CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

DEPARTMENT OF LIBERAL ARTS

School of Business and Management

Syllabus for
BA (Liberal Arts/Honours/Honours with Research)
Academic Year  (2023)

 
1 Semester - 2023 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
ENG184-1 ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses 2 2 50
LIB101-1B CRITICAL THINKING Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
LIB102-1B HISTORY OF IDEAS Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
LIB121-1B COMPUTATIONAL THINKING AND CODING Minor Core Courses 5 5 100
LIB141 SCIENCES AND SOCIETY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
LIB142 PERFORMATIVE ARTS-I Skill Enhancement Courses 4 4 100
LIB161-1B BASIC MATHEMATICS Skill Enhancement Courses 3 3 100
LIB162-1B SUSTAINABLE LIFE SKILLS/PUPPETRY Skill Enhancement Courses 2 0 50
LIB182-1B PRINCIPLES OF LIBERAL ARTS Bridge Courses 1 0 100
2 Semester - 2023 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
ENG184-2 LANGUAGE AND CONTEMPORARY SOCIETY Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses 2 2 50
LIB103-2B READING INDIA Major Core Courses-I 5 4 100
LIB104-2B FOUNDATIONS OF POLITICAL THOUGHT Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
LIB122-2B PYTHON PROGRAMMING Minor Core Courses 4 4 100
LIB143-2B BASIC STATISTICAL METHODS USING MS EXCEL Multidisciplinary Courses 4 4 100
LIB144-2B PERFORMATIVE ARTS-II Skill Enhancement Courses 4 2 100
LIB163-2B INTERMEDIATE MATHEMATICS Skill Enhancement Courses 4 4 100
LIB164-2B STORY TELLING (SKILL DEVELOPMENT) Skill Enhancement Courses 2 2 100
LIB282-2B DESIGN THINKING_CYBER SECURITY Bridge Courses 2 2 100
  

    

Introduction to Program:

Brief description about the Programme: 

The Liberal Arts Program refers to the concept of globalization in all its forms – including political, biological, digital, cultural, economic, and most importantly – historical. This will be an interdisciplinary exploration of a set of global issues through a very comprehensive lens and will delve into people, commodities, ideas, heritage and even diseases moving around the world - with a focus shifting to integrate mathematical, logical, analytical and creative skills in higher education. The Liberal Arts Program is meant to foster innovative problem solving by providing students with a variety of methods and analytic tools.

 

We at the department of Liberal Arts, firmly believe that new ideas come from ‘thinking outside the box’ and developing new perspectives that combine diverse ways of knowing the world. And with our enabling environment, empowered leadership and governance structure, we are breaking away from the pattern of conventional and rigid program and creating student-centric, flexible learning systems, and allow students to explore and curate their own visions and aspirations – incorporating creative expressions like music, theatre, art and sports into the curriculum as well.

A BA Liberal Arts (Honors/Honors with Research) will provide one with a passport to enter a highly rewarding career in fields including international relations, international business, foreign diplomacy, non-profit organizations, and more. Our majors’ program should be designed to offer a selection of stimulating coursework that prioritizes class discussion, featuring dedicated and experienced faculty, and prepares students for an inspiring career. It should shape one as an informed citizen who can make a difference in our increasingly globalised world. The Liberal Arts Degree is designed in a way that at the end of 3/4 years, the student can tailor their own specialization according to their own unique interests, from among the ‘Interdisciplinary Thematic Tracks’ mentioned below.

The Thematic Tracks are:

 

  1. Environment: Science, Society and Policy

  2.   

Programme Outcome/Programme Learning Goals/Programme Learning Outcome:

PO1: Demonstrate competency, knowledge, and linkage between two or more disciplines Tracks: Environment|Sustainability; Gender|Minority; Urban Studies; Industry Innovation and Infrastructure; Peace and Conflict Studies; Communication Studies; Healthcare and Wellness

PO2: To apply critical thinking and problem solving abilities using evidence-based reasoning to make rationalized and informed decisions Tracks : Foundational Course- Critical Thinking, Environment and Sustainability, Innovation and Infrastructure.

PO3: Apply logical reasoning to multiple narratives and demonstrate understanding to ethical concerns, and historical consciousness. Tracks: Environment and Sustainability, Gender and Minority, Peace and Conflict, Communication Studies.

PO4: Develop understanding of ideas and concepts on pluralism and cultural legacies by critiquing the dynamics of power to appreciate the lived social experiences in the areas of environment, sustainability, politics and history. Tracks:Peace and Conflict Studies,Gender and minority studies,Environment and Sustainability, Health care and wellness, Communication

PO5: Develop collaborative, leadership, team- and network- building skills to be applied towards understanding, engaging and valuing diverse perspectives Tracks: Communication Studies; Gender and minority studies; Peace and Conflict Studies; Infrastructure and Innovation

PO6: Employ effective written communication and disseminate knowledge acquired to both academic and non-academic communities the value of an individual voice, opinion, their education, and their cultural experiences through multiple mediums. Tracks: Communication Studies,Gender and minority studies,Peace and Conflict Studies ,Environment studies

PO7: Demonstrate individual and social responsibility (civic responsibility, engagement, and ethical reasoning), a propensity for life-long learning, employment, and prepare for global citizenship Tracks: All of them

PO8: Apply an interdisciplinary understanding of the knowledge gained from different disciplines in varying historical, socio-political and cultural contexts; environmental processes; and sustainability aspects through the display of critical skills in both theory and practice. Tracks: Environment and Sustainability; Urban studies; Industry innovation; Healthcare and Wellness

PO9: Apply appropriate research methods to generate effective multidisciplinary research Track: Foundational Research Methodology Course

PO10: Critically analyze and evaluate discourses of identity, citizenship, environmental ethics, nation-state and surveillance through an interdisciplinary approach. Tracks: Industry and Innovation, Urban studies, Environment and Sustainability

Programme Specific Outcome:

PSO1: NA

Programme Educational Objective:

PE01: NA
Assesment Pattern

Faculty members who are offering courses to BA Liberal Arts Programs may choose their assessments from the following list:

  1. In-class writing exercises: Teachers can provide students with ‘texts’ or contexts and ask them to read them closely and examine their language, rhetoric, style and narrative conventions. Teachers can require students to complete this task manually or without external resources to minimise the use of chatbots.

Skills to be tested: linguistic skills, analysis, synthesis, and critical thinking.

  1. Presentations and debates: Teachers can guide students to prepare presentations on topics relevant to their courses. 

Skills to be tested: Public speaking, argumentation, linguistic skills, analytical skills, critical thinking, teamwork and interpersonal skills, research, creative skills, summarising, paraphrasing, leadership skills, cultural and social sensitivity, and verbal and non-verbal skills.

  1. Content-creation and dissemination: Creative writing, blogging, Vlogging, other web or social media content, photo essays, graphic narratives, video essays, documentaries, exhibitions, and archive creations.

Skills to be tested: Creativity, linguistic skills, analytical skills, technical skills, critical thinking, teamwork and interpersonal skills, cultural and social sensitivity, research, writing for specific purposes and media, editing, proofreading, design skills, networking, professional ethics, and academic integrity. 

  1. Role play and performances: Acting, scripting, storytelling, folk narrations, dance, forms of theatre such as mono act, street plays, mime etc., Reels, sketch comedies, Open mic, and performance poetry.

Skills to be tested: Creativity, linguistic skills, analytical skills, technical skills, critical thinking, leadership, teamwork, cultural and social sensitivity, and performative skills.

  1. Written submissions: Critical essays, research essays, research papers, portfolios, reports, annotations, annotated bibliographies, precis writing, opinion pieces, and reviews. 

Skills to be tested: Research skills, Creativity, linguistic skills, analytical skills, technical skills, cultural and social sensitivity, professional ethics, academic integrity, and critical thinking.

  1. Workshops/Seminars/Conferences/Symposia: Faculty-guided and student-led events, paper presentations, and poster presentations.

Skills to be tested: Research skills, Creativity, linguistic skills, analytical skills, technical skills, cultural and social sensitivity, critical thinking, leadership, professional ethics, academic integrity, teamwork, and networking skills.

  1. Internship/apprenticeship: Service learning, community engagement, and discipline based professional development. 

Skills to be tested: leadership, professional ethics, academic integrity, cultural and social sensitivity, teamwork, and networking skills.

  1. Research Projects: Dissertations, capstone projects, translation, mini-projects, short research papers, creative writing, field-based research, curating and archiving, language documentation, problem-oriented project work, surveys, ethnographic research.

 

Skills to be tested: Research skills, Creativity, linguistic skills, analytical skills, technical skills,  leadership, professional ethics, academic integrity, cultural and social sensitivity, teamwork, and networking skills.

Examination And Assesments

TEACHING PEDAGOGIES/METHODS:

      Lectures which will complement readings, with focus on individual aspects of special interest.

      High onus being kept on offering multiple and alternative interpretations, and exposing students to key issues of scholarly debate.

      Documentaries, films, objects and docu-dramas will be viewed, providing visual material with commentary, enriching and deepening readings and lectures.

      There will also be intensive focus on Group work/projects, small group discussion, and mock problem-solving exercises, and case study analysis.

      Low-stakes writing assignments and presentations, student seminars and workshops will be a regular feature in various courses.

      Internships and participation in Live projects will be another component of the Program.

ENG184-1 - ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is an intensive program for two semesters for all the students of the BA/BSc programmes (ENGH, ECOH, JOUH, PSYH, EPH and EMP) that introduces students to a wide range of expository works in order to develop their knowledge of rhetoric and make them aware of the power of language. The course is designed to meet the rigorous requirements of graduate-level courses and therefore includes expository, analytical, personal, and argumentative texts from a variety of authors and historical contexts. It would allow students to work with the rhetorical situation, examining the authors’ purposes as well as the audiences and subjects in texts. The course is designed to engage students with rhetoric in multiple mediums, including visual media such as photographs, films, advertisements, comic strips, music videos, and TED talks; students would develop a sense to comprehend how a resource of language operates in any given text. In the semester the course focuses on famous rhetorical pieces from across the world to familiarise the learners with various techniques and principles.

The objective of the course is to

● Introduce learners to various types of rhetorical pieces - written, oral text and visual texts.

● Provide an understanding of various rhetorical strategies in various compositional pieces

● Famarlize learners with various strategies of reading and writing by exposing them to effective and ineffective rhetorical pieces.

Course Outcome

CO1: Analyse and interpret samples of good writing by identifying and explaining an author?s use of rhetorical strategies and techniques.

CO2: Evaluate both visual and written texts and determine if it is effective or ineffective rhetoric.

CO3: Create and sustain arguments by applying effective strategies and techniques in their own writing

CO4: Demonstrate their knowledge in the form of cogent well-written report.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Language of Composition
 

The unit will focus on understanding rhetoric and various rhetorical situations. The aim is to assert the idea that rhetoric is always contextual and there is a link between the speaker, audience and what the content of the text is. This will enable students to understand the significance of context whether local, regional, national or global while analysing and composing a text. The unit deals with human values. 

1. 1. Introduction to Rhetoric and Rhetorical Situation.

a. Lou Gehrig (1939) “Farewell Speech” (Speech) https://www.lougehrig.com/farewell/

2. SOAP Analysis: Through the analysis of the text the aim is to look at the mode in which various factors like subject, occasion, audience and purpose impact rhetoric. 

a. George W. Bush (2001) “9/11 Address to the Nation” (Speech) http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/gwbush911addresstothenation.htm

b. Jawaharlal Nehru (1947) “Tryst with Destiny” (Speech) http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/jawaharlalnehrutrystwithdestiny.htm

 

3. Ethos, Pathos and Logos: Understanding Aristotle’s concept of Ethos, Pathos and Logos is significant in understanding effective rhetoric. By looking at some of the famous rhetorical works the aim is to understand how the writer’s/ orators of some of the famous rhetorical pieces have used these elements to persuade the reader/ audience.

a. Ethos: i. King George VI (1939) “The King’s Speech” (Speech, can play part of the movie) https://www.awesomestories.com/asset/view/George-VI-King-s-Speech-September-3-1939

ii. Judith Ortiz Cofer (1992) “The Myth of Latin Women: I Just met a Girl Named Maria” (Essay) https://www.quia.com/files/quia/users/amccann10/Myth_of_a_Latin_Woman

b. Logos: i. Alice Waters (2006) “Slow Food Nation” (Essay) https://www.thenation.com/article/slow-food-nation/

c. Pathos: i. Dwight D. Eisenhower (1944) “Order of the Day” (Speech) https://www.whatsoproudlywehail.org/curriculum/the-american-calendar/order-ofthe-day-6-June-19

d. Combining Ethos, Logos, and Pathos

i. Rabindranath Tagore (1941) “Crisis of Civilization” https://www.scribd.com/doc/163829907/Rabindranath-Tagore-The-Crisis-of-Civilization

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Reading Written and Visual Texts
 

This unit will focus on introducing the students to multiple ways of analysis, close reading, and usage of argumentative statements and diction. In addition to that the unit will focus on how to read visual texts from a global, national and regional perspective and the impact it has on the audience. The unit enhances the reading and comprehension skills of students and prepare them to get employed in content creation.

1. Virginia Woolf (1942) “The Death of the Moth” (Essay)

https://www.sanjuan.edu/cms/lib8/CA01902727/Centricity/Domain/3981/Death%20of%20A%20Moth-Virginia%20Woolf%20copy.pdf

2. Groucho Marx (2006) “Dear Warner Brothers” (Letter) https://archive.org/details/Groucho_Marx_Letter_to_Warner_Brothers

3. ACLU (2000) “The Man on the Left” (Advertisement) https://www.mansonblog.com/2016/10/aclu-charles-manson-martin-luther-king.html

4. R. K. Laxman Political cartoons (Cartoon)

http://webneel.com/rk-lakshman-editorial-cartoons-indian-cartoonist (Political Cartoons)

5. Times of India (2017) ISRO launch cartoon (Cartoon)

https://www.tatacliq.com/que/isro-launch-breaks-record-memes/ISROLaunch

https://indianexpress.com/article/trending/trending-in-india/times-of-india-isro-104-satellite-launch-in-response-to-new-york-times-mangalyaan-cartoon-twitter-reactions-4529893

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Determining Effective and Ineffective Rhetoric
 

The unit will engage with the questions on why few texts are effective rhetorical pieces as opposed to others. A few texts will be analysed to look at different rhetorical situations, and how it is effective and ineffective in persuading the audience/ reader. The selected texts deal with the issues of animal rights, nuclear rights, food crisis, and holocaust (human values) and help the students to engage with global scenario of the issues concerned. Any five of the suggested topics can be taken in class.

1. PETA, Feeding Kids Meat Is Child Abuse (Advertisement) https://www.peta.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/childabuseBB72.jpg

2. Anne Applebaum (2011) “If the Japanese Can’t Build a Safe Reactor, Who Can?” (Essay) https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/if-the-japanese-cant-build-a-safe-reactor-who-can/2011/03/14/ABCJvuV_story.html?utm_term=.8

3. Simon Lancaster (2016) Ted Talk: Speak Like a Leader (Speech) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bGBamfWasNQ

4. Understanding Argument: Csalexander03 (2012) Why Investing in Fast Food May Be a Good Thing by Amy Domini (Essay) https://csalexander03.wordpress.com/2012/12/04/why-investing-in-fast-food-may-be-a-good-thing-by-amy-domini/

5. The New York Times (2004) Felons and the Right to Vote (Essay) http://www.nytimes.com/2004/07/11/opinion/felons-and-the-right-to-vote.html

6. Using Visual text for Argument: Objevit.cz (2017) “Holocaust + Selfie Culture = ‘Yolocaust’” (Video) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mjjV_X5re4g

Text Books And Reference Books:

Texts prescribed for study in each unit. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Kubota, R., & Lehner, A. (2004). Toward critical contrastive rhetoric. Journal of Second Language Writing, 13(1), 7-27.

Seaboyer, J., & Barnett, T. (2019). New perspectives on reading and writing across the disciplines. Higher Education Research and Development, 38(1), 1-10.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1- 5 marks 

MSE- 10 marks 

CIA 3-  5 marks 

ESE- 25 marks

 

LIB101-1B - CRITICAL THINKING (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

This course is a foundation course for students of the Liberal Arts program. It will explore issues about the nature and techniques of critical thought, viewed as a way to establish a reliable basis for our claims, beliefs, and attitudes about the world. We will explore multiple perspectives, placing established facts, theories, and practices in tension with alternatives to see how it could be otherwise. Views about observation and interpretation, reasoning and inference, valuing and judging, and the production of knowledge in its social context will be considered. Special attention will be given to translating what is learned into strategies, materials, and interventions for use in students' own educational and professional settings.

Course Objectives:

  1. To promote independent thinking, personal autonomy and reasoned judgment in thought and action. This involves two related dimensions, and this course aims to do so:

  • the ability to reason well and 

  • the disposition to do so.

 

  1. To acquaint students with logic as well as creativity. It will involve inductive and deductive reasoning, analysis and problem-solving as well as creative, innovative and complex approaches to the resolution of issues and challenges.

  2. To create independent centres of consciousness among the students, with the fundamental ability to determine the contours of their own minds and lives.

  3. To prepare learners for self-direction and not pre-conceived roles. It is, therefore, essential that learners be prepared for thinking their way through the maze of challenges that life will present independently.

  4. To acquaint students with the 3 fundamentals of Critical Thought - Thinking, Reasoning and Analysis - because clear thinking, careful analysis, and reasoned deliberation are fundamental to democracy and democratic life.

Course Outcome

CO1: A set of tools, experiences, activities, knowledge of publications, and an enhanced disposition to self­-directed lifelong inquiry around

CO2: their own critical thinking, i.e., scrutinizing the assumptions, reasoning, and evidence brought to bear on an issue ­by others and by themselves, where such scrutiny is enhanced by placing ideas and practices in tension with alternatives; and what is needed to teach or guide others regarding the above in ways that might depart markedly from their previous schooling and experience.

CO3: a critical understanding of collaborative explorations and allied approaches to project-­based learning in relation to participants re­engaging with themselves as avid learners and inquirers.

CO4: A basis/foundation on multidisciplinary as an approach, especially on how disciplines add value to one another in the road towards a resolution/solution.

CO5: Developed the ability to critically reflect on the valuable life skills gained, by learning the importance of feedback, both positive and constructive.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Critical Thought and Thinking
 

 

The first unit is specifically designed to initiate the process of problem orientation, and eventual solution to it. The unit begins with theoretical underpinnings, but very quickly proceeds towards using actual cases to deliberate on what/how/when it was tackled. This could be a local issue, or a global one - with very specific concerns being picked up across gender, class or ecological concerns.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Critical Thinking - Skills
 

 

The unit engages with analysis, interpretation, as well as cognitive strategies along with theoretical underpinnings, using actual cases to deliberate on what/how/when it should be handled. This could be a local issue, or a global one - with very specific concerns being picked up across gender, class or ecological concerns.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Values and Ethics
 

 

The unit engages with Ethics, Value assumptions, as well as conflicts, truths and half-truths, using actual cases to deliberate on what/how/when it should be handled. This could be a local issue, or a global one - with very specific concerns being picked up across gender, class or ecological concerns.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Power of Language
 

Level of Knowledge: Theory/Basic

  1. The idea of Power and Authority – Use and Abuse

  2. Reasoning – errors of perceptions, judgement and reaction

  3. Denotation and Connotation – Reification

 

Level of Knowledge: Practical/Application

 

  1. People and Meanings – Can words take on more power than in reality?

  2. Vagueness – Ambiguity – Weasel words – Double speak

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Power of Suggestions
 

Level of Knowledge: Theory/Basic

 

  1. The idea of Suggestion – Use and Abuse

  2. Power of Media to shape information – Television and print marketing and advertising tricks

  3. Storytelling as persuasion and suggestion – citizens, consumers and relationships in the age of technology

  4. Nation and Government – policies and idea of suggestion

  5. Suggestion and the influence of Ideas - Big Data Analytics, Artificial Intelligence

  6. Power of Media to shape information – Television and print marketing and advertising tricks

  7. Storytelling as persuasion and suggestion – citizens, consumers and relationships in the age of technology

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

  • Diestler, Sherry. 2011. Becoming a Critical Thinker, Prentice Hall.

  • Ruggiero, VR. 2009. Becoming a Critical Thinker. Boston: New York.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Materials are given time to time as the course progress

Evaluation Pattern

 

Assessment Details(Submission paper)

CIA

20 Marks

MSE

50 Marks

CIAII

20 Marks

ESE

50 Marks

Group

Assignment

Submission

(Assignment will be
Research based)

Individual

Assignment

Submission

(Assignment will be
Research based)

LIB102-1B - HISTORY OF IDEAS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

This course is a foundation course for students of the Liberal Arts program. Ideas shape the world we live in—from why we get married, to what we believe will happen after we die, to why we support a particular political party, to what we believe will make us more prosperous. These ideas have trajectories in the past - histories. What we believe is not the same as what other people in other places and other times have believed in. And this is where the course stems from - Why is this the case? Why have some ways of knowing come to dominate in some periods and places, and not in others? Why and how have certain notions about politics, economics, culture, and the natural world pushed aside competing claims? What roles have intellectuals played in creating and disseminating important ideas? How do particular frames of reference shape our understandings of history? What is the relationship between material conditions and the development of a robust intellectual culture? 

 

There are many ways to approach the history of ideas, ideologies, and intellectuals and in this particular course we will focus on the history of philosophy, science, religion, political and economic thought, as well as broader social ideas. Some units will focus on intellectuals and the development of particular schools of thought; others will seek to put the realm of ideas into a range of social, economic or political contexts. The course will mix discussions of theoretical approaches with practical application of the concepts and theories. As such, typical classes involve case analysis, group problem solving, analysis of relevant materials (movies, podcasts, pictures etc.) and debate.

 

Course Objectives:

  • One of the main objectives is to trace the human intellectual past – its ideological foundations and historical evolution from earliest experiences to the 21stcentury. 
  • The course’s focal point would be emphasizing discourses on communities, uniqueness and exceptionality, including the myths of origin and of cultural exclusivity, narratives of national history and even pantheons of heroes, in the creation of human memory and identity through ideas.
  • To help the students ask and evaluate questions like – What factors shape our identities? What dilemmas arise when others view us differently than we view ourselves? How do our identities influence our choices? And what role does ‘Ideas’ play in all of this?
  • To enable the students to realise that understanding the trajectory of ideas in the creation of identity is not only valuable for their own social, moral, and intellectual development, it also serves as a foundation for examining the choices made by individuals and groups in the past as well as in the present.
  • Acquaint the students with diversity of ideas and its politicization, as it becomes a topic of enormous contemporary relevance, with implications for the construction of national/international identity and responsibilities.
  • Further, to educate students on the dangers of ideas when misused in the construction of national and other group identities – especially when religion and politics are intermixed, and ‘us and them’ dichotomies of difference are created and mobilized in mass atrocities.
  • And finally, to make the student aware of the complexities in reconstructing the past of a nation on the basis of a trajectory of ‘ideas’ and to enable the learner to problematize the past as a non-monolithic entity.

Course Outcome

CO1: Critically engage with representations of the past in the present and use the evidence in interrogating historical accounts and memory.

CO2: Evaluate how issues of identity and memory, which are formulated through ideas, factor into our historical understandings and how this can condition present day policies and decision-making.

CO3: Critically reflect and engage with the interface between the past and the present, fostering a healthy appreciation for history and its imprint on our present world.

CO4: Analyze how ideas shape historical memory and identity and then how they in turn are shaped by states, organizations, and individuals.

CO5: Trace the evolution and interaction between history, memory and politics when following the news and in examining historical cases

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Histories of Ideas ? Whats and Whys
 

a)  An Idea - The Many Pasts; The Historiography of Ideas, Precept and Practice.

b)What Happened to An Idea: Adventures of the Dialectic – The Greeks (Nature and Value), Christianity and Historiography, threshold of Scientific notions of Idea – Romanticism, Kant, Hegel, Positivism

c)So Many Lies, So Little Time: Interrogating an Idea – Reality, Representation to Truths and Narratives through Thought, Knowledge, Imagination and Evidence.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Beginnings of the ?Idea?: Perspectives from East and the West
 

a)   The Grand Narratives: Teleologies; Evolution and Culture; Marx, Nietzsche, and Foucault

b)  Legitimization of Power and the idea of Polity: Nascent Stages and Beyond.

c)   The early ideas of Polity - Origins, monarchy, oligarchy, presto-republicanism

d) Beginnings of the Idea of Rights and Duties of Citizens: From the Cyrus Cylinder (6th Cent. BCE), Magna Carta (1215 CE), to the English Bill of Rights (1689), the French Declaration on the Rights of Man and Citizen (1789), and the US Constitution and Bill of Rights (1791) 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Idea: The Many After-lives
 

a)   Idea of the Individual – Renaissance, Enlightenment, Utilitarianism, and Logical Positivism. 

b)  Asia Imperium: Gunpowder Empires – Ottoman, Safavid, Mughals; Japan, China, and Korea.

c)     Ideas that refashioned the World: Industrial Revolution; Capitalism – Imperialism – Colonialism; The Original Manifesto. 

d)    White Man’s Burden: Clashing Visions and Consequences of Modernity; The Idea of French and British Colonial ‘Modern’ Identity.

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Legacies and Memory: Ideas for Whom?
 

a)   The Idea and the experience of Liberty: Negative and Positive liberties

b)  The Idea and the experience of Equality and Rights: Absolute vs Practical equality.

c)   Naturalistic theory (Individual self-interest (evolution) vs societal interest; Humanism.

d)  Need for Revisionism of Ideas; Affecting and Effecting the Future: Justice and its Maxims; the Idea of Redistribution?

e)   The Relevance of Ideas in the Era of Deep AI

Text Books And Reference Books:

·    Lovejoy, Arthur O. 1960. Essays in the History of Ideas, Capricorn.

·    Gaddis, John Lewis. 2002. The Landscape of History: How Historians Map the Past, New York:  Oxford University Press.

·    Beker, Avi. 2008. The Chosen: The History of an Idea, and the Anatomy of an Obsession, Palgrave Macmillan.

·    Gathercole, Peter and David Lowenthal (eds.) 1994. The Politics of the Past, New York: Routledge.

·    Kumar, Ravinder 1989. The Past and the Present: An Indian Dialogue, Daedalus, Vol. 118, No.4, pp. 27-49.

·    Thapar, Romila. 2000. History and Beyond, New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

·    Thapar, Romila. 2013. The Past Before Us: Historical Traditions of Early North India, New Delhi: Permanent Black.

·    Thompson, Willie. 2000. What Happened to History. London: Pluto Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

·      Banerjee, Sumanta, 2003. Ayodhya: A future bound by the past, Economic and Political Weekly, Vol. 38, No. 27, pp. 2795-2796.

·      Carr, E.H. 1967. What is History, Vintage.

·      Chalcraft, David et.al. 2008. Max Weber Matters: Interweaving Past and Present, Ashgate.

·      Chapman, James 2005. Past and Present: National Identity and the British Historical Film, I.B.Tauris.

·      Chatterjee, Partha. 1993. The Nation and its Fragments: Colonial and Postcolonial Histories. Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press.

·      Chatterjee, Partha. 2012. The Black Hole of Empire: History of a Global Practice of Power, Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press.

·      Fawcett, Bill (ed). 2007. You Said What: Lies and Propaganda Throughout History, Harper Collins E-books.

·      Fowler, Don D. 1987. Uses of the past: Archaeology in the service of the state, American Antiquity, Vol. 52, No. 2, pp. 229-248.

·      Galgano, Michael J., J. Chris Arndt, Raymond M. Hyser. 2007. Doing History: Research and Writing in the Digital Age. Boston: Wadsworth Publishing.

·      Gardiner, Juliet (eds). 1988. What is History Today, London: Macmillan Education UK.

·      Morris, Ian. 2010. Why the West Rules – for Now: The Patterns of History, and What They Reveal About the Future, London and New York: Profile Books and Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

·      Muller, Jan-Werner 2004. Memory and Power in Post-War Europe: Studies in the presence of the past, Cambridge Univ. Press.

·      Piercey, Robert 2009. The Uses of the Past from Heidegger to Rorty: Doing Philosophy Historically, Cambridge Univ. Press.

·      Shrimali, K.M. 1998. A Future for the Past? Social Scientist, Vol. 26, No. 9, pp. 26-51.

·      Southgate, Beverley C. 2005. What is History For? New York: Routledge.

·      Thapar, Romila, Harbans Mukhia, Bipan Chandra. 1969. Communalism and the Writing of Indian History, New Delhi: People's Publishing House.

·      Thapar, Romila. 1979. Dissent in the Early Indian Tradition, Volume 7 of M.N. Roy memorial lecture, New Delhi: Indian Renaissance Institute.

·     Walsh, Kevin 1992. The Representation of the Past: Museums and heritage in the post-modern world, Routledge.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

 

Assignment 1

Assignment 1

Total

20

20

40

 

Mid Semester Examination

Section A

Section B

Section C

Total

3X5=15

2X10=20

1x15=15

50

 

End Semester Examination

Section A

Section B

Section C

Total

3X5=15

2X10=20

1x15=15

50

 

LIB121-1B - COMPUTATIONAL THINKING AND CODING (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

This course is intended for students with little or no programming experience. It aims to provide students with an understanding of the role computation plays in this technology driven world, regardless of their major.

Although technology touches most aspects of life in a society in the modern world, a majority of people just use the technology created by a small group of companies without being curious about how the technology was built nor caring about the impact of these technologies on themselves and the society. In other words, we are creating a world of passive consumers who are divested of a basic understanding of their role in the technology world, thus handing a disproportionate amount of power to a small number of people, who learn how to make technology work for them.

In this course, students are not only taught the basics of programming, but are also encouraged to inculcate the habit of Computational Thinking (CT). CT is a way of approaching problems that enables students to use a computer or other tools to solve them. In order for the computer to be able to help solve a problem, the student will have to learn to conceptualise the problem in clear logical steps, identify patterns and think in abstract terms. This is a skill set that the course offers to its students.

Furthermore, the course declutters technology that is commonly used in everyday life and encourages students to envision new ways of contributing to society using technology. Using Python 3.5 as the programming language, the course provides a platform for students to start making technology work for them during their later semesters, as well as in their careers.

Course Objectives:

·      With Computational Thinking as the overarching theme the course will introduce learners from a non - computer science background to world of computing.

It encourages them to think critically about technology around them rather than becoming mere consumers.

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate an understanding of the Software Development Lifecycle

CO2: Design, develop and ideate new technological solutions impacting society

CO3: Demonstrate a foundational knowledge of Python as a programming language

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Computing
 

This unit provides a brief history of computing and computers, along with introducing learners to the building blocks of computing. It also introduces students to a formal programming language - Python, which is the most widely used programming language in the world.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Algorithms
 

Algorithmic thinking is the building block of computational thinking. In this unit students are introduced to the concept of algorithms and how to apply these in practical scenarios. Indicative list of topics are:

·      Sorting and Searching

·      Ciphers and Cryptography

·      Introduction to AI

·      Machines that learn

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Coding Project
 

Introduction to coding using Python as part of a mini project. This unit will introduce students to the constructs of programming and software development.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:20
Decoding Technology
 

Technology is pervasive; people now use technology in every aspect. This unit aims to declutter technology around us so that students view technology from a critical angle rather than being mere consumers.

Indicative list of topics are:

·      Error detection and correction (ex. bar codes)

·      Data representation using Binary

·      Location based services (ex. Google Maps)

·      Data routing (How the Internet works?)

Text Books And Reference Books:

The course is an application based course. If required the course instructor will assign readings depending on the topic beig discussed

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

The course is an application based course. If required the course instructor will assign readings depending on the topic beig discussed

Evaluation Pattern

The evaluation will be done on the basis of a Project that the student will have to submit under the supervision of the Course instructor.

LIB141 - SCIENCES AND SOCIETY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

Science and technology influence almost every aspect of human life. This course focuses on the increasing complexities of the interrelationship between science, technology and society. Social, political and cultural values affect scientific research and technological innovations, and in turn scientific research affects society, politics and culture. This course deals with philosophical and sociological aspects of technological change in society. The central focus of this course is to highlight the active role of society, culture and politics in the field of science & technology. The objective of the course is to enable students to understand science as a socio-cultural product in specific socio-historical contexts. The course exposes students to philosophical, historical and sociological perspectives to look at science as a practice deeply embedded in culture and society. It emphasizes the dynamic nature of the relations between wider cultural practices on one hand and scientific practices on the other. The attempt is to equip students with an understanding indispensable for an in-depth study of science-technology-society dynamics.

The course will begin with social theories on the production of technology and scientific knowledge systems, stratification within the community of technologists and scientists, discrimination (race, class, gender, caste) and the role of power in shaping the production of technology and scientific knowledge. Scientific controversies, both historical and emerging, and the organization of innovation and its geographies will be discussed. Case studies exploring ethical questions arising from new technologies such as information technology, nanotechnologies, biotechnologies, etc. will be used. Discussions on public understanding of science and role of the public and of experts in influencing policies related to science and technology will conclude the course.

Course Objectives

      To instill in students an appreciation for science and a scientific outlook and temper.

      The course further aims to increase awareness about fundamental scientific concepts that play an important role in our daily life using various examples and case studies.

      Students will be encouraged to understand and appreciate scientific concepts and their applications rather than solely memorizing factual information.

      It will encourage critical thinking and an awareness of how science and society interact and connect.

Course Outcome

CO1: To provide interdisciplinary knowledge with basic exposure to scientific methods, technologies and developments that have played a significant role in the evolution of human society from ancient to modern times.

CO2: To imbibe the scientific rationale of technological developments that would enable them to make informed decisions about their potential impact on society

CO3: To develop a critical understanding of the scientific principles underlying some of the major topical scientific issues in the public domain.

CO4: CO4. To demonstrate the ability to formulate, communicate and defend well-informed views of their own concerning the issues studied.

CO5: CO5. To deploy evidence and reasoning to build strong arguments about the relationships between science, technology and society

CO6: CO6. To Evaluate scientific, technological and historical texts critically, assessing their social, cultural and political origins and ramifications.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Tracing Science and Technology Historically
 

The unit will begin with social theories on the production of technology and scientific knowledge systems, stratification within the community of technologists and scientists, discrimination (race, class, gender, caste) and the role of power in shaping the production of technology and scientific knowledge.In this unit, students will be largely made aware about the contributions of various philosophers, scientists and intellectuals both global and Indian since ancient times till date. There will also be discussions on the various contributions of historical and political narrative within scientific upheavals and evolutions in society - cutting across gender, human values and ecological lines.

  1. History of Science: The Great Revolutions - Contributions of Copernicus and Galileo; A brief history of the Renaissance in Europe; Age of Enlightenment; Industrial Revolution; Science in the 20th century
  2. Science and Philosophy: Scientific Method, Importance of Observation, Experimental Design, Rationality, Myths vs. Facts
  3.  Science, Technology and Traditional Practices: Suggestive areas include: Water harvesting Structures and Practices; Construction, Architecture and Design (use of natural environment-friendly designs and materials); Agriculture (including domestication of plants and animals)
  4. The Interdependence of Science and Technology: Molecular basis of disease and vaccination, Laser and photonics applications,  Microscopy and applications
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Major Scientific Discoveries and Controversies
 

Scientific discoveries and controversies, both historical and emerging, and the organization of innovation and its geographies will be discussed. Case studies exploring ethical questions arising from new technologies such as information technology, nanotechnologies, biotechnologies, etc. will be used. Discussions on public understanding of science and role of the public and of experts in influencing policies related to science and technology will conclude the unit.

  1.  Science, Technology and Society: Cognitive and Ethical Dimensions
  2. Discoveries and Controversies and Inequalities in Science: Human Evolution; Lab Experiments; Vaccines and Antibiotics  (brief history of discovery and health impacts); Soaps, detergents, polymers; Atomic Energy; Genetics and Human Health; Nanotechnology.
  3. Science in Contemporary Times: Suggestive areas include: Public Health: Nutrition, Hygiene, Physical and MentaI Health
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Social Shaping of Technology
 
  1. Food Security - Green Revolution, White Revolution; IT Revolution, E-Governance;
  2. Clean Energy, Renewable Energy; Space Science and Exploration; Evolution, Ecology, Environment and Climate Change
  3.  Activities:

      Observing and documenting flora and fauna of College campus/city.

      Visits to science laboratories in the College or neighbouring College/Institute.

      Visits to science museums, planetarium, biodiversity parks and nature walks.

      Participation in a citizen science project/initiative.

  1.  Experiments:

      Measuring the height of the college building using a stick

      Observing transpiration and photosynthesis in plants

      The blood typing game (online)

      Are fruit juices, soap, carbonated drinks acidic or alkaline? (using pH strips or developing your own Litmus Test)

      How and why does the path of the sun in the sky change with the seasons?

      Identification of celestial objects with the naked eye

      Types of clouds

      Science of musical sounds

Text Books And Reference Books:

      B. Barnes and D. Edge (eds.), Science in Context: Readings in the Sociology of Science, The Open University Press, 1983.

      A.F. Chalmers, What is this Thing called Science?, The Open University Press, 1980.

      Basu and Khan (2001). Marching Ahead with Science. National Book Trust

      C.A. Alvares, Homo Faber: Technology and Culture in India, China and the West, 1500 to the Present Day, Allied Publishers, 1979.

      Gopalakrishnan (2006). Inventors who Revolutionised our Lives. National Book Trust

      D. Lyon, Information Society: Issues and Illusions, Polity Press, 1988.

      Biswas, Arun Kumar (Edited), 2001, History, Science and Society in the Indian Context : A Collection of Papers, The Asiatic Society, xv, 474 p, ISBN : 8172361033.

      D. MacKenzie and J. Wajcman (eds.), The Social Shaping of Technology, The Open University Press, 1999.

      H. Rose and S. Rose, The Political Economy of Science: Ideology of/in the Natural Sciences, The Macmillan Press Ltd., 1976.

      W. Bijker, T.P Hughes and T. Pinch (eds.), The Social Construction of Technological Systems: New Directions in the Sociology and History of Technology, The MIT Press, 1989.

      Yash Pal and Rahul Pal (2013) Random Curiosity. National Book Trust

      Hakob Barseghyan, Nicholas Overgaard, and Gregory Rupik () Introduction to History and Philosophy of Science

      John Avery {2005). Science and Society, 2nd Edition, H.C. 0rsted Institute, Copenhagen.

       I. Hacking, The Social Construction of What?, Harvard University Press, 2001.

      7. E.J. Hackett, O. Amsterdamska, M. Lynch and J. Wajcman (eds.), The Handbook of Science and Technology Studies, The MIT Press, 2008.

      Dharampal (2000). Indian Science and Technology in the Eighteenth Century, OIP.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

      Philosophy of science:

https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/doing-good-science/what-is-philosophy-ofscienceand- should-scientists-care/ http://abyss.uoregon.edu/~js/21st_century_science/lectures/lec01.html

https://wps.ablongman.com/wps/media/objects/1449/1483820/18 2.pdf 47

      Myths vs. facts:

https://www .science lea rn.org. nz/resources/415-myths-of-the-natu re-of-science

      History of technology:

https://www. vis ua lea pita list.com/history-of-tech no logy-earliest-tools-modernage/

      Water harvesting:

https://worldwaterreserve.com/introduction-to-rainwater-harvesting/

      Public Health:

https ://www .ajpmon Ii ne.org/a article/S07 49-3 797 ( 11)00514-9/full text https ://study.com/academy /lesson/public-health-vs-medicinedifference-similarities. htm I https ://www .deepc.org. in/video-tutorials/public-health

      Food Security:

 https://www.concern.net/news/what-food-security Energy: https://www.nrdc.org/stories/renewable-energy-clean-facts

Evaluation Pattern

ourse Code and Title


Assessment Details

 

CIA

20 Marks

MSE

50 Marks

CIAII

20 Marks

ESE

50 Marks

 

Group

Assignment

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

Individual

Assignment

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

 

LIB142 - PERFORMATIVE ARTS-I (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
  • To develop emotional intelligence. 

  • Cultivate skills for life-long learning, entrepreneurship and employability through professionally oriented courses, 

  • To equip themselves to face the challenges of society and the professional world by practising self-awareness, personal integrity, positive attitude, and respect for peers through curricular engagements.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate the importance of performative arts

CO2: Critically reflect on the valuable life skills

CO3: Build Confidence through Performative Arts

CO4: Creativity and Freedom of expression

CO5: Develop Emotional intelligence

CO6: Foster Bonding

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Understanding Music
 

 

  1. History of Western Classical Music

  2. History of Music Notations

  3. Classical Music in 1800’s & 1900’s 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Exploring Music
 
  1. Music and Mental Health.

  2.  Different types of Instruments

  3. Theory of Music

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Understanding Dance
 

What is Performance Art ?

 

Origin of dance as a Performing art in the West and East

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Exploring Dance Forms
 

 

History of Classical Indian arts: Bharathanatyam , Kuchipudi, Kathak, Odissi, Kalaripayattu, Chauu

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Introduction
 

An Introduction to theatre.

2.      Different departments in the theatre.

3.      Exploring the basics of acting.

4.      Theatre Appreciation

 

5.      Costume Designing in the theatre.

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

Introduction to Music Therapy. 3rd edition. William B Davis

An Actor Prepares – Constantin Stanislavsky

Applied Theatre Aesthetics – Gareth White

A practical Handbook for the Actor – Melissa Bruder

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

Introduction to Music Theory, ABRSM-  Grade 1-5.

 

Evaluation Pattern

A continious asssment process involving subssion paper and practicals. Marks division is as follows:

CIA 1- 20

CIA 2- 25

CIA 3- 20

CIA 4- 35

LIB161-1B - BASIC MATHEMATICS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

This is the first of a compulsory two-course sequence. This paper aims to transmit the body of basic mathematics at the undergraduate level. The course aims at introducing the application of mathematical techniques in general.

 

CourseObjectives:

The course aims to help students to:

 

  • understand basic skills in applied mathematics;

  • understand the mathematical techniques that are used in Economics. 

Course Outcome

CO1: Examine the basic mathematical methods.

CO2: To promote differentiation, engagement, and collaborative learning in Mathematical methods.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Unit I: Preliminaries
 

Fundamental Theorem of Arithmetic, zeros of a polynomial; relationship between zeros and coefficients of quadratic polynomials; Pair of linear equations in two variables and graphical method of their solution, consistency/inconsistency; standard form of a quadratic equation; solutions of quadratic equations (only real roots) by factorization, and by using quadratic formula; motivation for studying Arithmetic Progression; derivation of the nth term and sum of the first n terms of A.P. and their application in solving daily life problem.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit II: Sets and Functions:
 

 

Sets and their representations, Empty set, finite and Infinite sets, Equal sets, Subsets, Subsets of a set of real numbers especially intervals (with notations). Universal set; Venn diagrams. Union and Intersection of sets. Difference of sets. Complement of a set; Properties of Complement. Ordered pairs; Cartesian product of sets; function as a special type of relation. Pictorial representation of a function, domain, co-domain and range of a function; real valued functions, domain and range of these functions, constant, identity, polynomial, rational, modulus, signum, exponential, logarithmic and greatest integer functions, with their graphs. fundamental principle of counting. Factorial n. (n!) Permutations and combinations, derivation of formulae for nPr and nCr and their connections, simple applications.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Unit III: Algebra- Matrices and Determinants
 

 

Concept, notation, order, equality, types of matrices, zero and identity matrix, transpose of a matrix, symmetric and skew symmetric matrices. Operation on matrices: Addition and multiplication and multiplication with a scalar. Simple properties of addition, multiplication and scalar multiplication. Determinant of a square matrix (up to 3 x 3 matrices), minors, co-factors and applications of determinants in finding the area of a triangle. Adjoint and inverse of a square matrix. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Unit IV: Problem Solving in Workshop Mode
 

 

Workshop model combines direct instruction with hands-on and student-centered learning opportunities. The workshop begins with a mini-lesson delivered by the teacher, followed by a large block of time devoted to small group learning. It ends with a brief closure activity, or summary.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Mathematics - Textbook for class X - NCERT Publication.

Guidelines for Mathematics Laboratory in Schools, class X - CBSE Publication.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Mathematics exemplar problems for class XII, NCERT publication.

 

Evaluation Pattern

 

Assessment Details

CIA

20 Marks

MSE

50 Marks

CIAII

20 Marks

ESE

50 Marks

Group

Assignment

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

Individual

Assignment

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

LIB162-1B - SUSTAINABLE LIFE SKILLS/PUPPETRY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:0

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course has been designed taking into consideration the need to nurture and enhance some of the skills which are necessary for a society to function and individuals to interact with their immediate spaces and society at large. This course is an amalgamation of both personal and professional aspects and therefore would engage with questions of personal and professional integrity, social interactions, and harmonious living, so on and so forth.

Course Objectives:

The course is designed to:

  • Enhance social interaction skills.
  • Develop social awareness and sensitivity.
  • Nurture best academic, professional, and personal practices.

Course Outcome

CO1: Display cross-cultural interaction abilities.

CO2: Conduct several activities which have a positive social impact.

CO3: Construct arguments, activities, and exercises which display a thorough understanding of the best practices in multiple domains.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
The nature of the discipline
 

The nature of the discipline (English/Political Science/History)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
The current trends in the field
 

New Developments and its relevance 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
The prospective employment opportunities
 

Discipline specific career opportunities

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
The needs of the immediate spaces of engagement
 

The needs of the immediate spaces of engagement with interdisciplinary approach 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
National and global skill ecosystem
 

Skills required working at national and global levels

Text Books And Reference Books:

---

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

---

Evaluation Pattern

General Evaluation Pattern: Unit-Wise Continuous Evaluation

The evaluation will be based on the assessments formulated by the PTC student-instructors who facilitate each unit in the class. A continuous evaluation pattern will be followed whereby after the completion of each unit, an assignment will follow. The assessment will be done based on predefined rubrics and the score sheet needs to be tabulated. The cumulative score sheet is to be prepared at the end of the semester and the final Skill Development Score is to be computed.

LIB182-1B - PRINCIPLES OF LIBERAL ARTS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:1
Max Marks:100
Credits:0

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The concept of a liberal education has been traditionally understood as teaching and learning aimed at developing the knowledge and capacities of free individuals. For much of the twentieth century, liberal arts education also signified study in academic arts and sciences subjects primarily, with liberal learning intentionally holding itself apart from pre-professional and vocational concerns. In curricular terms, a liberal education combines breadth and depth of inquiry through general education and the major, with the former often being seen as a prelude to the latter. Typically, arts and sciences departments provide courses that fulfill general education requirements aimed at promoting capacities for life-long learning. Increasingly, higher education also has emphasized the development of various intellectual skills, which also are described as fundamental to a liberal education.

 

We will begin the semester by exploring the basic nature and intent of a liberal arts education. This theme will be used as a springboard for the application of a liberal arts education to (1) perceptions on ways of knowing, (2) perceptions of culture and (3) perceptions of self and community. This set of lectures aim to introduce students to Liberal Arts Education and its history. Students will be introduced to Liberal Arts thinking and how it differs from traditional discipline-based thinking. The lectures are structured around areas of intellectual debate.

Course Outcome

CO1: To formulate your own understanding of the process of learning and the purpose of a liberal arts education.

CO2: To be able to identify and evaluate different ways of knowing as well as the strengths and weaknesses of each

CO3: To appreciate what the various disciplines of a liberal arts education have to offer (humanities, arts, sciences, etc.), analyze the strengths of each, learn how and why we should make connections between each discipline

CO4: To analyze interactions between individuals and communities, as well as communities and different cultures

CO5: To use multiple perspectives to explore, evaluate, assess, and summarize our culture as well as others

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Liberal Arts and Education
 

 

This unit will initiate the students to understand and reflect on the philosophy behind the inception of Liberal Arts Education- it will bring in narratives from ideas across the world, as well as the ones from local situations - with case studies giving special focus to gender, human values and ecological concerns.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Beginning of Ideas: Perspectives from the East and the West
 

This unit focuses on the philosophies and philosophers that changed the world and its trajectories, including key debates. It also delves into the great impact it had at a global level, but keeping the details of the local and regional narratives in mind. It also cross-cuts into issues of gender, caste, class and ethics in society with the discussions on various case studies

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
The Many After-lives
 

 

This unit delves further into the consequences of the ideas of Liberal Arts that created a new world order. With the help of simulation activities, and engaging with primary source material, the unit will take up case studies which are both local, regional, national and global and ponder over the effects it had, especially keeping human values, ecological balance and gender aspects.

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

  • Apple, W. "A Narrow Focus on Vocational Goals" in Edutopia: A Manifesto for the Reform of Public Education Lane, J. 1987. 

  • "The Yale Report of 1828 and Liberal Education: A Neorepublican Manifesto" in History of Education Quarterly 27.3

  • Veysey, L. 1973. "Stability and Experiment in American Undergraduate Curriculum" in Content and Context: Essays on College Education, ed. Carl Kaysen. 

  • Schmidt, G.P. 1957. The Liberal Arts College: A chapter in American cultural history.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

  • Sloan, D. "Harmony, Chaos, and Consensus: The American College Curriculum" in Teachers College Record 73 (Dec. 1971): 221-51

  • "The Regina Beach Manifesto": A Policy for the Liberal Arts (1963) Kimball, B.A. 2010. 

  • The Liberal Arts Tradition: A Documentary History Peterson, P.M. 2012. "Liberal Arts Education in the Undergraduate Curriculum" in Confronting Challenges to the Liberal Arts Curriculum

Evaluation Pattern

Submission

ENG184-2 - LANGUAGE AND CONTEMPORARY SOCIETY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Language and Contemporary Society is a course offered for the second semester students of the BA/BSc programmes (ENGH, ECOH, EPH, EMP, JOUH, PSYH) that introduces students to a wide range of expository, analytical and fictional and non-fictional works to develop their knowledge of rhetoric and make them aware of the power of language. The course is designed to meet the rigorous requirements of graduate-level courses and therefore includes expository, analytical, personal, and argumentative texts from a variety of authors and cultural contexts. It would provide students with the opportunity to work with the rhetorical situation, examining the authors’ purposes as well as the audiences and the subjects in texts. The course is designed to engage students with rhetoric in varied genres, including essays, poetry, documentary and short story. The students would develop a sense to comprehend how a resource of language operates in any given text. The course is more thematic in nature familiarising students with texts from multiple disciplines, especially in the context of India.

Course Outcome

CO1: Critically engage with some of the existing rhetorics within the socio-political and cultural context of India.

CO2: Compose expository, analytical, and argumentative compositions that reflect divergent manifestations of the contemporary Indian socio-cultural milieu.

CO3: Demonstrate the ability to move effectively through the stages of the writing process with careful attention to inquiry and research, drafting, revising, editing, and review.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Questions of knowledge and Language
 

The unit aims to sensitise the students about the evolving politics of education in the regional, national and global contexts through expository, argumentative and analytical texts. The texts in the unit will also address larger questions of exclusion, intellectual freedom and of emerging technologies.

  1. Robert Anderson. “ The ‘Idea of a University’ today”
  2. Krishna Kumar. (2022). “Politics of Knowledge”
  3.  Chandra Bhan Prasad (2006) “Hail English, The Dalit Goddess” (Essay)

http://www.anveshi.org.in/hail-english-the-dalit-goddess/

  1. M Madhava Prasad (2015) Language, the Political Commons

https://www.anveshi.org.in/language-the-political-commons/

  1. Deutsche, Welle. (2023) “AI experts say ChatGPT is changing education. But how?” -Chat GPT and Academic Writing

https://frontline.thehindu.com/news/ai-experts-say-chatgpt-is-changing-education-but-how/article66449967.ece

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Question of Margins
 

The unit will engage the students with the discourses on the cross-cutting issues of caste, gender, food and marginality through short stories and poems which bring out different manifestations of the issues in the local and national contexts.

  1. Huchangi Prasad. (2019) Children of God Tran. by Chandan Gowda
  2. Sky Baba (2013) Vegetarians only (Short Story) (Minority/Life choice/Food politics)
  3. Ranajit Das: “Sherlock Holmes India Trip” (Rural Indian poverty, questions of gender, Bengali poem in translation)
  4. Ruskin Bond (1988) “The Night Train at Deoli” (Short Story reflecting the romantic humanist attitude of the educated middle class towards the downtrodden)
  5. Pallavi Rao (2017) “Politics of the Intimate Pt. 3: The Brahmin Mistress and the Bahujan Maid”(Essay) (Caste)

https://medium.com/@pallavirao84/politics-of-the-intimate-pt-3-the-brahmin-mistress-and-the-bahujan-maid-6becf6e2fbcb

Teaching learning strategies:

Lecture, discussions and readings

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Questions of Social Justice
 

The unit deals with varied questions of social justice through essays, speeches and poems. The texts are selected from global, regional and local contexts to enhance the understanding of contemporary issues of India and help the learners to gain the understanding of human values of the marginalised sections such as workers in unorganised sector, of the society.

  1. Jayati Ghosh (2016) On Anti-National Economics (Essay) (Economic policy)

http://www.frontline.in/columns/Jayati_Ghosh/antinational-economics/article8356541.ece

  1. Gopal Honnalgere: “The Convicts” (a poem on social justice in peril by Kannada poet)
  2. Sitakant Mahapatra: “The Election” (Poem on Rural India and Corrupted Politics)
  3. Ben Rowen. 2019. The Fault in Our Star Names. https://psmag.com/social-justice/the-fault-in-our-star-names
  4. P Sainath. Wrestling with the rural economy (2013)

https://ruralindiaonline.org/en/articles/wrestling-with-the-rural-economy/

Teaching learning strategies:

Reading, Debate and Discussion

Text Books And Reference Books:

Texts prescribed in the course

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

James Lovelock. The Coming Age of Hyperintelligence. MIT, 2019.

Michio Kaku. Physics of the Future:  How Science Will Shape Human Destiny and Our Daily Lives by the Year 2100, Anchor Academic Publishing, 2012.

Roshan Kishore (2017) “How a Bihari Lost his Mother Tongue to Hindi” (Essay)

http://www.livemint.com/Leisure/Nl73WC1JA8d6KVybBycNlM/How-a-Bihari-lost-his-mother-tongue-to-Hindi.html

Sen, Orjit and Pakhi Sen (2021) “Hear of Light”. (Graphic Narrative)

https://indianculturalforum.in/2021/02/02/heart-of-light/

R. Shashank Reddy. (2017) “Why India Needs a Strategic Artificial Intelligence Vision”.

https://thewire.in/tech/india-artificial-intelligence

Hariharan, Githa and Salim Yusufji. (2019). Battling for India.  Speaking Tiger: New Delhi.

Kakkoos (2017) by Divya Bharthi (Documentary) (Caste)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-UYWRoHUpkU

Raja Rao: What does it mean to be Queer (2019)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SMIuFl3m_U4

The Collected Poems of Gopal Honnalgare. Edited by K A Jayaseelan. Poetrywala, 2020

Shashi Tharoor (2015) Speech in Oxford (Speech)

http://www.ibtimes.co.in/shashi-tharoor-garners-appreciation-his-spirited-argument-oxford-union-debate-full-text-640299

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-I (10 Marks)

CIA II/MSE (50 Marks)

CIA-III (10 Marks)

ESE (50 Marks)

Attendance 5 Marks

Submission mode.

Can be an individual assignment or a group assignment with an additional individual component. Marks reduced to 5 in the final tallying.

 

 

Centralized exam.

Section A: 2x 10 marks

Section B: 1x 15 marks

Section C: 1 x 15 marks

There can be choices in Section A and B. Section C will have a compulsory question

Marks reduced to 20 in the final tallying.

Students will be tested on their conceptual clarity, theoretical engagements, application and analysis of given texts and contexts. 

Submission mode.

Can be an individual assignment or a group assignment with an additional individual component.

Marks reduced to 5 in the final tallying.

Centralized exam.

Section A: 2x 10 marks

Section B: 1x 15 marks

Section C: 1 x 15 marks

There can be choices in Section A and B. Section C will have a compulsory question.

Marks reduced to 25 in the final tallying.

Students will be tested on their conceptual clarity, theoretical engagements, application and analysis of given texts and contexts. 

Taken from KP

LIB103-2B - READING INDIA (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

It can be reasonably argued that in India, from the beginning of its civilizational enterprise, nothing has remained singular for too long. Whether God or religion, philosophy or metaphysics, language or custom, cuisine or costume, every realm is marked by plurality. It is impossible, therefore, to talk about the ‘Indian’ tradition: there are multiple traditions, all authentically and robustly Indian. Central to the plural tradition, or sensibility, is the notion that there are many ways of looking at and living in the world. Plurality accommodates differences; and differences, in their turn, embody and enact dissent. Even in the ‘Nasadiya Sukta’, a major verse in the Rig Veda, the Vedic seers inserted a deeply metaphysical note of dissent – which arose because multiple perspectives on diversity was always accepted.

But despite this, our image of the present is one which is tied to a series of contemporary assumptions and as a result can become restrictive and limited – especially when we try to understand what the identity of being an Indian subscribes to, especially in the contemporary context. And this precisely where the danger of mixing faith, religion, beliefs with politics of identity begins. Especially when we keep in mind that – in this Nation – often ‘dissent’ has been either directly suppressed, by terming it anti-national, or the state has kept quiet when Dalits and minorities have been attacked, often brutally. A lot of this is sought to be justified on the grounds that Indian traditions, especially religious ones are being wrongly interpreted, and that there’s an urgent need to correct such distortions and prevent a civilizational collapse. Also central to this enterprise is propaganda and distortion of history. A massive cultural amnesia is often spread through biased, unpardonably partisan cultural events, education and media. Majority communities are told repeatedly that they have been wronged, discriminated against and unjustly treated. Selective facts and figures are being brazenly propagated by certain groups that have appropriated the right to speak for all.

Part of the problem lies in how we are educating our younger generations as well. And towards this end, this course seeks to engage the students with the myriad ways in which the past, though no longer present – is a presence in our lives today. This course is specifically designed to introduce students to methodologies that are required for understanding the Indian identity and history as a multiple, layered, and often a contested set of representations. The course is built as an in-depth series of case studies, with the aim of bringing together three distinct areas of analytical questions that are implied by its title’s key terms – ‘history’, ‘memory’ and ‘identity’. Questions like – what are main approaches to social and cultural memory of this Nation? What, and whose history is being remembered and narrated? And in this quagmire, how should the Indian identity be understood? – would be the prime focus of the course.

Course Objectives

This course attempts to

·       Emphasize discourses on communities, uniqueness and exceptionality, including the myths of origin and of cultural exclusivity, narratives of national history and even pantheons of national heroes, in the creation of an Indian memory and identity from earliest times to today.

·       Engage with the notions of empire and post-coloniality, (post)socialism and (neo)liberalism as equally distinct forms of historical memory organization, with their own repertoires of referential imagery and understandings of boundaries.

·       Explore the issues of memory of war, communal clashes and ethnic conflict. Archive, film, body and material objects, including buildings, are approached as culturally-specific memory devices and contested sites for historical memory, in turn leading to the construction of the said Indian identity.

·       Acquaint the students with religious diversity and politicization, as it becomes a topic of enormous contemporary relevance, with implications for the construction of national/international identity and responsibilities.

·       Further, to educate students on the dangers of history when misused in the construction of national and other group identities – especially when religion and politics are intermixed, and ‘us and them’ dichotomies of difference are created and mobilized in mass atrocities.

·       Make students understand that deconstructing the Indian identity is not only valuable for their own social, moral, and intellectual development, it also serves as a foundation for examining the choices made by individuals and groups in the past as well as in the present.

·       And finally, to make the student aware of the complexities in reconstructing the past of a nation and to enable the learner to problematize the past as a non-monolithic entity.

Course Outcome

CO1: Critically engage with representations of the Indian past in the present, to enable them to analyze and use evidence in interrogating historical accounts and memory of the present Nation.

CO2: Examine the memories of their own past and its multiple perspectives, which will enable them to read, write and reflect on the past; or in other words, make it more difficult for them to fall prey to the dangers of rhetoric and post-truth discourses.

CO3: Trace the evolution of identity and memory, and how they factor into our historical understandings and thereby condition the present-day policies and decision-making.

CO4: Critically reflect and engage with the interface between the past and the present, fostering a healthy appreciation for history and its imprint on our present world.

CO5: Analyze the interaction between history, memory and politics when following the news and in examining historical cases.

CO6: Develop the ability to generate concepts and theoretical models, to test new methods and tools for professional and research-based activities.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Echoes of the Past: Odds and Ends
 

a)    Mapping the Terrain: India, Bhārata, Hindustan, Āryāvarta?

b)    Framing and Reframing Identity: Contested Place of Memory – Individual to Collective.

c)     Unstuck in Time: How to Narrate the Past? – Sources; Periodization; Multiple Pasts.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Turning the Time-turner: Earliest ?Indian? Memories
 

a)    Archaeological Imagination: Indus Valley Civilization – The State Conundrum in History

b)    Mind in Material: Social Formations and Transitions – Vedic Age – Which of us are Aryans?

c)     Peopling the Past: Religion and State – Asokan Legacies and the Mauryans; The Shining Golden Guptas; The Empire-building Colās.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
An Era of Darkness? Life in Medieval ?India?
 

a)    Constructed Time - The Problematic Medieval; Accommodations of Difference – Medieval in North and South Indian Subcontinent.

b)    Negotiating Space: Power and Privilege of Immunity in Indian Feudal Society.

c)     The Other Empires: Age of Wrath? – The Sultanate; The Last Glorious Age? – The Mughals.

d)    The Forgotten Variable: Indian Ocean and its Many Histories.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
British India: The Haunting
 

a)    Colonizing Knowledges: Racializing the ‘Other’; Latent and Manifest Orientalism.

b)    Endgames of Empire Building: British Revenue Systems; Commercialization of Agriculture, Deindustrialization; and Famines.

c)     Tryst with Destiny: Formation of ‘National Identity’; Burgeoning of the Press; a New Social Order.

d)    Birth of a Nation: Making of Indian Identity; Struggling for Independence; Experiencing Freedom.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Rhetoric of the Past: Whose History?
 

a)    Engendering the Past: The Many Voices of the Fringes.

b)    Devotion to Dissent – The Multivariate Class and Caste Movements through Ages.

c)     Re-Visioning the Silences of History: Tribal histories; Partition Narratives; Oral traditions; Folklore.

d)    Affecting and Effecting the Future: Making Choices – Can Indian Identity and History Belong to any One Group?

Text Books And Reference Books:

·      Guha, Ranajit (ed). 1997. A Subaltern Studies Reader 1986-1995, Minnesota: University of Minnesota Press.

·      Habib, Irfan. 2008. Medieval India: The Study of a Civilization, New Delhi: National Book Trust.

  • Metcalf, Barbara D., Thomas R. Metcalf. 2006. A Concise History of Modern India. 2nd Edition, New York: Cambridge University Press.

·      Roy, Kumkum (ed). 2011. Insights and Interventions: Essays in Honour of Uma Chakravarti, New Delhi: Primus Books.

  • Sarkar, Sumit. 2002. Modern India, 1885-1947, New Delhi: Macmillan India.

·      Thapar, Romila. 2003. Early India, From the Origins to AD 1300, New Delhi: Penguin.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

·      Alam, Muzaffar. 2014. The Languages of Political Islam in India c. 1200-1800. Ranikhet: Permanent Black.

·      Asher, C.B. and C. Talbot (eds). 2006. India before Europe, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

  • Bandyopadhyay, Sekhar. 2004. From Plassey to Partition: A History of Modern India. New Delhi: Orient Longman.

·      Bayly, Christopher A. 1990. Indian Society and the Making of the British Empire, (The New Cambridge History of India Series), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

  • Chandra, Bipan, Mridula Mukherjee, Aditya Mukherjee, K.N. Panikkar, and Sucheta Mahajan. 1989. India’s Struggle for Independence, New Delhi: Penguin.
  • Chandra, Bipan, Mridula Mukherjee, and Aditya Mukherjee. 1999. India After Independence 1947 – 2000, New Delhi: Penguin.

·      Chattopadhyaya, B.D. 1998. Representing the Other? Sanskrit Sources and the Muslims: Eighth to Fourteenth Century), Delhi: Manohar.

·      Chaudhuri, K.N. 1985. Trade and Civilisation in the Indian Ocean: An Economic History from the Rise of Islam to 1750, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

·      Eaton, R.M. 2000. Essays on Islam and Indian History, New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

·      Fritz, J.M. and G. Michell, (ed). 2001. New Light on Hampi: Recent Research at Vijayanagara, Mumbai: Marg Publications.

·      Guha, Ramachandra. 2011. India After Gandhi, New Delhi: Macmillan.

·      Jaiswal, Suvira. 2000. Caste: Origin, Function and Dimensions of Change, New Delhi: Manohar.

·      Kulke, Hermann. 2001. Kings and Cults: State Formation and Legitimation in India and Southeast Asia, New Delhi: Manohar.

·      Lal, Ruby. 2005. Domesticity and Power in the Early Mughal World, (Cambridge Studies in Islamic Civilization), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

·      Metcalf, Thomas 1995. Ideologies of the Raj, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

·      Pollock, Sheldon (ed). 2003. Literary Cultures in History: Reconstructions from South Asia, Berkeley: University of California Press.

·      Ratnagar, Shereen. 2002. Understanding Harappa; Civilization in the Greater Indus Valley, New Delhi: Tulika.

·      Roy, Kumkum (ed). 1999. Women in Early Indian Societies, New Delhi: Manohar.

·      Sarkar, Sumit and Tanika Sarkar (eds). 2007. Women and Social Reform in India, Vol I and II, Ranikhet: Permanent Black.

·      Sharma, R. S. 1980. Indian Feudalism (circa 300 – 1200), Manipal: Macmillan.

·      Sharma, R. S. 2007. Material Culture and Social Formations in Ancient India, 2nd Edition, New Delhi: Macmillan.

·      Thapar, Romila. 2000. History and Beyond, New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

·      Thapar, Romila. 2013. The Past Before Us: Historical Traditions of Early North India, New Delhi: Permanent Black.

·      Trautmann, Thomas. 2005. The Aryan Debate: Debates in Indian History and Society, New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA - Evaluation Pattern

Assignment 1

Assignment 2

Total

20

20

40

 

Mid Semester Examination

Submission

Presentation

Total

30

20

50

 

End Semester Examination

Submission

Presentation

Total

30

20

50

 

LIB104-2B - FOUNDATIONS OF POLITICAL THOUGHT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

This course offers an introduction to the history of political ideas from the world ranging from ancient to modern political thought. Close readings of the canon allow us to discuss enduring questions regarding freedom, equality, legitimacy, political economy, and liberalism. Particular attention is paid to the development of political liberalism by western thinkers such as Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Kant, Machiavelli, Mill, Marx and Engels, Indian thinkers as Kautilya, Mahatma Phule,  Dr. B.R. Ambedkar. Justice M.G. Ranade, G,K. Gokhale, Bal Gangadhar Tilak, Sri Aurobindo, Mahatma Gandhi, Vinoba Bhave, Ram Manohar Lohia, Acharya Narayan Dev, R.P. Dutt and M.N. Roy as well as the radical critiques of liberalism advanced by traditionalism, socialism, feminism, and critical race theory. The course concludes with a look at the continuing impact of these canonical thinkers on contemporary political thought. The course will be pondering on the Indian and western construction of political thought. 

Course Outcome

CO1: Analyze the values that inform political institutions, behavior, and policies

CO2: Identify the values, practices, and institutions that selected ideologies promote.

CO3: Explicate Indian and Western political thought on similar theory.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Ancient and Medieval Political thought: The Foundations of Sustainable Society
 

 

  1. Greek, Roman and Indian thought

  2. Plato, Aristotle

  3. Polybius, Cicero

  4. Kautilya, Machiavelli

  5. St.Thomas Aquinas, Dante Alighieri

  6. Neethishastra, Manusmriti and Upanishads

  7. Ziauddin Barani, Abu Fazl, Ramabai

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Liberalism and Communism: Towards Zero Poverty and Democratic Ideals
 

 

  1. Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau and J S Mill

  2. Kant, Marx, Engels, 

  3.  Ram Manohar Lohia, Acharya Narayan Dev, R.P. Dutt

  4. Indian thinkers and liberalism (M G Ranade,  Periyar, G K Gokhale)

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Equality and Justice : Enroute Inclusivity
 

 

  1. Tocqueville, Roberto Esposito, Rawls

  2. Mahatma Phule, Dr B R Ambedkar, M N Roy

Text Books And Reference Books:

Singh, M. P., & Roy, H. (2011). Indian Political Thought: Themes and Thinkers. Pearson Education India.

2. Chaurasia, R. (2003). History of Political Thought. Atlantic Publishers & Dist.

3. Jayapalan, N. (2000). Indian Political Thinkers: Modern Indian Political Thought. Atlantic Publishers & Dist.

4. Malik, S. K., & Tomar, A. (2021). Revisiting Modern Indian Thought: Themes and Perspectives. Taylor & Francis.

5.McClelland, J. S., & Mcclelland, J. S. (2005). A History of Western Political Thought. Routledge.

6.Nelson, B. R. (2015). Western Political Thought: From Socrates to the Age of Ideology, Second Edition. Waveland Press.

7.Wood, E. M. (2022). A Social History of Western Political Thought. Verso Books.

 

8. Balot, R. K. (2012). A Companion to Greek and Roman Political Thought. John Wiley & Sons.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Singh, A., & Mohapatra, S. (2010). Indian Political Thought: A Reader. Taylor & Francis US.

2. Pantham, T., & Deutsch, K. L. (1986). Political Thought in Modern India. SAGE Publications Pvt. Limited.

3. Suda, J. P. (1963). Main Currents of Social & Political Thought in Modern India: The liberal and national traditions.

4. Weber, L. (2018). Western Political Thought. Scientific e-Resources.

 

5. Salkever, S. (2009). The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Political Thought. Cambridge University Press.

Evaluation Pattern

Question Bank

LIB122-2B - PYTHON PROGRAMMING (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Build basic programs using fundamental programming constructs like variables, conditional logic, looping, and functions.

Work with user input to create fun and interactive programs.

Create simple games with images, animations, and audio using our custom beginner-friendly programming library, Wizardlib.

Course Outcome

CO1: Describe the history and evolution of computer

CO2: Foundational knowledge of Boolean Algebra

CO3: Analyse and interpret everyday technology in terms of computational thinking

CO4: Inculcate computational thinking in their approach to solving problems

CO5: Demonstrate a foundational knowledge of Python as a programming language

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
History and evolution journey of computers
 

A detailed discussion on the history and evolution of the computer. We will also discuss about the industrial impacts computers are making in day to day life.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Computational Logic
 
  1. What is logic?
  2. Boolean algebra and mathematical representation of logic
  3.  What is a procedure and Process Flowchart
  4. Introduction to programs and applications.
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:7
Introduction to Computer Components
 

Learn more about the OS and programming paradigms used across the industry

  1. Hardware
  2. Operation System
  3. Programming paradigms
  4. Types of languages – Python/Java/C/C++/JavaScript
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Problem-Solving
 

learn to write algorithms and flow charts for the real world problems.

  1. Introduction
  2. Steps for Problem-Solving
  3. Algorithm
  4. Representation of Algorithms (Flowcharts)
  5. Flow of Control 
Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Computers: The Life Story of a Technology by Eric G. Swedin and David L. Ferro
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.     Boolean Algebra and Its Applications By J. Eldon Whitesitt · 2010

Evaluation Pattern

Question Bank/Submission

LIB143-2B - BASIC STATISTICAL METHODS USING MS EXCEL (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

This course on statistical methods using MS Excel begins with basic concepts and terminology related to statistical analysis and inference. Then a detailed discussion of descriptive statistics starting from measures of central tendency to skewness and kurtosis is given in the second module. A separate module has been developed to deal with identifying the nature and the extent of the relationship between variables (correlation and regression analysis). MS Excel will be used to give a practical oriented approach to the subject.

 

Course Objectives:

This course has been designed to help students to:

 

  • demonstrate an understanding of the basic elements of data reading and visualisation.

  • apply summary statistics to describe the problem through data.

  • quantify the relationship between variables to test theory(ies).

Course Outcome

CO 1: explain basic elements of data reading and illustrate data through graphical representation.

CO 2: apply methods related to MCT and dispersion to describe the problems through data representation.

CO 3: quantify the relationship between variables using correlation and regression analyses to test theory(ies).

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Introduction and Overview
 

Meaning; Scope of statistics; Importance and limitation of statistics Collection of Data: Planning and organizing a statistical enquiry; Methods of collecting primary data; Sources of secondary data; Sampling: Census method vs. sample method; Classification of data: Meaning, methods of classification; Tabulation of data: meaning, role, parts of a table; General rules of tabulation; Presentation of data; Diagrams and graphs: General rules for construction a diagram; Types of diagrams; Types of graphs; Software applications using MS-Excel.

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Measures of Central Tendency and Dispersion
 

 

Measures of Central Tendency: Mean, Median and Mode; Geometric and Harmonic means; Measures of Dispersion: Range, interquartile range and quartile deviation, mean deviation, standard deviation and Lorenz curve, Moments, Skewness and Kurtosis; Partition Values: Quartiles; deciles; percentiles; Software applications using MS-Excel.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Correlation and Linear Regression Model
 

Correlation Analysis: Meaning, Types of correlation; Methods of studying correlation: Scatter diagram method, Karl Pearson’s coefficient of correlation, Spearman’s rank method, concurrent deviation method; Testing the significance of the correlation coefficient. Software applications using MS-Excel

Text Books And Reference Books:
  • Anderson, D. R., Sweeney, D. J., Williams, T. A., Camm, J. D., & Cochran, J. J. (2014). Essentials of Statistics for Business and Economics. Boston: Cengage Learning.

  •  Davis, G. W., Pecar, B., & Santana, L. (2014). Statistics for the social sciences using excel: A first course for South African Students. Oxford University Press Southern Africa.

  • Field, A. (2009). Discovering Statistics using SPSS. London: Sage publications.

  • Levine, D. M. (2005). Statistics for Managers Using Microsoft Excel (5th ed.). New York: Prentice

  • Lind, D. A., Waite, C. A., Marchal, W. G., & Wathen, S. A. (2005). Basic Statistics for Business & Economics. New York: McGraw-Hill.

 

  • Sharma, J. K. (2010). Fundamentals of Business Statistics. (2nded.). New Delhi: Vikas Publishing House

  • Gibbs, G. R. (2002). Qualitative Data Analysis: Explorations with NVivo. Buckingham: Open University Press Hall.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Croxton, F. E., & Cowden, D. J. (1964). Applied General Statistics. (2nd ed.). New Delhi: Prentice Hall of India Private Limited

Freund, J. E., & Perles, B. M. (2007). Modern Elementary Statistics. (12th ed.). New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Details:

 

Course Code and Title


Assessment Details

 

CIA

20 Marks

MSE

50 Marks

CIAII

20 Marks

ESE

50 Marks

 

Group

Assignment

Submission

Individual

Assignment

Submission

LIB144-2B - PERFORMATIVE ARTS-II (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course demonstrate an advanced understanding of conceptual and methodological frameworks in Performing Arts through classroom engagements, guided research and independent learning.This course will focus on applying the learning through production of a performance

Course objective:

-To Develop understanding of discourses related to contemporary social life and technologies such as ethics, privacy, surveillance, policy and citizenship through critical debates and discussions, simulations, peer engagements and activities.

-To Synthesize interdisciplinary approaches and perspectives for learning Performative Arts 

-To develop critical and creative solution-oriented thinking in research-based assignments and community-based engagements.

 

-To develop sensitivity and awareness on  sustainable practices related to performative arts, environment and diversity and inclusivity, through research and outreach endeavours

Course Outcome

CO1: Inculcating valuable life skills of understanding art forms

CO2: Build Confidence through Performative Arts

CO3: Finding the individuality/ Uniqueness.

CO4: Develop Social Sensitivity.

CO5: Learn the importance of Collaboration and feedback.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Music
 

 

  1. Distinguishing between Speaking Vs Singing.

  2.  Music theory

  3. Music Analysis and Critical Listening

  4. Singing Exercise

  5. Production

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Dance
 

 

  1. Introduction to Natyashastra

  2. The dependence of performance on culture and tradition

  3. Building choreography

  4. Production

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Theatre
 

 

  1.   Theatre and mental health.

  2.  Exploring the Navarasas in a modern context

  3. Building Script

  4. Production

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

  • Natyashastra 

  • Abhinava Darpana by Nandikeshwara. 

  • When the Body becomes all eyes by Phillip B Zarrilli.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

  • Introduction to Music Theory, ABRSM-  Grade 1-5.
Evaluation Pattern

 

Course Outcomes

Components of Assessment

CIA 1

CIA- 2

CIA 3

ESE

CO1: Include the outcome - Origin & Importance of Performative Arts, History of Classical Music, Dance & Theatre.

10

   

10

CO2: Dance, Theatre & Music as Therapeutic forms for enhancement of Mental Health.

3

 

5

10

CO3: Dance, Theatre & Music - medium for non- verbal communication, thereby improving communication skills.

2

   

10

CO4: Become effective collaborators, Performing arts, a discipline that encourages team work. 

-

5

5

10

CO5: Performing Arts - Listening / Appreciation and Critical Analysis

 

5

5

10

LIB163-2B - INTERMEDIATE MATHEMATICS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This is the first of a compulsory two-course sequence. The objective of this sequence is to transmit the body of basic mathematics that enables the study of economic theory at the undergraduate level, specifically the courses on microeconomic theory, macroeconomic theory, statistics and econometrics set out in this syllabus. In this course, particular economic models are not the ends, but the means for illustrating the method of applying mathematical techniques to economic theory in general. The level of sophistication at which the material is to be taught is indicated by the contents of the prescribed textbook

Course Outcome

CO1: interpret mathematical techniques and models for a deeper understanding of economics, especially the branches of microeconomics, macroeconomics and econometrics

CO2: build economic problems in a multivariable model and yield valuable insight about optimizing human behaviour

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Differential Calculus: Single Independent Variable Functions
 

Limits; Continuity; Curvilinear Functions; the Derivative; Rules of Differentiation; Higher order Derivatives; Optimisation; Uses of the Derivatives in Economics: Increasing and Decreasing Functions, Concavity and Convexity, Inflection points, Optimisation of Economic Functions, Relationship among Total, Marginal and Average Concepts.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Differential Calculus: Multivariable Functions
 

 

Multivariable Functions and Partial Derivatives; Rules of Partial Differentiation; Second and Higher-order differentials; Optimisation; Constrained optimisation with Multipliers; Implicit functions; Application of Partial Derivatives in Economics: Utility Maximisation, Marginal Productivity, Elasticity, Producers Equilibrium, Optimisation of Cobb Douglas and CES Production Function.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Differential Calculus: Exponential and Logarithmic Functions
 

 

Exponential and Logarithmic Functions; Solving Natural Exponential and Logarithmic Functions; Logarithmic transformation of Nonlinear Functions; Rules of Differentiation; Higher-order Derivatives, Partial Derivatives; Optimisation of Exponential and Logarithmic Functions; Logarithmic differentiation; Application in Economics: Elasticity, Alternative measures of growth, Optimal Timing, Derivation of Cobb Douglas Production Function.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Problem Solving in Workshop Mode
 

Workshop model combines direct instruction with hands-on and student-centered learning opportunities. The workshop begins with a mini-lesson delivered by the teacher, followed by a large block of time devoted to small group learning. It ends with a brief closure activity, or summary.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Chiang, A.C. & Wainwright, K. (2013). Fundamental Methods of Mathematical Economics.

(4th ed.). McGraw Hill Education (India) Private Limited.

Sydsaeter, K. & Hammond, P. (2016). Mathematics for Economic Analysis. New Delhi:

 

Pearson Education Inc.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bradley, T. (2013). Essential Mathematics for Economics and Business. London: John

Wiley & Sons.

Dowling, E. T. (2012). Schaum’s Outlines-Introduction to Mathematical Economics. (3rd

ed.). New York: McGraw Hill.

Renshaw, G. (2011). Maths for Economics. (4t h ed.). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

 

Roser, M. (2003). Basic Mathematics for Economists. (2nd ed.). New York: Routledge.

Evaluation Pattern

Question bank

LIB164-2B - STORY TELLING (SKILL DEVELOPMENT) (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The primary objective of this project is to raise awareness about historical aspects of urban neighbourhoods with the aim of enabling students to experience their surroundings from various perpsectives. Towards this, Immersive Trails is a skill development project that the students will go through across a time-period of 3-4 weeks in order to have a rich experience and learning in terms of understaning connections between urban spaces, communities, infrastructure, and environments. 

Course Outcome

CO1: ? To engage students in the foundational concepts of the UN Sustainable Development Goals

CO2: ? Through this project, students will be able to tackle the issues of informed and responsible decision-making practices as a cautious human being of this world

CO3: ? To demonstrate awareness of local, regional, national, and global needs, and within that framework act with an informed awareness of issues in the deconstruction of an identity which is not only valuable for their own social, moral,and intellectual development, it also serves as a foundation for examining the choices made by individuals and groups in the past as well as in the present ? for sustained development of any society, national or global in nature

CO4: ? To demonstrate awareness of local, regional, national, and global needs, and within that framework of the UN SDGs with an increased awareness of its practical application. It also serves as a foundation for future sustainable citizens

CO5: ? It also aims to localize the concept and its application i.e. Sustainable Development Goals in thought and action. Focusing on changes you can make right now to engage meaningfully with the SDGs in your everyday life

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:2
Historical aspects of chosen locality/neighbourhood
 

Students to walk around a guided trail of a locality within a city to observe, assimilate and learn through historical art and architectural designs of the past. Research on the same to be taken up as part of understaning any relevant material that may be available for study

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:2
Environmental aspects of locality
 

Students to assess the biodiversity, ecosystem services and livlihoods attached to trees, flora, fauna and asscoiated natural elements found in locality and connect them in terms of their historical evolution through the years. Background research to be done on any existing literature or material found in the same vein.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:2
Community engagement and learning
 

Students will engage and learn from the community in the locality on aspects of community building, conservation, preservation of physcial, social and other inter-related relationships that form the basis of local histories, urbanities and spaces.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:2
Policy and Governance
 

Students will be asked to understand the governance aspects of teh neighborhood they are trailing to engage with ideas of policy implementations, politics of decision-making on the ground and so on. This will enable them to get an in-depth and hands-on view of teh locality they are studying to enage with real-world spaces from the ground up

Text Books And Reference Books:

N/A

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

N/A

Evaluation Pattern

 

Students will submit a weekly report on their during the period of their immersive trails sessions and a final report at the end of the same. A final presentation and viva will be conducted at the culmination of the program. Marks 4 Weekly reports (10 marks each), Final report 50 marks, Presentation and Viva 10 marks

 

LIB282-2B - DESIGN THINKING_CYBER SECURITY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Cybersecurity is a popular topic, but do you know why it is essential? We are living in a digital era where data is everything. We must understand that private information is much more vulnerable than ever before. We often hear about data breaches and cases of identity theft that affect millions of consumers. The Internet has led to widespread and drastic changes in our lives. Due to its reach and coverage, more and more processes and activities in organizations large and small are shifting online. Banking and Communication sectors are just a couple of glaring examples of this development. However, the ease of use brought about by computers has brought with it a significant rise in malicious attacks on digital devices and software systems. 

 

With increased dependence on computers and the Internet, organizations are constantly exposed to high levels of business, operational and strategic risks. Hence, it is a challenge for these organizations to protect their data and systems from unauthorized access. This foundation program is geared towards generating and enhancing awareness about cyber security challenges and the concepts of cyber security and cyber ethics among the stakeholders to help them become responsible cyber citizens and participate safely and securely in the rapidly evolving information-age society. This course is in line with the directions of UGC to introduce an elementary course in cyber security at UG and PG level across all the Indian Universities/ Institutions. Thus, the course aims to address information gaps among people with respect to cyber security and can be used as a foundation course in cyber security across all the Indian Universities. The course content will contain recorded videos, which are based on the syllabus designed by the experts. All the participants, who are enrolled for the course, can take the course online. Also they can download the video/text material for later use. After the completion of each lecture, the students can clarify their doubts with the instructor, who is available online. At the end of the course, the students have an option to undergo an online test which is objective in nature. On successful completion of the exam, the student shall be provided with a certificate declaring the participation and successful completion of the course by the candidate as per the guidelines.

Course Outcome

CO1: To formulate your own understanding of the importance of cyber security, and what it means.

CO2: To be able to identify and evaluate basic network security

CO3: To appreciate the various principles of a network administration, analyze the strengths of each, learn how and why we should make connections between each of them

CO4: To analyze interactions between individuals and the internet, and summarize security risks associated with integrating systems

CO5: To appreciate the importance of security training, and addressing the security vulnerabilities in a network.

CO6: To evaluate encryption and cryptography techniques and best practices

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Cyber Security Fundamentals
 

Unit details: This unit will initiate the students to understand and reflect on the philosophy behind the idea of Cyber Security - it will bring in narratives from ideas across the world, as well as the ones from local situations - with case studies giving special focus to gender, human values and ecological concerns.

Level of Knowledge: Theory/Basic

  1. What is Cyberspace?

  2. What is Cybersecurity?

  3. Why is Cybersecurity Important?

  4. What is a Hacker?

  5. What is Malware?

 

Cyber crime and Cyber law Classification of cyber crimes

  1. Common cyber crimes- cyber crime targeting computers and mobiles, cyber crime against women and children, financial frauds, social engineering attacks, malware and ransomware attacks, zero day and zero click attacks, Cybercriminals modus-operandi ,

  2. Reporting of cyber crimes, Remedial and mitigation measures, Legal perspective of cyber crime, IT Act 2000 and its amendments

  3. Cyber crime and offences, Organisations dealing with Cyber crime 

  4. Cyber security in India, Case studies.

Level of Knowledge: Practical/Application

  1. Software Applications:

 

Teaching learning strategies:

 

  • Lectures which will complement readings, with focus on individual aspects of special interest.

  • Documentaries, films, objects and docu-dramas will be viewed, providing visual material with commentary, enriching and deepening readings and lectures.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Malware, System Hacking and Security
 

Unit details: This unit will focus on details of malware, security attacks, hacks and securty. It also delves into the great impact it had at a global level, but keeping the details of the local and regional narratives in mind. It also cross-cuts into issues of gender, caste, class and ethics in society with the discussions on various case studies.

 

Level of Knowledge: Theory/Conceptual

Malware Analysis

  • Introduction To Malware Analysis Types Of Malware

  • Virus, Worms, Backdoors, Spyware, Adware Introduction to Trojans

  • Trojans Attack Famous Cases

  • Ways a Trojan Can Get Into A System

  • Analysis Of Trojans/Virus

  • How we remove Trojans Manually

  • Security Against Malware

  • Immediate response against malware

 

Level of Knowledge: Practical/Application

 

Social Media Overview and Security

  • Social media privacy

  • Challenges, opportunities and
    pitfalls in online social network

  • Security issues related to social media

  •  Flagging and reporting of inappropriate content

  • Laws regarding posting of inappropriate content

System Hacking & Security

  • Introduction To Hacking

  • Hacking vs. Ethical hacking

  • Skill Profile of a Hacker

  • Types of Hackers

  • Some Famous Hackers and Groups

  • Introduction to Operating Systems

  • Windows & Linux Operating Systems

  • Windows Security Issues

  • Hacking Windows 10

  • System Hacking – Countermeasures, Services, Ports, Protocols

  • Firewall Configuration Monitoring System

Teaching learning strategies:

 

  • Documentaries, films, objects and docu-dramas will be viewed, providing visual material with commentary, enriching and deepening readings and lectures.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Data Security and Recovery
 

Unit details: This unit delves further into the consequences of the ideas of Security and Recovery rts that created a new world order. With the help of simulation activities, and engaging with primary source material, the unit will take up case studies which are both local, regional, national and global and ponder over the effects it had, especially keeping human values, ecological balance and gender aspects.

Level of Knowledge: Theory/Analytical

Data Security and Recovery

  • What Is Steganography

  • Alternate data stream in NTFS

  • How Attacker Hides His Data in Images and Other Formats

  • How to Find Data Which Are Hidden

  • What Is Cryptography

  • Securing Data by Using EFS and BitLocker

  • Advanced Cryptography Tools

  • Vera crypt and Trucrypt

Level of Knowledge: Practical/Application

Network Security & Hacking

  • Introduction To Networks ( LAN /WAN )

  • Understanding Communication Protocols

  • Sniffing Attacks

  • DOS & DDOS Attack

  • Mis-configuration

  • Man – In – Middle – Attacks

  • RIP attacks, IP spoofing, Mac Spoofing

  • Firewall Configuration & Maintenance

  • Network Monitoring & Analysis

  • ISP Attacks

  • Logs Maintenance

 

E - Commerce and Digital Payments

  • Elements of E-Commerce security

  • E-Commerce threats

  • E-Commerce security best practices

  • Components of digital payment and stake
    holders

  • Modes of digital payments- Banking
    Cards

  • Unified Payment Interface (UPI),
    e-Wallets

  • Unstructured Supplementary
    Service Data (USSD)

  •  Aadhar enabled payments

  • Digital payments related to common frauds and preventive measures.

Digital Devices Security , Tools and Technologies for Cyber Security

  • Password policy, Security patch management

  • Data backup, Downloading and management of third party software

  • Device security policy

Teaching learning strategies:

 

  • There will also be intensive focus on Group work/projects, small group discussion, and mock problem-solving exercises, and case study analysis.

  • Low stakes writing assignments and presentations, student seminars and workshops will be a regular feature in various courses.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Different readings will be given to the students, from time to time (mostly on a weekly basis), depending on the Case studies being discussed in class, as part of their assignments.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Different readings will be given to the students, from time to time (mostly on a weekly basis), depending on the Case studies being discussed in class, as part of their assignments.

Evaluation Pattern

Submission Project