy (ed.), Text and Variations of the Mahabharata: Contextual, Regional and Performance Traditions,Delhi, National Museum for Manuscripts & Indira Gandhi Centre for the Arts, 2009. Print, pp. 247-270.

·       Satya Chaitanya: “Bheel Bharath: When the Mahabharata Incarnates Down Under” Kalyan Kumar Chakravarthy (ed.), Text and Variations of the Mahabharata: Contextual, Regional and Performance Traditions, Delhi, National Museum for Manuscripts & Indira Gandhi Centre for the Arts, 2009. Print, pp. 185-220.

·       Sharayu Shejale: “The Ramayana and its Retellings: Deconstructing the Myth” http://intersections.anu.edu.au/issue45/shejale.html

·       Dutt, Toru. “Ancient Ballads and Legends of Hindustan”. 1882. Open Knowledge Foundation Network, India, 2013, https://in.okfn.org/files/2013/07/Ancient-Ballads-and-Legends-of-Hindustan.pdf.

·       Nair, Sreekantan, &Joseph, Sara. (2005). “Retelling the Ramayana: Voices from Kerala: “Kanchana Sita” &’ Five Ramayana Stories”. OUP India.

·       Nair, M. T. “Bhima Lone Warrior.” Harper Collins, 2013.

·       Ravi Chopra: “Mahabharat” (1988 TV series) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HnXkv_ozPQw&list=PLa6CHPhFNfadNcnVZRXa6csHL5sFdkwmV

·       Ramanand Sagar: “Ramayan” (1987 TV series) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vIh99bkSc_w&list=PL-nbe4FPvDBElyW0Iww5suxJqqmuGBgIH&index=3

·       Peter Stephen Paul Brook: “The Mahabharata https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=Peter+Stephen+Paul+Brook%3A+%E2%80%9CThe+Mahabharata

·       Kottayam Thampuran: “Bakavadham” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LTR1nbhLPzE&t=11491s

·       G.Aravindan, Kanchanasita (film),  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d2m9n0aKgn4

·       Karve, Irawati.Yuganta: The End of an Epoch. Mumbai: Orient Blackswan, 2008. Print.

·       Mukherjee, Meenakshi. “Epic and Novel in India.” The Novel: Volume 1 History, Geography and Culture. Ed. Franco Moretti. Princeton: Princeton UP, 2006. 596-631. Print.

·       Weimann, Robert. “History, Appropiation, and the Uses of Representation in Modern Narrative.” The Aims of Representation: Subject/Text/History. Ed. Murray Krieger. Stanford: Stanford UP, 1987. 175-215. Print.

·       Chandra, Rai Govind. 1996.Indian Symbolism. Symbols as Sources of our Customs and Beliefs. New Delhi: Munshiram Manoharlal.

·       Cooper, J.C. 1978. An Encyclopedia of Traditional Symbols. London: Thames and Hudson.

·       Dutt, Romesh Chander. 1961.The Ramayana and Mahabharata. London: J.M. Dent and Sons.

·       Ganguli, Kisari Mohan, trans. 2008. The Mahabharata. Delhi: MunshiramManoharlal

·       Kosambi, D D. 1983. Myth and Reality: Studies in the formation of Indian Culture. Bombay: Popular Prakashan. (1962)

·       Levi- Strauss, Claude. 1995. Myth and Meaning: Cracking the Code of Culture. Foreword by Wendy Doniger. New York: Schocken Books. (1979).

·       Segal, Robert. 2012.Myth: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford: OUP. (2004).

·       Frye, Northrop. 1976.Spiritus Mundi: Essays on Literature, Myth and Society. Bloomington: Indiana UP.

·       Paula Richman, Many Ramayanas: The Diversity of a Narrative Tradition in India. Oxford University Press. 1997.

·       Satchidanandan, K. (2003). Myth in Contemporary Indian Literature. New Delhi: Sahitya Akademi.

·       Abhichandani, Param, (2005) Encyclopedia of Indian Literature 6, New Delhi: Sahitya Akademi.

·       Agrawal, K. A. (2000) Indian Writing In English, New Delhi: Atlantic Publishers Ltd.

 

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I: The student will be asked to submit a proposal for a descriptive essay on any local art form, which is a retelling of an epic. The student should have completed a pilot study of the chosen field. It will be evaluated on the selection of the art form and the rationale of the study (20 marks).

CIA II: The student is required to submit a draft, which will include literature review and the uniqueness of the study. (20 marks)

 

CIA III: Submission of the final essay (50 Marks)

LAW144 - ENVIRONMENTAL LAW (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The present decline in environmental quality calls for a stricter enforcement of laws relating to protection of environment. The objective of this course is to give an insight into various legislations that has been enacted in our country for protection of environment and also to create awareness among the citizens of the country about the duties cast on them under various legislations in relation to protection of environment.

 

Course Objectives:

  • To impart an in-depth knowledge of environmental legislations to students from diverse backgrounds.
  • To interpret, analyse and make a critique of the legislations and Case laws relating to environment
  • To provide a brief understanding of various developments that has taken place at international level to check various environmental harms.

Course Outcome

CO1: learn about environmental law

C02: make students environmentally conscious

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
INTRODUCTION
 

INTRODUCTION

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
INDIAN CONSTITUTION AND ENVIRONMENT
 

INDIAN CONSTITUTION AND ENVIRONMENT

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
JUDICIAL REMEDIES AND PROCEDURES AVAILABLE FOR ABATEMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION
 

JUDICIAL REMEDIES AND PROCEDURES AVAILABLE FOR ABATEMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
ENVIRONMENT (PROTECTION) ACT, 1986
 

ENVIRONMENT (PROTECTION) ACT, 1986

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
ENVIRONMENT (PROTECTION) ACT, 1986
 

ENVIRONMENT (PROTECTION) ACT, 1986

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
WATER (PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF POLLUTION) ACT 1974
 

WATER (PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF POLLUTION) ACT 1974

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:5
FORESTS AND CONSERVATION LAWS
 

FORESTS AND CONSERVATION LAWS

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:5
WILD LIFE PROTECTION AND THE LAW
 

 WILD LIFE PROTECTION AND THE LAW

Unit-9
Teaching Hours:5
INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENTS FOR PROTECTION OF ENVIRONMENT
 

INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENTS FOR PROTECTION OF ENVIRONMENT

Text Books And Reference Books:

MC Mehta Enviromental Law Book

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

MC Mehta Enviromental Law Book

Evaluation Pattern

Class Discussion: 50 Marks

MCQ exam: 50 Marks

MED147 - MIDDLE CINEMA IN INDIA (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Description: Middle cinema is a specific film formation which refers to severe commercial films that capture the experiences of Indian society in transition and the attendant anguish of such change. It includes narrations about women, youth, the city and Muslims, to name a few. The idea is to watch and analyse the films that fall into the category of middle cinema to understand the issue presented and the way it is dealt with by the filmmaker. The purpose is not to pass judgements about the films or their intentions but to see how representations impact our perceptions of reality.

Course Objectives:

 

  1. To watch and appreciate the films that fall under the category of middle cinema

  2. To understand the varied depiction of our society in these films

  3. To critically evaluate the purpose and impact of middle cinema

Course Outcome

CO1: Able to appreciate the films that fall under the middle cinema category

CO2: Able to understand the varied representations of India through middle cinema

CO3: Able to critically evaluate the value of middle cinema and its influence on viewers

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Realism and Neo-realism in Cinema
 

Cinema and its purpose and influence

French wave and Italian neo-realism

Indian cinema

Indian neo-realism

Pioneers- Satyajit Ray, Mrinal Sen and Ritwik Ghatak

Maters of middle cinema- Shyam Benegal, Adoor Gopalakrishnan, Girish Kasarvalli, Syed Akhtar Mirza and Sai Paranjape

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Parallel cinema movement in India
 

Middle cinema or Parallel cinema movement in India

Film society movement

Government initiate- FCI, FTII, Film Division, Doordarshan

Before 1991 and after

Contemporary Indian parallel cinema

Independent film makers (Indi films)- Nagesh Kuknoor, Govind Nihalani, Dijo Jose Antony, Johnpaul George, etc.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Parallel Cinema in Indian Languages
 

Watching the following films:

1. Salim Langde pe mat roh

2. Alif

3. A death in Gunj

4. Samsara

5. Trikal

6. Hyderabad Blues

Discuss the film maker's method and technique of depicting Indian society- issues, groups and individuals

Whether they succeeded in their endevours

What is the future of middle cinema in India

Text Books And Reference Books:

Sachdeva, Vivek. (2020). Shyam Benegal's India- Alternative Images. Routledge, London.

Bhaskaran, Gautaman. (2017). Adoor Gopalakrishnan- A Life in Cinema. Penguin Random House, India.

 

Ray, Sandip. (2022). Satyajit Ray Miscellany- Life, Cinema, People & Much More. Penguin Random House, India.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reading materials:

1. History of Indian cinema- DAV University study material

2. Dwyer, Rachel. (2014). Bollywood's India: Hindi Cinema as a Guide to Contemporary India. Reaktion Books, India.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Assignment 1: MCQ on Indian cinema-  On January 25, 2024- 20 marks 

Assignment 2: Blog posts on Indian middle cinema- atleast 4 posts before 1 March 2024- 20 marks

Assignment 3: Research paper on any one film maker and his/her way of representing Indian society through middle cinema- 50 marks

MED148 - LANGUAGE OF CINEMA: A VISUAL APPROACH (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:45
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

As an art form, cinema possesses a language all its own—a language that transcends cultural boundaries and speaks to the universal human experience. From the evocative power of lighting to the rhythm of editing, every decision made by filmmakers contributes to the creation of meaning and emotion. Throughout this course, we will examine iconic films, analyze groundbreaking techniques, and decode the symbolism that enriches cinematic narratives.

Whether you are an aspiring filmmaker, a film enthusiast, or someone eager to gain a deeper understanding of the stories unfolding on the silver screen, "The Language of Cinema" is designed to equip you with the tools to appreciate and critically engage with the diverse and dynamic world of filmmaking.

Course Outcome

CO1: Develop a comprehensive understanding of visual language and enhance visual literary

CO2: Understand how filmmakers employ visual elements along with non-visual elements

CO3: Sense the importance of cinematography and editing in visual narration

CO4: Develop critical thinking skills in deconstructing a films

CO5: Apply cinematic aesthetics in diverse creative expressions

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Deconstructing visual language
 

Invention of camera, video camera, Narrative development and technological shifts;

Composition Techniques-Application of diverse compositions in narration

Camera experiments-Russian montage, Mainstream Hollywood practice, Mainstream Indian practice, Diverse and Melodramatic, Dogma 95; Movements, Appeal of reality visual construction in Indian parallel films.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Cinematic experiments
 

Varying focal-length, focus, aspect ratio, Lens, 

Shooting styles: Found footage, Single shot films, Film’s speed, PoV vs Subjective, Documentary style (Cinema Verite), Aerial view, Virtual reality, camera for green screen.

Visual construction in Television, social media and web-series.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Visual Politics-Inclusion and exclusion
 

Framing, Framing techniques, Lighting technique, Camera script vs Shooting script, Front and backdrop for a visual,

Reconstruction of Male gaze, portrayal of vulnerable, weaker and stronger characteristics, Replacing talent, camera for graphics.

Text Books And Reference Books:

5 C’s of Cinematography, Joseph V. Mascelli, Silman-James Press

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

·         Cinematography: Theory and Practice: Image Making for Cinematographers and Directors by Blain Brown, Taylor and Francis

·         Film Lighting Talks with Hollywood's Cinematographers and Gaffers by Kris Malkiewicz, Touchstone

·        The Filmmaker's Handbook: A Comprehensive Guide for the Digital Age, Steven Ascher, Edward Pincus, Plume.

Evaluation Pattern

Written exam and submission 

MED149 - INTRODUCTION TO SEMIOTICS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:45
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

The Department of Media Studies offers this course to introduce students from different disciplinary backgrounds to the world of signs, symbols, and icons. Besides, this course also aims to familiarise the students with the basic concepts and theories of visual culture. The visual in the forms of photographs, advertisements, and films shape our everyday experiences, so it becomes necessary to understand how these visuals could be deconstructed to identify literal, connotative, subjective, and metaphorical meanings. Further, this course will also explore the relationships among visual culture, digital media, and power. It will explore the analysis of specific visual texts and will reflect on understanding the larger cultural meanings assigned to the visual. The learning objectives are for students to develop the skills necessary to perform such critical analysis of visual texts and show an overall understanding of how the visual operates.

Course Outcomes/Objectives:

By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

·   Understand the critical and theoretical concepts relating to visual culture.

·  Demonstrate the process of meaning generation in visual media.

·  Interpret the levels of meanings in any given visual text.

·  Recognize the role of photographs, advertisements and films in contemporary visual culture.

 

·  Apply the theories of visual culture to interpret visual media messages and understand their relation to power.


Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the critical and theoretical concepts relating to visual culture.

CO2: Demonstrate the process of meaning generation in visual media.

CO3: Interpret the levels of meanings in any given visual text.

CO4: Recognize the role of photographs, advertisements, and films in contemporary visual culture.

CO5: Apply the theories of visual culture to interpret visual media messages and understand their relation to power.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Visual Culture
 

Introduction to Visual Culture: Concept and Definition; Critical Representation of/in Visual Culture. Recent Trends in Visual Culture.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Semiotics: Semiology
 

Branches of Semiotics; Dyadic Model of Signs; Meaning & types of Signs. Meaning-Making Process: Seeing.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Study of selected visual texts
 

Levels of meanings: Denotational meaning, and Connotation meaning.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Gaze and Power
 

Meaning of gaze; Relation of gaze and power; Theory of Panopticism; Types of cinematic gazes, viz. male gaze, and feminist gaze.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.     Chandler, D. (2007). Semiotics: The Basics. London: Routledge.

 

2.     Mirzoeff, N. (2012). The Visual Culture Reader (3rd ed.). London: Routledge.

 

3.     Seppaenen, J. (2006). The Power of the Gaze: An Introduction to Visual Literacy (New Literacies and Digital Epistemologies). NY: Peter Lang Publishing.

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

      Documentary: Ways of Seeing (Episode IEpisode IIEpisode IIIEpisode IV), available on YouTube.

      Documentary: Abstract: The Art of Design Platon: Photography

      Documentary: Abstract: The Art of Design Tinker Hatfield: Footwear Design

 

      Documentary: Abstract: The Art of Design Christoph Niemann: Illustration

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Outline:

The course shall not have a regular CIA- MSE -ESE model. Instead, the student will be given a series of assignments spread across the semester, leading to a building up of a holistic understanding of visual culture and how different signs, symbols, and icons operate in our day-to-day world in creating larger societal realities and worldviews. The teaching facilitator will consider the level of intelligibility in the class and the learning needs of the students and decide what assignment to give regularly. 

 

Sample Assignments:

      Summarising the four episodes of ‘Ways of Seeing’ by John Berger, and critically reflecting on the aspect of how in our day-to-day life it is contextual and relevant.

      Analyze an advertisement and present it to the class.

      Analyze a photograph and present it to the class.

 

      Analyze scenes of a film and present them in the class.

PHY141A - INTRODUCTION TO ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course presents an introduction to basic concepts in astronomy and  astrophysics. The course is designed for non-science students with strong interest in astronomy,
physics and mathematics. The course details some of the primary physical concepts relevant to  astronomy and astrophysics and also lays the foundation for more advanced coursework in
astrophysics. More importantly, to appreciate the  realization that “We are all made of stardust”.

Course Outcome

CO1: Compare and contrast the various ?exotic objects? in the cosmos (Neutron Stars, Black Holes, etc.)

CO2: Differentiate between different stellar types, and describe their life cycles.

CO3: Compare and contrast the types of galaxies, their distribution and possible evolution.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Solar system
 

Astronomical coordinate systems, Kepler’s Laws of planetary motion, Newton’s Law of
gravitation, Ancient astronomers, Solar system formation, Planets and associated moons, Comets
and asteroids; Meteoroids, Meteors, and Meteorites; Telescopes, Multi-wavelength astronomy,
Astronomy with space observatories.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Stars
 

Discussion of measurable physical quantities in astronomy, Distance measurement techniques,
Luminosity, Brightness of stars and relation between luminosity and brightness (flux),
Magnitude of a star, Filter system, Hertzsprung Russell diagram, Binary stars and measurements,
Spectral type of stars, Surface temperature of stars, Star Formation: Molecular clouds, Stellar
evolution- birth to death, White dwarfs, Neutron stars, and black holes.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Galaxies
 

The Milky Way galaxy, Structure of the Milky way, Motion of Stars in the Milky Way, Types of
galaxies: Hubble tuning fork diagram, Formation and evolution of galaxies, Quasars and active
galaxies, Hubble’s law and Expanding Universe, Gravitational waves, Dark Matter, Dark
Energy.

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1].Carroll, B. W., & Ostlie, D. A. (2007). An Introduction to Modern Astrophysics, 2nd Edn:
Pearson Addison-Wesley.
[2]. Pasachoff , J. M. (1998): Astronomy, from the Earth to the Universe: Saunders College
Publishing.
[3].  Kaler, J. B. (2016): From the Sun to the Stars: World Scientific

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Zeilik & Gregory, S. A. (1998): Introductory Astronomy and Astrophysics, Saunders
College Publication.

2. Harwit, M. (1988): Astronomy Concepts: Springer-Verlag.

Evaluation Pattern

 Assessment outline:

 

  • CIA I will be a objective-type exam to evaluate the understanding of the students from topics in Units 1 and 2. This carries 10 marks and administered in the last week of January.

  • CIA-II will be based on presentations on specified topics. It carries 25 marks 

  • CIA III includes a written assignment on specified topics. It carries 10 marks and will be conducted during second week of February.

  • End Semester Examination will be the descriptive exam for 50 marks. The students will be given 120 minutes to complete the exam.

  • Assessment will be based on the knowledge, problem solving capability and their wider in-depth perspective about the subject and presentation skills

 

 

POL141 - DEMOCRACY AND ETHICAL VALUES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course has been conceptualized to introduce and discuss the moral foundations of democracy in principle, and democratic institutions, in particular. The students are initiated to various types of moral discourses in political philosophy. Further, this course looks at the development of democracy, in the global as well as the national realm. Democracy as an ideal gets fructified in the form of a government, which in turn is based on the principles of justice, freedom, equality, and fraternity. Ethics acts as the premise on which a successful democracy rests.

Course Outcome

CO1: By the end of the course the learner should be able to: Demonstrate civic and political consciousness

CO2: To have a dedicated and empathetic band of students who would act as agents of change in society.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
DEMOCRACY AND ETHICS: AN INTRODUCTION
 
  1. Democracy
    1. Conceptual development of Democracy
    2. Principles of Democracy: Freedom, Equality and Fraternity
  2. Ethics
    1. Concept of Values, Morals and Ethics
  3. Democracy vis-a-vis Ethics
    1. Government by Consent
    2. Constitutional Government and Rule of Law
    3. Democracy and Human Rights
Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
DEMOCRACY AND ETHICS: AN INTRODUCTION
 
  1. Democracy
    1. Conceptual development of Democracy
    2. Principles of Democracy: Freedom, Equality and Fraternity
  2. Ethics
    1. Concept of Values, Morals and Ethics
  3. Democracy vis-a-vis Ethics
    1. Government by Consent
    2. Constitutional Government and Rule of Law
    3. Democracy and Human Rights
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
PERSPECTIVES ON ETHICS
 
  1. Western Thought
    1. Duty Ethic
    2. Utilitarianism
  2. Indian Thought                                                                  

a.     Hindu Tradition: Dharma and Karma, Purusharthas

b.     Buddhist Tradition: Four Noble Truths and Eight-fold Path

c.     Indian syncretic traditions-Ashoka, Kabir and Akbar

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
PERSPECTIVES ON ETHICS
 
  1. Western Thought
    1. Duty Ethic
    2. Utilitarianism
  2. Indian Thought                                                                  

a.     Hindu Tradition: Dharma and Karma, Purusharthas

b.     Buddhist Tradition: Four Noble Truths and Eight-fold Path

c.     Indian syncretic traditions-Ashoka, Kabir and Akbar

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
CHALLENGES TO INDIAN DEMOCRACY
 
  1. Institutional
    1. Free and fair elections
    2. Ethical Code of Conduct for Politicians
    3. Character record of members of the legislature
    4. Ethical use of majority in parliament
    5. Avoidance of ‘floor crossing’ and defection
    6. Alliance of political parties to form brittle governments
    7. Independence of judiciary and media
    8. Safeguard national history and avoid distortion
    9. Political neutrality in educational institutions.
    10. Judicious allocation of central funds to states
    11. Freedom of Press
  2. Citizen Centric
    1. Free speech and Expression
    2. Right to dissent
    3. Preventive detention and Sedition 
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
CHALLENGES TO INDIAN DEMOCRACY
 
  1. Institutional
    1. Free and fair elections
    2. Ethical Code of Conduct for Politicians
    3. Character record of members of the legislature
    4. Ethical use of majority in parliament
    5. Avoidance of ‘floor crossing’ and defection
    6. Alliance of political parties to form brittle governments
    7. Independence of judiciary and media
    8. Safeguard national history and avoid distortion
    9. Political neutrality in educational institutions.
    10. Judicious allocation of central funds to states
    11. Freedom of Press
  2. Citizen Centric
    1. Free speech and Expression
    2. Right to dissent
    3. Preventive detention and Sedition 
Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Christiano, Thomas, ed., Philosophy and Democracy, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002.
  2. Dewey, John, “Philosophy and Democracy” [1919] and “The Ethics of Democracy” [1888] in The Political Writings, ed. D. Morris, I. Shapiro, Indianapolis: Hackett, 1993.
  3. Finnis, John. Fundamentals of Ethics. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1983.
  4. Gandhi, M. K. An Autobiography or The Story of My Experiments with Truth. Ahmedabad: Navajivan Mudranalaya, 1927.
  5. Granville, Austin, The Indian Constitution: Cornerstone of a Nation. New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2000.
  6. Jain, Subhash, The Constitution of India: Select Issues and Perceptions. New Delhi: Taxmann, 2000.
  7. Walzer, Michael, “Philosophy and Democracy”, Political Theory, Vol.9, No.3, 1981, 379-399.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

  1. Locke, John, Second Treatise on Civil Government, (1690), ed. C. B. MacPherson, Indianapolis, IN: Hackett, 1980.
  2. Kant, Immanuel. Foundations of the Metaphysics of Morals. trans. Lewis White Beck, Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merril, 1959.
  3. Kant, Immanuel, Critique of Practical Reason, trans. Lewis White Beck, Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merril, 1956.
  4. Machiavelli, The Prince [1513], ed. Q. Skinner, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1988.
  5. Plato, The Republic, revised/trans. by Desmond Lee, Harmondsworth, UK: Penguin Books, 1974.
  6. Rawls, John, Political Liberalism, New York: Columbia University Press, 1996
  1. Sandel, Michael (ed.), Justice—A Reader, Oxford University Press, 2007.
  2. Singer, Peter, Democracy and Disobedience, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1973.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1-25

CIA 2-25

CIA 3-50

POL143 - POLITICS AND SOCIETY OF INDIA SINCE INDEPENDENCE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course introduces students to the trajectory of Indian politics and society after independence. Through exploration of certain key themes pertaining to the Indian state and society, it aims at equipping students with an ability to crucially examine political systems and processes, understand the institutional contexts, and analyse social cleavages and conflicts between communities in various parts of the country. Students will be exposed to biographies of important leaders and various perspectives on important social and political events. By the end of this course, they will develop a critical view to study and evaluate Indian society, democratic politics and the role of civil society.

Course Outcome

CO1: Familiarity with key themes in Indian politics and society after independence

CO2: Evaluate the institutional setting, political processes and important decisions taken by the government

CO3: Understand and assess cleavages and conflicts between various communities in India

CO4: Ability to critically understand the social and political changes undergoing in Indian society

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
India's Founding Moment
 

Partition and Refugees, Princely States, Constituent Assembly and Indian Constitution, Inheritance of Democracy

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:7
The Initial Years
 

Elections and universal adult franchise, Economic Planning, Land Reforms, Linguistic reorganisation of states

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:7
Political Parties and Processes
 

Party System, Political Parties, Mobilisation, Leadership, Panchayat Raj System

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:7
Social cleavages and contestations
 

Caste and politics, communalism, tribal tragedies, Naxal violence, social movements

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:7
Assessing Indian State
 

Study of Indian politics, trajectory of democracy, role of civil society

Text Books And Reference Books:

Chandra, B., Mukherjee, M., & Mukherjee, A. India After Independence

Guha, Ramachandra. India After Gandhi

Jayal, N., & Mehta, P (Eds). The Oxford Companion to Politics in India

Kohli, A., & Singh, P (Eds). Routledge Handbook of Indian Politics

 

Fiction (Students must read and review at least one of the following works):

Devi, M. Mother of 1084

Murugan, P. Rising Heat

Jospeh, S. Budhini

Roy, A. The God of Small Things

Singh, K. Train to Pakistan

Shukla, S. Raag Darbari

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Ahuja, A. Mobilizing the Marginalized: Ethnic Parties without Ethnic Movements

Jaffrelot, C. India’s Silent Revolution: The Rise of the Lower Castes in South India

Menon, N. Planning Democracy: Modern India’s Quest for Development

Nehru, J. The Discovery of India

Sen, R. House of the People: Parliament and the Making of Indian Democracy

Shani, O. How India Became Democratic: Citizenship and the making of the universal franchise

Sundar, N. The Burning Forest: India’s War in Bastar

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1: 20 Marks

CIA 2: 20 Marks

CIA 3: 50 Marks

PSY201-2 - PERSONALITY AND INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course helps students to understand and explore views on personality and individual differences. The course poses an opportunity for students to help understand the various theoretical approaches to the concepts of personality, intelligence and learning. The students will learn the strengths and weaknesses of major theories as well as how to assess and apply these theories. With the support of psychometric tools and lab-based activities, students would be able to identify the various tools to investigate personality and intelligence and be able to better understand themselves and others.

Course Outcome

CO1: : Describe the theoretical perspectives and psychometric assessments in personality and how key assumptions in each approach differentially account for individual differences.

CO2: Explain the contribution of behaviourism, cognitivism and social cognitive theory to the understanding of human learning and how it accounts for observed individual differences.

CO3: Explain individual differences using various intelligence theories and tests

CO4: Apply basic principles of personality and individual differences to the understanding of everyday life situations such as interpersonal relations in family, classroom and workplace.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
CO 1: Describe the theoretical perspectives on personality and how key assumptions in each approach differentially account for individual differences.
 

Personality: Definition, myths and misconceptions, why study personality Approaches in personality–Psychodynamic - Sigmund-Freud, Carl-Jung, Adler, Caron Horney, Humanistic- Abraham Maslow, Carl Rogers, Dispositional (Type and Trait) and Social-Cognitive approach; Assessment of Personality – Questionnaires and projective tests

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
CO 2: Explain the contribution of behaviouris m, cognitivism and social cognitive theory on the understanding of human learning and how it accounts for observed individual differences.
 

Learning -classical and operant conditioning -Skinner, Pavlov -social learning theory-Abert Bandura; learned helplessness- Seligman; How motivation is a learned response.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
CO 3: Explain individual differences using various intelligence theories and tests.
 

Intelligence: Definition and concepts: Determinants of Intelligence: Genetic, Environmental influences. Newer trends- Emotional Quotient, Social Quotient, Spiritual Quotient, Gender Difference Intelligence: Factor theories – Spearman, Cattell, Thurstone, Gardner, Guilford; Cognitive theory - Sternberg Emotional intelligence -EQ; Daniel Golman Can/should intelligence be measured? Flynn effect; concerns of cultural biases; labelling Characteristics of Intelligence tests, Types of Intelligence tests, Reliability, Validity, Norms and standardisation of psychological assessment.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
CO4: Apply basic principles of personality and individual differences to the understanding of everyday life situations such as interpersonal relations in family, classroom and workplace.
 

Example of family, classroom and workplace, each addressing conflict and aggression, adapting to the environment- changes and challenges Can people learn? What does the understanding of individual differences account for psychologists?

Text Books And Reference Books:

Weiten, W. (2014). Psychology: Themes and Variations (Briefer Version, 9th edition). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/Ce ngage Learning.

Feldman.S.R.( 2009).Essentia ls of understanding psychology ( 7th Ed.) Tata Mc Graw Hill

Hall, C.S., Lindzey, G. & Camobell, J.B. (2002). Theory of personality(4t h ed.). John Wiley and Sons. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Funder D. C. (2019). The personality puzzle (Eighth). W. W. Norton & Company.

Schultz, D.P. & Schultz, S.E. (2013). Theories of Personality (10 Ed.). Cengage Learning

Evaluation Pattern

5 marks for attendance as per University Policy

CIA 1 & 3 will be individual assignments

CIA2- will be mid-semester exam- case study based questions

End Semester Pattern- 2 hrs- 50 Marks

Section A (Very short Answer). 2 Marks X 5Qs= 10 Marks

Section B (Short answers). 5 Marks X 2Qs= 10 Marks

Section C (Essay questions). 10 Marks X 2Qs= 20 Marks

Section D (Case study). 10 Marks x 1Q= 10 Marks 

PSY202-2 - BRAIN AND BEHAVIOUR (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This second-semester course provides an undergraduate psychology major student with a general understanding of the biological mechanisms by which the brain, nervous system, and endocrine system mediate behaviour and mental processes. The students will be able to appreciate the role of the brain and nervous system in human behaviour and mental processes by studying normal brain functions and biological processes, including neurons and neuronal function, basic brain anatomy, and the sensory systems, as well as potential problems caused by abnormal brain functioning and processes. The course will cover a range of selected behaviours and processes that are critically related to the function of the nervous system. A special emphasis will be placed on research findings that have shed light on the intricacies of the brain-behaviour relationship

Course Outcome

CO1: Identify the structure and function of the brain and nervous system

CO2: Explain the neurochemical and hormonal influences on behaviour

CO3: Articulate psychophysiology of basic human drives of sleep, hunger and sex

CO4: Evaluate the brain-behaviour relationship and consequences of damage to brain regions controlling complex behaviours like memory, learning and consciousness.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
CO1: Identify the structure and function of the brain and nervous system
 

The Nervous system; Divisions and cells of the nervous system, the structure, function and types of neurons, Structure and Functions of the Central and peripheral nervous system.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
CO2: Explain the neurochemical and hormonal influences on behaviour
 

Hormones and behaviour, Mechanism of action and effects, Major endocrine glands, Thyroid, Parathyroid, Adrenal, Pancreas, Pituitary, Gonads. Hormones of the hypothalamus. Impact of chemicals on brain and behaviour, psychoactive drugs, addiction and brain

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
CO3: Articulate psychophysiology of basic human drives of sleep, hunger and sex.
 

Physiology of sleep. With special emphasis on the mechanisms of the biological clock. Human sleep stages, Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep, brain structures and functions that regulate The biology of thirst and hunger, brain mechanisms of hunger, and abnormal brain chemistry in eating disorders and obesity. The discussion on reproductive behaviours would focus on the organising and activating effects of hormones and the detailed biology of gender. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
CO4: Evaluate the brain-behaviour relationship and consequences of damage to brain regions controlling complex behaviours like memory, learning and consciousness.
 

Types of memory, the brain areas, and/ or mechanisms associated with these different types of memory and amnesia. Physiological representation of learning- engram, brain areas involved in learning and the phenomenon of long-term potentiation. How trauma impacts the brain? And how the brain can rewire -brain plasticity Role of brain in Consciousness

Text Books And Reference Books:

Carlson, N. R. (2005). Foundations of physiological psychology. Pearson Education.

Pinel, J. P. (2009). Biopsychology. Pearson education.

Kalat, J. W. (2015). Biological psychology. Cengage Learning.  

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

NIL

Evaluation Pattern

5 marks for attendance as per University Policy

CIA 1 & 3 will be individual assignments

CIA2- will be mid-semester exam- a case-study based questions

End Semester Pattern- 2 hrs- 50 Marks

Section A (Very Short Answer). 2 Marks X 5Qs= 10 Marks

Section B (Short answers). 5 Marks X 2Qs= 10 Marks

Section C (Essay questions). 10 Marks X 2Qs= 20 Marks

Section D (Case study). 10 Marks x 1Q= 10 Marks

SW141 - INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK AND SOCIAL WELFARE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

This is the foundational paper that introduces students to the profession of Social Work.  It includes the philosophical and ideological  foundations of the profession. It highlights how social work has come to be called a profession. In this paper, all the fields in which social work can be practiced are introduced, and the methods of social work

 

 

  1. To help students understand the social work profession, its history and evolution.
  2. To understand the philosophy, values and principles of professional social work.
  3. To understand the basics of various methods of social work.
  4. To understand the fields of social work practice.

Course Outcome

1: Demonstrate proficiency in understanding social work and related concepts.

2: Discuss the philosophy, values, principles and skills of professional social work.

3: Demonstrate proficiency in understanding the methods of social work.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Social Work:
 

Social work: Definition, Concept, Objectives, Similarities and dissimilarities of Concepts related to Social Work, Social Service, Social Welfare. Philosophy of Social Work, Values of Social Work, Principles of Social Work, Goals and Scope. History of Social Work in the West and in India

 

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to the Methods of Social Work
 

Case Work, Group Work, Community Organization, Social Work Research, Social Welfare Administration, and Social Action


 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Fields of Social Work
 

Fieldsof Social Work. Code of ethics. Skill Lab: Active Listening. Negotiation. Preparation and Planning. Understanding self through a SWOT. Presentation

 


 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Batra, N. (2004). Dynamics of social work in India. New Delhi: Raj Publishing.

House, B. (2006). Values & ethics in social work: An introduction. London: Routledge publication.

Bhattacharya, S. (2004). Social work: An integrated approach. New Delhi: Deep & Deep Publications.

Chris, L. C. (2000). Social work ethics: Politics, principles and practice. Exeter: Learning Matters.

Crawford, K. (2004). Social work and human development: Transforming social work practice.  Exeter: Learning Matters.

Desai, M. (2004). Methodology of progressive social work education. Jaipur: Rawat.

            Publication.

Desai, M. (2004). Ideologies and social work: Historical and contemporary analyses. Jaipur: Rawat. Publication.

Horner, N. (2006). What is social work? Context and perspectives. London: Routledge     publication.

National Association of Social Workers (2000). Policy statements 2000-2003, Social work          speaks. National Association of Social Workers Policy Statements 2000-      2003. New        York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Payne, M. (2007). What is professional social work? Jaipur:Rawat Publications.

381Pease, B. (1999).Transforming social work practice: Postmodern critical perspectives polity press. Jaipur: Rawat Publications.

Morales, A. (2004). Social work.  Boston: Pearson Education.

Timms, N. (1970).Social work. London: Routledge publishers.

World Bank (2005). Putting social development to work for the poor: An OED review of world bank activities. New York: World Bank.

 

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Banks, S. (1995). Ethics and values in social work. Hound Mills: MacMillan Publishers.

Gore, M.S. (1965). Social work education. New Delhi: Asia Publishing House.

Shaw, I., & Lishman,  J.  (1990). Evaluation and social work practice. London: Sage publishers.

Singh R.R. (1985).Fieldwork in social work education (ed). New Delhi: Concept Publishers.

Stroup, H.H. (1960). Social work education – An introduction to the field. New Delhi:      Eurasia Publishing.

Wadia, A. & Hormasji, N. (1968). History and philosophy of social work in India (2nd ed).          Bombay: Allied publishers

Evaluation Pattern
CIA 1  10 marks (conducted out of 20 )
 
CIA 2 10 marks (conducted out of 20 )
 
CIA 3 25 marks (conducted out of 50 )

SW142 - INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISATIONAL BEHAVIOUR (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: The course introduces students to theories associated with organizational behavior, facilitating their comprehension of individual and group behavior within an organization. Additionally, this paper equips students with essential knowledge of personality, motivation, theories, and leadership, establishing a foundational background in these areas.

 

Course Objectives:

  1. To develop familiarity with the origins and evolution of organizational behavior (OB).
  2. To comprehend the concept of motivation through the exploration of various theories.
  3. To gain theoretical andpractical knowledge and tools for implementing organizational development interventions.

Course Outcome

CO1: Exhibit proficiency in comprehending human behaviour within the workplace.

CO2: Apply interpretive and practical skills in utilizing various theories of Individual and group behaviour.

CO3: Demonstrate a solid understanding of the principles and theories of organizational development and change.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Organisation Behaviour
 

 

Definition and scope-approaches to Organizational Behaviour- Elements of Organizational Behaviour- Hawthorne studies-classical and modern approaches to Management- Human Relations movement and Behavioural systems approach to OB, OB Model- Definition, Developing OB model- Inputs, process, outcomes- Roles and challenges of OB- Skills of OB Manager

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Individual and Group Behaviour
 

Personality- Definition, Determinants and Theories of Personality-psychoanalytic theories, socio-psychological theories, trait theories and holistic theories- Personality and Organizational Behaviour,

Motivation: Meaning of   Motivation, Motivation-Traditional Theories of Work Motivation; Maslow’s hierarchy of needs - Herzberg Two Factor theory, , McGregor ‘s Theory X-and Adam ‘s Equity Theory of Work Motivation.

Group Behaviour- Definition, Classification and stages, Techniques in decision making, Effective Team Building, Leadership- Definition, Types

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Organizational Development and Change
 

Organizational Development- Definition- Scope of Organizational Development- Characteristics of OD, OD Interventions-Management By Objectives

Organizational change, forces of change; Resistance to change; Managing planned change, approaches to organizational change

Organizational Culture-Key cultures [Power culture, people/person culture. Task culture, role culture]- How culture is created- How culture is sustained

Organizational   Climate- methods to study organizational climate

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Bhattacharyya Dipik Kumar. (2014).Organizational behaviour. New Delhi; Oxford University Press.

Gupta, Ananda Das. (2014). Organizational behaviour design, structure and culture. Delhi: Biztantra.

King, D., & Lawley, S. (2012). Organizational behaviour. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Luthans, F. (2011). Organizational behaviour (12th ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill International.

Robbins, Judge and Vohra (2012).  Organizational behaviour. New Delhi: Pearson.

Robbins, S. P., Judge, T.A. & Vohra, N. (2012). Organizational behaviour, Pearson.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Luthans (2011). Organizational behaviour. 12/e, McGraw Hill International

Raisa Arvinen-Muondo. (2013). Organizational behaviour: People, process, work and human resource management. London: Kogan Page.

Schermerhorn, J. R & Osborn, R. N. (2012). Organizational behaviour (12th ed.).New Delhi Wiley.

Seijts, Gerard H. (2006).Cases in Organizational behaviour. New Delhi: Sage.

Singh,Kavita.(2010). Organizational behaviour: Text and cases. New Delhi: Perason Publication.

Thomas Kalliath,Paula Brough,Michael O'Driscoll,  Manimala  &  Oi-Ling Siu (2011). Organizational behaviour: A psychological perspective. Australia: McGraw-Hill.

Weber, Emma, Phillips, Patricia Pulliam &; Phillips, Jack J. (2016). Making change work: How to create behavioural change in organizations to drive impact and ROI.  London:  Kogan Page.

Evaluation Pattern
CIA 1 10 marks (conducted out of 20 )
 
CIA 2 10 marks (conducted out of 20 )
 
CIA 3 25 marks (conducted out of 50 ) 
 
Attendance 5 marks 

THE101-2 - THEATRE HISTORY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course surveys the history of Western theatre and playwriting from Ancient Greek Theatre to the XXI century. Tracing historical developments in acting style, playwriting, and theatrical technology.

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will be able to guide their own understandings and interpretations of theatre history through active class discussions.

CO2: Students will be able to identify and link the world's socio-political situation with Western theatre's development.

CO3: Students will be able to apply their knowledge and understanding of theatre history in practice.

CO4: Students will be able to plan, research, and present individual and group projects.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Ancient Theatre
 

Ancient Greek Theatre and Ancient Roman Theatre, Greek and Roman festivals, Greek tragedy and Aristotle’s Poetics, Hamartia, Catharsis, Eight elements of a play, Fabula Atellana, New Comedy, Theatre Spaces, Satyr Play.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Medieval Theatre and Renaissance
 

Medieval Theatre, Commedia Dell’Arte, Shakespeare, Christianity and Theatre,

Innovations in Plot, Characters, Costumes and Themes, Soliloquy, Globe Theatre.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.Oedipus Rex

2.Media

3.Antigone

4.Lysistrata 

5.Menaechmi 

6.Everyman 

7.The Merchant of Venice 

8.A Midsummer Night's Dream 

9.Romeo and Juliet 

10.Othello 

11.Hamlet 

12.The Importance of Being Earnest

13.The Seagull

14.A Streetcar Named Desire

15.Machinal

16.Mother Courage and Her Children

17.Death of a Salesman

18.Waiting for Godot

19.Rhinoceros

20.Rabbit Hole

21.West Side Story

22.Sweeney Todd

23.Mamma Mia

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.Brockett, G, Oscar.History of Theatre

2.Elam, Keir. Semiotics of Theatre and Drama. 2007. Print.

3.Postlewait, Thomas. Cambridge Introduction to Theatre Historiography. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2008. Print.

4.Powell, Kerry. Cambridge Companion to Victorian and Edwardian Theatre. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2004. Print.

5.Jones, David Richard. Great Directors at Work: Stanislavsky, Brecht, Kazan, Brook. 

6.Zarrilli, Phillip, B.Theatre Histories: An Introduction.New York: Rutledge, Taylor&Francis, 2010.Print.

7.Brandt, George W. Modern Theories of Drama: A Selection of Writings on Drama and Theatre 1850-1990. New York: Oxford University Press, 1998. Print.

8.Chambers, Colin. The Continuum Companion to Twentieth-Century Theatre. London: Continuum, 2002. Print.

9.Meyer-Dinkgrafe, Daniel. Who`s Who in Contemporary World Theatre. 2002. Print. 

10.Postlewait, Thomas. Cambridge Introduction to Theatre Historiography. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2008. Print.

11.Shepherd, Simon. The Cambridge Introduction to Modern British Theatre. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2009. Print.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1:  A group presentation.

Mid-Semester Examination: Written centralized exam.

CIA 3: A group presentation.

End Semester Examination: Written centralized exam.

 

THE102-2 - ART OF ACTING LEVEL I (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

l  To gain an understanding of acting principles and techniques.

l  Develop skills in the analysis and interpretation of dramatic texts for performance.

Course Outcome

CO1: An understanding of practical proficiency in executing the fundamental principles of all schools and styles of acting techniques to perform diverse characters on stage

CO2: The ability and willingness to engage in a structured play in an ensemble as an actor

CO3: Performing an audition

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Creating a body language of a character
 

Observations of animals and humans of different ages, creating a body language of historical personalities with the help of fine arts, sectors of gestures, energy centers, and muscle control. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Working with co-actors
 

Exercises in improvisation, repetition, coordinating a mise-en-scene, finding a conflict, objectives and super objectives, subtext, and analyzing a script from the actor’s point of view.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Practical Orientation ? Auditioning
 

Major tenets of auditioning practices and expectations, including mock auditions and building a repertoire book.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Hodge, Alison, 1959-Actor training. London; New York, NY: Routledge, 2010.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Hagen, Uta. Respect for acting, Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley & Sons, c2008.

Evaluation Pattern

The students will be tested on the learned skills of movements, voice, and stage combat through performance demonstration.