CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

DEPARTMENT OF LIFE SCIENCES

School of Business and Management

Syllabus for
BSc (Chemistry, Zoology/Honours/Honours with Research)
Academic Year  (2023)

 
1 Semester - 2023 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BLS102-1 ANIMAL DIVERSITY-I (NON-CHORDATA) Major Core Courses-I 3 3 100
BLS112-1 ANIMAL DIVERSITY-I LAB Major Core Courses-I 2 1 50
BLS162A-1 AQUARIUM FISH KEEPING Skill Enhancement Courses 3 3 100
BLS162B-1 SERICULTURE Skill Enhancement Courses 3 3 100
BLS162C-1 APICULTURE Skill Enhancement Courses 3 3 100
BOT121-1 BIODIVERSITY - I Allied Core Courses 3 3 100
CHE101-1 GENERAL CHEMISTRY Major Core Courses-I 3 3 100
CHE111-1 CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS I Major Core Courses-I 2 1 100
CHE161A-1 COSMETIC CHEMISTRY Skill Enhancement Courses 3 3 100
CHE161B-1 TECHNICAL JAPANESE FOR CHEMISTS Skill Enhancement Courses 3 3 100
CHZO001 BRIDGE COURSE IN CHEMISTRY AND ZOOLOGY Bridge Courses 2 0 50
CSC141 PROGRAMMING IN C Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
CSC149 INTRODUCTION TO DATA SCIENCE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
DMT142 INTRODUCTION TO CARNATIC MUSIC Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
DSC142 PYTHON PROGRAMMING FOR DATA SCIENCE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
ECO145 ECOLOGY AND DEVELOPMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
ENG181-1 ENGLISH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses 2 2 50
EST141 TRAVEL AND TRAVEL NARRATIVES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
EST142 READING SPORTS AND LITERATURE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
EST143 STORYTELLING, GAMES AND ETHICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
EST144 DESIGN THINKING AND SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP Multidisciplinary Courses 45 3 100
EST148 THE OCEANS IN CINEMA: A BLUE HUMANITIES READING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
HIS141 HISTORY AND CINEMA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
LAW142 RIGHT TO INFORMATION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
LAW144 ENVIRONMENTAL LAW Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
MAT141 FOUNDATIONS OF MATHEMATICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
MED144 HARRY POTTER AND CONTEMPORARY ISSUES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
PHY141 FUNDAMENTAL OF FORENSIC PHYSICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PHY142 ANALOG AND DIGITAL ELECTRONICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
POL143 SUBALTERN STUDIES: NARRATIVES OF THE COMMUNITIES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY143 ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND HUMAN-MACHINE INTERACTION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY155 PSYCHOLOGY OF GENDER Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY156 PSYCHOLOGY OF RELATIONSHIPS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY157 SCIENCE OF WELLBEING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY158 STRESS MANAGEMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
SOC141 WOMEN'S ISSUES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
THE141 THEATRE APPRECIATION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
THE142 IMPROVISATION AND DEVISED THEATRE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
2 Semester - 2023 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BLS105-2 ANIMAL DIVERSITY-II (CHORDATA) Major Core Courses-II 3 3 100
BLS106-2 COMPARATIVE ANATOMY AND EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY Major Core Courses-II 3 3 100
BLS115-2 ANIMAL DIVERSITY-II LAB Major Core Courses-II 2 1 50
BLS116-2 COMPARATIVE ANATOMY AND EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY LAB Major Core Courses-II 2 1 50
CHE101-2 INORGANIC CHEMISTRY-I: COORDINATION COMPOUNDS AND ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY Major Core Courses-I 3 3 100
CHE102-2 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY-I: FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS Major Core Courses-I 3 3 100
CHE111-2 CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS-II Major Core Courses-I 2 2 50
CHE112-2 CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS-III Major Core Courses-I 2 2 50
CSC154 INTRODUCTION TO PYTHON PROGRAMMING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
ECO146 GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 50
ECO147 THINKING THROUGH THE ENVIRONMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 50
ENG181-2 ENGLISH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses 3 2 100
EST150 GENDER AND POPULAR CULTURE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
EST151 COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY: DARSANA AND PHILOSOPHY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 50
EST152 SKILLS FOR PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 50
EST156 RETELLING OF EPICS IN INDIAN LITERATURE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
LAW142 RIGHT TO INFORMATION - 3 3 100
LAW144 ENVIRONMENTAL LAW - 3 3 100
LAW146 LAW AND PRACTICE OF INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 100
LAW149 LEGAL ASPECTS OF HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 100
MAT143 MATHEMATICS FOR ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
MED148 LANGUAGE OF CINEMA: A VISUAL APPROACH Multidisciplinary Courses 45 3 100
PHY141A INTRODUCTION TO ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
POL143 POLITICS AND SOCIETY OF INDIA SINCE INDEPENDENCE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
POL144 INDIA AND THE WORLD Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 100
PSY157 SCIENCE OF WELLBEING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY160 UNDERSTANDING ADDICTION AND SUBSTANCE USE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
SOC142 CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL PROBLEMS AND CHALLENGES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
    

    

Introduction to Program:

The programme is offered to students opting for a BSc degree with a combination of Chemistry and Zoology and BSc (Chemistry Honours/Honours with Research) or BSc (Zoology Honours/Honours with Research). The programme leads the students to higher learning in chemical and biological sciences and contributes to the welfare of society. It is designed to help the students to understand the importance and judicious use of technology for the sustainable growth of mankind in synergy with nature. During the study of this programme, students will be trained to use an experimental learning strategy to integrate the program's laboratory and lecture components. This programme combines cutting-edge biology and chemical research with instruction practically and uniquely. The programme leads the students to higher learning in biological, and chemical sciences and contribute to the welfare of the society.

Programme Outcome/Programme Learning Goals/Programme Learning Outcome:

PO1: Understand and apply the fundamental principles, concepts and methods in key areas of science and multidisciplinary fields

PO2: Demonstrate problem solving, analytical and logical skills to provide solutions for the scientific requirements

PO3: Understand and analyse the concepts of Chemistry and apply them to real-world situations

PO4: Develop logical and analytical skills in chemical sciences.

PO5: Exhibit professional skills to lead a successful career

PO6: Analyse the impact of chemicals in societal and environmental contexts.

PO7: Imbibe ethical, moral and social values in personal and social life leading to a highly cultured and civilized personality and developing various communication skills such as reading, listening, speaking, etc., which will help in expressing ideas and views clearly and effectively.

PO8: demonstrate and apply the fundamental knowledge of the basic principles in major fields of animal science.

PO9: apply the knowledge and transferable skills on identifying vectors and vector borne diseases and offer well-defined solutions for issues related to human health & environment.

Assesment Pattern

 

 

No.

Component

Schedule

Duration

Marks

CIA1

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

Before MST

--

10

 

CIA2

Mid-Sem Test

[MST]

2 Hrs (50 marks)

25

CIA3

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

After MST

--

10

CIA3

Attendance (75-79 = 1, 80-84 = 2, 85-89 = 3,

90-94 = 4, 95-100 = 5)

--

5

ESE

Centralized

3 Hrs (100 marks)

50

Total

100

 

Examination And Assesments

Continuous internal assessment (CIA) forms 50% and the end semester examination forms the other 50% of the marks in both theory and practical. CIA marks are awarded based on their performance in assignments (written material to be submitted and valued), mid-semester test (MST), and class assignments (Quiz, presentations, problem solving etc.) The mid-semester examination and the end semester examination for each theory course will be for two and three hours duration respectively. The CIA for practical sessions is done on a day to day basis depending on their performance in the pre-lab, the conduct of the experiment, and presentation of lab reports. Only those students who qualify with minimum required attendance and CIA will be allowed to appear for the end semester examination.

 

BLS102-1 - ANIMAL DIVERSITY-I (NON-CHORDATA) (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Understanding animal diversity is a fundamental goal of zoological research, with far-reaching implications for science and conservation. This course will give students a modern perspective on animal diversity and an understanding of how the process of evolution has produced this diversity; explore this diversity from various perspectives and examine how the diversity of body plans can be understood in terms of the relationship between evolution and development. This course will include sessions that demonstrate approaches and techniques used to investigate animal diversity, emphasising that this is an active research field, as well as sessions that help students develop core skills within the context of the course.

Course Outcome

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:4
Principles of classification and nomenclature
 

Systematics; Natural and classical. Nomenclature: Binomial and Trinomial nomenclature; International rules of Zoological nomenclature (brief account); Mention new trends in systematics like Chemotaxonomy, Serotaxonomy, Cytotaxonomy, Numerical taxonomy (Phenetics), Cladistics (Phylogenetic systematics), Molecular systematics.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:4
Concepts of classification of animals (brief account)
 

Classification based on number of cells, tissue or organ system level of organisation, development of germ layers, development of symmetry, development of coelom, segmentation in the somite, development of mouth and digestive tract; Detailed classification of Kingdom Animalia with major and minor phyla.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:4
Kingdom Protista
 

Five kingdom classification of living organisms; Mention Cavalier-smith’s eight kingdom classification; Characteristic features and classification of Kingdom Protista down to phyla (Major phylum Rhizopoda, Dinoflagellata, Parabasilia, Apicomplexa, Ciliophora with examples).  

 

Type Study: Plasmodium: Morphology and structural organization; locomotion, nutrition, excretion, osmoregulation and reproduction; conjugation.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:3
Parazoa - Porifera
 

 

General characters and classification down to classes; Type study: Sycon: Spicules; Cell types; Canal system 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Acoelomate ? Cnidaria, Ctenophora, Platyhelminthes
 

General characters and classification down to classes of each phylum; 

Polymorphism in Halistemma; evolutionary significance of Ctenophora.

Type study: Obelia and Taenia solium (Morphology and life cycle, Parasitic adaptations)

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:3
Pseudocoelomate - Nematoda
 

General characters and classification down to classes; pathogenicity and prophylaxis of Ascaris lumbricoides and its parasitic adaptations.

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:12
Coelomate ? Annelida, Arthropoda and Mollusca
 

General characters and classification up to classes of each phylum; evolution of coelom; metamerism in Annelida; evolutionary significance of trochophore larva; vision in Arthropoda, metamorphosis and moulting in insects; foot & shell modification in Mollusca

 

Type study: Earthworm, Penaeus indicus; Pila globosa

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:5
Deuterostomes ? Echinodermata and Hemichordata
 

 

General characters and classification up to classes; water-vascular system in Asteroidea; affinities of Balanoglossus with Chordata and Nonchordata.

Text Books And Reference Books:
    1. Cleveland Hickman, Susan Keen, Allan Larson, David Eisenhour (2021) Animal Diversity, 9th Ed. Mc Graw Hill.

    2. Ruppert and Barnes, R.D. (2006). Invertebrate Zoology, VIII Edition. Holt Saunders International Edition

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Barnes, R.S.K., Calow, P., Olive, P.J.W., Golding, D.W. and Spicer, J.I. (2002). The Invertebrates: A New Synthesis, III Edition, Blackwell Science.

  2. Prakash Puranik, Asha Bhate. Animal forms and functions: invertebrata. Sarup & Sons, 2007.

  3. F A Mandal. Biology of Non-Chordates. PHI Learning Pvt. Ltd.01-Nov-2017.

  4. Hall B.K. and Hallgrimsson B. (2008). Strickberger’s Evolution. IV Edition. Jones and Bartlett Publishers Inc.

  5. RL Kotpal Invertebrates 12th edition.

  6. P S Verma and E L Jordon (2009) Invertebrate Zoology.

  7. RL Kotpal A text book of Animal diversity, Rastogi publications

Evaluation Pattern

Internal Assessment: CIA 1(Quiz/ Tests/ MCQs/ Assignments) - 20 marks; CIA 2 (Midsemester Examination) 50 marks; CIA 3 (Quiz/ Tests/ MCQs/ Assignments - 20 marks)

External Assessment: End Semester Examination - 100 marks

Both the assessments will be scaled down to 50

BLS112-1 - ANIMAL DIVERSITY-I LAB (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:1

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

This lab course is designed to provide students with hands-on experience examining a wide breadth of animals representing different animal phyla. By closely examining live and preserved specimens students will gain a strong understanding and appreciation for the wide diversity in animal life cycles, body morphology and adaptations. 

Course Outcome

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
Animal Diversity 1 Lab
 
  1. Study of microscopes (simple and compound).

  2. Methods for collection and preservation of invertebrate animals 

  3. Methods for the preparation of permanent and temporary mounting.

  4. Study of museum specimens: Amoeba, Euglena, Paramecium, Sycon, Euplectella, Obelia, Physalia, Aurelia, Taenia solium, Faciola hepatica, Male and female Ascaris lumbricoides, Aphrodite, Nereis, Palaemon, Scolopendra, Apis, Chiton, Dentalium, Pila, Pentaceros, Cucumaria, Balanoglossus

  5. Spicules and gemmules in sponges

  6. Anatomical features of Prawn – nervous system, ovary, appendages (Pictures/ photographs/ slides only)

  7. Anatomical features of Cockroach – mouthparts, reproductive organs, salivary glands (Pictures/ photographs/ slides only): 

  8. Identification of Insect Orders 

  9. Anatomical features of Earthworm – Setae (Pictures/ photographs/ slides only):  Parasitic adaptations of T. solium and A. lumbricodes

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

  1. Clevel and Hickman, Susan Keen, Allan Larson, David Eisenhour (2021) Animal Diversity, 9th Ed. Mc Graw Hill

  2. Ruppert and Barnes, R.D. (2006). Invertebrate Zoology, VIII Edition. Holt Saunders International Edition.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

  1. Barnes, R.S.K., Calow, P., Olive, P.J.W., Golding, D.W. and Spicer, J.I. (2002). The Invertebrates: A New Synthesis, III Edition, Blackwell Science 

  2. S.S. Lal, PRACTICAL ZOOLOGY, 1st Edition, 2017-18, Rastogi Publications, Verma P S Advanced Practical Zoology, S Chand & Co Ltd.

  3. P.S. Verma, 2009. A Manual of Practical Zoology: Invertebrates, C. CHAND Publications

Evaluation Pattern

Internal Assessment: Performance - 20 marks; Midsemester Examination) 20 marks; record - 10 marks)

External Assessment: End Semester Examination - 50 marks

Both the assessments will be scaled down to 25

BLS162A-1 - AQUARIUM FISH KEEPING (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

To learn the basic principles, themes and steps needed to set-up and maintain an aquarium. This course will introduce students about the basic principles, themes and steps needed to set-up and manage a fish aquarium; explore various theoretical and practical approaches to aquarium keeping. This course will include sessions that emphasising that Aquarium keeping is an active field of entrepreneurship, as well as sessions that help students develop core skills within the context of the course.

Course Outcome

CO1: Comprehend the key skills needed to set up an aquarium,

CO2: Identify and differentiate the different aquarium/ornamental fishes.

CO3: Formulate fish food that provides complete nutritional benefits.

CO4: Analyze the required budget to set up a well maintained home aquarium

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Aquarium Fish Keeping
 

Scope of Aquarium Fish industry as a Cottage Industry, Different varieties of exotic and indigenous fishes. Principles of a balanced aquarium; Fabrication, setting up and maintenance of freshwater and marine aquarium.  Aquarium accessories and decorative.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Biology of Aquarium Fishes
 

Breeding and rearing of ornamental fishes. Broodstock management. Application of genetics and biotechnology for producing quality strains. Common characters and sexual dimorphism of Fresh water and Marine Aquarium fishes such as Molly, Sword tail, Gold fish, Angel fish, blue morph, Anemone fish and Butterfly fish.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Ornamental plants
 

Diversity of ornamental plants in India; identification, importance, propagation and maintenance of ornamental plants;Lighting and aeration

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Water quality management
 

 

Common physical, chemical and biological parameters of water affecting ornamental fishes, Management of water quality parameters of water.Water filteration system-biological, mechanical and chemical. Types of filters.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Food and Feeding of Aquarium Fishes.
 

 

Nutritional requirements of aquarium fishes; Different kinds of feeds; Preparation of dry feeds Aquarium fish feeds. Dry, wet and live feeds. 

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
Management of aquarium fish
 

 

Common diseases and their control; Conditioning, packing, transport and quarantine methods. Trade regulations and wildlife act in relation to ornamental fishes.

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

  1. Aquarium : Fish Keeping C B L Srivastava Published by Kitab Mahal. 

  2. Aquariums: The Complete Guide to Freshwater and Saltwater Aquariums, Jan 2009 by Thierry Maitre-alain, Chrisitan Piednoir.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. David Alderton- “Freshwater Aquariums”. 
  2. Mary Bailey –“The Complete Guide to Aquarium Fish Keeping”. 
  3. Andrew Cleave- “Aquarium Fish”. 
  4. Archana Sinha- Breeding And Culture Of Freshwater Ornamental Fish. 
  5. K.V.Jayashree,C.S.Tharadevi&N.Arumugum-HomeAquariumandOrnamental Fish Culture.
  6. Marine Aquarium (Fish: Keeping and Breeding Them in Captivity) 
  7. Boruchowitz, Davie. Published by Chelsea House Publications (1998) 
  8. Aquarium Setting Up (Fish: Keeping and Breeding Them in Captivity) Axelrod, Herbert R. Published by Chelsea House Publications (1998)

 

Evaluation Pattern

Internal Assessment: CIA 1(Quiz/ Tests/ MCQs/ Assignments) - 20 marks; CIA 2 (Midsemester Examination) Theory and Practical - 60 marks; CIA 3 (Quiz/ Tests/ MCQs/ Assignments - 20 marks) 

Internal Assessment (Test) Theory and Practical - 100 marks

 

Both the assessments will be scaled down to 50

 

BLS162B-1 - SERICULTURE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

This course will introduce students about the basic concepts of origin and growth of sericulture and sericulture as science; explore various theoretical and practical approach of mulberry cultivation and silkworm rearing. This course will include sessions that emphasising that Sericulture is an active field of research and entrepreneurship, as well as sessions that help students develop core skills within the context of the course.

Course Outcome

CO1: Develop an expert manpower to handle the own sericulture units/ entrepreneurship/ corporate sector units.

CO2: Gain scientific knowledge about mulberry cultivation silkworm rearing techniques.

CO3: Create awareness about Soil to Silk concept, Sericulture Extension and innovative technology /techniques etc.

CO4: Develop entrepreneurship skills among the students.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction
 

Sericulture: Definition, history and present status; Silk route: Types of silkworms (Tasar, Muga, and Eri) and their food plants, Mulberry and non-mulberry Sericulture

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Biology of Silkworm
 

Morphology and Life cycle of Bombyx mori, Structure of silk gland and secretion of silk.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Biology of Mulberry Plant
 

Botanical description of mulberry. Economic importance of mulberry Plant; Morphology of mulberry plant; Different cultivars of mulberry; Floral biology of mulberry: Structure of male and female flowers, Planting system, pruning and training, propagation, irrigation, fertilizer application, manuring, composting, vermicomposting weeding method; Diseases of mulberry Leaf (Leaf spot, Powdery mildew, Leaf Rust, Leaf blight), root (root rot disease, root knot disease) and pest management (Mealy bug, Bihar hairy caterpillar, Jassid, Leaf roller, Scale insect, Termites and mites their preventive and control measures).

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Rearing of Silkworms
 

Mulberry cultivation, Selection of land and establishment of mulberry garden, Different methods of planting –Organic and inorganic manure application, Rearing house and rearing appliances- Egg transportation and incubation –Egg handling – Hatching –Brushing –Silk worm rearing techniques

Disinfectants: Formalin, bleaching powder, Resham Keet Oushadh (RKO) Silkworm rearing technology: Early age and Late age rearing Types of mountages, Spinning, harvesting and storage of cocoons. 

 

Reeling methods – Reeling and Re-reeling –Silk examination, cleaning, lacing, bookmaking and grading of silk. Field visit to silk worm rearing centre and reeling industry.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Pests and Diseases
 

Pests of silkworm: Uzi fly, dermestid beetles and vertebrates Pathogenesis of silkworm diseases: Protozoan, viral, fungal and bacterial Control and prevention of pests and diseases.

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

  1. Text Book of Tropical Sericulture. Publ., Japan Overseas Corporation volunteers – 1975. 

  2. Silkworm Rearing Techniques in the Tropics, Dr. S. Omura, Japan International Cooperation Agency, 1980. 

  3. Muga Silk Industry by S. N. Choudhary, Directorate of Sericulture and weaving, Govt. of Assam, 1982. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

  1. The natures and property of soils (9th edition) N. C. Brady (Mac Millan pub. Co. Inc., New York.

  2. Studies on soils of India, S. V. Govind Rajan and H. G. Gopala Rao (1970), Vikas Publ. House Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi.

  3. Handbook of Practical Sericulture: S.R. Ullal and M.N. Narasimhanna CSB, Bangalore  

  4. Appropriate Sericultural Techniques; Ed. M. S. Jolly, Director, CSR & TI, Mysore.  

  5. Handbook of Silkworm Rearing: Agriculture and Technical Manual-1, Fuzi Pub. Co. Ltd., Tokyo, Japan1972.  

  6. Manual of Silkworm Egg Production; M. N. Narasimhanna, CSB, Bangalore 1988.  

  7. Silkworm Rearing; Wupang—Chun and Chen Da-Chung, Pub. By FAO, Rome 1988. 

  8. Tasar culture. Dr. M. S. Jolly et. al., CSB, 1974.

Evaluation Pattern

Internal Assessment: CIA 1(Quiz/ Tests/ MCQs/ Assignments) - 20 marks; CIA 2 (Midsemester Examination) 60 marks; CIA 3 (Quiz/ Tests/ MCQs/ Assignments - 20 marks)

Internal Final Assessment: Theory and Practical - 100 marks

Both the assessments will be scaled down to 100

BLS162C-1 - APICULTURE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

This course begins with a brief history of apiculture and its importance. Concise information on the equipment needed, handling of honey bee colonies, seasonal management, and economics has been provided. Because this course includes both theory and practice, the reading material is simple and to the point, which will aid them in learning practical beekeeping more effectively.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand economic importance of honey bees and developments taking place in modern beekeeping.

CO2: Differentiate hive bees from wild bees and species from subspecies.

CO3: Familiar with different equipment used in modern beekeeping for domesticating hive bee

CO4: Learn manipulations required for quality honey production, safety of honey bees and increasing colony productivity.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Basics of Apiculture
 

Honey bee species and identification: Introduction to honey bee; Origin, systematics and distribution; Types of honey bees, Species of honey bees. Bee identification

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Bee Keeping Techniques
 

Basic requirements for starting bee keeping: Getting Started in Beekeeping - Land and Buildings, Equipments and supplies - Vehicle, hives; Seasonal management of honey bees: Honey bees on Canola, Spring management of bees, Wintering bees, Apiary management for winter/early spring pollination. Summer management honey production; Queen rearing and colony multiplication: Raising honey bee queens. Developmental stages of queen bee, Requirements for rearing good queens, Methods of rearing queens, Hopkins Method, Alley Method, Miller Method, Dequeening Method, Raising Queen on double and Whole Brood Comb.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Bee Enemies, Diseases, Pesticide Poisoning
 

Bee enemies  - Wax Moth, Ants, Wasps, Microorganisms, Pests. Diagnosis and Identification; Bacterial, viral, fungal & protozoan diseases: Bacterial disease - American Foulbrood, European Foulbrood, Viral disease - Deformed Wing Virus, Sacbrood Viru, Black Queen Cell Virus, Kashmir Bee Virus, Acute Bee Paralysis Virus; Fungal disease - Chalkbrood, Stonebrood; Protozoan disease - Nosemosis, Nosema cerana; Pesticide poisoning of bees and mitigation: Definition of pesticides, types of pesticides and their length of residual toxicity, Pesticides and pollinators, Toxicity to bees – Honey bee health, Colony collapse disorder

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Bee Products, Economics and Marketing
 

Bee products (honey, pollen, royal jelly, bees wax, propolis & venom) and their significance; Value added honey products; Economics of bee keeping, Economic Value of Commercial Beekeeping; Marketing of bee products (honey comb and honey, pollination services, wax, propolis, pollen, royal jelly, Bee venom, adult and larval bees.

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Graham, J M (1992) The hive and the honey bee. Dadant and Sons, Hamilton, IIIinois.

  2. Mishra R.C. (1995) Honey bees and their management in India. ICAR Publication, New Delhi.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Gupta, J.K., Sharma, H K and Thakur, R K. 2009. Practical Manual on Beekeeping. Department of Entomology and Apiculture, Dr Y S Parmar University of Horticulture and Forestry, Nauni, Solan, p 83. 

  2. Gupta, J K. 2010. Spring management of honey bee colonies. In “OAPI-012 Management of honey bee colonies; Seasonal and specific management (Block 2), Indira Gandhi National open university, school of Agriculture, New Delhi, UNIT-I, pp 5-14, p 105.

  3. Gupta, J K. 2010.Management in summer. In “OAPI-012 Management of honey bee colonies; Seasonal and specific management (Block 2), Indira Gandhi National open university, school of Agriculture, New Delhi, UNIT-II, pp 15-25, p 105.

  4. Gupta, J K. 2010.Management in monsoon season. In “OAPI-012 Management of honey bee colonies; Seasonal and specific management (Block 2), Indira Gandhi National open university, school of Agriculture, New Delhi, UNIT-III, pp 26-33, p 105.

  5. Gupta, J K. 2010.Management in autumn season. In “OAPI-012 Management of honey bee colonies; Seasonal and specific management (Block 2), Indira Gandhi National open university, school of Agriculture, New Delhi, UNIT-IV, pp 34-40, p 105.

  6. Gupta, J K. 2010.Management in winter. In “OAPI-012 Management of honey bee colonies; Seasonal and specific management (Block 2), Indira Gandhi National open university, school of Agriculture, New Delhi, UNIT-V, pp 41-50, p 105.

  7. Gatoria, G.S., Gupta, J. K., Thakur, R.K. and Singh, J. 2011. Mass queen bee rearing and multiplication of honey bee colonies.
    All India Co-ordinated project on honey bees and pollinators, ICAR, HAU, Hisar, p70.

Evaluation Pattern

Internal Assessment: CIA 1(Quiz/ Tests/ MCQs/ Assignments) - 20 marks; CIA 2 (Midsemester Examination) 60 marks; CIA 3 (Quiz/ Tests/ MCQs/ Assignments - 20 marks)

Internal Final Assessment: Theory and Practical - 100 marks

Both the assessments will be scaled down to 100

BOT121-1 - BIODIVERSITY - I (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 The present course deals with the study of microbes, fungi and algae and the diseases caused in plants. The units of Phycology and Mycology deals with the general characters, thallus organization, morphology and life cycles of different algae and fungi. It also discusses the diseases caused in plants and evaluates the symptoms, causal agents and control measures of infected plants and other microbial diseases.

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will be able to understand and identify the diversity of microbes, fungi and algae

CO2: Students will be able to analyse the microscopic characters of microbes, fungi and algae

CO3: Students will be able to evaluate the significance of microbes, fungi and algae in the society

CO4: Students will be able to create awareness and disseminate the knowledge about the different types of microbial and fungal diseases

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:2
Introduction to microbial world and to study its diversity
 

Basic introduction about the microbial diversity

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Viruses
 

 Discovery; Physiochemical and biological characteristics; Classification (including Baltimore’s); Replication, Lytic and Lysogenic cycle; Structure of DNA virus (bacteriophage T4), RNA virus (TMV), Oncogenic virus (HIV); Symptoms, transmission and management of diseases caused by viruses in plants and in animals-with special reference to Mosaics and Vein clearing; and Dengue and AIDS 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Prokaryotes
 

Discovery of bacteria; Ecology and distribution; General structure; Comparison of Archaea and Eubacteria; Wall-less forms (L-forms, Mycoplasma, Protoplasts and Sphaeroplasts) Nutrition; Reproduction–vegetative, asexual and recombination; Economic importance; Symptoms, transmission and management of diseases caused by bacteria and mycoplasma on plants; Detailed study of two diseases each on plants (with special reference to: Crown gall and Citrus canker), and on animals (with special reference to: Tuberculosis and Cholera).

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Algae
 

 General characteristics; Ecology and distribution (with reference to distribution in Indian peninsula); Range of thallus organization and reproduction; Basic criteria used in classification (Fritsch, 1945); Important classes in relation to Applied Phycology listed below Cyanophyceae- Nostoc Chlorophyceae- Chlamydomonas, Volvox, ChlorellaBacillariophyceae-Diatoms Phaeophyceae- Sargassum and Rhodophyceae- Gracilaria

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Fungi and their allies
 

 General characteristics; Ecology and distribution; Range of thallus organization; Cell structure; Wall composition; Nutrition; Growth; Reproduction and spores; Heterokaryosis and parasexuality; Basic criteria used in classification. Myxomycetes: General characteristics; Ecology and significance (Physarum as an experimental tool); Oomycetes: General characteristics; Ecology and significance; Thallus organization, Reproduction; Life cycle of Albugo. Life cycle of Rhizopus (Zygomycetes), Peziza (Ascomycetes) Puccinia, (Basidiomycetes) and Alternaria (Deuteromycetes), Symptoms, transmission and management of fungal diseases on plants; Two diseases each on plants (with special reference to Rust of wheat and Early blight of potato), and on humans (with special reference to Candidiasis and Dermatophytes to be studied in detail). Associations of Fungi: Lichens: General account; Reproduction; Mycorrhizae: General account and its significance.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Sharma, OP (2002) Textbook of Thallophytes, Tata McGraw Hill Publishing Co. New Delhi.

2. Prescott's Microbiology by Willey, Joanne; Sherwood, Linda; Woolverton, Chris, 8th edition (2011) McGraw Hill.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Tortora, G.J, Funke, B.R, Case, C.L. (2010). 10th edition Microbiology: An Introduction,

Pearson.

2. Sharma, PD (2005). Fungi and Allied Organisms, Narosa Publishing House, New Delhi.

3. Alexopoulos, C.J., Mims, C.W. and Blackwell, M. (1996) Introductory Mycology, John

Wiley & Sons, Inc. USA.

4. Webster J. and Weber, R.W.S; (2007) Introduction to Fungi (3rd Edition) Cambridge Univ.

Paress, U.K.

5. Fritsch F.E. 1935, 45 (Vol. I & II) The structure and reproduction of the Algae. Vikas

Publishing House Ltd. Delhi

6. Sahoo Dinabandhu. 2000. Farming the ocean Aravali International, Delhi

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1: 20%

CIA2: 50%

CI3: 20%

Attendance: 10%

End Semester Exam: 100%

CHE101-1 - GENERAL CHEMISTRY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

In this introductory paper, the students acquire knowledge of the basic concepts of Physical, Organic, and Inorganic Chemistry. 

Course Outcome

CO1: Recall the fundamentals of structure and bonding.

CO2: Predict the chemical bonding in simple molecules.

CO3: Interpret the properties of organic molecules and reaction mechanisms.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Atomic Structure
 

Prelearning topics: Bohr’s theory and its limitations, Black body radiation, dual behaviour of matter and radiation, de Broglie’s relation, Heisenberg Uncertainty principle. Hydrogen atom spectra. Need of a new approach to Atomic structure.

 

 

Quantum mechanics: Postulates of quantum mechanics, Introduction, time independent Schrodinger equation and meaning of various terms in it. Significance of ψ and ψ2, Schrödinger equation for hydrogen atom. Radial and angular parts of the hydrogenic wave functions (atomic orbitals) and their variations for 1s, 2s, 2p, 3s, 3p and 3d orbitals (Only graphical representation). Radial and angular nodes and their significance. Radial distribution functions and the concept of the most probable distance with special reference to 1s and 2s atomic orbitals. Significance of quantum numbers, orbital angular momentum and quantum numbers ml and ms. Shapes of s, p and d atomic orbitals, nodal planes. Discovery of spin, spin quantum number (s) and magnetic spin quantum number (ms). Effective nuclear charge. Slater's Rules. *Stability of half-filled and completely filled orbitals,*concept of exchange energy. Relative energies of atomic orbitals, Anomalous electronic configurations.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Chemical Bonding and Molecular Structure
 

Ionic Bonding: General characteristics of ionic bonding. #Energy considerations in ionic bonding, lattice energy and solvation energy and their importance in the context of stability and solubility of ionic compounds. Statement of Born-Landé equation for calculation of lattice energy, Born-Haber cycle and its applications, polarizing power and polarizability. Fajan’s rules, ionic character in covalent compounds, bond moment, dipole moment and percentage ionic character.

Covalent bonding: VB Approach: Shapes of some inorganic molecules and ions on the basis of VSEPR and hybridization with suitable examples of linear, trigonal planar, square planar, tetrahedral, trigonal bipyramidal and octahedral arrangements. Concept of resonance and resonating structures in various inorganic compounds.

 

MO Approach: Rules for the LCAO method, bonding and antibonding MOs and their characteristics for s-s, s-p and p-p combinations of atomic orbitals, nonbonding combination of orbitals, MO treatment of homonuclear diatomic molecules (O2, N2) of 1st and 2nd periods (including idea of s-p mixing) and heteronuclear diatomic molecules such as CO, NO and NO+. Comparison of VB and MO approaches.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:7
Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry
 

Prelearning topics: Hybridizations, bond lengths, bond angles, bond energy. Localized and delocalized chemical bond, polarity of bonds, types of chemical reactions

 

 

Electronic Displacements: Inductive Effect, Electromeric Effect, Resonance, Hyperconjugation and steric effect. Effect of the above on strength of organic acids and bases: Comparative study with emphasis on factors affecting pK values. Cleavage of Bonds: Homolysis and Heterolysis. Nucleophiles and electrophiles. Reactive Intermediates: Carbocations, Carbanions, free radicals and carbenes - Structure, shape and reactivity of organic intermediates. Types of organic reactions: Addition, elimination, substitution, rearrangement and redox reactions (definition and one example each). 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Aliphatic Hydrocarbons
 

Prelearning topics: Classification, Nomenclature and sources of organic compounds.

 

Alkanes: (Upto 5 Carbons)

Preparation: Catalytic hydrogenation, from Grignard reagent. Reactions: Free radical Substitution: Halogenation. Selectivity and reactivity. (Mechanisms)

Cycloalkanes-Relative stabilities-Baeyer’s strain theory-Sache-Mohr theory of strainless rings.

Alkenes: (Upto 5 Carbons)

Preparation: Elimination reactions: Dehydration of alkenes and dehydrohalogenation of alkyl halides (Saytzeff’s rule); cis alkenes (Partial catalytic hydrogenation) and trans alkenes (Birch reduction). Mention stereoselective and regioselective reactions. Reactions: cis addition (alk. KMnO4) and trans-addition (bromine), Addition of HX (Markownikoff’s and anti-Markownikoff’s addition with mechanisms), Hydration, Ozonolysis, Hydroboration-oxidation.

Alkynes: (Upto 5 Carbons)                                                                                          

Prelearning topics: geminal and vicinal dihalides, basic concepts of addition and oxidation reactions.  Preparation: Acetylene from CaC2 and conversion into higher alkynes; by dehalogenation of tetra halides and dehydrohalogenation of vicinal-dihalides.

 

Reactions: formation of metal acetylides, addition of bromine and alkaline KMnO4, ozonolysis and oxidation with hot alkaline KMnO4.

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1]  B.R. Puri, L.R. Sharma and K.C. Kalia, Principles of Inorganic Chemistry, 31st Edition, Milestone Publishers and Distributors, New Delhi, 2013.

[2]  Bahl, A. &Bahl, B.S. Advanced Organic Chemistry, S. Chand, 2010.

[3]  B. Mehta, M. Mehta, Organic Chemistry, PHI Learning Private Limited, 2017.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1]  J.A. Lee, Scientific Endeavour, Addison Wesley Longman

[2]  D.A. Skoog, D.M. West, F.J. Holler and S.R. Crouch, Fundamentals of Analytical Chemistry, 8th Edition, Brooks/Cole, Thomson Learning, Inc., USA, 2004.

[3]  J. D. Lee, Concise Inorganic Chemistry, 5th ed., Blackwell Science, London, 2010.

[4]  Satya Prakash, Advanced Inorganic Chemistry, Volume 1, 5th Edition, S. Chand and Sons, New Delhi, 2012.

[5]  R.K. Prasad, Quantum Chemistry, New Age International, 2001

[6]  McQuarrie, J. D. Simon, Physical Chemistry – A molecular Approach, Viva Books.

[7]  I. N. Levine, Physical Chemistry, Tata McGraw Hill,

[8]  ManasChanda, Atomic structure and Chemical bonding in Molecular Spectroscopy” Tata McGraw Hill.

[9]  J. D. Lee, Concise Inorganic Chemistry, 5th edn., Blackwell Science, London.

[10]   B. R. Puri, L. R. Sharma, Kalia, Principles of Inorganic Chemistry, Milestone Publishers, New Delhi.

[11]   F. A. Cotton, G. Wilkinson and P. L. Gaus, Basic Inorganic Chemistry, 3rd ed., John Wiley.

[12]   B. Douglas, D. Mc Daniel, J. Alexander, Concepts and models in Inorganic Chemistry.

[13]   R. Gopalan, Inorganic Chemistry for Undergraduates, Universities Press, Hyderabad, 2009.

[14]   Jain and Sharma Modern Organic Chemistry 3rd edition, Vishal Publishing Company, 2009.

[15]   R. T Morrison, and R. N. Boyd. Organic Chemistry.  7thed. New Delhi: Prentice-Hall of India (P) Ltd., 2010.

[16]   S.M. Mukherji, S. P. Singh, and R. P. Kapoor. Organic Chemistry. 3rd, 12th Reprint, New Delhi: New Age International (P) Ltd. Publishers, 2009.

 

[17]   I. L Finar, Organic Chemistry Vol. II, 5thed. New Delhi: ELBS and Longman Ltd., reprint 2008.

Evaluation Pattern

No.

Component

Schedule

Duration

Marks

CIA1

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

Before MST

--

10

 

CIA2

Mid-Sem Test

[MST]

2 Hrs (50 marks)

25

CIA3

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

After MST

--

10

CIA3

Attendance (75-79 = 1, 80-84 = 2, 85-89 = 3, 

90-94 = 4, 95-100 = 5)

--

5

ESE

Centralized

3 Hrs (100 marks)

50

Total

100

CHE111-1 - CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS I (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:1

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is intended to impart basic analytical skills with an emphasis on volumetric analysis. It also emphasizes the importance of organized and systematic approach in carrying out experiments.

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate the physical parameters of liquids or solutions.

CO2: Perform the volumetric techniques for the quantitative analysis of various samples.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:60
Chemistry Practicals I
 

1.     Calibration of glassware.

2.     Determination of the surface tension of a liquid or a dilute solution using a stalagmometer.

3.     Study of the variation of surface tension of a detergent solution with concentration.

4.     Determination of viscosity of a liquid.

5.     Estimation of oxalic acid by titrating it with KMnO4.

6.     Estimation of water of crystallization in Mohr’s salt by titrating with KMnO4.

7.     Estimation of Fe (II) ions by titrating it with K2Cr2O7 using internal indicator.

8.     Estimation of Fe (II) ions by titrating it with K2Cr2O7 using external indicator.

9.     Estimation of Cu (II) ions iodometrically using Na2S2O3.

10.  Estimation of total alkalinity of water samples (CO32-, HCO3-) using double titration method.

 

11.  Measurement of chlorides in water samples by titrimetry (AgNO3 and potassium chromate)

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1]  Svehla, G. Vogel’s Qualitative Inorganic Analysis, Pearson Education, 2012.

 

[2]  Mendham, J. Vogel’s Quantitative Chemical Analysis, Pearson, 2009.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1]  Svehla, G. Vogel’s Qualitative Inorganic Analysis, Pearson Education, 2012.

 

[2]  Mendham, J. Vogel’s Quantitative Chemical Analysis, Pearson, 2009.

Evaluation Pattern

Scheme of assessment

 

1.  Continuous internal assessment of Practicals …………            20 Marks

2.  Mid-Sem practical Test …………………………………         20 Marks

3.  Record assessment ………………………………………         10 Marks

4.  End-semester Practical examination …………………..           50 Marks

  (Viva voce –10 marks; Performing experiment –  40 marks)      

                                        

                                 TOTAL                                                100 Marks

CHE161A-1 - COSMETIC CHEMISTRY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is aimed at creating awareness among the undergraduate students about the role of chemistry in day- to- day life. To learn more about cosmetics, their ingredients and other common chemicals used in daily life. This will help in selecting the appropriate products from the wide range available in the market. This will also develop in them, a sense of judicious use of cosmetics and other chemicals and also enhancement of self-esteem through proper grooming.

Course Outcome

CO1: Recall the various components present in cosmetics and their properties.

CO2: Understand the working of soaps, detergents and cleaners.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:3
Introduction to cosmetic chemistry
 

Introduction to cosmetic chemistry

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:4
Skin creams and lotions
 

Composition and property: Demonstration of Preparation of cold creams and vanishing cream

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Deodorants and antiperspirants
 

Composition and how they work       

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:4
Tooth pastes, mouth wash and tooth powder
 

Ccomposition and cleansing action, Demonstration of Preparation of a mouthwash, tooth powder and tooth paste                  

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Perfumes, colognes and aftershaves
 

Composition and properties Demonstration of Preparation of an aftershave lotion and shaving cream

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
Shampoos, hair colouring and hair removers
 

Composition and their action Demonstration of Preparation of shampoos

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:3
Nail polish, Face powder, pansticks, foundation and face masks
 

Composition and function Demonstration of  Preparation of face powders          

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:3
Lipsticks and Eye makeup
 

Demonstration of Preparation of lipsticks  

Unit-9
Teaching Hours:6
Soaps and detergents
 

Composition and cleansing action

Unit-10
Teaching Hours:6
Special purpose cleaners
 

Composition and working

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1].  Raymond Chang Chemistry, 8th Ed. Tata Mc Graw-Hill 2002

[2].  John Suchocki Conceptual Chemistry, 2nd Ed.Pearson Education. Inc. 2003

 

[3].John W. Hill, Doris K. Kolb Chemistry for changing times, 9th Ed. 2004

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1].  Raymond Chang Chemistry, 8th Ed. Tata Mc Graw-Hill 2002

[2].  John Suchocki Conceptual Chemistry, 2nd Ed.Pearson Education. Inc. 2003

 

[3].John W. Hill, Doris K. Kolb Chemistry for changing times, 9th Ed. 2004

Evaluation Pattern

No.

Component

Schedule

Duration

Marks

CIA1

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

Before MST

--

10

 

CIA2

Mid-Sem Test

[MST]

2 Hrs (50 marks)

25

CIA3

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

After MST

--

10

CIA3

Attendance (75-79 = 1, 80-84 = 2, 85-89 = 3, 

90-94 = 4, 95-100 = 5)

--

5

ESE

Centralized

3 Hrs (100 marks)

50

Total

100

CHE161B-1 - TECHNICAL JAPANESE FOR CHEMISTS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

It enables the students to understand the Japanese language essential for the translation of scientific literature which enhances the employment opportunities for the students.

Course Outcome

CO1: understand the writing system in Japanese scientific literature.

CO2: understand the basics of Japanese language used in scientific literature.

CO3: interpret the Japanese research papers and patents.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
Introduction
 

Sentence structure.Writing systems; Hiragana, Katakana, Kanji (On and Kun readings).Numbers, exercises

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:4
Particles
 

, , ,,,,, , , , , etc.  Exercises.                                   

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Adjectives, Adverbs and Verbs
 

-adjectives and -adjectives, past tense of adjectives. Adverbs. いちだ verbs, ごだ verbs and irregular verbs. Past forms, connective forms, conjunctive forms, passive forms and causative forms of verbs.

 

Transitive-Intransitive verb pairs. Examples and Exercises.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:4
Conditional forms, Comparative and Superlative Expressions
 

Conditional sentences with ,ければ,なら,たら, かった forms.Comparative expressions using ぐら, and ほど.Words implying a comparison (以上,以下,以外,以内,以前,以後).

 

Superlative expressions using一番 and最も.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:3
Miscellaneous Expressions
 

Construction with to, ,とす,とい, とよ,同時に,とき. Interrogative words with particles,.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
Chemical Nomenclature and Chemistry Vocabulary
 

Nomenclature of elements, binary compounds, bases, acids, salts, coordination compounds, organic compounds and biochemical compounds. Chemistry vocabulary.

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:3
Mathematical terminology
 

Numbers, units and counters. Numbers with prefixes and suffixes. Some mathematical expressions.

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:3
Vocabulary building in physics and biology
 

Vocabulary building in physics and biology

Unit-9
Teaching Hours:2
Utilization of online resources for translation
 

Utilization of online resources for translation

Unit-10
Teaching Hours:6
Online dictionaries and translators. Translation exercises
 

Online dictionaries and translators.  Translation exercises

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1]   Edward E.Daub, R.Byron Bird and Nobuo Inoue, Basic Technical

      Japanese, University of Wisconsin Press.

 

[2]   Different online resources available on internet.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1]   Edward E.Daub, R.Byron Bird and Nobuo Inoue, Basic Technical

      Japanese, University of Wisconsin Press.

 

[2]   Different online resources available on internet.

Evaluation Pattern

No.

Component

Schedule

Duration

Marks

CIA1

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

Before MST

--

10

 

CIA2

Mid-Sem Test

[MST]

2 Hrs (50 marks)

25

CIA3

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

After MST

--

10

CIA3

Attendance (75-79 = 1, 80-84 = 2, 85-89 = 3, 

90-94 = 4, 95-100 = 5)

--

5

ESE

Centralized

3 Hrs (100 marks)

50

Total

100

CHZO001 - BRIDGE COURSE IN CHEMISTRY AND ZOOLOGY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:0

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is an introduction to some of the basic understanding of chemistry and zoology required in the first year of undergraduate programme. One module of the course will be an introduction to basic concepts in chemistry and the other module will give a foundation for the students in understanding zoology.

Course Outcome

CO1: bridge the gap between subjects studied at the pre-university level and subjects they would be studying at the undergraduate level

CO2: acquire knowledge that is necessary to complete the course offered at the undergraduate level

CO3: improve the preparation and ease their transition to the university

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Basic concepts in Chemistry
 

a.     Atomic Models (5 Hrs)

Black body radiation, photoelectric effect, Compton effect, Thomson's model and its limitations Rutherford's model and its limitations Bohr's model and its limitations Dual nature of matter and light de Broglie's relationship Heisenberg uncertainty principle Concept of orbitals Concept of shells and subshells Quantum numbers Shapes of s, p and d orbitals

b.    Chemical Bonding and Molecular Structure(5 Hrs)

Valence electrons, Ionic bond, Covalent bond, Polar character of covalent bond, Covalent character of ionic bond, Valence bond theory, Resonance, Geometry of covalent molecules, VSEPR theory. Shapes of some simple molecules Molecular orbital theory of homonuclear diatomic molecules      

c.     Organic Chemistry (5 Hrs)

Hybridizations, bond lengths, bond angles, bond energy. Localized and delocalized chemical bonds, polarity of bonds, and types of chemical reactions. Classification, Nomenclature, and sources of organic compounds. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Foundation Course In Biology
 

a.     Introduction (5h)

The scientific method and experimental design; The organization of life: cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems; Taxonomy and the diversity of life; Chemical elements and molecules essential to living systems.

b.     Introductory Genetics (5h)

Mendelian genetics and inheritance patterns; Basic structure and function of DNA & RNA, Genetic diversity and evolution.

c.     Ecosystem (5h)

Preliminary concept on ecosystems and biomes; Biodiversity and conservation; Human impact on the environment.

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. B.R. Puri, L.R. Sharma and K.C. Kalia, Principles of Inorganic Chemistry, 31st Edition, Milestone Publishers and Distributors, New Delhi, 2013.
  2. Bahl, A. &Bahl, B.S. Advanced Organic Chemistry, S. Chand, 2010.
  3. Begon, M., Townsend, C. R., & Harper, J. L. (2006). Ecology: From Individuals to Ecosystems (4th ed.). Blackwell Publishing.
  4. Ricklefs, R. E., & Relyea, R. A. (2019). The Economy of Nature (8th ed.). W.H. Freeman.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. B. Mehta, M. Mehta, Organic Chemistry, PHI Learning Private Limited, 2017.
  2. Campbell, N. A., & Reece, J. B. (2018). Biology (11th ed.). Pearson.
  3. Freeman, S., Quillin, K., Allison, L., Black, M., Taylor, E., & Podgorski, G. (2017). Biological Science (6th ed.). Pearson.
  4. Pierce, B. A. (2018). Genetics: A Conceptual Approach (6th ed.). W. H. Freeman.
  5. Freeman, S., Herron, J. C., & University of Washington. (2019). Evolutionary Analysis (5th ed.). Pearson.
Evaluation Pattern

Pre and post-assessment of the bridge course. The post-assessment will be out of 50 marks. 

CSC141 - PROGRAMMING IN C (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course introduces students to the C programming language, covering its history, features, data types, and program structure. Students will learn to apply decision control and loop structures, along with various operators, to create basic programs. Additionally, the course covers functions, recursion, arrays, and pointers to provide a solid foundation for C programming and problem-solving.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the fundamentals of C programming, including its history, features, variables, and data types.

CO2: Apply decision control statements, loop control structures, and various operators to write basic C programs.

CO3: Analyze and design functions, including recursion and passing values/arrays, and understand storage classes in C.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to C
 

 

Types of Programming Language- History of C, Features of C , C Tokens, variables and keywords and identifiers ,Types of C constants and variables, Rules for constructing variable names, Structure of C program, Input /output statements in C

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Data types and Control Structures
 

Data Types, Type declaration, Different Operators in C - Arithmetic, Logical, Relational, Bitwise, Conditional, Expressions, Hierarchy of operations.

Control structures

 

Decision control statements-if, switch, go to statement, conditional operator statement. Loop control structures- while, do-while, for loop, Break statement, Continue statement.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Function
 

Introduction, function definition and prototyping, Types of functions, passing values to function, recursion, passing arrays to functions. I/O functions- formatted & unformatted console I/O functions Storage classes in C- Automatic, Register, Extern and Static Variables.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Arrays
 

 

One dimensional and multidimensional arrays, Declaration, initialization, Reading values into an array, Displaying array contents and Array Manipulations. String-Basic Concepts, Library Functions

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Pointers
 

Definition, notation, pointer and arrays, pointers and functions-call by value and call by reference.

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1] Balagurusamy, E. Programming in ANSI C 4th Edition. Tata McGraw-Hill, 2010.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1] Kanetkar, Yashavant. Let Us C. 4th Edition. BPB Publications, 2012.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 50%

ESE 50%

CSC149 - INTRODUCTION TO DATA SCIENCE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Introductory-level training will be given software and tools for solving data science problems.

This course is designed to provide the theoretical foundations of data science.

Standard problems in data science, such as pre-processing, classification, clustering, and visualization, will be addressed.

Practical sessions will provide demonstrations, training, and discussions on results and interpretation methods.

Course Outcome

CO1: Collect the data from various sources.

CO2: Understand the problem scenario.

CO3: Solve data science problems with appropriate tools.

CO4: Interpret the results through visualizations.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
UNIT 1
 

Introduction – Concept data – types of data – sources of data – data sets – terminologies – pre-processing – classification – clustering – association rule mining – visualization – approaches – statistics – machine learning and soft computing.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Preprocessing & Data Transformation:
 

Data cleaning – handling missing values – errors and outliers

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Classification
 

Decision trees – naïve based methods – neural networks – SVM.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Data Transformation
 

Application of normalization methods – min-max method – 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Clustering
 

K-Means – Distance-based methods – Association Rules – finding frequent itemsets – apriori method.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Post-processing
 

Performance metrics of tasks – drawing various charts from the results – interpretation of results.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Tools for data science
 

Exploring the open source tools: Weka, Orange, Rapid Miner.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques, Han, Kamber and Pei, 2013

2. Data Mining and Predictive Analytics, Daniel T. Larose & ChantalD Lorose, Wiley Publisher, 2017

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Data Mining and Analysis Fundamental Concepts and Algorithms, Zaki and  Meira, MK Publisher,  2014.

2. Data Mining: The Text  Book, Aggarwal, Springer, 2015.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 50%

ESE 50%

DMT142 - INTRODUCTION TO CARNATIC MUSIC (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Introduction to Carnatic music focus on the basic fundamentals of Carnatic music. This course helps to improve the vocal quality as the lessons works as voice culture to the begginner.

Course Outcome

CO1: Ability to render the Swara-s in three speeds

CO2: Ability to identify and render the 7 Swara-s

CO3: Ability to render Sarala, Janta, Dhatu, Tarasthayi, and Alankara-s in three speeds.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Svaravali varisas and Janti varisas
 

Lessons in three speeds

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Tarasthayi and Dhattu varisas
 

All the lessons in to three speeds

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Alankaras and Geethams
 

Sapta tala alankaras and any for geethams

Text Books And Reference Books:

Carnatic music reader by Panchapakesha Iyer

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Ganamrutha Bodhini

Evaluation Pattern

Final assessment for 100 Marks

DSC142 - PYTHON PROGRAMMING FOR DATA SCIENCE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course covers the programming paradigms associated with Python. It provides a comprehensive understanding of Python data types, functions and modules with a focus on modular programming.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand and apply core programming concepts.

CO2: Demonstrate significant experience with python program development environment.

CO3: Design and implement fully-functional programs using commonly used modules and custom functions.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
INTRODUCTION
 

INTRODUCING PYTHON

Introduction, Python Fundamentals, Features of Python, Components of a Python Program, Understanding the interpreter.

Python basics:

Identifiers, Basic Types, Operators, Precedence and Associativity, Decision Control Structures, Looping Structures, Console input, output.

Practical Exercises:

1.Implement Basic data types, Control structures and operators.

2.Exercise on console input and output.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:18
Programming Fundamentals
 

PYTHON DATA TYPES

Strings,Lists:Accessingelements,Basic List operations, Built-in methods

Tuples: working with elements, Basic Tuple operation, Tuple methods and Type of Tuples 

Sets: Definition, Set Elements, Built-in methods, basic set operations, Mathematical Set operation, Variety of Sets.

Dictionaries: Defining a dictionary, accessing elements, basic operations, methods.

COMPREHENSIONS and FUNCTIONS

 Comprehensions:ListComprehensions, Set Comprehension, Dictionary Comprehension.

Functions: Defining a function, Types of arguments, unpacking arguments.

Recursive functions.Main module, built-in, custommodules, importing a module.

 

Practical Exercises:

    1. Implement Tuples

    2. Implement Dictionary

    3. Implement Set

    4.ImplementList, Set and Dictionary Comprehensions

    5.Implement Recursive function

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to NUMPY AND PANDAS
 

NUMPY 

Introduction to NumPy, Aggregations Computation on Arrays, Comparisons, Sorting Arrays.

PANDAS

Introduction to Pandas: Data indexing and Selection, Operating on Data, Handling Missing Data.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

[1]Martin Brown, Python:The Complete Reference,     McGraw Hill Publications,4th Edition March 2018.

[2]Yashavant Kanetkar,Aditya Kanetkar, Let Us Python, BPB Publications ,4th Edition 2022.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1]Reema Thareja ,Python Programming using problem solving Approach , Oxford University, Higher Education Oxford University Press, 2017

[2]Zhang.Y      ,An      Introduction     to         Pythonand      Computer            Programming,Springer Publications,2015

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 100%

ECO145 - ECOLOGY AND DEVELOPMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course aims to provide a holistic and a deeper understanding of the trade-off between ecology and development. Through an inter-disciplinary lens an organic approach is adopted to understand the trade-off. This course, therefore, seeks to cultivate not only the moral and ethical thinking of the ecology but also it tries to put forth an action plan from a policy front. 

Course Outcome

CO1: To evoke a sense of deep ecology and social justice.

CO2: To familiarize the students with the development paradigms and how it affects the ecology.

CO3: To examine the problems behind value designations

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Ecology and Value
 

The Value Problem in Ecological Economics- Values in Ecological Value Analysis: What Should We Be Learning from Contingent Valuation Studies? - Natural Capital in Ecological Economics-Entropy in Ecological Economics.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Ecology and Development
 

The environmental impact of land development-Development of water resources-Development and changing air quality- Urban development and environmental change-Environmental economics and ecological economics: Where they can converge?- Power Inequality and the Environment.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Ecofeminism and Ecocriticism
 

Gender and environment; Ecofeminism; androcentrism; Deep ecology – ecofeminism debate; Ecocriticism; Nature writings; Thinking like a mountain; The forgetting and remembering of the air - The Varna Trophic System An Ecological Theory of Caste Formation. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:11
Action Plans
 

Reading Ecology, Reinventing Democracy-Scientists or Spies?- Revisiting the Debates on Man-Nature Relation- Lecture of Medha Patkar- Ecological Fiscal Transfers and State-level Budgetary Spending in India- -Bourgeois Environmentalism, the State, the Judiciary, Urban Poor, Significance of Silent Valley- Silent Valley: A controversy that focused global attention on a rainforest 40 years ago- Equity and Justice

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      1.Burkett, Paul. (2006). Marxism and Ecological Economics. Brill

2.Daly & Farley. (2011). Ecological Economics (Principles and Applications). Island Press

3.Pepper, D. (2002). Eco-socialism: from deep ecology to social justice. Routledge

1.      4.Gupta, Avijit. (1998).Ecology and Development in Third World. Routledge

4. Patel, S. (1997). Ecology and Development. Economic and Political Weekly, 2388-2391.

5. Sankar, U. (ed.) (2000). Environmental Economics. Oxford University Press

6. Burkett, Paul. (2006). Marxism and Ecological Economics. Brill

7.Venkatachalam, L. (2007). Environmental economics and ecological economics: Where they can converge?. Ecological economics, 61(2-3), 550-558.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.    1. Plumwood, V. (1993).  Feminism and the Mastery of Nature. London: Routledge

2. Warren, K.J. (ed), (1994).  Ecological Feminism. London: Routledge.

3.Shiva, V. (2016). Staying alive: Women, ecology, and development. North Atlantic Books.

4.Kavoori, P. S. (2002). The Varna Trophic system: an ecological theory of caste formation. Economic and Political Weekly, 1156-1164. 

5.Gill, K. (2009). Bourgeois environmentalism’, the State, the Judiciary, and the ‘urban poor’: The political mobilization of a scheduled caste market. Of Poverty and Plastic (Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 2010), 209.

6. Kaur, A., Mohanty, R. K., Chakraborty, L., & Rangan, D. (2021). Ecological fiscal transfers and state-level budgetary spending in India: Analyzing the flypaper effects. Levy Economics Institute, Working Papers Series July.

7.Parameswaran, M. P. (1979). Significance of Silent Valley. Economic and Political Weekly, 1117-1119.

8. Lewis, M. (2002). Scientists or spies? Ecology in a climate of Cold War suspicion. Economic and Political Weekly, 2323-2332.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 - 25 Marks

CIA 2- 25 Marks

CIA 3- 50 Marks 

ENG181-1 - ENGLISH (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
  • To expose learners to a variety of texts to interact with
  • To help learners classify ideologies and be able to express the same
  • To expose learners to visual texts and its reading formulas
  • To help learners develop a taste to appreciate works of literature through the organization of language
  • To help develop critical thinking
  • To help learners appreciate literature and the language nuances that enhances its literary values
  • To help learners understand the relationship between the world around them and the text/literature
  • To help learners negotiate with content and infer meaning contextually
  • To help learners understand logical sequencing of content and process information

·         To help improve their communication skills for larger academic purposes and vocational purposes

·         To enable learners to learn the contextual use of words and the generic meaning

·         To enable learners to listen to audio content and infer contextual meaning

·         To enable learners to be able to speak for various purposes and occasions using context specific language and expressions

·         To enable learners to develop the ability to write for various purposes using suitable and precise language.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand how to engage with texts from various countries, historical, cultural specificities, and politics and develop the ability to reflect upon and comment on texts with various themes

CO2: Develop an analytical and critical bent of mind to compare and analyze the various literature they read and discuss in class

CO3: Develop the ability to communicate both orally and in writing for various purposes

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
1. The Happy Prince- Oscar Wilde 2. Sonnet 18- William Shakespeare
 
  • 1. The Happy Prince- Oscar Wilde
  • 2. Sonnet 18- William Shakespeare

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
Language
 

Common errors- subject-verb agreement, punctuation, tense errors  Just a minute talk, cubing

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
1. Why We Travel-Pico Iyer
 

 Why We Travel-Pico Iyer 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

Sentence fragments, dangling modifiers, faulty parallelism,

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:4
1. Thinking Like a Mountain By Aldo Leopold
 

Thinking Like a Mountain  By Aldo Leopold

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:4
language
 

Note taking

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Aarushi-Hemraj Murder Article
 

 

Aarushi-Hemraj Murder Article 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Language
 

Newspaper report

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:4
1. My Story- Nicole DeFreece
 

 

 My Story- Nicole DeFreece

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:4
Language
 

Essay writing

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:4
Language
 

Paraphrasing and interpretation skills

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:4
Casey at the Bat- Ernest Lawrence Thayer
 
  • Casey at the Bat-  Ernest Lawrence Thayer
Text Books And Reference Books:

ENGlogue 1

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Additional  material as per teacher manual will be provided by the teachers

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1=20 

CIA 2=50 

CIA 3= 20 

ESE= 50 marks

EST141 - TRAVEL AND TRAVEL NARRATIVES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Travel Literature is one of the most popular areas of study and research today. Theoretical and practical understanding of travel and Travel Literature has evolved a lot in its journey to the present. We discuss journeys at multiple levels; physical, philosophical, psychological, religious, internal, external etc. The involvement of multidisciplinary perspectives has enriched the whole understanding of travel. Questions like why people travel and what happens when one sets out on a journey becomes so pertinent to the whole discipline. This course will try to engage with the ideas of travel and writing on travel from a chronological and historical perspective. This course will also provide students with a modern and comprehensive way of understanding the world of travel and travel narratives.

 

Course Objective: This course is aimed at providing a comprehensive introduction and survey on the contemporary world of travel and travel narratives. The course is aimed at providing students a direct engagement with the modern theoretical understanding of the travel narratives.

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will be able to understand the history and development of travel literature

CO2: Students will be able to get an idea of Travel narratives in India

CO3: This will provide an introductory peek into the theory of Travel and Travel writing

CO4: Students will Will be able to critically and academically engage with travel writings

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
What is Travel ? A Basic introduction
 

Travel is the buzz word of the day. In the fast-changing modern world travel plays a vital role in shaping up thoughts and aspirations of people. People travel for multiple reasons like to enjoy, to study, as a profession, etc and the theoretical understanding of travel needs to be taken into account at the beginning itself. Understanding travel in the light of modern socio-political and economic scenario is also very important in today’s global scenario. These basic positions of the course would enable students to look at travel in a broader context to create a better world with diversity and inclusivity.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Travel Writing: An Overview
 

This unit is intended to give students an over view of the evolution of the genre of Travel Writing. Some important theories of travel writing will be introduced in this module along with the evolution of travel narratives in India.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Indian Travel Narratives
 

This module focuses on the evolution of Indian Travel Narratives.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Women and Travel Writing in India
 

This unit is trying to look at the rise and development of women travellers historically and sociologically. This will enable students to critically evaluate the Indian scenario of travel narratives.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Unit I: What is Travel – Basic introduction

1.     Pratt, Mary Louise. Imperial Eyes: Studies in Travel Writing and Transculturation.Routledge, 1992.

2.     Lislie, Debbie. The Global Politics of Contemporary Travel Writing, Cambridge University Press, 2009 Print.

Unit II: Travel Writing: An Overview

1)    Hulme, Peter, and Tim Youngs, eds., 2002. The Cambridge Companion to Travel Writing. Cambridge: Cambridge UP.

2)    Said, Edward (1983). ‘Traveling Theory.’ The World, the Text, and the Critic. [1982]. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP. 226–47.

Unit III: Indian Travel Narratives

1)    Bhattacharji, Shobhana(ed). 2008. Travel Writing in India, Sahitya Academy, New Delhi.

        2)    Mandal, Somadatta.  Indian Travel Narratives, Rawat Publications, New Delhi. 2010. 

Unit IV: Women and Travel Writing in India

1.     Ghose, Indira. Women Travellers in Colonial India: The Power of the Female Gaze OUP Delhi 1998 Print. Pp.1-19

2.     Nath, Shivya. The Shooting Star: A girl, her backpack and the World, Penguin 2017.

      

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1)    Pratt, Mary louis. 1992. Imperial Eyes, Travel Writing and Transculturation, London: Routledge.

2)    Tagore, Rabindranath. 1962. Diary of a Westward Voyage. Asia Publishing House.

3)    Dalrymple, William. Nine Lives: In Search of the Sacred in Modern India. Bloomsbury, New Delhi.2010.

1.                 4)    Jung, Anees. Unveiling India: A Woman’s Journey, Penguin India,1986.

 5) Bohls, E. A. (1995). Women travel writers and the language of aesthetics, 1716-1818 (No. 13). Cambridge University Press.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Examination and Assessment

Assessment Pattern    

 

20 (CIA 1)

20 (CIA 3)

50 (CIA 2)

50 (End Semester)

CIA I and III can be either written analysis/presentation of a travel narrative analysis of a popular writer of contemporary time, debates or seminar/panel discussions.

Mid semester exam – A written paper on the modules covered for 50 marks. Section A will have questions (6x5 =30 marks). Section B will have 2 analytical questions (10 marks each) to assess conceptual clarity and understanding of the domain.

End-semester exam – Two sections: Section A (30 marks) will have 3 questions (10 marks each) testing the knowledge on the evolution of the genre. Section B (20 Marks)will have 2 conceptual/Analytical question (10 marks each).

EST142 - READING SPORTS AND LITERATURE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:3
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Reading Sports and Literature

Course Description: The Sports and Literature course aims to explore the relationship between sports and literature through the analysis of various literary works. By examining texts that center around sports themes, this course will delve into the cultural, social, and personal aspects of sports as portrayed in literature. Students will develop critical thinking, analytical, and communication skills as they engage with a diverse range of texts, including novels, short stories, poems, and essays. Through class discussions, readings, and written assignments, students will gain a deeper understanding of the literary representation of sports and its significance in society.

Course Objectives:

To analyze and interpret literary works that feature sports themes.

To examine the portrayal of sports in literature and its reflection of cultural and social values.

To explore the personal and psychological dimensions of sports as depicted in literature.

To develop critical thinking and analytical skills through textual analysis.

 

To enhance written and oral communication skills through class discussions and written assignments.

Course Outcome

CO1: To analyze and interpret literary works that feature sports themes.

CO2: To examine the portrayal of sports in literature and its reflection of cultural and social values.

CO3: To explore the personal and psychological dimensions of sports as depicted in literature.

CO4: To develop critical thinking and analytical skills through textual analysis.

CO5: To enhance written and oral communication skills through class discussions and written assignments.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Introduction to Sports and Literature
 

Defining the relationship between sports and literature

Historical perspectives on sports in literature

 

The role of sports in society and culture

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
The Heroic Athlete
 

 

Exploring the archetype of the hero in sports literature

Analysis of sports heroes and their portrayal in literary works

 

Themes of triumph, perseverance, and sacrifice

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Gender and Sports
 

 

Gender representation in sports literature

Examination of gender roles and expectations in athletic contexts

 

Sports as a means of empowerment and resistance

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Sports and Identity
 

 

Sports as a vehicle for personal and collective identity

Intersectionality and the portrayal of race, ethnicity, and class in sports literature

 

The relationship between sports and national identity

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Sports and Coming-of-Age
 

 

Analysis of sports as a backdrop for personal growth and maturation

The challenges and conflicts faced by young athletes in literature

 

Themes of ambition, dreams, and disillusionment

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:8
Sports and Society
 

Unit 6: Sports and Society

Critical examination of the social issues depicted in sports literature

Sports as a reflection of broader societal dynamics

 

Ethics, values, and controversies in the world of sports

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. "The Natural" by Bernard Malamud
  2. "Friday Night Lights" by H.G. Bissinger
  3. "The Art of Fielding" by Chad Harbach
  4. "Seabiscuit: An American Legend" by Laura Hillenbrand
  5. "The Contender" by Robert Lipsyte
  6. "The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Runner" by Alan Sillitoe
  7. "A Fan's Notes" by Frederick Exley
  8. "The Boys of Summer" by Roger Kahn
  9. "The Sportswriter" by Richard Ford
  10. "Open" by Andre Agassi
  11. "Fever Pitch" by Nick Hornby
  12. "The Crossover" by Kwame Alexander (young adult literature)
  13. "The Runner" by Cynthia Voigt (young adult literature)
  14. "The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian" by Sherman Alexie (young adult literature)
  15. "The Fighter" by Michael Farris Smith
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. "The Boxer" by Joyce Carol Oates
  2. "The Runner" by Don DeLillo
  3. "Blindside" by Michael Lewis
  4. "The Tennis Partner" by Abraham Verghese
  5. "Basketball" by John Updike
  6. "The Chariot" by Ray Bradbury
  7. "The Trophy" by Alberto Alvaro Ríos
  8. "The Catch" by W.P. Kinsella
  9. "In the Ring" by Andre Dubus
  10. "Roller Derby Queen" by Margot Livesey
Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1-20

CIA 2- MSE 50

CIA 3- 30

ESE- 50

EST143 - STORYTELLING, GAMES AND ETHICS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: In the last 20-25 years the field of game studies has evolved significantly. It is globally recognised. Video games have been studied using inter, multi and transdisciplinary methods to understand culture, identity, media, narration and communication. The course will provide a historical, social, cultural and critical foundation about games, digitality, storytelling and its moral and ethical world. This will enable students to understand the connection between identities, moralities and our current engagement with the gaming world. This will help in broadening the interdisciplinary focus and assessment of storytelling in diverse forms and connect it with the ethical issues of the contemporary world.

 

Course Objectives: The course will survey the evolution of ideas connecting storytelling, gaming and ethics and morality. It will introduce the latest research in gaming and ethics as evidenced in the globalised world. It will provide a methodology for students to assess and critically evaluate the meaning, content, intent, narration (compared to other broader media), ideology and ethical implications of gaming in the contemporary world.

Course Outcome

CO1: ? will be able to understand the narrative conventions of gaming, their uses and ideological effects

CO2: ?will evaluate how narrative choices reflect ethical contextualisation

CO3: ?will be able to analyse and evaluate contemporary social, cultural and political issues and perspectives reflected in games

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Unit I: What is gaming ? Basic introduction
 

While gaming has been popular, studying games with its historical, social and cultural context requires a foundation in history of games. Locating games within cultures of social transactions and strategic implications will provide the required base to begin the course.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit II: Gaming, Society and Narration
 

This unit is divided into three smaller subunits. The students will be divided into smaller groups in class and asked to explore the following blog to choose any one area of interest within the subcategories mentioned. The class will progress accordingly. They have to choose between games and colonialism, games and gender, games and philosophy (utopia/dystopia).

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit III: Games and Ethics
 

This unit is focussed on ethical framework of games.

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Unit IV: Storyboard ? design a game (basic story line)
 

The students are expected to narrate and design a basic concept for a game to respond to the questions raised in the course.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Unit I: What is gaming – Basic introduction                                                         (10 hours)

While gaming has been popular, studying games with its historical, social and cultural context requires a foundation in history of games. Locating games within cultures of social transactions and strategic implications will provide the required base to begin the course.

1.     Roberts, J. M., Arth, M. J., & Bush, R. R. (1959). Games in culture. American anthropologist61(4), 597-605.

2.     Chapter 1 from Grace, L. D. (2019). Doing things with games: Social impact through play. CRC Press.

Unit II: Gaming, Society and Narration                                                                (15 hours)

This unit is divided into three smaller subunits. The students will be divided into smaller groups in class and asked to explore the following blog to choose any one area of interest within the subcategories mentioned. The class will progress accordingly. They have to choose between games and colonialism, games and gender, games and philosophy (utopia/dystopia).

https://coe-gamecult.org/

Reading: Shaw, A. (2010). What is video game culture? Cultural studies and game studies. Games and culture5(4), 403-424.

Salter, A., & Blodgett, B. (2017).  Toxic Geek Masculinity: Sexism, Trolling, and Identity Policing (Cham: Springer International Publishing, 2017), 73-99.

Case study: Hellblade: Senua’s Sacrifice

Unit III: Games and Ethics                                                                                      (15 hours)

Kowert, R., & Quandt, T. (Eds.). (2015). The video game debate: Unravelling the physical, social, and psychological effects of video games. Routledge. (Chapter 2/4/5).

Gotterbarn, D. The ethics of video games: Mayhem, death, and the training of the next generation. Inf Syst Front 12, 369–377 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10796-009-9204-x

Schrier, K. (2015). EPIC: A framework for using video games in ethics education. Journal of Moral Education44(4), 393-424.

Sicart, M. (2015). Playing the good life: Gamification and ethics. The gameful world: Approaches, issues, applications, 225-244.

Unit IV: Storyboard – design a game (basic story line)

The students are expected to narrate and design a basic concept for a game to respond to the questions raised in the course.

1.     Workshop by gaming planner/designer

2.     https://www.pluralsight.com/blog/film-games/creating-game-concept-first-step-getting-game-ground

3.     https://uxdesign.cc/a-board-game-design-process-a-game-is-a-system-5469dfa4536

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Recommended readings:

Bolter, J. et al. (1999). Remediation. Understanding New Media. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 20-52; 88-102.

Burrill, D. A. (2008). Die tryin': videogames, masculinity, culture (Vol. 18). Peter Lang. (13-44).

Mukherjee, S. (2017). Videogames and Postcolonialism. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 1-52. (Rise of the Tomb Raider).

Schrier, K. (2017). Designing role-playing video games for ethical thinking. Educational Technology Research and Development65(4), 831-868.

Sicart, M. (2013). Beyond choices: The design of ethical gameplay. MIT Press.

Zhang, Y. (2009). Ian Bogost, Persuasive Games: The Expressive Power of Videogames.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Examination and Assessment

Assessment Pattern    

20 (CIA 1)

20 (CIA 3)

50 (CIA 2)

50 (End Semester)

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I and III can be either written analysis/presentation of an author, book review, narrative analysis of a dominant idea of the contemporary time, debates or seminar/panel discussions.

Mid semester exam (class test) – A written paper on the modules covered for 50 marks. Section A (10 marks) will have objective questions (20, ½ marks each). Section B will have 4 questions (10 marks each) to assess conceptual clarity. Section B will have one compulsory question which will be analytical.

End-semester exam (class test) – Three sections: Section A (10 marks) will have objective questions (20, ½ marks each). Section B will have 1 conceptual question (10 marks each). They will be conceptual. Section C (15 marks each) will be having two case studies - one purely based on identification of features, styles, and narrative devices, and second question will be evaluative and analytical.

Consolidated marks will be sent after the final examination.

EST144 - DESIGN THINKING AND SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:45
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

 

Rural India comprises 66.46% of India’s population and contributes to a large portion of India’s GDP by way of agriculture, services, skilled and non-skilled labour.  Rural India suffers from socio-economic distress due to several factors, small land holding, rain dependent agriculture, and lack of alternative sources of income, migration to urban centers and due to several sociological factors. 

Rural India in its diverse geographies has a huge potential to provide solutions to some of the gravest global challenges pertaining to environment and sustainable development and which remains largely untapped.  This calls for a focused approach in exploring the potential opportunities through a scientific approach of critical thinking and creativity, pro-active engagement of rural communities, creating effective structures to implement and create global visibility for the proprietary products and services created. Such an approach will substantially mitigate socio-economic distress in rural communities by providing them income generating opportunities by engaging social enterprises and also contribute to the sustainability goals of the UN.

The course of Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship for students of English Language and Literature  seeks to sensitise students with an on field immersion with rural India and explore possibilities for enterprise through case studies on innovative rural enterprises.  The course seeks to apply their finer eye for aesthetics and culture and

Course Objectives

 

•           To familiarize students with the Sustainability goals envisioned by UN and motivate them to proactively contribute towards its attainment.

•           To create a firsthand awareness of rural India and challenges which can be translated into entrepreneurial opportunities.

•           To study and analyze different Social Enterprise models and their relative outcomes

•           To gain an understanding of the challenges of running a social enterprise.

•           To give students a firsthand experience of understanding the challenges of capacity building and leadership creation in rural communities for an enterprise and engage them proactively in building a sustainable business.

•           To stimulate curiosity in students to identify the areas of gaps in products and services and come up with creative solutions which can be translated into profitable enterprises.

•           To help students develop ethical business models founded on the principles of equity and fair play vis-à-vis the engagement of rural and grass root communities

•           To enable students to curate branding and market strategies for products and services emerging from a social enterprise to make them profitable and sustainable

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will have a comprehensive understanding of the U N Sustainability goals and get engaged in it proactively.

CO2: Students will have gained a firsthand awareness of rural India and challenges which can be translated into entrepreneurial opportunities.

CO3: Students will be exposed to different Social Enterprise models and their relative outcomes

CO4: Students will have envisaged the challenges of running a social enterprise.

CO5: Students will have gained on-field experience of engaging with rural communities for capacity building and leadership

CO6: Students will have envisaged the challenges of running a social enterprise.

CO7: Students will have identified at least one problem/gap area in a product or service and will have come up with creative solutions as part of their project.

CO8: Students will develop business models founded on the principles of equity and fair play vis-à-vis the engagement of rural and grass root communities

CO9: Students will develop branding and market strategies for products and services which they will have developed as part of their project work.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:4
Understanding UN Sustainability Development Goals
 

Session on 17 UN Sustainability Development Goals.   After the disucssion, students are asked to identify any two sustainability goals and asked to suggest any action steps that can be taken at the community level to reach the goals.  Students present their ideas.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Understanding Rural India
 

Field visit and online interaction with members of rural communities to understand how political, societal, and domestic realities vary among different geographies and how they impact life and living of rural communities.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Understanding Rural India
 

Field Visit and online interactive session

Students visit a village near Bangalore and interact with the communities.  Students also have online interactive sessions with women groups in three villages one each in Karnataka, Kerala, and Tamil Nadu.  

Students study how political, societal, and domestic spheres vary in different geographies of India and how they impact their life and living.  

Student groups present their finidings.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Rural Enterprise: Case Study
 

Student groups identify one Social Entrepreneur in India and analyze their social enterprise vis-a-vis problem identified and addressed, understanding how they converted the problem into a viable business,  the business model, challenges and opportunities.

Student groups make their presentation

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Grassroots Innovation: Problem Identification and Building the Value Proposition Canvas
 

Student groups are given the task of identifying one problem/gap in service which can be converted into an opportunity.

Students are taught how to build the value proposition around a problem or gap in service by identifying the pain points and possible gain creators which can result in a business opportunity

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
Buildling Proof of Concept, Prototyping/Piloting
 

Students are taught how to iterate and build a proof of concept of their solution.  Students are facilitated to prototype their products/pilot their innovative solutions i

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:9
Business Model Canvas/Pitch Deck/Presentation
 

Students are taught to build a Business Model Canvas of their solution, and prepare a pitch deck and make their final business presentation

Text Books And Reference Books:

Frugal Innovation: How to Do More With Less: Navi Radjou Jaideep Prabhu

           Jugaad Innovation: Navi Radjou, Jaideep Prabhu, Simone Ahuja

           Poor Economics: Abhijit Bannerjee, Esther Duflo

           The Open Book of Social Innovation: Geoff Mulgan, Robin Murray

           The 22 Immutable Laws of Branding: Al Ries

           Marketing Strategy- A Decision-Focused Approach: Walker, Mullins

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

A Handbook of Rural India (Readings on Economy, Polity and Society) Surinder S Jodka

           Women in Rural India: Vani Prabhakar

           Rural Development in India Strategies and Processes: G Sreedhar and D Rajasekar

           Communication for Rural Innovation: Cees Leeuwis, A. W. van den ban

Evaluation Pattern

Two Case Studies-40 Marks

Live Project-40 Marks

Presentation-20 Marks

EST148 - THE OCEANS IN CINEMA: A BLUE HUMANITIES READING (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Moving from land to ocean marks a shift in our understanding with fluidity as the focal point. ‘Blue Humanities’ or ‘Blue Cultural Studies’ uses the ocean as the lens to foreground diverse historical, social, cultural, economic and political aspects. The expansive field of Blue Humanities adopts a multidisciplinary approach, weaving together insights from environmental studies, oceanography, marine studies, cultural studies, film studies, history, etc. The course specifically focuses on revisiting the cliched conceptualization of the ocean as vast, alien, terra nullis and ahistorical. The ‘Oceanic Turn’ transitions from the surface to the depths below to explore the three-dimensional ocean through socio-cultural representations. Reading the ocean and the sea through cinema from across the world will help understand how the ocean is portrayed in myriad ways ‘foregrounding and problematizing issues connected to gender, race, pollution, social justice, maritime activities, privatization, globalization, capitalism ontologies’ to revisit our established thought regimes. 

Course Outcome

CO1: ? Appreciate and interpret the ocean in the light of Blue Humanities

CO2: ? Analyze and understand the changing relationships between societies and the ocean through the cinematic representations

CO3: ? Rethink and initiate action towards oceanic thinking and sustainability

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Knowing the Ocean: Re-visiting History and Origins
 

The unit will provide an alternative reading of our established understanding of ‘Origins’ with reference to the ocean – formation of the earth, the oceans, plants and animals and human beings. Destabilizing the pre-set reading of the formation of the world and prioritizing the land over the sea, the unit will help refocus the establishment of life in the Universe.

 

·       Excerpts from Rachel Carson, The Sea Around Us

·       Steve Mentz, “Two Origins: Alien or Core?”

·       Philip E. Steinberg and Kimberley Peters, “Wet Ontologies, Fluid Spaces: Giving Depth to Volume Through Oceanic Thinking”

 

 

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:13
Mapping the Ocean: Reading through Blue Humanities
 

The unit will throw light on the field of Ecocriticism with specific focus on Blue Humanities and its emerging engagement with the oceans around the world. The unit will help position the study of the oceans in the field of Humanities with specific reference to Cultural studies to frame the Blue Cultural Studies.

·       Excerpts from Sidney I. Dobrin, “Unearthing Ecocriticism”

·       John R.  Gillis – “The Blue Humanities”https://www.neh.gov/humanities/2013/mayjune/feature/the-blue-humanities

 

·       Helen M Rozwadowski, Oceans in three Paradoxes: Knowing the Blue through Humanities – Virtual Exhibition https://www.environmentandsociety.org/exhibitions/oceans-three-paradoxes

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Seeing the Ocean: Re-viewing the ocean through cinema
 

The unit will probe into pivotal aspects surrounding the construction of the ocean space through filmic representations of the ocean. The intent is to analyze through a range of issues informing the oceanic representations in films to unearth the pluri-focussed politics, both explicit and otherwise, manoeuvring through them - Maritime histories and activities, Aquatic world, Disasters, Conquests, Wars, Exploration, Adventure, Folk Tales and Myths, Colonialism and Postcolonialism, Gender, Race, Capitalism, International Relations, Globalization, Ecology and Medical Humanities.

·       James L. Smith and Steve Mentz - Learning an Inclusive Blue Humanities: Oceania and Academia through the Lens of Cinema

·       Stefan Helmreich, “Massive movie waves and the Anthropic Ocean”

·       Dilip M Menon, “Sea-Ing Malayalam Cinema”

·       Rie Karatsu, The Representation of the Sea and the Feminine in Takeshi Kitano's A Scene at the Sea (1991) and Sonatine (1993)” (SLA)

 

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Carson, Rachel. The Sea Around Us. Canongate, 2021

Dobrin, Sidney I. Blue Ecocriticism and the Oceanic Imperative. Routledge, 2021.

Mentz, Steve. An Introduction to Blue Humanities. Routledge, 2023.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

·       Blum, Hester. “Introduction: Oceanic Studies.” Atlantic Studies, vol. 10, no. 2, June 2013, pp. 151–55. 

·       Chen, Cecilia, Janine MacLeod, and Astrida Neimanis, editors. Thinking with Water. McGill-Queens Univ. Press, 2013. 

·       DeLoughrey, Elizabeth. “Toward a Critical Ocean Studies for the Anthropocene.” English Language Notes, vol. 57, no. 1, Apr. 2019, pp. 21–36.

·       Di Leo, Jeffrey R., editor. “Blue Humanities,” Symploke, vol. 27 no. 1, 2019, pp. 7-10· 

·       Gillis, John R. “The Blue Humanities.” HUMANITIES, vol. 34, no. 3, May/June 2013.

·       Jue, Melody. Wild Blue Media: Thinking through Seawater. Duke Univ. Press, 2020.

·       Mentz, Steve. “Toward a Blue Cultural Studies: The Sea, Maritime Culture, and Early Modern English Literature.” Literature Compass, vol. 6, no. 5, Sept. 2009, pp. 997–1013. 

·       Mentz, Steve. Ocean. Bloomsbury Academic, 2020.

·       Mentz, Steve. Shipwreck Modernity: Ecologies of Globalization, 1550-1719. Univ. of Minnesota Press, 2016.

·       Raban, Jonathan, editor. The Oxford Book of the Sea. Oxford Univ. Press, 1993.

·       Roorda, Eric. The Ocean Reader: History, Culture, PoliticsDuke Univ. Press, 2020. 

·       Steinberg, Philip E. The Social Construction of the Ocean. Cambridge Univ. Press, 2001.

 

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

As the course is multidisciplinary, the assessments will be done periodically to gauge the student’s level of understanding and learning. Review writing, weaving together a scrapbook, review tests and photo essays will form part of the assessment.

 End semester evaluation will be based on students setting up an online archive. They shall create an online archive selecting topics and presenting them by blending texts, theory and research. The submission will also have a viva component.  

HIS141 - HISTORY AND CINEMA (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course attempts to map out the connection between history and cinema. It aims to look at how cinema can be treated as a visual text and a source for understanding history. 

Course Outcome

CO1: To enhance and deepen the understanding of history through cinema.

CO2: To enable the students to develop their understanding and awareness of the rich possibilities of cinema and its connection with history.

CO3: To enhance the analytical skills of students and develop an understanding of how cinema engages with socio-cultural and political concerns, by placing the cinema in their historical context and engage with the current debates and future challenges with cinema as a medium.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Unit 1
 

a)   History as a narrative – History and Truth Contested Notions –Ideology, Sources and Historian

b)   Multiple Identities and Histories – History as a point of reference – Issues of Legitimacy & Justification.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Unit 2
 

a)     Cinema as a narrative – Words and Images – Genre- Representation Vs. Reality – Propaganda – selling History. 

b)    Language of Cinema- Color – Angles – Movement

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
UNIT 2
 

a)     Cinema as a narrative – Words and Images – Genre- Representation Vs. Reality – Propaganda – selling History. 

b)    Language of Cinema- Color – Angles – Movement

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Unit 3
 

a)     Between History and Cinema:  The problem of linear narratives and flash back – questions of authenticity – definition of authenticity.

b)    Cinema as a political, social and historical text.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Chapman, J. (2003). Cinemas of the World: Film and Society from 1895 to the Present. Reaktion Books.

Chapman, J., Glancy, M., & Harper, S. (Eds.). (2007). The new film history: sources, methods, approaches. Springer.

Ferro, M. (1988). Cinema and history. Wayne State University Press.

Chapman, J. (2005). Past and present: national identity and the British historical. London: IB Tauris.

Miskell, P. (2004). Historians and film. In Making History (pp. 253-264). Routledge.

Nowell-Smith, G. (Ed.). (1996). The Oxford history of world cinema. OUP Oxford.

Raghavendra, M. K. (2014). Seduced by the Familiar: Narration and Meaning in Indian Popular Cinema. Oxford University Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Chapman, J. (2013). Cinema, propaganda and national identity: British film and the Second World War. In British Cinema, Past and Present (pp. 213-226). Routledge.

Miskell, P. (2005). Seduced by the silver screen: Film addicts, critics and cinema regulation in Britain in the 1930s and 1940s. Business History47(3), 433-448.

Sedgwick, J., Miskell, P., & Nicoli, M. (2019). The market for films in postwar Italy: Evidence for both national and regional patterns of taste. Enterprise & Society20(1), 199-228.

Raghavendra, M. K. (2011). Bipolar identity: Region, nation, and the Kannada language film. Oxford University Press.

Raghavendra, M. K. (2014). The Politics of Hindi Cinema in the New Millennium: Bollywood and the Anglophone Indian Nation.

Sanyal, D. (2021). MK Raghavendra, “Locating World Cinema: Interpretations of Film as Culture” (Bloomsbury Academic India, 2020).

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1:  10 Marks            

CIA 2:  Mid Semester Examinations 25 Marks

CIA 3:  10 Marks

End semester examination: 50 Marks

Attendance: 5 Marks

LAW142 - RIGHT TO INFORMATION (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

There is no gainsaying the fact that knowledge is the paramount source of empowerment and empowerment enriches democracy. The attributes of democracy, viz. the government- of, by and for the people, can be realized successfully if the people are well informed and participate in decision making.

To achieve this goal, the Parliament has enacted the Right to Information Act, 2005, and the same has conferred, the most invaluable right to be informed, on the people. Hailed widely as a vaccine against corruption and a multi-vitamin for nourishment of democracy, law relating to Right to Information has become an indispensable weapon for the citizens.

Course Outcome

CO1: To comprehensively understand the legal framework regarding the Right to Information in India.

CO2: To contextualise Right to Information in the broader realm of public law along with allied concepts such as open governance, rule of law, accountability, transparency etc.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction
 

Historical background; Shift in attitudes- secrecy, privilege, open government; Citizens’ right to know; Campaign for freedom of information; Constitutional Provisions; Technological revolution – Information technology

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Legal Framework
 

Right to information Act. 2005  –  Overview – Objectives and reasons – Scope of the Act and Overall Scheme of the Act – What concerned citizens will want to know – Definitions

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
OBLIGATIONS OF PUBLIC AUTHORITIES
 

Right to information; Obligations of public authorities; Public information officers; Request for information; Disposal of request

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
RIGHT TO INFORMATION ? EXEMPTIONS
 

Grounds for rejection to access in certain cases; Severability; Third party information; Statutory exemptions

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
INFORMATION COMMISSIONS
 

Constitution of Central Information Commission; State information commission; Powers and functions of commission; Appeal and Penalties; Freedom of information in commercial disputes; Right to Privacy v Right to information

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Sudhir NaibThe Right to Information Act 2005: A Handbook (1st edition ed. 2011).
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. N. V. Paranjape, Right To Information Law In India (First Edition ed. 2014).
Evaluation Pattern

As per University norms

LAW144 - ENVIRONMENTAL LAW (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The present decline in environmental quality calls for a stricter enforcement of laws relating to protection of environment. The objective of this course is to give an insight into various legislations that has been enacted in our country for protection of environment and also to create awareness among the citizens of the country about the duties cast on them under various legislations in relation to protection of environment.

 

Course Objectives:

  • To impart an in-depth knowledge of environmental legislations to students from diverse backgrounds.
  • To interpret, analyse and make a critique of the legislations and Case laws relating to environment
  • To provide a brief understanding of various developments that has taken place at international level to check various environmental harms.

Course Outcome

CO1: learn about environmental law

C02: make students environmentally conscious

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
INTRODUCTION
 

INTRODUCTION

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
INDIAN CONSTITUTION AND ENVIRONMENT
 

INDIAN CONSTITUTION AND ENVIRONMENT

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
JUDICIAL REMEDIES AND PROCEDURES AVAILABLE FOR ABATEMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION
 

JUDICIAL REMEDIES AND PROCEDURES AVAILABLE FOR ABATEMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
ENVIRONMENT (PROTECTION) ACT, 1986
 

ENVIRONMENT (PROTECTION) ACT, 1986

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
ENVIRONMENT (PROTECTION) ACT, 1986
 

ENVIRONMENT (PROTECTION) ACT, 1986

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
WATER (PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF POLLUTION) ACT 1974
 

WATER (PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF POLLUTION) ACT 1974

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:5
FORESTS AND CONSERVATION LAWS
 

FORESTS AND CONSERVATION LAWS

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:5
WILD LIFE PROTECTION AND THE LAW
 

 WILD LIFE PROTECTION AND THE LAW

Unit-9
Teaching Hours:5
INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENTS FOR PROTECTION OF ENVIRONMENT
 

INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENTS FOR PROTECTION OF ENVIRONMENT

Text Books And Reference Books:

MC Mehta Enviromental Law Book

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

MC Mehta Enviromental Law Book

Evaluation Pattern

Class Discussion: 50 Marks

MCQ exam: 50 Marks

MAT141 - FOUNDATIONS OF MATHEMATICS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is designed as a foundation course in Mathematics for those who have not been exposed to any Mathematics course earlier.  This enables the students to improve their analytical, reasoning and problem solving skills. Topics included are Set Theory, Theory of Equations, Matrices and Determinants.

Course Outcome

CO1: Solve problems on sets, union and intersection of sets, complement of sets, inclusion and exclusion principle, linear, quadratic, cubic operations and fourth roots of unity.

CO2: Demonstrate conceptual and working knowledge of Matrices and Determinants.

CO3: Solve linear/nonlinear equations and a system of linear equations.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Set Theory
 

Set Theory – Definition – Types of Sets – Operation on sets (Union, Intersection Complement, Difference) – Venn Diagram – Application problems.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Equations and Inequalities
 

Basic linear Equations, Modeling with equations, – solution of linear equation – Quadratic equations – solutions of Quadratic equations – The equation x2 + 1 = 0 and introduction to complex numbers -  Square roots, cube roots and fourth roots of unity, inequalities.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Matrices and Determinants
 

Matrices – Types of Matrices – Operations on Matrices – Expansion of 2nd and 3rd order Determinants – Minors – Co-factors – Adjoint – Singular and Non-singular matrices – Inverse of a matrix – Solution of systems of linear equations by matrix and determinant methods.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.     D. C. Sancheti and V. K. Kapoor, Business Mathematics, 11th ed., New Delhi, India: Sultan Chand and Sons, 2012.

2.     B. G. Satyaprasad, K. Nirmala, R. G. Saha, and C. S. Anantharaman, Business Mathematics. 1st ed., Mumbai, India: Himalaya publishing House, 2006.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. S. Narayanan and P. K. Mittal, Text book of Matrices, 10th ed.: S. Chand and Company Ltd., 2010.

2. E. Don and J. Lerner, Schaum's Outlines of Basic Business Mathematics, 2nd ed., McGraw Hill, 2000.

Evaluation Pattern
This course is completely depending upon the CIAs, which will be evaluated through assignments and tests/examinations.

The component-wise evaluation pattern is given below:

Component

Mode of Assessment

Parameters

Points

CIA I

Test and written assignment

Basic, conceptual, and analytical knowledge of the subject

 

25

CIA II

Test and written assignment

Application of core concepts and

Problem solving skills.

30

CIA III

Comprehensive Examination

Comprehensive knowledge of the subject and Problem solving skills.

40

Attendance

Attendance

Regularity and Punctuality

05

 

 

MED144 - HARRY POTTER AND CONTEMPORARY ISSUES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course will provide students the opportunity to apply a variety of interdisciplinary approaches on popular young adult narratives. Students will be exposed to the real -world culture and physical environment that produced, shaped, and continues to inform the Harry Potter series, giving students greater insight into the importance of textual awareness and analysis.

Course Outcome

CO1: Explore the socio-cultural, historical, and technological perspectives behind Harry Potter phenomenon.

CO2: Develop critical thinking skills

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
History of wizards in cinema
 

History of wizards in cinema – P L Travers, Disney era, rise of Nanny McPhee, Arrival of Harry potter in bookstores, narrative development of book 1 – Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, Deconstruction of characters, significance of four houses, potions, beasts and spells.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Hogwarts a world class school
 

Hogwarts a world class school – dynamics of homework, relationship, bullying, teachers, team spirits and opponents, wizards and other, Debates on Morality, Technology and Media in Potter world, Privacy concerns with magical objects, Cultural Hegemony, Case Study on Snape and Dumbledore

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Sociological perspective
 

Sociological perspective – idea of home, community, clan and society, class struggle and dynamics, Aurora and Azkaban, Representation of Gender, Idea of family and institution, construction of power structures

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Film Screening
 

Screening of First and Last Harry Potter films

Text Books And Reference Books:

Harry Potter and Sorcerer’s Stone, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0590353427)

Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0439064873)

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0439136365)

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0439139601)

Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0439358071)

Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0439785969)

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0545139700)

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

Whited, L A & Grimes, K. (2015). Critical Insights: The Harry Potter Series. Salem Books.

Bell, C E (2018). Inside the World of Harry Potter: Critical Essays on the Books and Films.McFarland Publishers.

Evaluation Pattern

Assignments will be done through Google Classroom

CIA -1 – Class Test– 20 marks

CIA 2 –  – 50 marks

CIA 3 – Group Assignment – 20 marks

End Semester - Project – 50 marks

PHY141 - FUNDAMENTAL OF FORENSIC PHYSICS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course introduces the students to the fundamentals of forensic science. Student will be introduced to the different analytical tool to analyse the results. They will also learn the physics behind investigative method used to gather evident. Finally, students will study emerging use of nanotechnology in forensic science.  

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the different technique to analyse the results.

CO2: Understand the basic science underlying the motion of bullets, collisions, explosion and blood dynamics.

CO3: Learn about the advantage of nanotechnology in forensic science.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Analytical instruments and techniques of forensic physics
 

Introduction, electromagnetic spectrum, sources of radiation, their utility and limitations, refractive index, interaction of light with matter, idea on instrumentation and results analysis.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Forensic physics
 

Scope and significance of forensic physics, basic physics in solving crime, motion of bullet and other projectile, vehicular collisions, blood stain analysis using fluid mechanics, physics of explosions, development and identification of latent fingerprints using optics.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Nanotechnology in forensic science
 

Nanotechnology, utilization of nanotechnology in analysis of physical evidence, applications of nanotechnology in forensic evidence analysis, introduction to nanomaterials, types of nanomaterials. 

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. B.B. Nanda and R.K Tiwari, Forensic Science in India: A vision for the Twenty First Centrury, select publishers, New Delhi (2001)
  2. CM Hussain, D Rawtani, G Pandey, M Tharmavaram, Handbook of Analytical Techniques for Forensic Samples: Current and Emerging Developments, ISBN: 978-0-12-822300-0, Elsevier, 2020
  3. M.K Bhasin and S.Nath, Role of Forensic Science in the New Millenium, University of Delhi, Delhi(2002).
  4.  S.H James and J.J Nordby, Forensic Science :An introduction to scientific and Investigative Techniques, 2nd Edition, CRC Press, Boca Raton(2005)
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. W.G. Eckert and R.K. Wright in Introduction to Forensic Sciiences, 2nd Edition, W.G. Eckert (ED), CRC Press, Boca Raton(1997).
  2. R. Saferstein, M.L. Hastrup and C.Hald, Fisher’s Techniques of Crime scene Investigation, CRC Press, Boca Raton (2013)
  3. W.J. Tilstone, M.L. Hastrup and C.Hald, Fisher’s Techniques of Crime Scene Investigation, CRC Press, Boca Raton (2013)
Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation will be based on presentations by each student and class work.

PHY142 - ANALOG AND DIGITAL ELECTRONICS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This multidisciplinary course on Basic Electronics and Gadgets is aimed at giving a feel of electronics to non science/core students. It helps them in knowing the fundamentals of various electronic gadgets they use in daily life and related technologies. The course covers  categories of consumer electronic systems, electronic audio systems, basic colour television and video systems, communication systems covering telephone , mobile phone fundamentals and basics of computerhardware. This programme also tries to create awareness about e-waste and its effective management.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand basics of electronic devices and circuits

CO2: Describe the working principles of audio , video and communication systems

CO3: Discuss the fundamentals of computer hardware and e-waste management.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Electronics
 

Electronics and its applications. Electronic components: Resistors, Capacitors, inductors- types, uses. Conductors, insulators, semiconductors- definitions. Semiconductor materials- Silicon, Germanium, semiconductor devices: Diode- working and application of diode as rectifier, Transistor- working, transistor as an amplifier, electronic switch. Electronic DC power supply- basic block diagram. Basics of measuring instruments- DMM and CRO. Hands on with tinkercad tool.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Fundamentals Of Electronic Communication Systems
 

Basic principle of electronic communication-. Basic operation of transmitter and receivers. AM and FM radio receivers- qualitative description. Frequency allotment. Basics of Microphone, Loud speakers Principle of TV transmission and reception, Colour TV principle,. Digital TV principle- set top converter box, Optical fiber cables- principle of operation, advantages. Fundamentals of cellular mobile phone- Cells, coverage area, roaming, operation (qualitative description). Latest trends in mobile phones, smart phones, generations.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Basics of Computer Hardware and e waste management
 

Fundamentals of Digital computer, microprocessors, motherboards, power supply - SMPS,  mouse, keyboard, memory devices, Modems, monitors, printers, latest trends in computers, specifications. Internet fundamentals

Electronic waste- brief description, qualitative discussion of hazards of e-waste, the materials responsible, management of e-waste, Indian and global current scenario of e-waste and its management.

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1]. V K Mehta and Rohit Mehta (2011),Principles of Electronics, S Chand and Co, New Delhi.

[2]. B R Gupta (2008) Consumer Electronics, 4th Edition, Kataria &sons, New Delhi.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[3]. Bob Goodman (2002. ),How electronic things work, TMH

[4]. https://www.tinkercad.com 

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation will be based on internal assessment components and a written exam at the end of the course.

Internal assesment : 50 marks

Written exam : 50 marks

POL143 - SUBALTERN STUDIES: NARRATIVES OF THE COMMUNITIES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Subaltern Studies emerged as an intellectual project to counter the elitism prevailing in dominant historical narratives. This project aimed at giving voice to the people’s autonomous agency and struggles against the dominant forces. They offered a new outlook to narratives of Peasant, Adivasi and Woman’s movements in history. Over time, subaltern perspective was adopted to understand several issues concerning India and it still holds significant relevance in shedding light on contemporary issues. This course aims to introduce the students to subaltern studies and cultivate a new standpoint to understand and interpret the world.

Course Outcome

CO 1: Demonstrate knowledge about subaltern studies, its foundations, relevance methodology, and critique

CO 2: Analyse various narratives of communities, avenues of their struggles against the dominance

CO 3: Develop a sensibility to view the world from a subaltern perspective

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to Subaltern Studies
 

Foundation of Subaltern Studies Collective, Ranajit Guha, Need of subaltern studies, Resources, Subaltern life narratives

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Communities Countering the Dominance
 

State and subaltern citizens, Dominance without Hegemony, Peasant rebellions, Dalit and Adivasi Assertion, Indian Nationalism, Women’s question and the emergence of counter narratives

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Contemporary Avenues of subaltern struggles
 

Cricket and caste, Environmental movements, political and social mobilization of marginalized classes, public theatre and reclaiming dignity

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Subaltern Narratives in Film, Fiction and Folklore
 

-       Films: Laggan, Karnan, and The Discreet Charm of the Savarnas

-       Fiction: Subaltern in Mahasweta Devi’s stories (Jamunabati’s Mother, and Mother of 1084)

-       Folklore: Folktales from India, “So Many Words, So many sounds”: An Interview

-       People’s Archive of Rural India

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Critiquing the subaltern studies
 

- Exploring the Relevance and Irrelevance of subaltern studies

- Adding new locations? Or After subaltern studies?

Text Books And Reference Books:

 Guha, R. (1982). Preface. In R. Guha (Ed.), Subaltern Studies I (pp. vii–viii). Oxford University Press

Guha, R. (1982). On Some Aspects of the Historiography of Colonial India. In R. Guha (Ed.), Subaltern Studies I (pp. 1–8). Oxford University Press.

Kumar, R. (2021). Police Matters: The Everyday State and Caste Politics in South India, 1900–1975. Cornell University Press.

Guha, R. (2005). ‘The Moral that can be Safely Drawn from the Hindus’ Magnificent Victory’: Cricket, Caste and the Palwankar Brothers. In J. H. Mills (Ed.), Subaltern Sports: Politics and Sport in South Asia (pp. 83–106). Anthem Press.

        Ahuja, A. (2019). Mobilizing the Marginalized. Oxford University Press.

       Chatterjee, P. (2012). After subaltern studies. In Economic and Political Weekly (Vol. 47, Issue 35).

       Ramanujan, A. K. (2009). Folktales From India. Penguin India.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bhadra, G. (1983). Two Frontier Uprisings in Mughal India. In R. Guha (Ed.), SS II (pp. 43–59). Oxford University Press.

Berg, D. E. (2021).Casteism and the Tsundur Atrocity. In Dynamics of Caste and Law (pp. 127–149). Cambridge University Press.

Chemmencheri, S. R. (2015). State, social policy and subaltern citizens in adivasi India. Citizenship Studies, 19(3–4), 436–449.

Das, A. N. (1983). Agrarian Change from Above and Below: Bihar 1947-78. In Ranajit Guha (Ed.), SS II (pp. 180–227). Oxford University Press.

Devi, M. (2005). Jamunabati’s Mother. In In the Name of the Mother. Seagull Books.

Devi, M. (2008). Mother of 1084. Seagull Books.

Guha, R. (1995). Review: Subaltern and Bhadralok Studies. Economic and Political Weekly, 30(33), 2056–2058.

Guha, R. (1996). The Small Voice of History. In  Amin & Chakrabarty (Ed.), SS IX (pp. 1–12). Oxford University Press.

“So Many Words, So many sounds”: An Interview. (2004). In Romtha. Seagull Books.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I-25 Marks

CIA II-25 Marks

CIA III-50 Marks

PSY143 - ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND HUMAN-MACHINE INTERACTION (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Artificial intelligence (AI) is the basis for all human-machine interfaces and learning, and it is the future of all complex decision-making across diverse sectors. Students will explore the concepts of HMI and AI and become aware of advances in Artificial Intelligence. Case studies and workshops will allow students to consider how human factors and design thinking are applied in designing an interface and the ethical issues and implications of preserving human values. Through discussion, analysis, and workshops, students move towards designing or modifying a user-centric interface considering any sustainable development goal.

Course objectives: 

  • To explain Human-Machine Interactions and Artificial Intelligence and their applications in daily life.
  • To identify the importance and application of human factors and design thinking in interface design. 
  • To evaluate a user-centric interface considering any sustainable development goal.

Course Outcome

CO1: Explain Human-Machine Interactions and Artificial Intelligence and their applications in daily life.

CO2: Identify the importance and application of human factors and design thinking in interface design.

CO3: Evaluate a user-centric interface considering sustainable development goals.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to AI and HMI
 

Introduction to AI and HMI, Types of AI and HMI, Machine and Deep Learnings and their applications, Current trends and development.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Human factors & AI
 

Human factors - Sensation, Perception, Apperception, Working Memory, Decision-making, and Design Thinking.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Principles of interface Design and Application of AI
 

Schneiderman’s eight golden rules, Norman’s model of interaction, Neilson’s Heuristics, Designing for people across the lifespan, and the Application of AI in health, aviation, and the workplace.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Dix, A., Dix, A. J., Finlay, J., Abowd, G. D., & Beale, R. (2003). Human-computer interaction. Pearson Education.

Tenner, E. (2015). The Design of Everyday Things by Donald Norman. Technology and Culture, 56(3), 785-787. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Burnett, B., & Evans, D. (2016). Designing your life: How to build a well-lived, joyful life. Knopf.

Gassmann, O., & Reepmeyer, G. (2008). Universal design–innovations for all ages. In The silver market phenomenon (pp. 125-140). Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. 

Davenport, T., & Kalakota, R. (2019). The potential for artificial intelligence in healthcare. Future healthcare journal, 6(2), 94. 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1 will be an individual assignment.

CIA2 will be a group assignment with individual components for evaluation. 

CIA3 will be a written exam for 2 hours and 50 Marks. CIA3 will have Section- A and Section - B.

Section A (Essay questions). 10 Marks X 3 Questions=30 Marks 

Section B (Case study). 20 Marks x 1Q= 20 Marks

PSY155 - PSYCHOLOGY OF GENDER (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course has been conceptualized to help learners in delving into the conversation between gender and psychology. Through the lens of socio-historico location of an individual an attempt will be made to locate gender, cognize the spaces of performing, reproducing and perpetuating gender. Looking through psychological and feminist theoretical lenses, the course will analyze the connection of the psychology of gender to the discourse of power and socio-political economical structures. Learners are encouraged to evaluate and envision possible new grounds for a better world, considering the changing cultural diversity in the present Indian society, therefore, reinforcing them to approach gendered issues through cultural, social constructionist and post-structuralist lens to analyze its implications.

Course Outcome

1: Examine the accounts of the production, reproduction and perpetuation of gendered and sexual identities, spaces and subjectivities and related psychological concepts.

2: Discuss gender roles and intersectional nature of identity in everyday life and experience, using psychological, feminist and post-feminist lenses.

3: Demonstrate psychological literacy and problem-solving abilities by suggesting possible counters to the critical gendered issues in personal, interpersonal, social, emotional, cultural, political and professional domains in a multicultural context

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction
 

Describing the spectrum and gender-diverse identities. 

Classical 

psychoanalytic theories on masculinity and 

feminity, analyses 

through feminist, queer and trans readings of psychoanalytic 

theories. 

Feminist theories 

Male gender role stress Gender and space - 

secondarity, 

performativity, 

multiplicity, trans 

community and mental health. 

Body, identity and 

subjectivity - 

psychological and 

philosophical readIngs

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 1
 

Describing the spectrum and gender-diverse identities. Classical psychoanalytic theories on masculinity and feminity, are Analyses through feminist, queer and trans readings of psychoanalytic theories. Feminist theories Male gender role stress Gender and space - secondarity, performativity, multiplicity, trans-community and mental health. Body, identity and subjectivity - psychological and philosophical readings

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Theories
 

Queer and trans theories, Political Economy of Sex Gender and life-space- psychology, feminism, architecture, history & philosophy.

Gender and Bodies; Gender and Violence; Gender and Media

Gender and Work; Gender and Parenthood; Gender and Mental Health

Gender and Indian Law: LGBTQIA+ RightS

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 2
 

Queer and trans theories, Political Economy of Sex; Gender and life-space psychology, feminism, architecture, history & philosophy. Gender and Bodies; Gender and Violence; Gender and Media; Gender and Work; Gender and Parenthood; Gender and Mental Health; Gender and Indian Law: LGBTQIA+ Rights

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Project Work
 

Project-work: 

Examine various sites of the performance and perpetuation of gender and Gendered 

discrimination– 

Through field work, that shows its 

Production in everyday spaces and at the 

Intersections of social, cultural, politcal  Location marked 

Discourses of gender.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 3
 

Project-work: Examine various sites of the performance and perpetuation of gender and Gendered discrimination– Through fieldwork,

that shows its Production in everyday spaces and at the Intersections of social, cultural, political. Location marked. Discourses of gender

Text Books And Reference Books:

RUDMAN, L. A. (2021). Social Psychology of gender: How Power and Intimacy Shape Gender Relations (2nd ed.). GUILFORD.

Matlin, M. (2011). Potential Problems and Biases in Current Research in The Psychology of Women (pp. 20-27). Nelson Education.

Fine, C. (2010). Delusions of gender: How our minds, society, and neurosexism create difference. WW Norton & Company.

Matlin, M. (2011).The Psychology of Women. Nelson Education.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Webb, D. (2023). LGBTQ rights in India. AEA Randomized Controlled Trials. https://doi.org/10.1257/rct.10953-1.0

Irigaray(1995)-The Question of the Other Foucault(1976)-The Will to Knowledge: History of Sexuality (Vol 1)

Kristeva (1980) - Powers of Horror: An Essay on Abjection; Tans. (1992) by L. S. Roudiez.

Gayle (1975). “The Traffic in Women: Notes on a Political Economy of Sex.” In Rayna R. Reiter (ed.), Toward an Anthropology of Women. Monthly Review Press. pp. 157--210

(1975)

Stryker (2004) - Transgender Studies: Queer Theories Evil Twin.

Nagoshi et al. (2010)- Transgender Theories: Embodying Research & Practice Fieldwork and Project-based learning

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Outline: 

 

CIA 1 and CIA 2 is a 20 mark assignment 

CIA 3 is a 50 mark complex assignment

PSY156 - PSYCHOLOGY OF RELATIONSHIPS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: Understanding close relationships is among the central goals of social psychology. Close relationships range from family ties to friendships to romantic and sexual relationships. Our main purpose will be on learning about the life cycle of adult intimate (i.e., romantic) relationships, ranging from stages of initial attraction and relationship initiation to growth and maintenance of the relationship, and in some cases, dissolution. Although other close relationships such as close friendships, family, and work relationships will also be addressed and integrated into the course, they will be of secondary importance. Class meetings will consist mainly of facilitated discussions and student-led presentations on topics such as the biological bases of attraction and love, commitment and interdependence, relationship cognition, attachment, communication, sexuality, relational interaction patterns, relationship satisfaction, and the social context of relationships (e.g., the influence of others) conflict, relationship dissolution, and relationship maintenance.

CO1: Understand the major concepts and models of interpersonal relationships.

CO2: Evaluate the different types of relationships and their impact on one's life.

CO3: Use strategies to enhance everyday life challenges and sustain effective relationships

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the major concepts and models of interpersonal relationships.

CO2: Evaluate the different types of relationships and their impact on one's life.

C03: Use strategies to enhance everyday life challenges and sustain effective relationships

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Understand the major concepts and models of interpersonal relationships.
 

Introduction to key theories and concepts in relationship psychology (attachment theory, social exchange theory, equity theory, interdependence theory, etc.), theories of attraction (evolutionary, social, and cognitive perspectives), historical perspectives on the study of relationships, Ethical considerations in relationships.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Evaluate the different types of relationships and their impact on one's life.
 

Different types of relationship: childhood relationship (parent, teacher, caregiver), adult relationship, friendship and workplace relationships, emerging trends in relationships such as virtual relationship, long distance relationship, cohabitation, post- divorce relationship, friendships and social networks – benefits, types and maintenance. Social media and its influence on relationship formation and maintenance

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Use strategies to enhance everyday life challenges and sustain effective relationships
 

Effective communication strategies,

Active listening skills and empathetic communication,

Conflict resolution techniques and managing relationship disagreements, developing self-awareness, empathy, emotional intelligence, and applying psychological principles to real-life relationship scenarios.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Baron, R.A., Byrne, D. & Bhardwaj, G. (2010). Social Psychology (12th Ed.). New Delhi: Pearson.

Miller, Chapter 1: The Building Blocks of Relationships Reis, H. T. (2012).

A history of relationship research in social psychology. In A.W. Kruglanski & W Stroebe (Eds.), Handbook of the history of social psychology (pp. 213- 232). New York: Psychology Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Graziano, W. G., & Bruce, J. W. (2008). Attraction and the initiation of relationships: A review of the empirical literature. In S. Sprecher, A. Wenzel, & J. Harvey (Eds), Handbook of relationship initiation, pp. 269-295. New York: Psychology Press.

Cameron, J. J., Stinson, D. A., & Wood, J. V. (2013). The bold and the bashful: Selfesteem, gender, and relationship initiation. Social Psychological and Personality Science, 4, 685-692. https://doi.org/10.10 02/9780470939338

Finkel, E.J., Eastwick, P.W., Karney, B.R., Reis, H. T., & Sprecher, S. (2012). Online dating: A critical analysis from the perspective of psychological science. Psychological Science in the Public Interest, 13, 3– 66.

Emery, L. F., Muise, A., Dix, E. L., & Le, B. (2014). Can you tell that I’m in a relationship? Attachment and relationship visibility on Facebook. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 40, 1466–1479.

Vanden Abeele, M., Schouten, A. P., & Antheunis, M. L. (2017). Personal, editable, and always accessible: An affordance approach to the relationship between adolescents’ mobile messaging behavior and their friendship quality. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships.

Sbarra, D. A., & Beck, C. J. A. (2013). Divorce and close relationships: Findings, themes, and future directions. In J. A. Simpson & L. Campbell (Eds.), The Oxford handbook of close relationships (pp. 795-822). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. Lewandowski, G. W., Aron, A., Bassis, S. & Kunak, J. (2006). Losing a selfexpanding relationship: Implications for the selfconcept. Personal Relationships, 13, 317-331

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1:Individual assignment – Video presentations

The students are required to make individual video presentations on the basis of the topics that will be given to them. Submission will be based on one of the different topics through a Video PPT (The feature is available in PPT software) Topics: Example: theories of relationship psychology; theories of attraction Number of Slides: Maximum 9 slides (excluding the Title slide) Duration: 3 minutes

Test details: ● Total Marks: 20 marks ● Date of Submission: 31st August

Evaluation Criteria:  Organization of the content  Quality of the information  Research citations   Creativity   Personal Learnings 

CIA 2: Group Presentation (with viva)

This is a group assignment and the groups will be divided into groups of five. The faculty in charge will be giving each group a movie (based on relationships). Each group will be given one movie/short film to watch and a week long time shall be given for the same. In the following Thursday, 2 hours shall be given to the group to prepare a presentation (5 Slides in 5 Minutes) on the basis of guiding questions and will have to present the same in 5 mins in the next class. Individually group members shall answer facilitator’s questions. Post the presentation each member of the group will write a reflective note on their experience working on the topics and submit the same on moodle. Students can be creative in making their ppts and adding audio-visuals etc but should be able to cover within the specified time limit. PPT submission pre presentation mandatory and individual reflective notes submission post presentation is mandatory. The presentation might primarily include :  Different types of relationships portrayed in the film  Their own perception as to whether the relationships has been portrayed accurately in the film or not.  Conflict resolution strategies in relationships that were used in the film vs what they would have used.

Details: Total marks: 20 ● Date of Allotment of their Movie/Documentary: 12th September ● Date of Group Discussion/Planning: 21st September ● Date of Presentation – 28th September 

Evaluation Criteria:

Pre- Presentation: ● 1. Timely Submission 

Individual contribution: ● a. Organization and Flow of the content ● b. Relevance of the content  ● c. Reference 

Presentation: ● 3. Delivery and presentation of information  ● 4. Organization of the slides  5. Group effort and team spirit  6. Time Management  7. Q & A (one question to per person) 

Post Presentation 8. Depth of Individual Reflections / Learnings

CIA 3: In class written exam

This will be an in class written exam. It will consist of two parts – Part A and Part B. Part-A is for a total of 30 marks. Part A will consist of five 10-mark questions. Out of five, students will answer three questions (each question carries ten marks). Part - B is for 20 marks. It is a compulsory case study that the students need to answer. There is no choice. Total marks: 50 marks Date of examination: 26th October An Assessment scheme will be created for the paper

PSY157 - SCIENCE OF WELLBEING (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This multidisciplinary course will focus on those aspects that help individuals thrive. The course sheds its light on well-being and its components and also clears all the misconceptions revolving around it. The students will be exposed to certain theories, concepts and practice procedures of well-being and its components. This programme will help the students to reflect on their life experiences on these dimensions and to know how to improve them and flourish in their life. 

Course Outcome

CO1: Explain the concept of well-being and its components

CO2: Analyze the role of happiness and emotions in enhancing well-being using relevant theories

CO3: Apply various concepts of well-being on the life experiences of students

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Well-being
 

Well-being - components of well-being: subjective happiness and life satisfaction

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Well-being - components of well-being
 

subjective happiness and life satisfaction

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Happiness & Emotion
 

Happiness - Definition, Significance Misconceptions, types and interventions  Emotion - types, emotion regulation

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Happiness
 

Definition, Significance Misconceptions, types and interventions Emotion - types, emotion regulation

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Mindfulness- components
 

Mindfulness- components: gratitude, forgiveness, kindness-compassion

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:25
Mindfulness components
 

Gratitude, forgiveness, kindness-compassion

Text Books And Reference Books:

·       Carr, A. (2004). Positive Psychology. New York: Routldge.

·       Hupper, F. A., Baylis, N., & Keverne, B. (2005). The science of well-being. Oxford Scholarship.

·       Hupper, F. A., Baylis, N., & Keverne, B. (2005). The science of well-being. Oxford Scholarship.

·       Ivtzan, I. & Lomas, T.(Ed.) (2016) Mindfulness in Positive Psychology. New York: Routldge.

·       Kabat-Zinn, J. (2012). Mindfulness for beginners: reclaiming the present moment—and your life. Boulder, CO, Sounds True.

·       Linley, P. A., & Joseph, S. (Eds.). (2004). Positive psychology in practice. John Wiley & Sons, Inc.. https://doi.org/10.10 02/9780470939338

 

·       Maddux, J. E. (2018). Subjective Wellbeing and Life Satisfaction. New York: Routldge.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

.

Evaluation Pattern

 

 

CIA1

CIA2

CIA3

Class attendance & Participation

20 marks

20 marks

50 marks

10

PSY158 - STRESS MANAGEMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Stress is a common word used today in everyday walks of life. This course is designed to enable students to understand the nature of stress and stressors at theoretical and Practical level. to understand the impact of stress on health and wellbeing and To analyse the maladaptive and adaptive coping strategies in developing a self-plan to manage stress effectively in a life long process.

Course Outcome

CO1: Explain the nature of stress, long-term effects and illnesses that can result from stressors at physiological, Psychological and behavioural levels

CO2: Evaluate personal stressors at various domains of life

CO3: Use various stress management techniques to achieve and maintain well-being.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Understanding the Meaning and Nature of Stress
 

Explain the nature of stress, long-term effects and illnesses that  can result  from stressors at physiological, Psychological and behavioural levels

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Understanding the Meaning and Nature of Stress: (15 hours)
 

Types and Sources of Stress,

Theories and Models of Stress,

Stressors at the workplace,

Stressors unique to age and gender.

Stress and Health: Life style diseases Psychological - Irritability, Depression,

 

Anxiety, Eating disorders, Insomnia

 

Behavioural - Maladaptive, risky

behaviours.

related to stress –

Cardiovascular Disorder, Allergies,

Digestive System Disorder, Recurrent

 

Head ache and Cancer.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Coping Strategies
 

Evaluate personal stressors at various domains of life

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Coping Strategies (10 hours) Styles of Coping
 

Maladaptive Coping Behaviors,

Maladaptive Cognitive Coping - addiction, abuse, violence, irrational thought process.

Individual differences in Coping

Adaptive Coping

Assessment of stress and wellbeing;

self-reflection

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Stress Management Approaches
 

Use various stress management techniquesto achieve and maintain well-being.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Stress Management Approaches (20 hrs)
 

Breathing Exercise;

Systematic Desensitization;

Progressive Muscle Relaxation Techniques;

Meditation;

Mindfulness, yoga.

Care of the Self:

Nutrition and Other Lifestyle Issues

Develop a personal stress management plan;

suggest stress

management

techniques for various

contexts like academic,

workplace etc

Text Books And Reference Books:

Health Psychology by Taylor; Control your Stress by Piperopoulus Dutta, P,K, (2010) Stress management Himalaya, Himalaya Publishing House Baron .L & Feist.J (2000) Health Psychology 4th edition, USA Brooks/Cole

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

The Stress Management Handbook by Selhub Olpin, M. & Hesson, M. (2015). Stress Management for Life:

 

A Research-Based Experiential Approach. 4th edition. Wadsworth Publishing. Cooper,C,& Palmer,S, (2000)Conquer Your tress, London: Institute of personal development Universities Press. Dutta, P,K, (2010) Stress management Himalaya, Himalaya Publishing House. Lee, K. (2014). Reset: Make the Most of Your Stress: Your 24-7 Plan for Well-being. Universe Publishing.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1

CIA 2

CIA 3

Attn+CP

20 marks

20 marks

50 marks

10 marks

SOC141 - WOMEN'S ISSUES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course aims at enabling the student to study and understand the problems and issues relating to women in Indian society in the context of wider social forces. This course will sensitize students on the issues of subjugation of and oppression prevalent against women in Indian society and enhance their understanding of the various social problems that women face in the society.

Course objectives :

●        To introduce the students to social issues relating to women

●        To explore gender relations from an interdisciplinary perspective 

Course Outcome

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Unit I: Sociological Understanding of Social Problem with a Gender Perspective
 
  1. Conceptualization of a social problem                                         
  2. Structural and functional perspective, cultural roots, and critical analysis of social issues under power, ideology, and hegemony.
  3.  Understanding Gender and subjugation of gender.
Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Unit I: Sociological Understanding of Social Problem with a Gender Perspective
 
  1. Conceptualization of a social problem                                         
  2. Structural and functional perspective, cultural roots, and critical analysis of social issues under power, ideology, and hegemony.
  3.  Understanding Gender and subjugation of gender.
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Unit II: Problems of Inequality
 
  1. Poverty - Concept of poverty, its multidimensional manifestations, Feminization of Poverty.
  2. Caste Inequality - Concept of caste, nature of inequality and position of women within it.
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Unit II: Problems of Inequality
 
  1. Poverty - Concept of poverty, its multidimensional manifestations, Feminization of Poverty.
  2. Caste Inequality - Concept of caste, nature of inequality and position of women within it.
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit III: Problems of Violence and Discrimination
 
  1. Violence against Women: Cultural setting, Dowry, acid attacks, physical and sexual abuse, Global Sex Market.
  2. Missing Millions- Skewed sex ratio, son preference
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit III: Problems of Violence and Discrimination
 
  1. Violence against Women: Cultural setting, Dowry, acid attacks, physical and sexual abuse, Global Sex Market.
  2. Missing Millions- Skewed sex ratio, son preference
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Unit IV: Problem of Personal Well-being
 
  1. Women and Health : Reproductive health
  2. Aging and women
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Unit IV: Problem of Personal Well-being
 
  1. Women and Health : Reproductive health
  2. Aging and women
Text Books And Reference Books:

Bhasin, K. (1994). What is Patriarchy? New Delhi: Kali for Women.

Beteille, A. (1990). Race, Caste and Gender. Man, 25(3), 489–504. https://doi.org/10.2307/2803715

John, Mary E. (2008). Women’s Studies in India: A Reader. New Delhi:Penguin Books.

Krishnaraj, M. (2007). Understanding Violence against Women. Economic and Political Weekly, 42(44), 90–91. http://www.jstor.org/stable/40276750

Kotiswaran, P. (2008). Born Unto Brothels: Toward a Legal Ethnography of Sex Work in an Indian Red-Light Area. Law & Social Inquiry, 33(3), 579–629. http://www.jstor.org/stable/20108776

KUMAR, A. K. S. (2013). The Neglect of Health, Women and Justice. Economic and Political Weekly, 48(23), 25–27. http://www.jstor.org/stable/23527205

 

Karkal, M. (1999). Ageing and Women in India. Economic and Political Weekly, 34(44), WS54–WS56. http://www.jstor.org/stable/4408566

 

Merton, R and Nisbet. (1966). Contemporary Social Problems, New York: Harcourt, Brace and World.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bhasin, K. (1994). What is Patriarchy? New Delhi: Kali for Women.

Evaluation Pattern

Internal Assessment:

CIA 1  10 marks (conducted out of 20 )- Class Presentations

CIA 2 10 marks (conducted out of 20 )- Article Review

CIA 3 25 marks (conducted out of 50 ) - Prferably an exam

Attendance 5 marks 

 

THE141 - THEATRE APPRECIATION (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is a participatory practice course, which makes Theatre appreciation applicable to all. It includes different Theoretical, Interactive and Participatory sessions from experts in the cultural industry. It also envisages witnessing live performances and digital performances to enhance the knowledge of the domain, which supports learning with clarity.

This course deals with five strands; Plays, Players, Places, Playgoers, and Performance practice.

Course Outcome

CO1: Able to appreciate the Theatre Art form as a whole.

CO2: Able to analyse and understand the aesthetics of the Theatre Performances.

CO3: Able to appreciate the performer's practices and the audience's reception.

CO4: Able to critically review live and digital Theatre performances.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Plays
 

Focus on Author and Texts.

Theatre Plays, Theatre text, What is Plays, Play style, Author, Dramatic text, Play text.

So, here is Talk, Play Reading 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Players
 

Focus on Acting practices and training.

How the plays can be played by players-who are the Players-Players are nothing but Actors/Performers, all Players are Directors cum Practitioners.

How these players Enact, Perform, Prepare, and how these Players are subjected to Acting training.

Players' concept -Acting, Directing, Design.

Players are playing a play.

So here is a workshop model planning.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Places
 

Focus Design concept.

What are the places where the Act happens -different stages, different Theatre, practice, live, video.

How places interact, Act happens, Events take place, What are the different Stage places, and how places connect with the significant aspects of the design; in this liveness, the video presentation will be there to make them understand different kinds of places and events. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Playgoers
 

Focus on Audience appreciation and participation of the audience.

Devising plays, Theatre dimension, Performance Devise, Analyse the Process.

How Playgoers or the Audience appreciate, involve, interact and immersively participate in the Theatre practice.

So there we devise practices. 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Performance practice
 

Focus on Theatre practice and performance.

Where a play or Devised Theatre performance will be done with the Students/ Participants.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Theatre: The Lively Art11th Edition​ By Edwin Wilson and Alvin Goldfarb,2022

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Theatre, Brief13th Edition​,By Robert Cohen, Donovan Sherman and Michelle Liu Carriger​,2023

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation CIAs :2 Hrs

Writing assignments, Live performance watching, and review writing.

Evaluation ESE :3 Hrs

End Semester Exam will be a performance and submission of journals.

THE142 - IMPROVISATION AND DEVISED THEATRE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

l  To gain an understanding of principles and techniques of improvisation.

l  Develop skills in collaborative script development and performance.

 

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Apply an understanding of practical proficiency in executing the fundamental principles of a variety of devising techniques and improvised scene work in rehearsals and project development

CO2: Students will showcase acquired skills through practical performances of devised and improvised live theatre

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:4
Rules of Comedy
 

Application of comedy rules through scene work, theatre sports, monologues, and play development

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Short Form Improvisation
 

Concepts of endowment, justification, plot progression, and ensemble/group mind are explored through short form stage scenarios

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:7
Sketch Writing
 

Concept mining, plot structures, collaborative scripts, and using improvisation as a writing tool within a performance ensemble

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:7
Long Form Improvisation
 

Students will explore case studies and history of long form improvised performance and practice rehearsing and performing “The Harold” for test audiences 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Devised Theatre Companies and Practices
 

Case studies of historic and contemporary devised theatre companies, paired with practical experiments in devising through imagery, text, and movement solutions 

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:15
Devised Performance Scripts
 

Research, story development, and improvisation will result in a devised theatrical performance for a public audience that will showcase the tools and skills employed in the previous units

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.           Lynn, Bill. Improvisation for Actors and Writers: A Guidebook for Improv Lessons in Comedy. Colorado Springs: Meriwether Publishing, 2004. Print 

2.           Halpern, Charna and Del Close. Truth in Comedy: The Manual of Improvisation. Colorado Springs: Meriwether Publishing, 1994. Print

3. Playscripts selected by instructor and actors for case study projects 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.           Spolin, Viola. Improvisation for the Theater. Evanston, Illinois: Northwestern University Press, 1999. Print 

 

2.           Halpern, Charna. Art by Committee: A Guide to Advanced Improvisation. Colorado Springs: Meriwether Publishing, 2004. Print

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern: Conducted internally at the departmental level

 

Assignment 1:  Quiz on Comedy Rules & Theatre Sports Practical Performance

Assignment 2:  Script Submission & Performance of Collaborative Comedy Sketch

Assignment 3:  Presentation & Student-Led Training Session from Historic Theatre Collectives

Assignment 4:  Actor Showcase Through Live Performances of Original Devised Theatre Pieces

BLS105-2 - ANIMAL DIVERSITY-II (CHORDATA) (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

Understanding animal diversity is a fundamental goal of zoological research, with far-reaching implications for science and conservation. This course will give students a modern perspective on animal diversity and an understanding of how the process of evolution has produced this vertebrate diversity; explore this diversity from various perspectives and examine how the diversity of body plans can be understood in terms of the relationship between evolution and development. This course will include sessions that demonstrate approaches and techniques used to investigate animal diversity, emphasising that this is an active research field, as well as sessions that help students develop core skills within the context of the course.

Course Outcome

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:4
Origin of Chordates
 

Introduction and charterers of chordates. Classification of chordates up to order level.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Protochordata
 

Urochordata: General characters and classification up to order level. Study of Herdmania and its affinities. 

Cephalochordates: General characters and classification up to order level. Study of Branchiostoma (Amphioxus) and its affinities.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:4
Agnatha
 

General characters and classification up to order level. Study of Petromyzon and its affinities.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:4
Super Class Pisces
 

General characters and classification up to order level. Types of scales and fins of fishes, migration and parental care in fishes; Type study: Scoliodon and Labeo

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:18
Super class Tetrapod
 

Class Amphibia

Generalcharacters and classification up to order level, Frog as type study, parental care, neoteny and paedogenesis. Type study: Rana

 

Class Reptilia

General characters and classification up to order level, Identification of poisonous and non-poisonous snakes and biting mechanism of snakes; Type study: Calotes.

 

Class Aves

General characters and classification up to order level; Characters of Archaeopteryx; Flight adaptations; Type study: Columba

 

Class Mammalia

General characters and classification up to order level; dentition in mammals. Economic importance of mammals; Type study: Rabbit (Oryctolagus)

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Liem, Karel F., William E. Bemis, Warren F. Walker, Lance Grande, 2001. Functional Anatomy of the Vertebrates: An Evolutionary Perspective. Brooks Cole.

  2. Pough, F.H., Janis, C.M. & Heiser, J.B. 2002. Vertebrate Life. (Pearson Education, Inc.).

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

  1. F.H. Pough, J.B. Heiser & W.N. McFarland, 1996. Vertebrate life. (Prentice Hall Pvt. Ltd.).

  2. M. Ekambaranatha Ayyar, 1973. A manual of zoology. Part II. (S. Viswanathan Pvt. Ltd., Madras).

  3. Gurdarshan Singh & H. Bhaskar, 2002. Advanced Chordate Zoology. Campus Books, 6 Vols., 

  4. R.L.Kotpal, 2000. Modern textbook of zoology, Vertebrates. (Rastogi Publ., Meerut). 

  5. E.L. Jordan & P.S. Verma, 1998. Chordate zoology. (S. Chand & Co.). 

  6. G.S. Sandhu, 2005. Objective Chordate Zoology. Campus Books, vii, 

  7. Sandhu, G.S. & H. Bhaskar, H. 2004. Textbook of Chordate Zoology. Campus Books, 2 vol

Evaluation Pattern

Internal Assessment: CIA 1(Quiz/ Tests/ MCQs/ Assignments) - 20 marks; CIA 2 (Midsemester Examination) 50 marks; CIA 3 (Quiz/ Tests/ MCQs/ Assignments - 20 marks)

External Assessment: End Semester Examination - 100 marks

Both the assessments will be scaled down to 50

BLS106-2 - COMPARATIVE ANATOMY AND EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

This course aims to study the structure, function and evolution of different . Relationships between the structural and functional adaptations of the different vertebrate groups and their environment are examined. The laboratory features dissections and experiments that illustrate these adaptations in both aquatic and terrestrial vertebrates.

Course Outcome

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:3
Integumentary System
 

 

General structure and comparison of integument from Pisces to Mammal; Derivatives of integument.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:3
Skeletal System
 

Overview of the axial and appendicular skeleton, Jaw suspensorium and Visceral arches

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Digestive and Respiratory Systems
 

Anatomy of the gut in relation to the feeding habits-herbivores, carnivores and omnivores; Brief account of Gills, lungs, air sacs and swim bladder, and Accessory respiratory organs.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Circulatory and nervous System
 

General plan of circulation, the evolution of heart and aortic arches; Comparative account of brain; Structure and functions of different types of receptors.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:3
Urinogenital and muscular System
 

Succession of kidney, Evolution of urinogenital ducts; Muscles Tissue, introduction to skeletal muscles.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
History of life and Introduction to evolutionary theories
 

Historical Overview, Major events in the history of life; Lamarckism, Darwinism, Mutation theory and Neo-Darwinism

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:7
Processes of evolutionary changes
 

Types of fossils, dating of fossils, phylogeny of horse; Isolating mechanisms, natural selection (Example- Industrial melanism), types of natural selection (Directional, Stabilizing, Disruptive), artificial selection

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:8
Species concept and Extinction
 

 

Biological species concept (advantages and limitations), mode of speciation (allopatric, sympatric); Background extinction, Mass extinction (causes, names of five major extinctions, K-T extinction, role of extinction in evolution.

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

  1. Comparative Anatomy And Developmental Biology, Rastogi Publications; 1st Edition: 2019-20

  2. Kardong, K.V. (2005) Vertebrates’ Comparative Anatomy, Function and Evolution. IV Edition. McGraw-Hill Higher Education.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

  1. Ridley, M. (2004). Evolution. III Edition. Blackwell Publishing 

  2. Barton, N. H., Briggs, D. E. G., Eisen, J. A., Goldstein, D. B. and Patel, N. H. (2007). Evolution. Cold Spring, Harbour Laboratory Press. 

  3. Hall, B. K. and Hallgrimsson, B. (2008). Evolution. IV Edition. Jones and Bartlett Publishers 

  4. Campbell, N. A. and Reece J. B. (2011). Biology. IX Edition, Pearson

  5. Kent, G.C. and Carr R.K. (2000). Comparative Anatomy of the Vertebrates. IX Edition. The McGraw-Hill Companies. 

  6. Hilderbrand, M and Gaslow G.E. Analysis of Vertebrate Structure, John Wiley and Sons. 

  7. Walter, H.E. and Sayles, L.P; Biology of Vertebrates, Khosla Publishing House

Evaluation Pattern

Internal Assessment: CIA 1(Quiz/ Tests/ MCQs/ Assignments) - 20 marks; CIA 2 (Midsemester Examination) 50 marks; CIA 3 (Quiz/ Tests/ MCQs/ Assignments - 20 marks)

External Assessment: End Semester Examination - 100 marks

Both the assessments will be scaled down to 50

BLS115-2 - ANIMAL DIVERSITY-II LAB (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:1

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This lab course is designed to provide students with hands-on experience examining a wide breadth of animals representing different animal phyla. By closely examining live and preserved specimens students will gain a strong understanding and appreciation for the wide diversity in animal life cycles, body morphology and adaptations.

Course Outcome

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
ANIMAL DIVERSITY II - LAB
 

 

  1. Study of collection and preservation techniques of specimens 

  2. Study of museum specimens: Ascidia, Amphioxus, Petromyzon, Scoliodon, Rohu, Rana, Salamander, Ichthyophis, Chelon, Cobra, Pigeon, Woodpecker, Bat, Loris

  3. Studies on the anatomical features of Fish (different systems) (Charts/ Pictures)

  4. Studies on the anatomical features of frog (different systems) (Charts/ Pictures)

  5. Studies on the anatomical features of calotes (different systems) (Charts/ Pictures)

  6. Studies on the anatomical features of Pigeon (different systems) (Charts/ Pictures)

  7. Studies on the anatomical features of rabbit (different systems) (Charts/ Pictures)

  8. Methods of diversity assessment

  9. Differentiation of poisonous and non-poisonous snakes

  10. Management of snake bite

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

  1. Clevel and Hickman, Susan Keen, Allan Larson, David Eisenhour (2021) Animal Diversity, 9th Ed. Mc Graw Hill

  2. Ruppert and Barnes, R.D. (2006). Vertebrate Zoology, VIII Edition. Holt Saunders International Edition.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

  1. S.S. Lal. Practical Zoology, 1st Edition, 2017-18, Rastogi Publications, 

  2. Verma P S Advanced Practical Zoology, S Chand & Co Ltd.

  3. PS Verma, A Manual of Practical Zoology: Vertebrates, C. Chand Publications

  4. Barnes, R.S.K., Calow, P., Olive, P.J.W., Golding, D.W. and Spicer, J.I. (2002). The Invertebrates: A New Synthesis, III Edition, Blackwell Science 

Evaluation Pattern

Internal Assessment: Performance - 20 marks; Midsemester Examination) 20 marks; record - 10 marks)

External Assessment: End Semester Examination - 50 marks

Both the assessments will be scaled down to 25

BLS116-2 - COMPARATIVE ANATOMY AND EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY LAB (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:1

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

This course examines the anatomical features of vertebrates as well as their evolutionary significance. Students will investigate vertebrate anatomy to learn how structures form, how they evolve, and how they interact with one another to allow animals to live in a variety of environments.

Course Outcome

CO 1: Compare and contrast the external anatomy, skeletal features, and internal organ systems of the different groups of vertebrates.

CO 2: Observe and discuss field and laboratory techniques used in the study of Vertebrates.

CO 3: Trace the evolution relationship among vertebrates based on their anatomical features.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
COMPARATIVE ANATOMY AND EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY LAB
 

 

  1. The scales of fishes (Scoliodon and bony fishes)

  2. Digestive system in fish and tetrapod (pictures/ 

  3. Evolutionary trends in the heart of vertebrates (Pictures/ museum specimen)

  4. Modification of aortic arches in vertebrates (Pictures)

  5. Osteology: a) Disarticulated skeleton of fowl and rabbit; b) Carapace and plastron of turtle /tortoise; c) Mammalian skulls: One herbivorous and one carnivorous animal; d) types of vertebra. 

  6. Brain and cranial nerves of Labeo (Pictures/ museum specimen)

  7. Respiratory systems in vertebrate (Pictures/ museum specimen)

  8. Study of fossil evidences from plaster cast models and pictures.

  9. Study of vestigial organs and atavism.

  10. Study of homology with suitable example – Mouth parts of Insects; forelimb of mammals 

  11. Serial homology in Prawns

  12. Study of analogy from suitable specimens – wings of bird and insect; eye of cephalopod and vertebrate

  13. Phylogeny of horse with diagrams or cut outs of limbs and teeth of horse ancestors

  14. Darwin’s Finches with diagram or cut outs of beaks of different species

  15. Visit to natural history museum and submission of report

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

  1. Comparative Anatomy And Developmental Biology, Rastogi Publications; 1st Edition: 2019-20

  2. Kardong, K.V. (2005) Vertebrates’ Comparative Anatomy, Function and Evolution. IV Edition. McGraw-Hill Higher Education.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

  1. Kent, G.C. and Carr R.K. (2000). Comparative Anatomy of the Vertebrates. IX Edition. The McGraw-Hill Companies. 

  2. Hilderbr and, M and Gaslow G.E. Analysis of Vertebrate Structure, John Wiley and Sons. 

  3. Walter, H.E. and Sayles, L.P; Biology of Vertebrates, Khosla Publishing House

Evaluation Pattern

Internal Assessment: Performance - 20 marks; Midsemester Examination) 20 marks; record - 10 marks)

External Assessment: End Semester Examination - 50 marks

Both the assessments will be scaled down to 25

CHE101-2 - INORGANIC CHEMISTRY-I: COORDINATION COMPOUNDS AND ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course deals with the chemistry of transition elements and the fundamentals of coordination chemistry. This course will introduce the students to concepts of environmental pollution.