CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH AND CULTURAL STUDIES

School of Business and Management

Syllabus for
BA (Psychology, English/Honours/Honours with Research)
Academic Year  (2023)

 
1 Semester - 2023 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBA141B MARKETING AND SELLING SKILLS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
BBA141D TALENT MANAGEMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
BBA141E UNDERSTANDING OF FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
BLS141 INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 03 100
BLS142 PRINCIPLES OF FORENSIC SCIENCE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
COM142 BRAND MANAGEMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
COM143 ENTREPRENEURSHIP DEVELOPMENT AND SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
COM144 FINANCIAL LITERACY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 03 100
COM145 CREATIVE ADVERTISEMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 45 3 100
CSC141 PROGRAMMING IN C Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
DMT141 DANCE MOVEMENT THERAPY Multidisciplinary Courses 2 3 100
DMT142 INTRODUCTION TO CARNATIC MUSIC Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
DMT143 INTRODUCTION TO ACTING Multidisciplinary Courses 2 3 100
ECO143 DEMOCRACY AND ECONOMY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
ECO145 ECOLOGY AND DEVELOPMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
ENG182-1 DEVELOPING ACADEMIC SKILLS - I Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses 2 2 50
EST101-1 LITERARY STUDIES: IDEAS AND GENRES Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
HIS141 HISTORY AND CINEMA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
LAW141 CYBER LAW Multidisciplinary Courses 3 4 100
LAW143 LABOUR AND SOCIAL WELFARE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
LAW144 ENVIRONMENTAL LAW Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
MED141 MEDIA AND POLITICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
MED142 AUDIO AND VIDEO PRODUCTION TECHNIQUES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
MED143 CELEBRITY PR Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 50
MED144 HARRY POTTER AND CONTEMPORARY ISSUES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
MED146 PUBLIC SPEAKING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
PHY141 FUNDAMENTAL OF FORENSIC PHYSICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
POL141 DEMOCRACY AND ETHICAL VALUES Multidisciplinary Courses 2 2 100
POL142 SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
POL143 SUBALTERN STUDIES: NARRATIVES OF THE COMMUNITIES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY101-1 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
PSY161-1 LIFE-SKILL EDUCATION Skill Enhancement Courses 3 3 100
SOC141 WOMEN'S ISSUES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
SOC142 CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL PROBLEMS AND CHALLENGES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
SOC143 SOCIOLOGY THROUGH CINEMA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
THE141 THEATRE APPRECIATION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
THE142 IMPROVISATION AND DEVISED THEATRE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
2 Semester - 2023 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBA142B EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE AND MANAGERIAL EFFECTIVENESS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
BBA142C FUNDAMENTALS OF DIGITAL MARKETING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
BBA142F FINANCIAL EDUCATION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
BLS143 PRINCIPLES OF HORTICULTURAL TECHNIQUES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 4 100
BLS144 PRINCIPLES OF AYURVEDA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
CHE141 CHEMISTRY IN ACTION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
COM147 E-COMMERCE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
COM148 PERSONAL TAX PLANNING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
COM150 FINANCIAL LITERACY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
DSC143 DATA VISUALIZATION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
ECO143 DEMOCRACY AND ECONOMY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
ECO146 GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 50
ECO147 THINKING THROUGH THE ENVIRONMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 50
ENG182-2 DEVELOPING ACADEMIC SKILLS - II Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses 2 2 50
EST103-2 INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL STUDIES Major Core Courses-II 4 4 100
EST201-2 POETRY AND PROSE Major Core Courses-II 4 4 100
LAW144 ENVIRONMENTAL LAW - 3 3 100
LAW146 LAW AND PRACTICE OF INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 100
LAW148 LEGAL DIMENSIONS OF MARKETING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 100
LAW149 LEGAL ASPECTS OF HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 100
LAW150C CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND HUMAN RIGHTS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
MAT141 MATHEMATICS FOR MANAGERIAL DECISIONS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
MED147 MIDDLE CINEMA IN INDIA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
MED148 LANGUAGE OF CINEMA: A VISUAL APPROACH Multidisciplinary Courses 45 3 100
MED149 INTRODUCTION TO SEMIOTICS Multidisciplinary Courses 45 3 100
MED150 ARTS APPROACHES TO PEACEBUILDING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PHY141A INTRODUCTION TO ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PHY141B RENEWABLE ENERGY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
POL141 DEMOCRACY AND ETHICAL VALUES Multidisciplinary Courses 2 2 100
POL143 POLITICS AND SOCIETY OF INDIA SINCE INDEPENDENCE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
POL144 INDIA AND THE WORLD Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 100
PSY201-2 PERSONALITY AND INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
PSY202-2 BRAIN AND BEHAVIOUR Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
SOC141 WOMEN'S ISSUES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
SOC142 CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL PROBLEMS AND CHALLENGES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
SOC143 SOCIOLOGY THROUGH CINEMA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
SW141 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK AND SOCIAL WELFARE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
SW142 INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISATIONAL BEHAVIOUR Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
THE144 ACTING FOR MEDIA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
    

    

Introduction to Program:

Psychology Majors: Psychology is offered as a major in BA dual majors programmes with an option of doing a Honours in Psychology with or without research in the fourth year of the undergraduate programme. The psychology courses aim to introduce students to the fundamental processes underlying human behaviour and familiarise them with a few emerging fields and branches of psychology. There are also practicum and skill-building courses like experimental psychology practicum and life-skills education as part of psychology majors. Students can take specialised electives from the fifth semester onwards from a pool of courses.  Students can undertake research projects and internships for the four-year BA programme. 

English Majors: The double major programmes offered to undergraduate students is to open options and to graduate in any one major of their choice. The English Studies course is combined with Psychology, Communication and Journalism to offer a wider perspective of all these courses through an intersection of these majors at all levels. (certificate level, diploma level, degree and honours). The English major will largely include courses from literary and cultural studies which is a wide spectrum of domains like gender studies, culture studies, colonial and postcolonial literatures to name a few. 

Programme Outcome/Programme Learning Goals/Programme Learning Outcome:

PO1: Demonstrate a coherent understanding and comprehensive knowledge of the fundamental theories and concepts in the discipline of psychology in a multidisciplinary learning context.

PO2: Demonstrate critical thinking, scientific inquiry and problem-solving skills by applying psychological theories and research to real-world scenarios.

PO3: Demonstrate understanding of appropriate values and ethical standards in research, practice, and academic contexts.

PO4: Demonstrate communication skills, digital and psychological literacy to achieve personal, professional, and community goals.

PO5: Demonstrate an understanding of literatures in English and translation and appreciate the role that historical context plays in the creation and interpretation of literary works.

PO6: Apply critical and theoretical approaches to the reading and analysis of literary and cultural texts in multiple genres.

PO7: Develop critical thinking and imagination through fiction and nonfiction and to familiarize students with cultural diversity.

PO8: Analyze the role that intersections among race, gender, class, sexuality, and/or national or global history play in literary studies.

Assesment Pattern

As detailed in the University student handbook

Examination And Assesments

CIA I,II, III and ESE 

As detailed in the University student handbook

BBA141B - MARKETING AND SELLING SKILLS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

This is the basic course in Marketing and Selling Skills where students will get the exposure of Marketing and sales. The subject gives them a vast and wide insight of the traditional and contemporary aspects in Marketing and sales. The input of basic fundamentals, coupled with the practical knowledge will be given to the students to help them in understanding and designing the sales & marketing tactics and strategies.

 

Course Objective:

      To understand and appreciate the concept of marketing & sales in theory and practice

      To evaluate the environment of marketing and develop a feasible marketing &selling plan 

      To understand and apply the STP of marketing (segmentation, targeting, positioning)

      To have an elementary knowledge of consumer behaviour its determinants and selling skills

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of marketing and sales principles, theories, and their practical applications (RBTL 2)

CO2: Identify the key elements of the marketing environment and their impact on marketing and selling activities. (RBTL 3)

CO3: Apply segmentation techniques to categorize target market segments effectively. (RBTL 3)

CO4: Demonstrate basic selling skills, such as effective communication and relationship building, through practical exercises and simulations. (RBTL 2)

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Unit 1: An Introduction to Marketing
 

Introduction, genesis & evolution of marketing in society, Importance and Scope of Marketing, Elements of Marketing – Need, Want, Demand, Desire, Marketing Philosophies, Mccarthy’s 4P classification, Lauterborn’s 4C’s classification & 4A’s Framework of rural marketing, Product service continuum.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Marketing Environment ? An Understanding
 

Basics of Marketing Environment, Factors Affecting Marketing Environment, Environmental analysis – SWOT & PESTLE, Marketing Environment in India, Legal & regulatory framework in India, Marketing Mix (Four Ps of Marketing).

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Unit 3: Segmentation, Targeting and Positioning
 

Market Segmentation, Basis of segmentation & its types - Demographic, Geographic, Psychographic and behavioral Segmentation etc, Targeting- Five Patterns of Target Market Selection, Positioning-Concept of Positioning, Perceptual Mapping.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Unit 4: Product Life Cycle and Consumer Behaviour
 

Product Life Cycle concept, marketing implications of PLC stages, corresponding strategies, dealing with competition, Perceptual Mapping, Consumer Behaviour – Rational V/s Emotional, Consumer proposition & acquisition process, buying motives, its types, Consumer Behaviour process

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Unit 5: Selling ? An Introduction
 

Nature, Meaning and Significance of Sales Management and Personal selling; Evolution of Sales Management, Role of Selling in Marketing, Characteristics of a successful Salesman; Types of Selling, Selling Functions, Sales Funnel; Process of Effective Selling: Sales strategies; Prospecting: Meaning, process & methods; Ways to approach a customer

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:7
Unit 6: Effective Sales management and Sales Force Organisation
 

Sales presentation; Handling objections; Closing a sale; Current issues in sales management; Case lets and applications, Meaning of Sales Force Management; Determining the sales force and size of the sales force, Introduction to: Sales organization concepts; Sales territories

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Books: 

  1. Kotler, P., & Keller, K. (2015). Marketing management 15th edition. Prentice Hall.
  2. Kotler, P. (2013). Marketing management: A south Asian perspective.  13th edition, Pearson Education India.
  3. Panda, T. K., & Sahadev, S. (2nd Edition, 2011). Sales and distribution management. Oxford Publication.
  4. Spiro, R. L., Rich, G. A., & Stanton, W. J. (12th Edition, 2008). Management of a sales force. McGraw-Hill/Irwin.

 

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Suggested Readings: 

  1. Ramaswami, S., Namakumari. S,(2013) marketing management–Global Perspective Indian Context, Macmillan Publishers India Ltd, 5th Edition
  2. Rajan Saxena, Marketing Management, (2009) 4th edition, Tata McGraw-Hill Education
  3. Etzel M.J., Walker B.J. and Stanton William J - Marketing concept & Cases special Indian 14th Edition Tata Mc Graw Hill.
  4. Czinkota, Kotabe, Marketing Management, II edition, Thomson Publications.
  5. Still, R. R., Cundiff, E. W., & Govoni, N. A. (1988). Sales management: decisions, strategies, and    cases, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall.
  6. Coughlan, A. T., Anderson, E., Stern, L. W., & Adel, I. (2006). El-Ansary. Marketing Channels. Prentice-Hall.
  7. Jobber, D., & Lancaster, G. (2007). Selling and sales management. Painos. Harlow: Pearson Education.
  8. Cron, Decarlo T. E. (2016). Sales Management concepts and cases: Wiley India
  9. Pingali Venugopal (2008). Sales and Distribution Management, Sage Publication 
Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1: 20 MARKS ( LATER CONVERTED TO 10 MARKS)

CIA 2: 20 MARKS ( LATER CONVERTED TO 10 MARKS)

CIA 3: 50 MARKS ( LATER CONVERTED TO 25 MARKS)

Attendance 5 marks 

Total 50 marks 

BBA141D - TALENT MANAGEMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Human Resource is considered as a valuable resource in every organization. The world class companies compete among themselves to attract the best talent across the globe.  They view talent as competitive differentiator and one where the acquisition, engagement, development and retention of talent is considered as a strategic priority of business.  This course exposes the students to methods and practices to acquire, engage and develop talent, focus on development of strategic leaders within an organization and also deals with how talent and knowledge can be managed effectively for the development of the organization

Course Outcome

CO 1: 1. Demonstrate an understanding of key concepts, principles and models related to talent and knowledge management

CO 2: 2. Evaluate the importance of talent management in developing organizations

CO 3: 3. Learn to apply the theories and concepts studied in the classroom to practical situations

CO 4: 4. Analyse the various talent and knowledge management practices and their value to organizations

CO 5: 5. Solve the issues pertaining to talent and knowledge management

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
Introduction to Talent Management
 

Meaning and concept of talent management, need and scope for talent management, Talent vs Knowledge, Talent management models: Process and Integrated model, Talent management initiatives, Techniques for potential appraisal, Talent management grid, Benefits of talent management.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:7
Creating Talent Management Systems
 

Building blocks for talent management strategy, Developing and implementing Effective Talent Management System, Measuring the effectiveness of talent management, creating talent management system for organizational excellence.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:7
Competency mapping and approaches to talent management
 

Competency Mapping- Meaning, Importance and Steps in competency mapping, Competency model, Role of leaders and HR in talent management, Talent Management Approaches, Mapping Business Strategies and Talent Management Strategies, Achieving competitive advantage, Best practices in talent management- Case studies

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:7
Integrating Talent and Knowledge Management
 

Introduction to knowledge management, types of knowledge, Benefits of Knowledge Management, Integrating talent management and knowledge management, Role of Information technology in talent and knowledge management.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:7
Recent Trends and Best Practices in Talent Management
 

Introduction, Use of Technology in Talent Management, Use of AI in Talent Management, Talent Management using Design Thinking

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Project Work: Field study & Report Submission
 

Experiential Learning Activity: Identifying any one organization in the manufacturing or service sector- Interacting, observing and conducting interviews with their senior HR leaders to understand how they manage and retain talent in their organizations.  

Text Books And Reference Books:

       Lance A. Berger, Dorothy Berger (2017): Talent management handbook, McGraw Hill New York.

 

       Mohapatra.M & Dhir.S (2022); Talent Management-A contemporary perspective (2022), Sage Publications

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

       Mark Wilcox (2016), Effective Talent Management: Aligning strategy, people and performance, (1st ed.), Routledge Taylor and Francis Group.

       Marshal Gold Smith and Louis Carter (2018): Best practices in talent management, A Publication of the practice institute, Pfeiffer, A Wiley Imprint.

       Atheer Abdullah Mohammed (2019), Integrating Talent and Knowledge Management: Theory and practice, Lamber Publishing co.,

       Cappeli Peter: Talent on Demand –Managing Talent in an age of uncertainty, Harvard Business press.

Sphr Doris Sims, Sphr Matthew Gay(2007),Building Tomorrow’s Talent : A Practitioner’s Guide to Talent Management and Succession Planning, Author House

Evaluation Pattern

Component

 

Maximum marks

Weightage

Total Marks in Final Grade

CIA1

20

50%

10

CIA2

20

50%

10

CIA3

50

50%

25

Attendance

5

100 %

05

Total = 50

 

BBA141E - UNDERSTANDING OF FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 Course Description: This course aims at understanding the financial statements published by Indian companies and make a meaningful understanding of the same. The course gives the initiation towards terminology in accounting and takes the readers through Income statement and Balance sheet. The interpretation of the cash flow, Income statement and Balance sheet gives the reader an understanding of fundamentals of the company and gives a sense of financial soundness or not of any company. The growing need of adherence to rules and practice of ethics in accounting in its various aspects from public practice to reporting with case studies will explain the profoundness of Ethics in Accounting and corporate reporting.

Course Outcome

1: Relate to accounting terminologies

2: Explain the components of Financial statements

3: Interpret financial statements

4: Realise the importance of ethics in accounting practices

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Terminologies in Financial Statement
 

Assets- Current assts and fixed assets, Non-current Liabilities, current liabilities, Owners Equity, shareholders fund, External equity, Return on investment, operating expenses, Normal profit, Earnings per share private -Public Investors-Income Statement-Revenue-Expenses-Profit/loss-Balance sheet- Dual aspects of the balance sheet, Significant accounting policies and principles- Full Disclosure-Standalone statements-consolidated statements.

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Understanding Income Statement and Balance sheet
 

Meaning and Purpose of Income statement- Cost of goods Sold-Gross profit, Operating Income-EBITDA-EBIT-EBT-Depreciation-Tax provisions made-Deferred Taxation- EPS: Basic and Diluted- Purpose of Balance sheet- Share capital- Net Worth-Shareholders fund- Book value of assets-Face value of shares-Current and non-current liabilities and assets- Amortisation and Depreciation-Notes to accounts.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Cash Flow statements and Notes to accounts
 

Meaning and Purpose of cash flow statements- Meaning of cash flow,  sources of cash flow, Operating, Investing and Finance activities- Inflow and outflow of cash- Indirect method-Interpreting company growth rate from cash flow stage-Positive and Negative cash flow-Effect of changes in cash flow on performance – Interpretation of high cash balances-Exhibit of cash flow statements of Indian companies- Schedules or notes to accounts- preparation and  relevance- interpretation of schedules.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Interpretation of Financial Statements
 

Year On Year (YoY) comparison of Income statement and Balance sheet-Common size comparison-Interpreting EPS, DPS, MPS, PE Ratio, Intrinsic value, Liquidity ratio, Current ratio, Debt Equity Ratio- Dividend payout- Ascertaining performance of a company through exhibit of annual report of Indian companies

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
: Ethics in Accounting
 

Compliance of accounting standard in letter vs true spirit- window dressing- effects of unethical practices and non-disclosures-case study ethics in public practice of accounting, ethics in compliance, ethics in corporate reporting, ethics in non-profit organisations.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Gupta, A. (2020). Financial Accounting for Management: An Analytical Perspective, Noida, Pearson Education.
  2. Raman, B. S. (2014). Financial Accounting (1stedi).I & II, New Dehli:United Publishers.
  3. Porter, G.A., & Norton, C.L. (2013). Financial Accounting (IFRS update)( 6thedi), Cengage Learning.
  4. Jawahar Lal & Seema Srivastava (2013). Financial Accounting New Delhi:Himalaya Publishing House.
  5.  Sharma & Sashi Gupta (2020) Management Accounting, Kalyani Publishers 
  6. I M Pandey (2020) Management Accounting, Vikas Publishers 
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Financial Accounting By SP JAIN & NArang , Kalyani Publishers, Noida

Evaluation Pattern

Total 50 marks . 

CIA-1 20 marks (weightage 50% ie 10 marks ) 

CIA-2 20 marks(weightage 50% ie 10 marks ) 

CIA-3 - 50 marks (weightage 50% ie 25 marks ) 

For attendance 5marks 

This is a Submission paper .There is no MSE or ESE 

BLS141 - INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:03

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 This course introduces students to the basic principles of biology. Students will learn about the organization of life, including the cell theory and taxonomy, the chemistry of life, genetics, evolution, and ecology. The course will also cover current issues in biology such as biotechnology and environmental sustainability.

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will be able to describe the fundamental principles and concepts of biology, including the organization of life and the chemistry of living systems.

CO2: Students will be able to explain the role of genetics in inheritance, diversity, and evolution.

CO3: Students will be able to analyze the impact of human activities on the environment and the measures that can be taken to promote sustainability.

CO4: Students will be able to evaluate the ethical implications of advances in biotechnology and their impact on society.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Biology
 

 

The scientific method and experimental design; The organization of life: cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems; Taxonomy and the diversity of life; Chemical elements and molecules essential to living systems

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Genetics and Evolution
 

 

Mendelian genetics and inheritance patterns; DNA structure and function, gene expression and regulation; Genetic diversity and evolution; Natural selection and adaptation

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Ecology and Environmental Biology
 

 

Ecosystems and biomes; Population dynamics and community interactions; Biodiversity and conservation; Human impact on the environment and sustainability

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Biotechnology and Ethics
 

 

Applications of biotechnology in medicine, agriculture, and industry, Ethical issues related to biotechnology; The impact of biotechnology on society; Regulations and policies related to biotechnology

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Campbell, N. A., & Reece, J. B. (2018). Biology (11th ed.). Pearson.
  2. Freeman, S., Quillin, K., Allison, L., Black, M., Taylor, E., & Podgorski, G. (2017). Biological Science (6th ed.). Pearson.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1.  Begon, M., Townsend, C. R., & Harper, J. L. (2006). Ecology: From Individuals to Ecosystems (4th ed.). Blackwell Publishing.
  2. Ricklefs, R. E., & Relyea, R. A. (2019). The Economy of Nature (8th ed.). W.H. Freeman.

  3. Kuby, J., Owen, J., & Kindt, T. J. (2019). Kuby Immunology (8th ed.). W.H. Freeman.

  4. Thompson, P. B., & Kaplan, D. M. (2019). Encyclopedia of Food and Agricultural Ethics (2nd ed.). Springer.

Evaluation Pattern

Attendance and Class Participation- 10%

Midterm Examination- 30%

Review paper/Research Paper- 20%

Seminar presentation – 10%

Final Examination - 30%

 

BLS142 - PRINCIPLES OF FORENSIC SCIENCE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Forensic science is the application of scientific principles and techniques to the investigation of crimes and legal issues. This course covers the fundamental principles of forensic science, including various scientific analysis techniques used in criminal investigations, legal and ethical issues, and types of evidence collected at crime scenes.

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will be able to Understand the principles and techniques used in forensic science investigations

CO2: Students will be able to describe the legal and ethical considerations associated with forensic science.

CO3: Students will be able to identify and analyze different types of evidence collected at crime scenes

CO4: Students will be able to evaluate scientific evidence in a legal context using proper documentation and reporting techniques

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Forensic Science
 

 

Introduction to forensic science; Historical development of forensic science; Branches and applications of forensic science; Legal and ethical issues in forensic science

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Physical Evidence
 

 

Types of physical evidence; Collection and preservation of physical evidence; Analysis of physical evidence; Interpretation and evaluation of physical evidence

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Biological Evidence
 

 

Types of biological evidence; DNA analysis; Serology analysis; Analyzing and interpreting biological evidence

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Digital Forensics
 

 Digital forensic investigations; Evidence collection in digital forensics; Analyzing and interpreting digital evidence; Legal and ethical considerations in digital forensics

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

  1. Saferstein, R. (2019). Forensic science: From the crime scene to the crime lab. Pearson Education.

  2. Criminal Justice & Forensics. (2017). Cengage.

  3. Fisher, B. A. (2019). Techniques of crime scene investigation. Taylor & Francis Group.

  4. Richard Saferstein, R. (2018). Criminalistics: An Introduction to Forensic Science. Pearson Education.

  5. Houck, M. M., & Siegel, J. A. (2010). Fundamentals of forensic science. Academic Press.

  6. Casey, E. (2018). Digital evidence and computer crime: Forensic science, computers, and the internet. Academic Press.

  7. Nelson, B., Phillips, A., & Steuart, C. (2016). Guide to computer forensics and investigations. Cengage

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

  1. Lee, H. C. (2016). Forensic science : an illustrated dictionary. CRC Press.

  2. Barry, J., & Cooper, J. (2018). Introduction to forensic science. Routledge.

  3. Houck, M. (2018). Trace evidence analysis: More cases in mute witnesses. Academic Press. 

  4. Brown, T. W. (2018). Handbook of Forensic Pathology, Second Edition. CRC Press.

  5. Barbara, J. (2011). Forensic anthropology: An introduction. CRC Press.

  6. Hall, M. (2017). Current practice in forensic medicine. John Wiley & Sons.

  7. Sammons, J., & Jenks, M. (2017). Digital forensics trial graphics: Teaching the jury through effective use of visual aids. Academic Press.

Evaluation Pattern

Attendance and Class Participation- 10%

Midterm Examination- 30%

Review paper/Research Paper- 20%

Seminar presentation – 10%

 

Final Examination - 30%

COM142 - BRAND MANAGEMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Brand Management course will enable student to have a fundamental understanding of how to build, measure, and manage a brand.

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate concepts, principles, techniques and application of contemporary branding management process.

CO2: Evaluate the taxonomy in designing brands.

CO3: Summarise the measures and manage brand-equity and extension.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Strategic Brand Management Process
 

Brands – Brands Vs Products – Different Product Levels - Things that can be branded

 Branding Challenges and Opportunities – Strategic Brand Management Process, PRACTICAL: SBM Process, Trends and innovations in brand management,  Emerging technologies and their impact on branding

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Branding identity, architecture and taxonomy
 

Brand Image, Developing a brand identity, Brand Identity – Kapferer’s Brand Identity Prism,  Creating a brand positioning statement,  Understanding the importance of brand consistency, Developing a brand architecture strategy, Managing brand portfolios, Brand extensions and sub-brands.  Criteria for choosing brand elements – Brand Names – Landor’s Brand Name Taxonomy – Brand Name Linguistic Characteristics – Trademark Issues and Concerning Names – PRACTICAL: Naming Hypothetical Brands 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Brand Messaging, Designing and Aesthetics
 

Developing a brand messaging strategy, Creating effective brand communications, Managing brand reputation, URLs – Logos and Symbols – Characters – Slogans and Jingles – Packaging and Signage – PRACTICAL: Creating Logos and Mascots for Hypothetical Brands. Impact of digital technologies on brand management, Developing digital branding strategies, Managing online brand reputation

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Brand Equity & Brand Communication
 

Customer Based Brand Equity – CBBE Pyramid – PRACTICAL: Constructing CBBE Pyramid. Understanding the impact of consumer behavior on brand management, Consumer decision-making process, Building brand relationships with consumers, Understanding the role of advertising in brand management, Developing effective advertising campaigns, Measuring and analyzing advertising effectiveness

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Brand Extension & International Brand Management
 

Brand Extension - Merits and Demertis of Extension – Types of Brand Extension. Building brand loyalty, Measuring and analyzing brand equity and brand loyalty, Understanding the challenges of international brand management, Adapting branding strategies for international markets, Managing global brand portfolios

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.       Keller, M. (Latest Edition). Brand Management. Delhi: Pearson Education India.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Rajagopal, M. (Latest Edition). Brand Management. New York: Nova Science Publisher

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I MCQ (5 Marks)

Google Form/Google Classroom based Quiz consisting of MCQs to test the basic concepts relating to Unit 1 and 2. This would be an individual assessment with a set of 10 questions, 5 each from unit 1 and 2.  The details of this assignment, and the penalties for not attending shall be posted in the Google Classroom.

CIA 2 (a) Video Content Creation 10 marks

Every student shall for a group of four members and they need to identify a brand and prepare a 10 minutes video. Later a Google spread sheet of students list shall be sent to the students.  Within a week the students need to enter the name of the brand identified so as to avoid repetition in their selections and start preparing the video. The video shall discuss the history of the chosen brand and discuss the possibilities of changing different attributes of the brand for positive outcome. The video needs to describe and display the new brand. Any delay in submission without prior consent or approval shall lead to a penalty of marking the student ZERO in this component.   The video shall be assessed based on the following rubrics. Report submitted will be valued for 10 marks.

CIA 2(b) - Case Study (5 marks)

The same group formed for video assignment shall identify a case study related to brand extension. The group shall prepare a presentation regarding the case. They shall develop questions related to the case and also provide answers. The group also needs to provide references for their case study and Q&A.

CIA III Written Examination (25 marks)


Every student shall sit for a written examination of marks covering all the units. The students will be evaluated based on their understanding and learning about different concepts of branding. The higher order thinking is assessed by one case analysis included in the question paper. There will be 7 questions of 2 marks each and the case analysis will be of 6 marks.

COM143 - ENTREPRENEURSHIP DEVELOPMENT AND SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Entrepreneurship is not just about start-ups: it is a topic that is rapidly growing in importance in government policy and in the behaviour of established firms. The course provides students with an understanding of the role and personality of the entrepreneur, and a range of skills aimed at successful planning of entrepreneurial ventures. Material covered includes fostering creativity and open-mindedness, knowledge acquisition and management, innovation systems, screening and evaluating new venture concepts, market evaluation and developing a marketing plan, legal Issues Including intellectual property, preparation of venture budgets, and raising finance. The major piece of assessment is the writing of a comprehensive business plan for a new venture.

Course Outcome

CO 1: Discuss the fundamental concept and emerging trends of entrepreneurship.

CO 2: Elaborate the entrepreneurial process and classify the different styles of thinking.

CO 3: Develop and summarize the creative problem-solving technique and types of innovation.

CO 4: Compile the legal and regulatory framework and social responsibility relating to entrepreneur.

CO 5: Create a business model for a start-up.

CO 6: Build competence to identify the different sources of finance available for a start-up and relate their role in different stages of business.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to Entrepreneurship
 

Evolution, Characteristics, Nature of Entrepreneurship, Types, Functions of Entrepreneur, Distinction between an Entrepreneur and a Manager, Concept, Growth of Entrepreneurship in India, Role of Entrepreneurship in Economic Development, Emerging trends of contemporary entrepreneurship – Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Globalisation, changing demands, unemployment, changing demographics, Institutional support, ease of entry in the informal sector

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
The Entrepreneurial Process
 

Steps in the Entrepreneurial Process: Generating Ideas, Opportunity Identification, Business concepts, Businessconcepts,Resources(Financial,PhysicalandHuman), Implementing and managing the venture, Harvesting the venture, Design Thinking, Systems Thinking, Agile thinking and Lean thinking Blue Ocean Strategy, Role and relevance of mentors, Incubation cell, Methods of brainstorming ideas.

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Creativity and Innovation
 

Creativity, Principles of creativity, Source of New Idea, Ideas into Opportunities. CreativeProblemSolving:Heuristics,Brainstorming,Synectics, ValueAnalysisInnovationandEntrepreneurship: Profits and Innovation, Principles of Innovation, Disruptive, Incrementaland Open innovations, Nurturing and Managing Innovation, Globalization, Concept andModelsofInnovation, MethodsofprotectingInnovationandcreativity,SignificanceofIntellectualPropertyRights,Patents & Copy right, Business Model Canvas, and Lean Management. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Entrepreneurship Practice
 

EssentialsofBusinessOwnership:Typesofventures,RiskandBenefits,LegalandRegulatoryFramework,EthicsandSocialResponsibility,MarketResearch(ventureopportunityscreening), Feasibility Analysis, Introduction to the Business Plan, Developing the BusinessModel for starting a new venture, E-Commerce and Growing the Venture: The Internet andits impact on venture development

Approaches to E-Commerce, Strategies for E-CommerceSuccess,The nature of international entrepreneurship and their importance

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Sources of raising capital
 

Different sources of financing for start-ups, stages of financing involve in start-ups, advantages and disadvantages of the different sources of financing, Mezzanine finance, Specific financial assistance from government and financial institutions to promote entrepreneurship, Venture Valuation Methods

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Allen,K.R.(2011), “LaunchingNewVentures:AnEntrepreneurialApproach”,6thEdition.Mason,Ohio: South-WesternCengage Learning.
  2. Kuratko,DonaldF.Entrepreneurship:(2010) Theory,Process,Practice9thEdition.Mason,Ohio: South-WesternCengage Learning
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Scarborough,N.M.(2011),“EssentialsofEntrepreneurshipandSmallBusinessManagement”,6thEdition. NewJersey:PrenticeHall.
  2. Verstraete,T.and Jouioson-Laffitte,E.(2012),“ABusinessModelforEntrepreneurship”,
  3. Cheltenham:EdwardElgarPublishingLtd.
  4. Poornima Charantimath,(2007) “EntrepreneurshipDevelopment-SmallBusinessEnterprise”,Pearson Education.
  5. RoberDHisrich,MichaelPPeters,DeanAShepherd,(2007), Entrepreneurship,(6ed.), The McGraw-Hillcompanies.
  6. RajivRoy,(2011),Entrepreneurship,(2ed.)OxfordUniversityPress
Evaluation Pattern

CIA I (a) Multiple Choice Questions (MCQ)

CIA I (b) Video Content Creation

 

CIA II Case Study Analysis

 

CIA III (a) Multiple Choice Questions(MCQ)

CIA III (b) Business Plan Creation + VIVA

 

CIA I (a): Week 1 & 2: MCQ (5 Marks)


Google Form/Google Classroom based Quiz consisting of MCQs to test the basic concepts relating to Unit 1 and 2. The date of examination is on or before 05-08-2023.  This would be an individual assessment with a set of 10 questions, 5 each from unit 1 and 2.  The details of this assignment, and the penalties for not attending shall be posted in the Google Classroom.

 

CIA I (b) Preparing a video interview of an Entrepreneur (Individual Assignment) 10 marks

Every student shall identify an entrepreneur and prepare a 15 minutes video interview on them.  Orientation about the video preparation shall be given by the respective faculty in the first week of the semester itself. Later a Google spreadsheet of students list shall be sent to the students.  Within a week the students need to enter the name of the entrepreneurs identified so as to avoid repetition in their selections and start preparing the interview. Once the entrepreneur is finalized, an orientation about plagiarism policies shall be given by the faculty.  The last date of the video submission is 10-08-2023, before 06:00 PM.  Inability to submit the video on or before the due date should be priorly intimated to the faculty.  Any delay in submission without prior consent or approval shall lead to a penalty of marking the student ZERO in this component. 

 

The video shall be assessed based on the following rubrics. Report submitted will be valued for 10 marks.

More details of the report:

 

  1. The video should include genesis, growth, management contributions, challenges, how they overcome, achievements, major entrepreneurship inferences.
  2. References and sources should be mentioned as per APA 6th Edition, towards the end of the video.
  3. The video interview should be a minimum of 15 minutes.
  4. Last date for submission 10th August 2023, late submission within two days of the scheduled date, will carry a penalty deduction of two marks. 

 

CIA II - Case Study (15 marks)

Group of not more than six members in a team will be formed randomly in the class based on the subject teacher’s discretion. Each group shall gather content and solve the assigned case study and submit a written report of the same. Report shall include the introduction to the case, highlights and objectives, conceptual definitions, detailed analysis, findings and suggestion, conclusion.  Groups are free to use all authentic sources to gather information. Once the case study is finalized, an orientation about case analysis, report writing, and plagiarism policies shall be given by the faculty.  The last date of the case analysis report submission is 30-09-2022, before 06:00 PM.  The report can be supported with article reviews, statistical facts and examples and book references.


More Details of the Report:

1.      Case Study has to be based on growth of Entrepreneurship in India or Emerging trends of contemporary entrepreneurship.

 

  1. References as per APA 6th Edition, and Appendix.
  2. Detailed analysis of the problem and alternatives available should form part of the report.
  3. The written report should be a minimum of 6 pages.
  4. Last date for submission 30th September, 2023, late submission within two days of the scheduled date, will carry a penalty deduction of two marks. 

 

CIA III (a): Week 15 & 16: MCQ (5 Marks)

 


Google Form/Google Classroom based Quiz consisting of MCQs to test the basic concepts relating to Unit 1 and 2. The date of examination is on or before 02-11-2023.  This would be an individual assessment with a set of 10 questions, 5 each from Units 1 and 2.  The details of this assignment, and the penalties for not attending shall be posted in the Google Classroom.

 

CIA III (b) Business Plan and viva-voce (10 marks)


The same group allotted for Case Study report shall continue. Once the idea for the business plan is finalized, an orientation about various components of the business plan, report writing, and plagiarism policies shall be given by the faculty. However, every student shall contribute in the construction of a
creative and technical business plan in detail consisting details from idea to implementation stage. The report will be valued for 10 marks by a panel of three external reviewers. The assessment criteria shall be discussed and finalized before the final submission and in consonance with the inputs and suggestions 
of the reviewers identified.  This criterion shall also be presented and discussed with the students prior to the final submission.  Though this is a group assignment, the assessment of the contribution of each student would be done individually.

More Details of the Report:

§  The report shall include details on value proposition, business and revenue model, sustainability

§  The written report should be a minimum of 10 pages.

§  References as per APA 6th Edition, and Appendix.

Last date for submission 5th November 2023, late submission within two days of the scheduled date, will carry a penalty deduction of two mark 

COM144 - FINANCIAL LITERACY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:03

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course aims at enhancing their financial skills as well as training the students to be financial educators with family and friends. There is a need for students to effectively plan and monitor their spending. The course aims at effectively training students and equipping them with the knowledge and tools to manage their finances and also teach others the same.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the basic concepts of financial literacy.

CO2: Apply financial planning and budgeting decisions on a personal and professional front.

CO3: Understand the purpose and functions of the Banking system.

CO4: Understand the role and importance of financial instruments and insurance products.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to Financial Literacy
 

Introduction, Evolution, Meaning and importance of -  Income, Expenses, Savings, Budget, Money, Currency, Bank account, savings investment, JAM-balance sheet – purpose features, format – Technology in finance – FinTech, TechFin, Regtech, sandox, Mobile-based Banking – post offices – Savings vs investments – Power of Compounding – risk and Return-Time Value of Money- Simple Interest-Compound Interest-

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Planning and Budgeting
 

Introduction to Financial Planning - Analysing the resources of the person - Concepts in Financial Planning:The time value of money, Diversification - 'spreading risk', Investment Timing - Financial Products for Savers: Financial Products options for savers, personal budget – family budget – financial planning procedure.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Banking Products and Services
 

Introduction and evolution of Banking – Banking in India – RBI – Role of RBI in India– Savings and Deposits – Deposits, Accounts, KYC,e/v KYC Types of Deposits - Saving Bank Accounts, Fixed Deposit Accounts, Recurring Deposit Account, Special Term Deposit Schemes, Loans and Types of loan advanced by Banks and Other secondary functions of Bank – PAN, NSDL: PAN, Meaning of Cheque and types of cheques – CTS_MICR-IFSC – e- Banking – ATM, Debit, Credit, Smart Card, UPI, e-Wallets, Payment Banks-NPCI: Products and role in regulating the online payments, CIBIL – Banking complaints and Banking Ombudsman. Mutual Funds_ Types of Mutual Funds-NAV. Digital Currency-Bitcoin- NFO

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Post Office Products, Retirement planning and Investment Avenues
 

Post Office Savings Account(SB)​​​​​, National Savings Recurring Deposit Account (RD)​​, ​National Savings Time Deposit Account (TD), National Savings Monthly Income Account (MIS), Senior Citizens Savings Scheme Account (SCSS)​, Public Provident Fund Account (PPF)​, Sukanya Samriddhi Account (SSA)​, National Savings Certificates (VIIIth Issue) (NSC), Kisan Vikas Patra (KVP), PM CARES for Children Scheme, 2021, Interest rates (New)​, How to avail services, Schedule of Fee – IPBS – KYC. Employees Provident Fund (EPF) - Public Provident Fund (PPF), Superannuation Fund, Gratuity, Other Pension Plan, and Post-retire Counselling-National Pension Scheme(NPS)

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Life Insurance and Related Services
 

Life Insurance Policies: Life Insurance, Term Life Insurance, Pension Policies, ULIP, Health Insurance, Endowment Policies, Property Insurance: Policies offered by various general insurance companies. Post office life Insurance Schemes: Postal Life Insurance and Rural Postal Life Insurance (PLI/RPLI). Housing Loans: Institutions providing housing loans, loans under Pradhan Mantri Awas Yojana – Rural and Urban-Atal Pension Yojana (APS),

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Chandra, P. (2012). Investment Game: How to Win. New Delhi: Tata McGraw Hill Education
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

  1. Mittra, S., Rai, S. K., Sahu, A. P., & Starn, H. J. (2015). Financial Planning. New Delhi: Sage Publications India Pvt. Ltd.
  2. https://rbidocs.rbi.org.in/rdocs/content/pdfs/GUIDE310113_F.pdf

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1 25 marks

CIA2  25 marks 

ESE  50 marks 

COM145 - CREATIVE ADVERTISEMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:45
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The main objective of this course is to enable students to develop creative concepts for advertising of any product or service.

Course Outcome

CO1: To understand the critical role of creativity in advertising and develop creative strategies to be able to position the product/service.

CO2: To become familiar with the approaches and forms of advertising

CO3: To gain technical knowledge in the development of advertising for a company

CO 4: To learn to empathize with the client's needs and create content that meets the purpose in a creative manner.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Creativity and Aesthetics
 

Introduction to Creativity- The creativity process- Difference between a creative mind and non creative mind- Patterns of thoughts indicating creativity- How to bring out your creative genius- Philosophy of Aesthetics - Introduction to Creative works of the century

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
 
Syllabus Unit Mapping
1.Development Needs:Global,
2.Skill Focused:Employability,
3.Integration of Cross Cutting Issues:Environment,Professional Ethics,
Creativity and Aesthetics

 

Introduction to Creativity- The creativity process- Difference between a creative mind and non creative mind- Patterns of thoughts indicating creativity- How to bring out your creative genius- Philosophy of Aesthetics - Introduction to Creative works of the century

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Functions and Forms of Advertising
 

Types of advertisement, Ethics in advertisement, Position of Products/Services, Interplay of Branding and Advertising- Meaning of Advertising, Creative Ad makers and Advertising Agencies in India and World - Indian and Foreign creative advertisements, the controversial advertisements- The most memorable advertisements - Highly impactful and Creative advertisements.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
 
Syllabus Unit Mapping
1.Development Needs:Global,
2.Skill Focused:Employability,
3.Integration of Cross Cutting Issues:Professional Ethics,Environment,
Functions and Forms of Advertising

 

Types of advertisement, Ethics in advertisement, Position of Products/Services, Interplay of Branding and Advertising- Meaning of Advertising, Creative Ad makers and Advertising Agencies in India and World - Indian and Foreign creative advertisements, the controversial advertisements- The most memorable advertisements - Highly impactful and Creative advertisements.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Advertising and campaign Planning
 

 

Marketing strategy and situation analysis; Advertising plan; Advertising objectives; DAGMAR approach; Advertising campaign planning process. The art of copywriting; Advertising copy testing; Creativity in communication; motivational approaches; types of appeals used in advertising; Advertising budget process.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
 
Syllabus Unit Mapping
1.Development Needs:Global,
2.Skill Focused:Employability,
3.Integration of Cross Cutting Issues:Professional Ethics,Environment,
Elements and Principles of Design

Principles of Design- Lines, Scale, Color, Repetition, Negative Space, Symmetry,

 

Transparency, Texture, Balance, Hierarchy, Contrast, Framing, Grid, Randomness, Direction, Rules, Movement, Depth, Typography, Composition.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Elements and Principles of Design
 

Principles of Design- Lines, Scale, Color, Repetition, Negative Space, Symmetry,

 Transparency, Texture, Balance, Hierarchy, Contrast, Framing, Grid, Randomness, Direction, Rules, Movement, Depth, Typography, Composition.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
 
Syllabus Unit Mapping
1.Development Needs:Global,
2.Skill Focused:Employability,
3.Integration of Cross Cutting Issues:Professional Ethics,
Designing Advertisements

Creative brief - Value Questions -Research -Conceptual framework- Development of multiple ideas- Creative concept development process- creative brainstorming- creative differences- editing -refining creative concepts- concept presentation to the client- Appeals in advertising copy writing-print copy elements, headlines-body copy-slogans - Designing print ad- choosing –-choosing layout- -choosing Typefaces

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Designing Advertisements
 

Creative brief - Value Questions -Research -Conceptual framework- Development of multiple ideas- Creative concept development process- creative brainstorming- creative differences- editing -refining creative concepts- concept presentation to the client- Appeals in advertising copy writing-print copy elements, headlines-body copy-slogans - Designing print ad- choosing –-choosing layout- -choosing Typefaces

Text Books And Reference Books:

Batra, A. M. (2010). Advertising Management. Delhi: Pearson Education.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

  • Chunawala, S .A.(2015). Advertising Management. Mumbai: Himalaya Publishers.

  • Moriarty, W. B. (2020). Advertising Principles and Practices. New Delhi: Prentice Hall of India.

Evaluation Pattern

100 marks divided into 20 marks each assignment.

CSC141 - PROGRAMMING IN C (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course introduces students to the C programming language, covering its history, features, data types, and program structure. Students will learn to apply decision control and loop structures, along with various operators, to create basic programs. Additionally, the course covers functions, recursion, arrays, and pointers to provide a solid foundation for C programming and problem-solving.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the fundamentals of C programming, including its history, features, variables, and data types.

CO2: Apply decision control statements, loop control structures, and various operators to write basic C programs.

CO3: Analyze and design functions, including recursion and passing values/arrays, and understand storage classes in C.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to C
 

 

Types of Programming Language- History of C, Features of C , C Tokens, variables and keywords and identifiers ,Types of C constants and variables, Rules for constructing variable names, Structure of C program, Input /output statements in C

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Data types and Control Structures
 

Data Types, Type declaration, Different Operators in C - Arithmetic, Logical, Relational, Bitwise, Conditional, Expressions, Hierarchy of operations.

Control structures

 

Decision control statements-if, switch, go to statement, conditional operator statement. Loop control structures- while, do-while, for loop, Break statement, Continue statement.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Function
 

Introduction, function definition and prototyping, Types of functions, passing values to function, recursion, passing arrays to functions. I/O functions- formatted & unformatted console I/O functions Storage classes in C- Automatic, Register, Extern and Static Variables.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Arrays
 

 

One dimensional and multidimensional arrays, Declaration, initialization, Reading values into an array, Displaying array contents and Array Manipulations. String-Basic Concepts, Library Functions

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Pointers
 

Definition, notation, pointer and arrays, pointers and functions-call by value and call by reference.

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1] Balagurusamy, E. Programming in ANSI C 4th Edition. Tata McGraw-Hill, 2010.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1] Kanetkar, Yashavant. Let Us C. 4th Edition. BPB Publications, 2012.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 50%

ESE 50%

DMT141 - DANCE MOVEMENT THERAPY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description:

This course has been conceptualized in order to Understanding and exploring theory and practice as two sides of the same coin for academic 

excellence in Performing Arts. Benchmarking quality, understanding and exploring adaptability to situations and taking leadership tasks.

Maintaining emotional and aesthetics sensitivity in verbal and non-verbal communication

Course Outcome

CO1: To work on the body schema, body image and physical self-concept To examine the concept of creativity and imagination.

CO2: To understand and gain practical understanding about the human body expression through the Gross Motor Skills Development, the Global Motor Coordination Schemes according Bartenieff, the Effort/Shape system of movement analysis according Laban.

CO3: To gain the ability to express emotions To improved confidence and self-esteem

CO4: To analyse and to gain practical understanding about the concept of Dance: from ancient social function to performance, from performance to therapy. To learn how Dance Movement Therapy dances with life: instances of different social areas in which Dmt is practised.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Introduction on Dance Movement
 

  Definition of Dance and its history 

 Definition of creativity 

 History of Dance Movement Therapy theory 

 

To understand and to gain practical understanding about the human body expression 

the Gross Motor Skills Development,

the Global Motor Coordination Schemes according Bartenieff,  

the Effort/Shape system of movement analysis according Laban.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:25
Practice
 

Explore the body: The warm –up in Dance Movement Therapy 

The social function of the dance 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Essential references: (in APA format)

- Bellia , V. (2020). A body among other bodies. Relational Expressive Dance Movement Therapy. Catania A&G

- Hackney, P. (1998). Making connections. Total body integration through Barrtenieff Fundamentals. Routledge, New York.

- Laban R. (1950). The mastery of movement on the stage. McDonald & Evans, London

- Laban R., Lawrence F.C. (1947). Effort. McDonald & Evans, London

- Schilder P., (1935) The image and appearance of the human body. Taylor & Francis

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Essential references: (in APA format)

- Bellia , V. (2020). A body among other bodies. Relational Expressive Dance Movement Therapy. Catania A&G

- Hackney, P. (1998). Making connections. Total body integration through Barrtenieff Fundamentals. Routledge, New 

- Schilder P., (1935) The image and appearance of the human body. Taylor & Francis

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation patterns  - final assessment 100 marks

DMT142 - INTRODUCTION TO CARNATIC MUSIC (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Introduction to Carnatic music focus on the basic fundamentals of Carnatic music. This course helps to improve the vocal quality as the lessons works as voice culture to the begginner.

Course Outcome

CO1: Ability to render the Swara-s in three speeds

CO2: Ability to identify and render the 7 Swara-s

CO3: Ability to render Sarala, Janta, Dhatu, Tarasthayi, and Alankara-s in three speeds.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Svaravali varisas and Janti varisas
 

Lessons in three speeds

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Tarasthayi and Dhattu varisas
 

All the lessons in to three speeds

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Alankaras and Geethams
 

Sapta tala alankaras and any for geethams

Text Books And Reference Books:

Carnatic music reader by Panchapakesha Iyer

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Ganamrutha Bodhini

Evaluation Pattern

Final assessment for 100 Marks

DMT143 - INTRODUCTION TO ACTING (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This introductory course explores fundamental acting techniques, including character development, improvisation, and emotional expression. Engage in various acting exercises and scene work to enhance students' understanding of the craft. This course further develops confidence and creativity as the students delve into the art of storytelling through performance.

Course Outcome

CO1: Recognise and explain the basics of acting.

CO2: Demonstrate and interpret the interrelationship between speech, movement and text.

CO3: Relate and experiment with the interconnection between text and acting design.

CO4: Apprise and critique the role of the actor as a performing medium.

CO5: Design and develop original piece of work.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Voice and Speech
 

This unit delves into the artistry of vocal expression and its profound impact on theatrical performance. Through rigorous vocal exercises and comprehensive training, students will develop various vocal techniques, mastering the nuances of pitch, tone, resonance, and articulation. Emphasizing voice integration with the actor's body and emotions, this transformative learning experience empowers students to deliver compelling, authentic, and emotionally resonant performances on stage and beyond.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Actor and the Stage
 

This unit delves into the essence of captivating stage presence, refining students' gestures and body language skills. Participants will learn to create profound connections with their co-actors through immersive exercises, fostering authentic and compelling performances. Embark on a transformative journey, honing acting prowess and embracing the art of storytelling.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Actor and the Text
 

This unit delves into captivating interplay between the actor and the text. Explore the essence of character portrayal through an in-depth analysis of themes, situations, and scenes within various dramatic texts. Uncover the art of embodying diverse roles, harnessing emotional depth, and expressing emotions. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Stanislavski, C. (1989). Actor Prepares. Taylor & Francis Group.

Chekhov, M. (1953). To the actor: On the technique of acting. Harper & Row.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Merlin, B. (2017). Acting: The Basics. Taylor & Francis Group.

Kahan, S. (1991). Introduction to acting (3rd ed.). Allyn and Bacon.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Mode of Assessment - Final Assessment

  • Performance Presentation - 100 Marks

ECO143 - DEMOCRACY AND ECONOMY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is aimed at undergraduate students to introduce to them the prominent debates on democracy and emerging issues in economies.  The course discusses how various socioeconomic factors act as constraints on economic growth and development. This basic framework allows a student to delve into the causes and consequences of various strategies/methods taken/applied by policymakers and practitioners and how it affects the overall objective of the state/economy through a trifocal analysis of the economy, society, and market keeping the central theme of ‘Democracy.’This course will introduce students to:

  • Growing crisis of wealth distribution and income inequality.
  •  Sectoral significance and state intervention in policy making.
  • Informal sector and labor market participation and rights.
  • Analyze corruption in emerging economies through various case studies.
  • Discuss the informal economy through concepts, theory, and measurement.

Course Outcome

CO1: Recognise the growing crisis of wealth and income inequality among the members of the economy.

CO2: Understand the economic crisis in different sectors and government interventions in practices.

CO3: Get familiar informal sector and labour market participation and rights.

CO4: Understand debates about transparency, competition and privatization and its relevance to corruption.

CO5: Investigate issues from various perspectives, such as, viewing challenges in economies through the lens of democracy.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Democracy, Democratization and Society
 

Theories of Democratization; Democratic and Undemocratic States; Measuring Democracy and Democratization; The Global Wave of Democratization; Causes and Dimensions of Democratization: The Political Economy of Democracy; Political Culture, Mass Beliefs and Value Change; Gender and Democratization; Social Capital and Civil Society; Social Movements and Contention in Democratization Processes: Role, impact on policy reforms and cultural change.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Democracy, Democratisation and Society
 

Theories of Democratisation; Democratic and Undemocratic States; Measuring Democracy and Democratisation; The Global Wave of Democratisation; Causes and Dimensions of Democratisation: The Political Economy of Democracy: Political Culture, Mass Beliefs, and Value Change; Gender and Democratisation; Social Capital and Civil Society; Social Movements and Contention in Democratisation Processes: Role, Impact on Policy Reforms and Cultural Change

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Actors and Institutions
 

Conventional Citizen Participation;   Institutional Design in New Democracies; Gender and Democratization; A Decade of Democratic Decline and Stagnation.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Actors and Institutions
 

Conventional Citizen Participation; Institutional Design in New Democracies; Gender and Democratisation; A Decade of Democratic Decline and Stagnation.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Democracy and Redistribution
 

A Theory of political transitions: Choice of the economic and political regime; Theoretical extensions: growth, trade, political institutions; Democracy and the public sector; the state, the treat of expropriation and the possibility of development: Social and economic wellbeing and policy reforms.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Democracy and Redistribution
 

A Theory of Political Transitions: Choice of Economic and Political Regime; Theoretical Extensions: Growth, Trade, Political Institutions; Democracy and the Public Sector; the State, the Threat of Expropriation and the Possibility of Development: Social and Economic Wellbeing and Policy Reforms

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Democracy and Economic Growth and Development
 

A Marxian theory of democracy; The Importance of Social Class in Historical Comparative Perspective; Dependency and Development; Democracy in Developing Countries; Transitions from Authoritarian Rule: Tentative Conclusions about Uncertain Democracies.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Democracy and Economic Development
 

A Marxian Theory of Democracy; The Importance of Social Class in Historical Comparative Perspective; The Case Study of India; Dependency and Development; Democracy in Developing Countries; Transitions from Authoritarian Rule: Tentative Conclusions about Uncertain Democracies

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Democracy and Economic Growth and Development Indian Experience
 

India’s Tryst with Destiny; Democracy, Inequality, and Public Reasoning; A case study on Gujarat experience of development: Approaches, impact, and outcome; Kerala experience of development: Approaches, impact, and outcome.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Democracy and Economic Development: Indian Experience
 

India's Tryst with Destiny; Democracy, Inequality and Public Reasoning, A Case Study on Gujarat's Experience of Development: Approaches, Impact and Outcome; Kerala's Experience of Development: Approaches, Impact and Outcome

Text Books And Reference Books:

Bhagwati, J. N., & Panagariya, A. (2012). India's Tryst with Destiny: Debunking Myths that Undermine Progress and Addressing New Challenges. HarperCollins Publishers.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Boix, C. (2003). Democracy and Redistribution. Cambridge University Press.

Drèze, J., & Sen, A. (2015). An Uncertain Glory: India and Its Contradictions. Economics Books.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1: 20 marks

CIA 2: 20 Marks

CIA 3: 45 Marks

Attendance: 5 Marks

ECO145 - ECOLOGY AND DEVELOPMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course aims to provide a holistic and a deeper understanding of the trade-off between ecology and development. Through an inter-disciplinary lens an organic approach is adopted to understand the trade-off. This course, therefore, seeks to cultivate not only the moral and ethical thinking of the ecology but also it tries to put forth an action plan from a policy front. 

Course Outcome

CO1: To evoke a sense of deep ecology and social justice.

CO2: To familiarize the students with the development paradigms and how it affects the ecology.

CO3: To examine the problems behind value designations

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Ecology and Value
 

The Value Problem in Ecological Economics- Values in Ecological Value Analysis: What Should We Be Learning from Contingent Valuation Studies? - Natural Capital in Ecological Economics-Entropy in Ecological Economics.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Ecology and Development
 

The environmental impact of land development-Development of water resources-Development and changing air quality- Urban development and environmental change-Environmental economics and ecological economics: Where they can converge?- Power Inequality and the Environment.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Ecofeminism and Ecocriticism
 

Gender and environment; Ecofeminism; androcentrism; Deep ecology – ecofeminism debate; Ecocriticism; Nature writings; Thinking like a mountain; The forgetting and remembering of the air - The Varna Trophic System An Ecological Theory of Caste Formation. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:11
Action Plans
 

Reading Ecology, Reinventing Democracy-Scientists or Spies?- Revisiting the Debates on Man-Nature Relation- Lecture of Medha Patkar- Ecological Fiscal Transfers and State-level Budgetary Spending in India- -Bourgeois Environmentalism, the State, the Judiciary, Urban Poor, Significance of Silent Valley- Silent Valley: A controversy that focused global attention on a rainforest 40 years ago- Equity and Justice

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      1.Burkett, Paul. (2006). Marxism and Ecological Economics. Brill

2.Daly & Farley. (2011). Ecological Economics (Principles and Applications). Island Press

3.Pepper, D. (2002). Eco-socialism: from deep ecology to social justice. Routledge

1.      4.Gupta, Avijit. (1998).Ecology and Development in Third World. Routledge

4. Patel, S. (1997). Ecology and Development. Economic and Political Weekly, 2388-2391.

5. Sankar, U. (ed.) (2000). Environmental Economics. Oxford University Press

6. Burkett, Paul. (2006). Marxism and Ecological Economics. Brill

7.Venkatachalam, L. (2007). Environmental economics and ecological economics: Where they can converge?. Ecological economics, 61(2-3), 550-558.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.    1. Plumwood, V. (1993).  Feminism and the Mastery of Nature. London: Routledge

2. Warren, K.J. (ed), (1994).  Ecological Feminism. London: Routledge.

3.Shiva, V. (2016). Staying alive: Women, ecology, and development. North Atlantic Books.

4.Kavoori, P. S. (2002). The Varna Trophic system: an ecological theory of caste formation. Economic and Political Weekly, 1156-1164. 

5.Gill, K. (2009). Bourgeois environmentalism’, the State, the Judiciary, and the ‘urban poor’: The political mobilization of a scheduled caste market. Of Poverty and Plastic (Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 2010), 209.

6. Kaur, A., Mohanty, R. K., Chakraborty, L., & Rangan, D. (2021). Ecological fiscal transfers and state-level budgetary spending in India: Analyzing the flypaper effects. Levy Economics Institute, Working Papers Series July.

7.Parameswaran, M. P. (1979). Significance of Silent Valley. Economic and Political Weekly, 1117-1119.

8. Lewis, M. (2002). Scientists or spies? Ecology in a climate of Cold War suspicion. Economic and Political Weekly, 2323-2332.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 - 25 Marks

CIA 2- 25 Marks

CIA 3- 50 Marks 

ENG182-1 - DEVELOPING ACADEMIC SKILLS - I (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Academic Skills are a blend of theoretical ability to recognize the nuances of language aspects and hands-on training to exercise the acquired knowledge in reasoning, reading and writing. Academic Skills focus on developing research skills through careful reading and critical writing that are considered foundational and crucial in textual scholarship and knowledge production. The participants of this course will determine their areas of interest in conceptualizing their seminal work and constructing a reasoned argument. This course prompts the participants to take their learning-receptive skills and productive skills in a purpose-driven and practice-oriented mode on a contextual basis.

The course deals with receptive skills (reading) and productive skills (writing). In fact listening and speaking skills are not directly involved but act as a higher cognitive process. This course facilitates the participants with varied practices, tasks, exemplars, sample papers to practice with context-driven reading material. It runs for one full academic year with specific learning outcomes which are two-fold – conceptual grasp and textual application. The whole course and its structure involve Bloom’s taxonomy of knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis, evaluation and synthesis.

Objectives

To enable the learner

       acquire higher order receptive and productive skills

       develop reading skills at the higher education level

       be aware of functional grammar to improve research writing skills

       grasp and apply the mechanics in academic writing skills

       use study skills for research-based knowledge dissemination (writing a paper or presentation)

 

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Different approaches to knowledge, critical and creative bent of mind, that leads to content-based investigation. Integration of problem-based learning and need-based learning

CO2: Working knowledge of different purposes of writing, especially persuasive (argumentative), analytical, and informative writings paves the way for research-based reading and writing.

CO3: Application of functional grammar and mechanics that enhance conceptual clarity, communicative style, and style of writing. Experiential learning through participatory learning and service learning

CO4: Hands-on experience in a research culture which is discipline-specific in nature

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Basic skills
 

To enable learners to fine tune their expressions through better choice of words and sentence structures with clarity of idea.

Introduction to the course Developing Academic Skills

Vocabulary nuances (verb and noun forms)

Subject-verb agreement

Literary devices

Figures of speech

 

Concept mapping

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Reading skills
 

To enable students to develop appropriate reading comprehension skills through nuanced understanding of reading techniques.

Previewing

Reading for Main Ideas

Active and Passive reading

 

Skimming/Scanning for Details

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Study Skills
 

To enable students to use basic study skills to organize knowledge received and to streamline their ideas into appropriate academic discourse.

Annotation

Outlining

Summarising

 

Paraphrasing

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Listening skills
 

to enable students to understand and appreciate different kinds of literature and express their understanding in the form of short paragraphs or essays

Approaches to LS

Features of LS

Importance of LS at university level education

 

Practical sessions

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Language Skills
 

To enable students to listen to lectures and take notes and organize these to discuss or write about concepts or show application of knowledge

Note taking types

Note making

Introduction to Mnemonics

 

Types of mnemonics

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:4
Critical Reading
 

To enable students to develop the art of critical reading through close reading formulas

Finding oppositions

Critical Appreciation

 

Developing an argument

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:1
portfolio organisation
 

Set of hours for application

Exemplars

(Self Study Learning, Portfolio Building, teaching on Formative and Summative assessment mode, Problem Based Learning modules and project Submission)

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      Langan, J. (1995). English Skills With Reading (3rd Ed.). McGraw Hill. New York.

2.      Osmond, A. (2013). Academic Writing and Grammar for Students. Sage. Los Angeles.

3.      Robitaille, J. and Connelly, R. (2002).  Writer’s Resource: From Paragraph to Essay. Thomson Heinle. Australia.

Please note that the teacher in charge will also be bringing in authentic material to the class apart from the books mentioned in the reference.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Please note that the teacher in charge will also be bringing in authentic material to the class apart from the books mentioned in the reference. (through google classroom) 

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I – 20 MARKS- Tasks done in the portfolio based on Unit I

CIA II- 50 Marks- Tasks done in the portfolio based on Unit I and II

CIA III- 20 Marks- Tasks done in the portfolio based on Unit III

ESE Portfolio Submission

 

EST101-1 - LITERARY STUDIES: IDEAS AND GENRES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course offers an understanding to literary movements and genres. The focus is on form, structure and terminologies in literature. It enables students to interpret and critique texts and to understand that literature is representational. This course also examines texts in their socio-political context to engage with the historical context and cultural production of literature.

Course Objectives: This course aims to 

1.    offer a comprehensive understanding of the text and the contexts. 

2.     develop analytical and critical reading strategies

3.     enhance students to understand texts from multiple perspectives.

4.     develop analytical writing skills and to understand methods of interpretation

5.     acquire a literary vocabulary to read and write academic essays

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will be able - to articulate and analyze literary texts critically

CO2: to apply multiple interpretative methods

CO3: to analyze texts from different perspectives

CO4: to write academic essays using the acquired literary vocabulary

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Classical and Medieval Literature
 

Evolution from myths and folk tales

Ovid Metamorphoses (Book I excerpts)

Caedmon’s Hymn (Excerpts)

Geoffrey Chaucer – Prologue to Canterbury Tales (excerpts)

Thomas Malory - Morte Darthur (excerpts)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Literary Renaissance
 

The Revival of Learning and Bible Translations

Johannes Gutenberg and the Print Culture

William Caxton and the English Press

Mystery, miracle and morality plays (festival of Corpus Christi)

Emergence of tragedies and comedies – from translations to English plays

Thomas More- Utopia (excerpts)

Francis Bacon - Essays, or Counsels Civil and Moral (excerpts)

William Shakespeare – King Lear

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
The Enlightenment Period
 

Voltaire’s - Letters on the English (excerpts)

Rousseau – Discourse on Inequality (excerpts)

Thomas Paine – Rights of Man (excerpts)

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
The Romantic Period/ American Transcendentalism
 

Preface to Lyrical Ballads (excerpts)

Maria Edgeworth -  Letters for Literary Ladies (excerpts)

Shelley – To Skylark

R W Emerson – Self- reliance

Nathaniel Hawthorne – The Scarlett Letter

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Modernism
 

William Faulkner - The Sound and The Fury

Virginia Woolf - A Room of One’s Own

T.S Eliot – Ash Wednesday

Text Books And Reference Books:

Ovid Metamorphoses (Book I excerpts)

Caedmon’s Hymn (Excerpts)

Geoffrey Chaucer – Prologue to Canterbury Tales (excerpts)

Thomas Malory - Morte Darthur (excerpts)

Thomas More- Utopia (excerpts)

Francis Bacon - Essays, or Counsels Civil and Moral (excerpts)

William Shakespeare – King Lear

Voltaire’s - Letters on the English (excerpts)

Rousseau – Discourse on Inequality (excerpts)

Thomas Paine – Rights of Man (excerpts)

Preface to Lyrical Ballads (excerpts)

Maria Edgeworth -  Letters for Literary Ladies (excerpts)

Shelley – To Skylark

R W Emerson – Self- reliance

Nathaniel Hawthorne – The Scarlett Letter

William Faulkner - The Sound and The Fury

Virginia Woolf - A Room of One’s Own

T.S Eliot – Ash Wednesday

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

M. H. A. Abrams, A Glossary of Literary Terms, 7th edition (1999) 

The Penguin Dictionary of Literary Terms and Literary Theory, 4th edition (1999)

The Norton Anthology of Poetry, 5th edition

An Outline History of English Literature, William Henry Hudson (1999)

Evaluation Pattern

Examination & Assessment

CIA I - 20 Marks 

1. A class test based on the text

2. Essay on concepts and its application

3. A book/film/media review

CIA III - 20 Marks, the students can be asked

1. To prepare group presentations on topics relevant to the units

2. To put up an exhibition/display of

 

MSE - 50 Marks - Centralized Exam

(5 out of 7) x 10=50 Marks

 

ESE - 50 Marks - Centralized Exam

(5 out of 7) x 10=50 Marks 

 

 

 

 

HIS141 - HISTORY AND CINEMA (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course attempts to map out the connection between history and cinema. It aims to look at how cinema can be treated as a visual text and a source for understanding history. 

Course Outcome

CO1: To enhance and deepen the understanding of history through cinema.

CO2: To enable the students to develop their understanding and awareness of the rich possibilities of cinema and its connection with history.

CO3: To enhance the analytical skills of students and develop an understanding of how cinema engages with socio-cultural and political concerns, by placing the cinema in their historical context and engage with the current debates and future challenges with cinema as a medium.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Unit 1
 

a)   History as a narrative – History and Truth Contested Notions –Ideology, Sources and Historian

b)   Multiple Identities and Histories – History as a point of reference – Issues of Legitimacy & Justification.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Unit 2
 

a)     Cinema as a narrative – Words and Images – Genre- Representation Vs. Reality – Propaganda – selling History. 

b)    Language of Cinema- Color – Angles – Movement

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
UNIT 2
 

a)     Cinema as a narrative – Words and Images – Genre- Representation Vs. Reality – Propaganda – selling History. 

b)    Language of Cinema- Color – Angles – Movement

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Unit 3
 

a)     Between History and Cinema:  The problem of linear narratives and flash back – questions of authenticity – definition of authenticity.

b)    Cinema as a political, social and historical text.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Chapman, J. (2003). Cinemas of the World: Film and Society from 1895 to the Present. Reaktion Books.

Chapman, J., Glancy, M., & Harper, S. (Eds.). (2007). The new film history: sources, methods, approaches. Springer.

Ferro, M. (1988). Cinema and history. Wayne State University Press.

Chapman, J. (2005). Past and present: national identity and the British historical. London: IB Tauris.

Miskell, P. (2004). Historians and film. In Making History (pp. 253-264). Routledge.

Nowell-Smith, G. (Ed.). (1996). The Oxford history of world cinema. OUP Oxford.

Raghavendra, M. K. (2014). Seduced by the Familiar: Narration and Meaning in Indian Popular Cinema. Oxford University Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Chapman, J. (2013). Cinema, propaganda and national identity: British film and the Second World War. In British Cinema, Past and Present (pp. 213-226). Routledge.

Miskell, P. (2005). Seduced by the silver screen: Film addicts, critics and cinema regulation in Britain in the 1930s and 1940s. Business History47(3), 433-448.

Sedgwick, J., Miskell, P., & Nicoli, M. (2019). The market for films in postwar Italy: Evidence for both national and regional patterns of taste. Enterprise & Society20(1), 199-228.

Raghavendra, M. K. (2011). Bipolar identity: Region, nation, and the Kannada language film. Oxford University Press.

Raghavendra, M. K. (2014). The Politics of Hindi Cinema in the New Millennium: Bollywood and the Anglophone Indian Nation.

Sanyal, D. (2021). MK Raghavendra, “Locating World Cinema: Interpretations of Film as Culture” (Bloomsbury Academic India, 2020).

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1:  10 Marks            

CIA 2:  Mid Semester Examinations 25 Marks

CIA 3:  10 Marks

End semester examination: 50 Marks

Attendance: 5 Marks

LAW141 - CYBER LAW (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Cyber law has emerged as a medium for growth with immense potential for solving many new and interesting challenges.  The course aims at appreciating one of the important emerging areas of law and the nitty-gritty involved in it. This introduces the students to the underlying philosophy of the subject and its relation to other areas focusing on human rights.

UNIT 1 is designed to introduce students to the role of law in technology, especially the internet and is designed to give a brief overview of the historical aspects of the internet. UNIT 2 acquaints the students with the regulation of cyberspace. UNIT 3 deals with digital contracts and information technology, while UNIT 4 deals entirely on cyber crimes which are rampant in the digital era.  UNIT 5 issues in E-commerce. Unit 6 deals with IPR issues in cyberspace and UNIT 7 deals with international regulation of cyberspace.

Course Outcome

CO1: Gain an understanding of the underlying philosophy of cyber law and its relation to information technology.

CO2: Facilitate an overall understanding on needs for regulation of information technology in India

CO3: Impart basic idea of information technology and its relation with digital signature

CO4: Acquaint with legal challenges arising out of privacy issues awareness about the various kinds of cyber crimes and legal issues and cases

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:3
UNIT 1 FUNDAMENTALS OF CYBER LAW
 

An overview of cyber world – Jurisprudence of cyber law – Scope of cyber law – Introduction to Indian cyber law

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:2
UNIT 2 CYBERSPACE
 

Meaning, nature and emergence of cyberspace – Attributes of cyberspace – Classification of cyberspace – Legal framework for cyberspace

 

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:2
UNIT 3 DIGITAL CONTRACTS
 

Law of digital contracts – Functions of digital signature – Electronic and digital signature – procedural and functional issues – Legal issues of digital signatures – Certifying authority – Regulatory framework of digital signatures

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:2
UNIT 4 CYBER CRIMES
 

Salient features – Cyber crime and related concepts – Types of crimes – Regulation of cyber crime – International perspective

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:2
UNIT 5 E-COMMERCE
 

Emerging significant of – e-Commerce – Transactions and Technology of e-Commerce – e-Commerce Contracts – Legal Issues of e-Commerce and Case Laws – e-Commerce Legislations

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:2
UNIT 6 IPR ISSUES
 

IPR - An overview – Copyright issues in Cyberspace – Trademark issues in Cyberspace – Computer software and related IPR issues – Domain names and related issues

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:2
UNIT 7 INTERNATIONAL SCENARIO IN CYBER LAWS
 

European convention of Cyber Crimes – UNCITRAL Model Law on e-commerce 1996 – International Legal Regime relating to IPR – Berne Convention, Rome Convention, WIPO Copyright, UDRP, OECD Convention on Database Protection – Domestic legal regime – Information Technology Act , 2000. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Seth Karnika, Computers Internet and New Technology Laws. Gurgaon: Lexis Nexis, 2013

Cyber Security & Cyber Laws - by Nilakshi Jain & Ramesh Menon, Wiley 2020

Cyber Crimes & Law - by Dr Vishwanath Paranjepe, 2nd Edtn 2019, Central Law Agency

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Cyber Crimes & Law - by Dr Vishwanath Paranjepe, 2nd Edtn 2019, Central Law Agency

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-I:   Assessment Description: Class test for 20 marks on assessing the understanding of the fundamentals of Cyber law. It is a class room test. 2 questions for 25 marks each carrying 12.5 marks.

CIA-II: Oral Presentation, shall be accompanied by PPT by a group of 5 students for maximum of 15 minutes on any Cyber  law issues.

CIA-III: Students will be given a specific topic or case law. They are required to identify the research issues and find an answer to it by analysing the available literature.

LAW143 - LABOUR AND SOCIAL WELFARE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

It is a solitary principle of industrial relations that a happy and content labourer is an indispensable asset for any employer. However, labourers have not received their due on account of historical wrongs, and in this era of a market economy, labourers do not seem to get the minimum standards of social security. As a result, industrial peace and harmony have remained a distant dream. Hence, constant efforts are being made by the governments to ameliorate the working conditions of labour in order to ensure minimum welfare for the workers.

Course Outcome

CO 1 : Explain the general concept of labour social welfare and also the constitutional foundation of the same

CO 2 : Analyse the role of the International Labour Organisation in the protection of Labour Welfare

CO 3 : Describe existing provisions relating to the working conditions of Labourers

CO 4 : Describe the legal provisions relating to the health, safety, and welfare conditions of the employees.

CO 5 : Analyze the legal provisions relating to Maternity benefits in workplaces

CO 6: Describe the legal provisions relating to and regulation of Contractual employment in India

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
INTRODUCTION
 

Meaning and nature of social security; Public assistance v. Public insurance; Constitutional foundations and the role of ILO

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
HEALTH, SAFETY AND WELFARE OF WORKERS
 

Introduction; Manufacturing and hazardous processes; Health, safety and welfare in factories; Working hours and employment of young persons 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
EMPLOYEES' INSURANCE
 

Introduction; Important definitions; ESI Corporation; Various benefits

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
MATERNITY BENEFIT
 

Introduction; Employment of or work by women; Right to payment of maternity benefit; Dismissal and deduction of wages

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
CONTRACT LABOUR
 

Introduction: nature and meaning; Licensing of contractors; Regulation and abolition of Contract Labour

Text Books And Reference Books:

Industrial Jurisprudence: A Critical Commentary by Dr EM Rao., Lexis Nexis., Second Edition 2015 p. 14-21

Labour and Industrial Law by H.L.Kumar., Universal Law Publishing Co., 2 volumes 15th edition 2010.,p.2082-2125

P.L.Malik‟s Industrial Law 2 Volumes., Eastern Book Company., 23rd Edition 2011.,p.2398-2405 

Pai, G. B. Labour Law in India. New Delhi: Butterworth, 2001. Rao, E. M. Industrial Jurisprudence, New Delhi: LexisNexis (India), 2004.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Industrial Jurisprudence: A Critical Commentary by Dr EM Rao., Lexis Nexis., Second Edition 2015 p. 14-21

Labour and Industrial Law by H.L.Kumar., Universal Law Publishing Co., 2 volumes 15th edition 2010.,p.2082-2125

P.L.Malik‟s Industrial Law 2 Volumes., Eastern Book Company., 23rd Edition 2011.,p.2398-2405 

Pai, G. B. Labour Law in India. New Delhi: Butterworth, 2001. Rao, E. M. Industrial Jurisprudence, New Delhi: LexisNexis (India), 2004.

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment outline: There are in all 3 components in the scheme of evaluation. Weightage for the components is indicated in percentage.

CIA I- Class Test carrying 25 marks

CIA II – Class Test carrying 25 marks

CIA III – Class Test carrying 50 marks

LAW144 - ENVIRONMENTAL LAW (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The present decline in environmental quality calls for a stricter enforcement of laws relating to protection of environment. The objective of this course is to give an insight into various legislations that has been enacted in our country for protection of environment and also to create awareness among the citizens of the country about the duties cast on them under various legislations in relation to protection of environment.

 

Course Objectives:

  • To impart an in-depth knowledge of environmental legislations to students from diverse backgrounds.
  • To interpret, analyse and make a critique of the legislations and Case laws relating to environment
  • To provide a brief understanding of various developments that has taken place at international level to check various environmental harms.

Course Outcome

CO1: learn about environmental law

C02: make students environmentally conscious

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
INTRODUCTION
 

INTRODUCTION

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
INDIAN CONSTITUTION AND ENVIRONMENT
 

INDIAN CONSTITUTION AND ENVIRONMENT

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
JUDICIAL REMEDIES AND PROCEDURES AVAILABLE FOR ABATEMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION
 

JUDICIAL REMEDIES AND PROCEDURES AVAILABLE FOR ABATEMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
ENVIRONMENT (PROTECTION) ACT, 1986
 

ENVIRONMENT (PROTECTION) ACT, 1986

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
ENVIRONMENT (PROTECTION) ACT, 1986
 

ENVIRONMENT (PROTECTION) ACT, 1986

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
WATER (PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF POLLUTION) ACT 1974
 

WATER (PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF POLLUTION) ACT 1974

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:5
FORESTS AND CONSERVATION LAWS
 

FORESTS AND CONSERVATION LAWS

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:5
WILD LIFE PROTECTION AND THE LAW
 

 WILD LIFE PROTECTION AND THE LAW

Unit-9
Teaching Hours:5
INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENTS FOR PROTECTION OF ENVIRONMENT
 

INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENTS FOR PROTECTION OF ENVIRONMENT

Text Books And Reference Books:

MC Mehta Enviromental Law Book

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

MC Mehta Enviromental Law Book

Evaluation Pattern

Class Discussion: 50 Marks

MCQ exam: 50 Marks

MED141 - MEDIA AND POLITICS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

This course considers the degree to which media influences political opinion and actions and also its impact on public policy in the Indian context. In other words, the course examines the role of news media in the Indian political process from both behavioural and institutional perspectives.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: To understand the concepts and theories that inform us about the role of news media in society.

CO2: To be able to critically analyse the role of Indian media in shaping public opinion.

CO3: To attempt a deconstruction of the role social media plays in shaping the fortunes of politicians.

CO4: To apply this understanding to further greater political participation among students.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Media & Politics: A Theoretical Perspective
 

Theories of news media

Media as fourth estate of democracy

Media and civic engagement

Politics and social media: Issues and debates

 

Media regulation and politics

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Media & Politics: Dynamics
 

Media and the political communication process

Media and its impact on public opinion

Sociology of news construction

Media’s role in the empowerment of social movements

Role of media in elections- campaigns, strategies and advertisement

Media role in exposing political scandals

 

Media as spaces for dissent, marginal voices and alternative platforms

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:3
Media & Politics: A Critical Appraisal
 

The corporate world, media conglomerates and politics interface

Media’s role in manufactured consent giving

Visual media and political communication

Role of social media in image building

 

Case study- Rebranding of PM Modi

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

Politics of Media, 1st Edition by Ranjith Thankappan, 2016.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Making Sense of Media and Politics: Five Principles in Political Communication, 2nd Edition by Gadi Wolfsfeld, 2022.

 

Political Communication and Mobilisation: The Hindi Media in India, by Taberez Neyazi, 2018.

Evaluation Pattern

Blog (weekly posts)- reflections on issues in the news media

CIA 1- MCQ

CIA 2- Class test

CIA 3- Group presentation

 

ESE- Written exam

MED142 - AUDIO AND VIDEO PRODUCTION TECHNIQUES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This course will introduce students to the basic principles and techniques of audio and video production. Students will learn how to use a range of equipment and software to produce high-quality audio and video content. This course is designed for non-media students who want to acquire basic skills in audio and video production.

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will be able to identify different types of media software and their uses in the media industry.

CO2: Students will be able to describe the features and functions of software tools used for media production, editing, and distribution.

CO3: Students will be able to use media software tools to create and edit media content.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Introduction to Audio and Video Production
 

Introduction to Audio and Video Production (10 hours)

Basic principles of audio and video production

Overview of equipment used in audio and video production

Introduction to software tools used in audio and video production

 

Audio Production Techniques (10 hours)

Microphone selection and placement

Recording techniques and best practices

 

Mixing and mastering audio content

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Video Production Techniques
 

Video Production Techniques (10 hours)

Camera selection and setup

Lighting techniques and best practices

Shooting and capturing video footage

 

Editing Audio and Video Content (10hours)

Introduction to audio and video editing software

Editing and arranging audio and video content

 

Adding transitions and effects to audio and video content

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Advanced Audio and Video Production
 

Creating soundscapes and sound effects

Advanced camera techniques and shot composition

 

Motion graphics and visual effects

Text Books And Reference Books:

"The Filmmaker's Handbook: A Comprehensive Guide for the Digital Age" by Steven Ascher and Edward Pincus.

"Audio Engineering 101: A Beginner's Guide to Music Production" by Tim Dittmar

"The Art of Digital Audio Recording: A Practical Guide for Home and Studio" by Steve Savage

"Video Production Handbook" by Gerald Millerson and Jim Owens

 

"Pro Tools 101: An Introduction to Pro Tools 11" by Frank D. Cook

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

"The Filmmaker's Handbook: A Comprehensive Guide for the Digital Age" by Steven Ascher and Edward Pincus

"Audio Engineering 101: A Beginner's Guide to Music Production" by Tim Dittmar

"The Art of Digital Audio Recording: A Practical Guide for Home and Studio" by Steve Savage

"Video Production Handbook" by Gerald Millerson and Jim Owens

 

"Pro Tools 101: An Introduction to Pro Tools 11" by Frank D. Cook

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 – Interview Project - Students could work in groups to produce a video where they interview employees of a local business or organization. The video could showcase the company culture and highlight different aspects of the business. (15Marks)

CIA 2 – Product Demo Video Project - Students could work in groups to produce a video that showcases a product or service. The video would need to be engaging and informative, and would aim to persuade the viewer to purchase or use the product or service. (20 Marks)

CIA 3 – Educational Video Project - Students could work in groups to produce an educational video on a topic of their choice. The video would need to be informative and engaging, and could cover topics like science, history, or current events. (15 Marks)

All CIAs   – Department level only

MED143 - CELEBRITY PR (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course attempts to understand the nature, process and issues related to celebrity actors and their presence, which inadvertently contribute to the success of films.

Course Outcome

CO1: Will be able to understand the concept of celebrity PR

CO2: Will be able to understand the role of celebrity presence in the success of a film

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Understanding PR as Strategic Communication
 

PR concept, role and relevance in selling goods/services; Brief history & evolution of PR. Competing forces for PR-Advertising, Publicity, Marketing/Sales. PR as distinct from spin, hype & exaggeration. Top Bollywood PR firms in India-Dale Bhagwagar PR, Raindrops, Spice PR, Aspire PR.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Celebrity PR and Bollywood
 

Bollywood and the need and emergence ofCelebrity PR, early beginnings, and present status. Acquiring and sustaining celebrity status through PR, Celebrity brand building & nurturing. PR in celebrity reputation management. Building the celebrity profile through analysis and research. Case Study-The making of Shilpa Shetty (UK's Big Brother Reality TV), Amitabh Bachchan and KBC, Aamir Khan and Satyameva Jayate

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Celebrity PR Responsibilities & Activities
 

Interviews, Press conferences,Rejoinders,Official comments/no comments. Organising events-Public 'meet and greet', Social events of significance, Public gatherings-award functions, airport meets.  Helping to manage crisis--damaging details from celebrity past, social media criticism and backlash, dealing with success and failure with grace and dignity, Helping deal with paparazzi encounter

Text Books And Reference Books:

Barron, Lee. (2015). Celebrity Cultures: An Introduction. SAGE Publications Ltd. Bräu, Marlena. (2013), Twitter Kills The Publicity Star? How social media is influencing the business of Celebrity PR. Grin Verlag Publishing, Germany. Jonas, C Priyanka. (2021). Unfinished: A Memoir. Penguin Viking.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Raju, J Jeetu. (2020). Escape the rat race. Google Books, Thames Publication. Stewart, B James and Abrams, Rachel. (2023). Unscripted: The Epic Battle for a Hollywood Media Empire. Penguin Books.

Evaluation Pattern

Single assessment of 50 marks

MED144 - HARRY POTTER AND CONTEMPORARY ISSUES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course will provide students the opportunity to apply a variety of interdisciplinary approaches on popular young adult narratives. Students will be exposed to the real -world culture and physical environment that produced, shaped, and continues to inform the Harry Potter series, giving students greater insight into the importance of textual awareness and analysis.

Course Outcome

CO1: Explore the socio-cultural, historical, and technological perspectives behind Harry Potter phenomenon.

CO2: Develop critical thinking skills

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
History of wizards in cinema
 

History of wizards in cinema – P L Travers, Disney era, rise of Nanny McPhee, Arrival of Harry potter in bookstores, narrative development of book 1 – Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, Deconstruction of characters, significance of four houses, potions, beasts and spells.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Hogwarts a world class school
 

Hogwarts a world class school – dynamics of homework, relationship, bullying, teachers, team spirits and opponents, wizards and other, Debates on Morality, Technology and Media in Potter world, Privacy concerns with magical objects, Cultural Hegemony, Case Study on Snape and Dumbledore

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Sociological perspective
 

Sociological perspective – idea of home, community, clan and society, class struggle and dynamics, Aurora and Azkaban, Representation of Gender, Idea of family and institution, construction of power structures

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Film Screening
 

Screening of First and Last Harry Potter films

Text Books And Reference Books:

Harry Potter and Sorcerer’s Stone, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0590353427)

Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0439064873)

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0439136365)

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0439139601)

Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0439358071)

Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0439785969)

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0545139700)

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

Whited, L A & Grimes, K. (2015). Critical Insights: The Harry Potter Series. Salem Books.

Bell, C E (2018). Inside the World of Harry Potter: Critical Essays on the Books and Films.McFarland Publishers.

Evaluation Pattern

Assignments will be done through Google Classroom

CIA -1 – Class Test– 20 marks

CIA 2 –  – 50 marks

CIA 3 – Group Assignment – 20 marks

End Semester - Project – 50 marks

MED146 - PUBLIC SPEAKING (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Public Speaking is an essential skill in the twenty first century that offers a lot of benefits for thos excel in it. Thise who have the gift of the gab are bound to interact with people with a lot of confidence and exert influence on how others respond. It boosts the chances of anyone to build their professional profile. Apart from these obvious positives in the personal and interpersonal spheres, those with Public Speaking skills are often seen as potential leaders. This course on Public Speaking aims to provide a solid conceptual foundation and a lot of opportunities for the participants to build their public speaking skills and excel at different levels.  

Course Outcome

CO1: The student will be able to demonstrate one's capacity to positively manage stage fright.

CO2: The student will be able to organise the content of one's speech strategically.

CO3: The student will be able to speak confidently and employ different mechanisms to create an impact on the audience.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Public Speaking - Basics
 

Why Public Speaking?

Sample Public Speeches

Understanding the Psychological and Physiological states while speaking  

Overcoming Stage Fright

Understanding context, objectives and the audience

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Manner of speaking
 

In this unit, the students will learn how to speak.

Voice and delivery: Volume, texture, pauses, pace, variance

Body language: Gestures, postures, movement

Stage Presence: Using the mike,  the podium and the rostrum; positioning, spatial interactions

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Matter of speaking
 

Organisation: Beginning, middle and ending

Working on the desired impact

Practice and feedback

Text Books And Reference Books:

Gallo, C. (2017). Talk like TED. Pan Books.

Acker, M. (2019). Speak with no fear: Go from a Nervous, Nauseated, and Sweaty Speaker to an Excited, Energized, and Passionate Presenter. Advance, Coaching and Consulting.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Gallo, C. (2017). Talk like TED. Pan Books.

Acker, M. (2019). Speak with no fear: Go from a Nervous, Nauseated, and Sweaty Speaker to an Excited, Energized, and Passionate Presenter. Advance, Coaching and Consulting.

Evaluation Pattern

 Evaluation 1: One-minute self introduction

Evaluation 2: three-minute speech on one's chosen topic

Evaluation 3: five-minute speech on a given topic

 

PHY141 - FUNDAMENTAL OF FORENSIC PHYSICS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course introduces the students to the fundamentals of forensic science. Student will be introduced to the different analytical tool to analyse the results. They will also learn the physics behind investigative method used to gather evident. Finally, students will study emerging use of nanotechnology in forensic science.  

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the different technique to analyse the results.

CO2: Understand the basic science underlying the motion of bullets, collisions, explosion and blood dynamics.

CO3: Learn about the advantage of nanotechnology in forensic science.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Analytical instruments and techniques of forensic physics
 

Introduction, electromagnetic spectrum, sources of radiation, their utility and limitations, refractive index, interaction of light with matter, idea on instrumentation and results analysis.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Forensic physics
 

Scope and significance of forensic physics, basic physics in solving crime, motion of bullet and other projectile, vehicular collisions, blood stain analysis using fluid mechanics, physics of explosions, development and identification of latent fingerprints using optics.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Nanotechnology in forensic science
 

Nanotechnology, utilization of nanotechnology in analysis of physical evidence, applications of nanotechnology in forensic evidence analysis, introduction to nanomaterials, types of nanomaterials. 

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. B.B. Nanda and R.K Tiwari, Forensic Science in India: A vision for the Twenty First Centrury, select publishers, New Delhi (2001)
  2. CM Hussain, D Rawtani, G Pandey, M Tharmavaram, Handbook of Analytical Techniques for Forensic Samples: Current and Emerging Developments, ISBN: 978-0-12-822300-0, Elsevier, 2020
  3. M.K Bhasin and S.Nath, Role of Forensic Science in the New Millenium, University of Delhi, Delhi(2002).
  4.  S.H James and J.J Nordby, Forensic Science :An introduction to scientific and Investigative Techniques, 2nd Edition, CRC Press, Boca Raton(2005)
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. W.G. Eckert and R.K. Wright in Introduction to Forensic Sciiences, 2nd Edition, W.G. Eckert (ED), CRC Press, Boca Raton(1997).
  2. R. Saferstein, M.L. Hastrup and C.Hald, Fisher’s Techniques of Crime scene Investigation, CRC Press, Boca Raton (2013)
  3. W.J. Tilstone, M.L. Hastrup and C.Hald, Fisher’s Techniques of Crime Scene Investigation, CRC Press, Boca Raton (2013)
Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation will be based on presentations by each student and class work.

POL141 - DEMOCRACY AND ETHICAL VALUES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course has been conceptualized to introduce and discuss the moral foundations of democracy in principle, and democratic institutions, in particular. The students are initiated to various types of moral discourses in political philosophy. Further, this course looks at the development of democracy, in the global as well as the national realm. Democracy as an ideal gets fructified in the form of a government, which in turn is based on the principles of justice, freedom, equality, and fraternity. Ethics acts as the premise on which a successful democracy rests.

Course Outcome

CO1: By the end of the course the learner should be able to: Demonstrate civic and political consciousness

CO2: To have a dedicated and empathetic band of students who would act as agents of change in society.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
DEMOCRACY AND ETHICS: AN INTRODUCTION
 
  1. Democracy
    1. Conceptual development of Democracy
    2. Principles of Democracy: Freedom, Equality and Fraternity
  2. Ethics
    1. Concept of Values, Morals and Ethics
  3. Democracy vis-a-vis Ethics
    1. Government by Consent
    2. Constitutional Government and Rule of Law
    3. Democracy and Human Rights
Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
DEMOCRACY AND ETHICS: AN INTRODUCTION
 
  1. Democracy
    1. Conceptual development of Democracy
    2. Principles of Democracy: Freedom, Equality and Fraternity
  2. Ethics
    1. Concept of Values, Morals and Ethics
  3. Democracy vis-a-vis Ethics
    1. Government by Consent
    2. Constitutional Government and Rule of Law
    3. Democracy and Human Rights
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
PERSPECTIVES ON ETHICS
 
  1. Western Thought
    1. Duty Ethic
    2. Utilitarianism
  2. Indian Thought                                                                  

a.     Hindu Tradition: Dharma and Karma, Purusharthas

b.     Buddhist Tradition: Four Noble Truths and Eight-fold Path

c.     Indian syncretic traditions-Ashoka, Kabir and Akbar

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
PERSPECTIVES ON ETHICS
 
  1. Western Thought
    1. Duty Ethic
    2. Utilitarianism
  2. Indian Thought                                                                  

a.     Hindu Tradition: Dharma and Karma, Purusharthas

b.     Buddhist Tradition: Four Noble Truths and Eight-fold Path

c.     Indian syncretic traditions-Ashoka, Kabir and Akbar

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
CHALLENGES TO INDIAN DEMOCRACY
 
  1. Institutional
    1. Free and fair elections
    2. Ethical Code of Conduct for Politicians
    3. Character record of members of the legislature
    4. Ethical use of majority in parliament
    5. Avoidance of ‘floor crossing’ and defection
    6. Alliance of political parties to form brittle governments
    7. Independence of judiciary and media
    8. Safeguard national history and avoid distortion
    9. Political neutrality in educational institutions.
    10. Judicious allocation of central funds to states
    11. Freedom of Press
  2. Citizen Centric
    1. Free speech and Expression
    2. Right to dissent
    3. Preventive detention and Sedition 
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
CHALLENGES TO INDIAN DEMOCRACY
 
  1. Institutional
    1. Free and fair elections
    2. Ethical Code of Conduct for Politicians
    3. Character record of members of the legislature
    4. Ethical use of majority in parliament
    5. Avoidance of ‘floor crossing’ and defection
    6. Alliance of political parties to form brittle governments
    7. Independence of judiciary and media
    8. Safeguard national history and avoid distortion
    9. Political neutrality in educational institutions.
    10. Judicious allocation of central funds to states
    11. Freedom of Press
  2. Citizen Centric
    1. Free speech and Expression
    2. Right to dissent
    3. Preventive detention and Sedition 
Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Christiano, Thomas, ed., Philosophy and Democracy, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002.
  2. Dewey, John, “Philosophy and Democracy” [1919] and “The Ethics of Democracy” [1888] in The Political Writings, ed. D. Morris, I. Shapiro, Indianapolis: Hackett, 1993.
  3. Finnis, John. Fundamentals of Ethics. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1983.
  4. Gandhi, M. K. An Autobiography or The Story of My Experiments with Truth. Ahmedabad: Navajivan Mudranalaya, 1927.
  5. Granville, Austin, The Indian Constitution: Cornerstone of a Nation. New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2000.
  6. Jain, Subhash, The Constitution of India: Select Issues and Perceptions. New Delhi: Taxmann, 2000.
  7. Walzer, Michael, “Philosophy and Democracy”, Political Theory, Vol.9, No.3, 1981, 379-399.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

  1. Locke, John, Second Treatise on Civil Government, (1690), ed. C. B. MacPherson, Indianapolis, IN: Hackett, 1980.
  2. Kant, Immanuel. Foundations of the Metaphysics of Morals. trans. Lewis White Beck, Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merril, 1959.
  3. Kant, Immanuel, Critique of Practical Reason, trans. Lewis White Beck, Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merril, 1956.
  4. Machiavelli, The Prince [1513], ed. Q. Skinner, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1988.
  5. Plato, The Republic, revised/trans. by Desmond Lee, Harmondsworth, UK: Penguin Books, 1974.
  6. Rawls, John, Political Liberalism, New York: Columbia University Press, 1996
  1. Sandel, Michael (ed.), Justice—A Reader, Oxford University Press, 2007.
  2. Singer, Peter, Democracy and Disobedience, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1973.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1-25

CIA 2-25

CIA 3-50

POL142 - SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The main objectives of the course are to:

      Present an overview of the major concepts, debates, and historical facets of STI in IR.

      Create a foundation for the students to pursue further research in various aspects of STI in IR, and provide a systemic understanding of its impact on the economy, politics, culture, society, and foreign relations of India and other countries.

Providing an academic understanding in the current context of emerging technologies, its impact and influences in the society, as well as create avenues for interdisciplinary understanding and research.

Course Outcome

CO1: - Understand the nature, scope and significance of STI in International Relations (IR). - Understand the concepts, ideas, and debates in Science, Technology and Innovation vis-a-vis International Relations.

CO2: - Learn to use conceptual tools to understand new developments which of Science, Technology and Innovation in International Relations. - Analyze the major theories/approaches of Science, Technol-ogy and Innovation. - Develop a critical perspective on the major international regimes/ issues in STI in International Relations.

CO3: - Develop a thorough understanding on the scientific, technological and innovation-related process in major powers and national economies, especially India. - Explore the ways and Science, Technology and Innovation issues confronted by the world from a foreign policy perspective.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction
 

Science, Technology and Innovation (STI) in International Relations;

History and Evolution of STI in International Relations;

STI and Globalization;

STI and Diplomacy;

State, non-State actors and Stakeholders;

STI and International Institutions;

International Scientific Relations (ISR)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Basic Concepts and Theories:
 

Digital Westphalia,

Technonationalism,

Cyberspace and related facets of sovereignty, warfare, security, espionage, terrorism, and crime;

Data sovereignty, Technocolonialism; Digital imperialism,

Security v Privacy debate,

STI and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Global STI Landscape
 

History and Evolution of Global STI Landscape;

Fourth Industrial Revolution;

Knowledge Economy;

STI and Human Capital;

International Political Economy of STI

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
India:
 

India’s STI Policies: history, evolution, implementation and challenges;

Spin-offs: civilian, military;

Research and Development (R&D);

Political Economy of India’s STI Ecosystem;

Institutions and Organisations

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Case Studies:
 

STI landscape in countries: Emergent Technologies and Institutions, Internet of Things; Artificial Intelligence; Big Data; Blockchain

Text Books And Reference Books:

Aghion, P., David, P.A. and Foray, D. (2008). Science, Technology and Innovation for Economic Growth: Linking Policy Research and Practice in 'Stig Systems'. Research Policy 38(4): 681-693.

Del Canto Viterale, F. (2021). International Scientific Relations: Science, Technology and Innovation in the International System of the 21st Century. Anthem Press.

Ogburn, W.F. (1949). Technology and international relations. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

Colglazier, E.W. and Montgomery, K. (2022). Opportunities and Challenges for Science Diplomacy. Science & Diplomacy.

Hieronymi, O. (1987). Technology and International Relations. London: Palgrave Macmillan.

Leijten, J. Innovation policy and international relations: directions for EU diplomacy. Eur J Futures Res 7, 4 (2019).

M. Mayer, M. Carpes, & R. Knoblich. (eds.). (2014). The Global Politics of Science and Technology - Vol. 1. Springer Berlin, Heidelberg.

Ruffini, P.-B. (2017). Science and Diplomacy: A New Dimension of International Relations. Paris: Springer International Publishing AG.

 

Klein, U. (2020). Technoscience in History: Prussia, 1750-1850. MIT: The MIT Press.

McIlwain, C.H. (1933). A Fragment on Sovereignty. Political Science Quarterly, Vol. 48(1), pp. 94-106.

Negroponte, N. (1995). Being Digital. Hodder and Stoughton: Great Britain.

Reghunadhan, R. (2022). Cyber Technological Paradigms and Threat Landscape in India. First Edition., Palgrave Macmillan, Springer Singapore, ISBN: 978-981-1691-27-0.

Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR). (2017a). Findings of The Investigation into China’s Acts, Policies, and Practices Related to Technology Transfer, Intellectual Property, and Innovation Under Section 301 of The Trade Act of 1974. https://ustr.gov/sites/default/files/Section%20301%20FINAL.PDF: 3-18 

Schmidt, J.C. (2021). Philosophy of Interdisciplinarity: Studies in Science, Society and Sustainability. History and Philosophy of Technoscience. Oxford: Routledge.

Schultz, T.W. (1961). Investment in Human Capital. The American Economic Review 51(1): 1-17.

Trencher, G. (2018). Towards the smart city 2.0: Empirical evidence of using smartness as a tool for tackling social challenges, Technological Forecasting and Social Change 142: 117-128.

Suttmeier, R.P., Cao, C. and Simon, D.F. (2006). China’s Innovation Challenge and the Remaking of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. Innovations: Technology, Governance, Globalization 1(3d): 78-97.

Landes, D. (2006). Why Europe and the West? Why Not China? The Journal of Economic Perspectives 20(2): 3-22.

M. Z. Taylor. (2016). The Politics of Innovation: Why Some Countries Are Better Than Others at Science and Technology. Oxford: Oxford University Press

Villa-Henriksen, A., Edwards, G.T.C., Pesonen, L.A., Green, O. and Sørensen, C.A.G. (2020). Internet of Things in arable farming: implementation, applications, challenges and potential. Biosys. Eng. 191: 60–84

Zhang, W. (2019). Constitutional Governance in India and China and Its Impact on National Innovation. In Liu, K-C. and Racheria, U. (eds.). Innovation, Economic Development, and Intellectual Property in India and China. ARCIALA Series on Intellectual Assets and Law in Asia. Springer Singapore: Singapore: 39-67.

Department of Science and Technology (DST). (2020). Science, Technology, and Innovation Policy. Government of India. https://dst.gov.in/sites/default/files/STIP_Doc_1.4_Dec2020.pdf

Reghunadhan, R. (2022). Cyber Technological Paradigms and Threat Landscape in India. First Edition., Palgrave Macmillan, Springer Singapore, ISBN: 978-981-1691-27-0.

Kharbanda and Ashok Jain. (eds.). Science and Technology Strategies: for Development in India and China. New Delhi: Har-Anand Publications Pvt Ltd: 93-134.

P.K. Pattnaik et al. (eds). IoT and Analytics for Agriculture, Volume 3. Studies in Big Data, vol 99, Singapore: Springer, pp. 201-225, ISBN: 978-981-16-6210-2.

Krishnan Saravanan et al. (eds.). Handbook of Research on Blockchain Technology, London: Academic Press (Elsevier), pp. 1-34, ISBN: 9780128198162.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

Department of Science and Technology (DST). (2020). Science, Technology, and Innovation Policy. Government of India. https://dst.gov.in/sites/default/files/STIP_Doc_1.4_Dec2020.pdf

Reghunadhan, R. (2022). Cyber Technological Paradigms and Threat Landscape in India. First Edition., Palgrave Macmillan, Springer Singapore, ISBN: 978-981-1691-27-0.

Kharbanda and Ashok Jain. (eds.). Science and Technology Strategies: for Development in India and China. New Delhi: Har-Anand Publications Pvt Ltd: 93-134.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Written analyses in about 800-1500 words submitted 

Multiple Choice Questions (MCQs) covering wide range of facets that focus on knowledge, skill and attitude of the student and their understanding on the topic.

 Subjective type question(s): Understanding the emerging complexities and dynamics in the region

Application of the understanding to the situation

Solutions to the problems given

POL143 - SUBALTERN STUDIES: NARRATIVES OF THE COMMUNITIES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Subaltern Studies emerged as an intellectual project to counter the elitism prevailing in dominant historical narratives. This project aimed at giving voice to the people’s autonomous agency and struggles against the dominant forces. They offered a new outlook to narratives of Peasant, Adivasi and Woman’s movements in history. Over time, subaltern perspective was adopted to understand several issues concerning India and it still holds significant relevance in shedding light on contemporary issues. This course aims to introduce the students to subaltern studies and cultivate a new standpoint to understand and interpret the world.

Course Outcome

CO 1: Demonstrate knowledge about subaltern studies, its foundations, relevance methodology, and critique

CO 2: Analyse various narratives of communities, avenues of their struggles against the dominance

CO 3: Develop a sensibility to view the world from a subaltern perspective

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to Subaltern Studies
 

Foundation of Subaltern Studies Collective, Ranajit Guha, Need of subaltern studies, Resources, Subaltern life narratives

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Communities Countering the Dominance
 

State and subaltern citizens, Dominance without Hegemony, Peasant rebellions, Dalit and Adivasi Assertion, Indian Nationalism, Women’s question and the emergence of counter narratives

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Contemporary Avenues of subaltern struggles
 

Cricket and caste, Environmental movements, political and social mobilization of marginalized classes, public theatre and reclaiming dignity

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Subaltern Narratives in Film, Fiction and Folklore
 

-       Films: Laggan, Karnan, and The Discreet Charm of the Savarnas

-       Fiction: Subaltern in Mahasweta Devi’s stories (Jamunabati’s Mother, and Mother of 1084)

-       Folklore: Folktales from India, “So Many Words, So many sounds”: An Interview

-       People’s Archive of Rural India

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Critiquing the subaltern studies
 

- Exploring the Relevance and Irrelevance of subaltern studies

- Adding new locations? Or After subaltern studies?

Text Books And Reference Books:

 Guha, R. (1982). Preface. In R. Guha (Ed.), Subaltern Studies I (pp. vii–viii). Oxford University Press

Guha, R. (1982). On Some Aspects of the Historiography of Colonial India. In R. Guha (Ed.), Subaltern Studies I (pp. 1–8). Oxford University Press.

Kumar, R. (2021). Police Matters: The Everyday State and Caste Politics in South India, 1900–1975. Cornell University Press.

Guha, R. (2005). ‘The Moral that can be Safely Drawn from the Hindus’ Magnificent Victory’: Cricket, Caste and the Palwankar Brothers. In J. H. Mills (Ed.), Subaltern Sports: Politics and Sport in South Asia (pp. 83–106). Anthem Press.

        Ahuja, A. (2019). Mobilizing the Marginalized. Oxford University Press.

       Chatterjee, P. (2012). After subaltern studies. In Economic and Political Weekly (Vol. 47, Issue 35).

       Ramanujan, A. K. (2009). Folktales From India. Penguin India.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bhadra, G. (1983). Two Frontier Uprisings in Mughal India. In R. Guha (Ed.), SS II (pp. 43–59). Oxford University Press.

Berg, D. E. (2021).Casteism and the Tsundur Atrocity. In Dynamics of Caste and Law (pp. 127–149). Cambridge University Press.

Chemmencheri, S. R. (2015). State, social policy and subaltern citizens in adivasi India. Citizenship Studies, 19(3–4), 436–449.

Das, A. N. (1983). Agrarian Change from Above and Below: Bihar 1947-78. In Ranajit Guha (Ed.), SS II (pp. 180–227). Oxford University Press.

Devi, M. (2005). Jamunabati’s Mother. In In the Name of the Mother. Seagull Books.

Devi, M. (2008). Mother of 1084. Seagull Books.

Guha, R. (1995). Review: Subaltern and Bhadralok Studies. Economic and Political Weekly, 30(33), 2056–2058.

Guha, R. (1996). The Small Voice of History. In  Amin & Chakrabarty (Ed.), SS IX (pp. 1–12). Oxford University Press.

“So Many Words, So many sounds”: An Interview. (2004). In Romtha. Seagull Books.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I-25 Marks

CIA II-25 Marks

CIA III-50 Marks

PSY101-1 - INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This first-semester course introduces undergraduate psychology majors to the scientific study of human nature. The student would be able to understand how psychologists ask questions from several different perspectives. Students will learn about the various scientific methods psychologists use to study behaviour and become acquainted with many of psychology's important findings and theoretical approaches. Further, students will be able to appreciate the shape that contemporary psychology has taken. The aim is to build a familiarity with psychology’s intellectual origins and to foster an awareness of its many false steps, dead-ends, and alternative pathways to appreciating the social, cultural, and psychological influences on theorising in psychology. The course will equip the student with knowledge and scope for careers in psychology and develop an understanding of the professional skills required for such a career. Students will have learned to think critically about psychological evidence through journal clubs and class discussions embedded in the course.

Course Outcome

CO1: Explain the fundamental concepts, principles, and scientific approaches in psychology.

CO2: Evaluate the history of psychology and how it has impacted today?s society.

CO3: Reflect on the different career paths, roles, challenges, and responsibilities of a psychologist

CO4: Critically analyse psychological research and different psychological issues with evidence-based reasoning.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
CO1. Explain the fundamental concepts, principles and scientific approaches in psychology.
 

Definition, Goals, Principles of psychology. Psychology as a science: Objectivity versus subjectivity. mind-body connection; Why study behaviour; Thinking like a psychologist about psychological information; Myths and misconceptions about psychology

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
CO2. Evaluate the history of psychology and how it has impacted today?s society.
 

Roots of psychology: Schools and perspectives of psychology, including Structuralism, Functionalism, Psychodynamic, Biological, Behaviouristic, Gestalt, Cognitive, Humanistic, Cross-cultural and Evolutionary. Eastern philosophies broader perspectives– Confucius and Taoism, Indian - Buddhism, (special comparing Eastern and Western principles in major concepts like consciousness and meditation). Psychology in modern India (Indigenous nature) 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
CO3. Reflect on the different roles, challenges and responsibilities of the psychologist
 

Why study psychology? what is the scope Describe the value of psychology and possible career paths for those who study psychology? Specific focus on opportunities after BA; Allied professionals -social work, public health Broad focus on professional skills (especially as a practitioner and researcher) essential to be a psychologist and discuss the temper required to pursue psychology as a career. What can students do at BA to pursue a career in psychology? Multicultural and ethical issues; professional responsibility- Personal and professional roles.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
CO4: Critically analyse psychological research and different psychological issues with evidence-based reasoning
 

Methods – use of scientific methods in psychology; scientific temper. How to review literature- discuss current issues and trends- Mental health literacy, psychological literacy, Current trends in Psychology, and issues discussed in CO 1,2 or 3

Writing and communicating using APA standards -Critically reviewing academic texts (books, journal articles etc.). APA style of writing Basic APA formatting for articles, APA referencing style, Academic writing skills.  

Text Books And Reference Books:

Feldman, R. S. (2011). Understanding Psychology. Tata McGraw Hill.

Weiten, W. (2014). Psychology: Themes and Variations (Briefer Version, 9th edition). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/Cengage Learning. 

American Psychological Association. (2020). Publication manual of the American Psychological Association (7th Ed.).https://doi.org/10. 1037/0000165-000

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Ciccarelli, S.K. & White, J. N. (2012). Psychology (3rd edition). Pearson Education. 

Dalal, A. K., & Misra, G. (2010). The core and context of Indian psychology. Psychology and developing societies, 22(1), 121-155.

Brennan, J.F. (2003). History and systems of psychology (6thEdn.).New Delhi: Pearson Education Inc.

Hergenhahn, B.R. & Henley, T. (2013). An Introduction to the History of Psychology. Belmont, CA: Cengage Learning.

Hockenbury, D. H. & Hockenbury, S. E. (2011). Discovering Psychology (5th edition). Worth Publishers 

 Showman, A., Cat, L. A., Cook, J., Holloway, N., & Wittman, T. (2013). Five essential skills for every undergraduate researcher. Council on Undergraduate Research Quarterly, 33(3), 16+. https://link.gale.com/a pps/doc/A324399343/ AONE?u=monash&sid =googleScholar&xid= a3697d9b

Evaluation Pattern

5 marks for attendance as per University Policy

CIA 1 & 3 will be individual assignments

CIA2- will be a mid-semester exam- with case study-based questions

End Semester Pattern- 2 hrs- 50 Marks

Section A (Very Short Answer). 2 Marks X 5Qs= 10 Marks

Section B (Short answers). 5 Marks X 2Qs= 10 Marks

Section C (Essay questions). 10 Marks X 2Qs= 20 Marks

Section D (Case study). 10 Marks x 1Q= 10 Marks

PSY161-1 - LIFE-SKILL EDUCATION (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This paper is offered to undergraduate students as a skill-enhancement course. Basically, the course follows the WHO life skills model. Where life skills education is well developed and practised, it enhances the well-being of young minds and promotes a positive outlook and healthy behaviour. The life skills model facilitates the overall development of the individual, and this course will help the learner to translate knowledge, attitude, skills, and values into action. Hence the course adopts an experiential learning pedagogy providing students with an opportunity for personal development.

Course Outcome

CO1: Explain the significance and major aspects of Life Skills Education

CO2: Apply life skills in their day-to-day life situations

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
CO1: Explain the significance and major aspects of Life Skill Education
 

Definition and Importance of life skills, life skills approach and Life skill education, Core life skills according to WHO - Personal/social Skills, Cognitive skills and Coping skills, quality education and life skills; Life skills for self and others 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:30
CO2: Apply life skills in their day-to-day life situations
 

Interpersonal Skills and Conflict Resolution, multicultural awarenessSWOC analysis, Johari window, -Discuss issuesBehave responsibly and which leads to healthy living; Promote risk-free behaviour. Effective communication and listening skills, Emotional Intelligence, Conflict resolution strategies, and Teamwork. Life Skills for self-development- Improve self-perception through building self-confidence, self-esteem and self-worth Stress management and strategies, mindfulness and relaxation technique

Text Books And Reference Books:

WHO (1997). Life Skills for Children and Adolescents.

WHO (1999). Partners in Life Skills Education: Conclusions from a United Nations Inter-Agency Meeting, WHO, Geneva.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

UNESCO (2005). Quality Education and Life Skills: Darkar Goals, UNESCO, Paris.  

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 & 2 will be individual assignments; 5 marks class engagement and supervisor feedback  - Total 50 marks

CIA 3- Department level -submission, viva/presentation - Total 50 marks

SOC141 - WOMEN'S ISSUES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course aims at enabling the student to study and understand the problems and issues relating to women in Indian society in the context of wider social forces. This course will sensitize students on the issues of subjugation of and oppression prevalent against women in Indian society and enhance their understanding of the various social problems that women face in the society.

Course objectives :

●        To introduce the students to social issues relating to women

●        To explore gender relations from an interdisciplinary perspective 

Course Outcome

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Unit I: Sociological Understanding of Social Problem with a Gender Perspective
 
  1. Conceptualization of a social problem                                         
  2. Structural and functional perspective, cultural roots, and critical analysis of social issues under power, ideology, and hegemony.
  3.  Understanding Gender and subjugation of gender.
Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Unit I: Sociological Understanding of Social Problem with a Gender Perspective
 
  1. Conceptualization of a social problem                                         
  2. Structural and functional perspective, cultural roots, and critical analysis of social issues under power, ideology, and hegemony.
  3.  Understanding Gender and subjugation of gender.
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Unit II: Problems of Inequality
 
  1. Poverty - Concept of poverty, its multidimensional manifestations, Feminization of Poverty.
  2. Caste Inequality - Concept of caste, nature of inequality and position of women within it.
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Unit II: Problems of Inequality
 
  1. Poverty - Concept of poverty, its multidimensional manifestations, Feminization of Poverty.
  2. Caste Inequality - Concept of caste, nature of inequality and position of women within it.
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit III: Problems of Violence and Discrimination
 
  1. Violence against Women: Cultural setting, Dowry, acid attacks, physical and sexual abuse, Global Sex Market.
  2. Missing Millions- Skewed sex ratio, son preference
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit III: Problems of Violence and Discrimination
 
  1. Violence against Women: Cultural setting, Dowry, acid attacks, physical and sexual abuse, Global Sex Market.
  2. Missing Millions- Skewed sex ratio, son preference
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Unit IV: Problem of Personal Well-being
 
  1. Women and Health : Reproductive health
  2. Aging and women
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Unit IV: Problem of Personal Well-being
 
  1. Women and Health : Reproductive health
  2. Aging and women
Text Books And Reference Books:

Bhasin, K. (1994). What is Patriarchy? New Delhi: Kali for Women.

Beteille, A. (1990). Race, Caste and Gender. Man, 25(3), 489–504. https://doi.org/10.2307/2803715

John, Mary E. (2008). Women’s Studies in India: A Reader. New Delhi:Penguin Books.

Krishnaraj, M. (2007). Understanding Violence against Women. Economic and Political Weekly, 42(44), 90–91. http://www.jstor.org/stable/40276750

Kotiswaran, P. (2008). Born Unto Brothels: Toward a Legal Ethnography of Sex Work in an Indian Red-Light Area. Law & Social Inquiry, 33(3), 579–629. http://www.jstor.org/stable/20108776

KUMAR, A. K. S. (2013). The Neglect of Health, Women and Justice. Economic and Political Weekly, 48(23), 25–27. http://www.jstor.org/stable/23527205

 

Karkal, M. (1999). Ageing and Women in India. Economic and Political Weekly, 34(44), WS54–WS56. http://www.jstor.org/stable/4408566

 

Merton, R and Nisbet. (1966). Contemporary Social Problems, New York: Harcourt, Brace and World.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bhasin, K. (1994). What is Patriarchy? New Delhi: Kali for Women.

Evaluation Pattern

Internal Assessment:

CIA 1  10 marks (conducted out of 20 )- Class Presentations

CIA 2 10 marks (conducted out of 20 )- Article Review

CIA 3 25 marks (conducted out of 50 ) - Prferably an exam

Attendance 5 marks 

 

SOC142 - CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL PROBLEMS AND CHALLENGES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course discusses various social issues which are of relevance for contemporary world. These issues surround the broad themes of population, health, development. In relation to population and health this course would cover issues like aging, reproductive health, HIV AIDS, euthanasia, drug abuse, etc. In relation to development this course would look into issues like urban land use, farmer’s suicide, displacement, etc.

 Course Objective:

Students shall be able to identify and analyze contemporary social problems. They will be able to apply interdisciplinary approach to relevant policies at local, national, and international levels.

 

Course Outcome

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Sociological Analysis of Social Problems
 
  1. Study of ‘Social Problems’
  2. Characteristics, Stages and Reactions 
Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Sociological Analysis of Social Problems
 
  1. Study of ‘Social Problems’
  2. Characteristics, Stages and Reactions 
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Population and Health and Social Problems
 
  1. Demographic Transition
  2. HIV AIDS and societal alienation
  3. Drug Abuse

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Population and Health and Social Problems
 
  1. Demographic Transition
  2. HIV AIDS and societal alienation
  3. Drug Abuse

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Development and social problems
 
  1. Poverty
  2. Corruption
  3. Development induced displacement

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Development and social problems
 
  1. Poverty
  2. Corruption
  3. Development induced displacement

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Human Rights Issues
 
  1. Covenants
  2. Human Rights Organizations
  3. Domestic Violence and child abuse

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Human Rights Issues
 
  1. Covenants
  2. Human Rights Organizations
  3. Domestic Violence and child abuse

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Alavi, H.D and Shanin, T. (Ed.) (1982). Introduction to the Sociology of Developing Societies, London: MacMillan.

Ahuja R.  (2014). Social problems in India. New Delhi: Rawat Publication.  

Merton, R. and Nisbet. (1966). Contemporary Social Problems, New York: Harcourt, Brace and World.

Shah, G. (2001). Cultural Subordination & Dalit Challenge. Vol. II

Weeks, J. (2011). Population: An Introduction to Concepts and Issues. Wadsworth Publishing Company, California.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Alavi, H.D and Shanin, T. (Ed.) (1982). Introduction to the Sociology of Developing Societies, London: MacMillan.

Ahuja R.  (2014). Social problems in India. New Delhi: Rawat Publication.  

Merton, R. and Nisbet. (1966). Contemporary Social Problems, New York: Harcourt, Brace and World.

Shah, G. (2001). Cultural Subordination & Dalit Challenge. Vol. II

Weeks, J. (2011). Population: An Introduction to Concepts and Issues. Wadsworth Publishing Company, California.

Evaluation Pattern
CIA 1  10 marks (conducted out of 20 )
 
CIA 2 10 marks (conducted out of 20 )
 
CIA 3 25 marks (conducted out of 50 ) 
 
Attendance 5 marks 

SOC143 - SOCIOLOGY THROUGH CINEMA (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course will begin with a session on the Sociology of Cinema and the tools and techniques necessary to analyze the films that will be used in this course as a vehicle to examine society sociologically. This course introduces the student to the discipline of Sociology through cinema from India and elsewhere. It aims to allow students to critically examine society through cinema and its representation.

Course objectives:

  • To enable students to view cinema as a text for sociological analysis
  •  To gain an introduction to the discipline of sociology through cinema

Course Outcome

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Introduction to Sociology
 
  1. Sociology as a discipline
  2. Sociological Imagination
  3. Theoretical perspectives
Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Introduction to Sociology
 
  1. Sociology as a discipline
  2. Sociological Imagination
  3. Theoretical perspectives
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Social Structure
 
  1. Community, Association and Institution  
  2. Status and role
  3. Power and authority

Films: Dor (2006), Prem Rog (1982), Roja (1992)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Social Structure
 
  1. Community, Association and Institution  
  2. Status and role
  3. Power and authority

Films: Dor (2006), Prem Rog (1982), Roja (1992)

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Culture and Socialization
 
  1. Culture
  2. Socialization
  3. Conformity and Deviance

Films: Taare Zameen Par (2007)

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Culture and Socialization
 
  1. Culture
  2. Socialization
  3. Conformity and Deviance

Films: Taare Zameen Par (2007)

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Social Stratification
 
  1. Sex and gender
  2. Race and Ethnicity
  3. Caste and Class 

 Films: Lajja (2001), India Untouched: Stories of a People Apart (2007)

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Social Stratification
 
  1. Sex and gender
  2. Race and Ethnicity
  3. Caste and Class 

 Films: Lajja (2001), India Untouched: Stories of a People Apart (2007)

Text Books And Reference Books:

Burton, E. (1988 ). Sociology and the feature film. Teaching Sociology 16: 263-271.

Dudrah, R K. (2006).  Bollywood: Sociology goes to the Movies. New Delhi: Sage Publications.

Prendergast, C. (1986 ). Cinema Sociology: Cultivating the Sociological Imagination through Popular Film. Teaching Sociology 14: 243-248.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Mills, C. W. (2023). The sociological imagination. In Social Work (pp. 105-108). Routledge.

Evaluation Pattern
CIA 1  10 marks (conducted out of 20 )
 
CIA 2 10 marks (conducted out of 20 )
 
CIA 3 25 marks (conducted out of 50 ) 
 
Attendance 5 marks 

THE141 - THEATRE APPRECIATION (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is a participatory practice course, which makes Theatre appreciation applicable to all. It includes different Theoretical, Interactive and Participatory sessions from experts in the cultural industry. It also envisages witnessing live performances and digital performances to enhance the knowledge of the domain, which supports learning with clarity.

This course deals with five strands; Plays, Players, Places, Playgoers, and Performance practice.

Course Outcome

CO1: Able to appreciate the Theatre Art form as a whole.

CO2: Able to analyse and understand the aesthetics of the Theatre Performances.

CO3: Able to appreciate the performer's practices and the audience's reception.

CO4: Able to critically review live and digital Theatre performances.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Plays
 

Focus on Author and Texts.

Theatre Plays, Theatre text, What is Plays, Play style, Author, Dramatic text, Play text.

So, here is Talk, Play Reading 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Players
 

Focus on Acting practices and training.

How the plays can be played by players-who are the Players-Players are nothing but Actors/Performers, all Players are Directors cum Practitioners.

How these players Enact, Perform, Prepare, and how these Players are subjected to Acting training.

Players' concept -Acting, Directing, Design.

Players are playing a play.

So here is a workshop model planning.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Places
 

Focus Design concept.

What are the places where the Act happens -different stages, different Theatre, practice, live, video.

How places interact, Act happens, Events take place, What are the different Stage places, and how places connect with the significant aspects of the design; in this liveness, the video presentation will be there to make them understand different kinds of places and events. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Playgoers
 

Focus on Audience appreciation and participation of the audience.

Devising plays, Theatre dimension, Performance Devise, Analyse the Process.

How Playgoers or the Audience appreciate, involve, interact and immersively participate in the Theatre practice.

So there we devise practices. 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Performance practice
 

Focus on Theatre practice and performance.

Where a play or Devised Theatre performance will be done with the Students/ Participants.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Theatre: The Lively Art11th Edition​ By Edwin Wilson and Alvin Goldfarb,2022

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Theatre, Brief13th Edition​,By Robert Cohen, Donovan Sherman and Michelle Liu Carriger​,2023

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation CIAs :2 Hrs

Writing assignments, Live performance watching, and review writing.

Evaluation ESE :3 Hrs

End Semester Exam will be a performance and submission of journals.

THE142 - IMPROVISATION AND DEVISED THEATRE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

l  To gain an understanding of principles and techniques of improvisation.

l  Develop skills in collaborative script development and performance.

 

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Apply an understanding of practical proficiency in executing the fundamental principles of a variety of devising techniques and improvised scene work in rehearsals and project development

CO2: Students will showcase acquired skills through practical performances of devised and improvised live theatre

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:4
Rules of Comedy
 

Application of comedy rules through scene work, theatre sports, monologues, and play development

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Short Form Improvisation
 

Concepts of endowment, justification, plot progression, and ensemble/group mind are explored through short form stage scenarios

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:7
Sketch Writing
 

Concept mining, plot structures, collaborative scripts, and using improvisation as a writing tool within a performance ensemble

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:7
Long Form Improvisation
 

Students will explore case studies and history of long form improvised performance and practice rehearsing and performing “The Harold” for test audiences 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Devised Theatre Companies and Practices
 

Case studies of historic and contemporary devised theatre companies, paired with practical experiments in devising through imagery, text, and movement solutions 

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:15
Devised Performance Scripts
 

Research, story development, and improvisation will result in a devised theatrical performance for a public audience that will showcase the tools and skills employed in the previous units

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.           Lynn, Bill. Improvisation for Actors and Writers: A Guidebook for Improv Lessons in Comedy. Colorado Springs: Meriwether Publishing, 2004. Print 

2.           Halpern, Charna and Del Close. Truth in Comedy: The Manual of Improvisation. Colorado Springs: Meriwether Publishing, 1994. Print

3. Playscripts selected by instructor and actors for case study projects 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.           Spolin, Viola. Improvisation for the Theater. Evanston, Illinois: Northwestern University Press, 1999. Print 

 

2.           Halpern, Charna. Art by Committee: A Guide to Advanced Improvisation. Colorado Springs: Meriwether Publishing, 2004. Print

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern: Conducted internally at the departmental level

 

Assignment 1:  Quiz on Comedy Rules & Theatre Sports Practical Performance

Assignment 2:  Script Submission & Performance of Collaborative Comedy Sketch

Assignment 3:  Presentation & Student-Led Training Session from Historic Theatre Collectives

Assignment 4:  Actor Showcase Through Live Performances of Original Devised Theatre Pieces

BBA142B - EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE AND MANAGERIAL EFFECTIVENESS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Emotional intelligence is considered to be a pertinent skill and it influences the way we act and react in any given situation in our lives. It helps to understand the emotion of self and others, which paves the way for coping up with one's challenges, maintain good social relationships and remain successful in one's own endeavors and goals.

Course Objectives: Through the course, the instructor aims to 

 

1. Introduce learners to the need and importance of Emotionally Intelligent behaviours at the workplace

2. Familiarize learners with contemporary scientific theories regarding emotions and emotional intelligence 

3.Equip learners with skills needed for emotional awareness and emotional regulation

4.Give an overview of the utility of EI in personal and professional growth 

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Explain the role of EI at the workplace

CO2: Familiarize learners with contemporary scientific theories regarding emotions and emotional intelligence

CO3: Equip learners with skills needed for emotional awareness and emotional regulation

CO4: Give an overview of the utility of EI in personal and professional growth

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Introduction to Emotions
 

Emotions: Definition, Types, Purpose, Basic Theory & Dimension Theory of Emotions; Affect-circumflex model of emotions, Myths associated with emotions. Emotional Intelligence (EI): Definition, components and importance of EI in personal and professional life. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Emotional Awareness and Regulation
 

Culture and Emotional Regulation and Emotional Expression. Developing Emotional Literacy Tools for Emotional Regulation: Mindfulness, Training students in mindfulness. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Understanding the Self
 

Examining "Success":   Relationship between Self concept, self esteem, self efficacy with Emotional Regulation; Relationship with core beliefs and values and Emotional expression and regulation; Relationship between Personality and Emotional expression and regulation; Indigenous (Non-western) conceptualization of Self and its importance in Emotional Regulation 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Interpersonal Success & Empathy
 

Interpersonal effectiveness: Interpersonal orientation; Effective Communication in cross cultural contexts, Conflict: Types, Process of Conflict Resolution, Role of EI in Conflict Resolution; Empathy: Definition, types, and importance. Empathetic listening, empathetic body language, tactics for empathetic connection.      

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
EI at the workplace
 

EI at the Workplace; Impact of Emotionally Intelligent behaviour at the workplace - for individuals, teams and organizations.   Developing Emotionally Intelligent Teams; Being a Emotionally Intelligent Leader

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
EI for Lifelong learning
 

Contemporary science of EI; EI training for teams: Methods, activities and assessment 

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.     King Jacob (2019): Master Your Emotions: Practical Guide to Manage Feelings, Overcome Negativity, Stress, Anxiety, Anger and Depression, and Change Your Life Developing Emotional Intelligence and Positive Thinking.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.     The EQ Edge: Emotional Intelligence and Your Success – Steve J. Stein & Howard E. Book.

2.     www.6seconds.org

3.     Cowen A (2018) How Many Different Kinds of Emotion are There?. Front. Young Minds. 6:15. doi: 10.3389/frym.2018.00015. 

4. Posner, J., Russell, J. A., & Peterson, B. S. (2005). The circumplex model of affect: an integrative approach to affective neuroscience, cognitive development, and psychopathology. Development and psychopathology17(3), 715–734. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0954579405050340

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1- 20 marks

CIA 2- 20 marks

CIA 3- 50 marks

BBA142C - FUNDAMENTALS OF DIGITAL MARKETING (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:  

This course will be a base for the students to understand the various facets of Digital Marketing. The course is a foundation stone for students to get motivated and start a career in Digital Marketing. The course will facilitate any novice student to understand and use digital marketing platforms.

Course Objectives: 

 

  1. To understand the role of digital marketing in driving business growth
  2. To get familiarized with the various modes of getting business online
  3. To use E-Marketing Campaigns effectively 
  4. To leverage the benefits of Social Media Marketing
  5. To get insights on various digital marketing strategies

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand about Digital Marketing

CO2: Analyse various Content Management System to select the appropriate one for Website Design

CO3: Design E-Mail marketing campaigns

CO4: Analyse the potential of Social Media Marketing

CO5: Analyse and select appropriate digital marketing strategies

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Introduction to Digital Marketing
 

Digital Marketing: Introduction, Significance, Growth. Traditional vs Digital Marketing, Digital Marketing Mix, The 7Cs, Drafting Digital Marketing Plan

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Online Presence
 

Launching Business Online: Local Listings, Websites, Social Media. Websites: Components, Layout. Utility of Content Management Softwares in Website Design, Selecting Domain, Hosting Services and Plans

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
E-Mail Marketing
 

E-Mail Marketing: Significance, Process, E-Mail Marketing Strategy, E-Mail Marketing Campaign with MailChimp

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Social Media Marketing
 

Overview of Social Media Platforms, Selecting Channels, Publishing Content, Twitter Marketing, LinkedIn Marketing, YouTube Marketing 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
Digital Marketing Strategies
 

Content Marketing, Video Marketing, Affiliate Marketing, Web Remarketing, Podcast Marketing

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
Practical / Hands on Sessions
 

Content Creation  - Digital Content Creation – hands on tools training for crating Post- Story- Reels- Shorts. Multiple tools strategy- #tag strategy- Email marketing- email content. Blog creation [ Canva / creative cloud express / Figma / Adobe XD ]

 

Strategy for Campaign - Strategy for Twitter Ad- Linked-in Ad- Instagram ad- Facebook ad- Google ad- Virtual campaigns

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Seema Gupta, “Digital Marketing, 3rd  edition”, McGraw Hill (2022)
  2. Jeremy Kagan , Siddharth Shekhar Singh, “Digital Marketing: Strategy & Tactics”, Wiley (2020)
  3. Puneet Bhatia, “Fundamentals of Digital Marketing, 2nd Edition”, Pearson (2019)
  4. Ryan Deiss, Russ Henneberry, “Digital Marketing for Dummies”, Wiley (2020)
  5. Simon Kingsnorth, “Digital Marketing Strategy: An Integrated Approach to Online Marketing” Kogan Page
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Seema Gupta, “Digital Marketing, 3rd  edition”, McGraw Hill (2022)
Evaluation Pattern
  1. Evaluation Pattern
     

    CIA 1- 20 marks

    CIA 2- 20 marks

    CIA 3- 50 marks

BBA142F - FINANCIAL EDUCATION (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course covers topics such as income, expenditure, savings & investment avenues, borrowing, managing risk, budgeting, etc. Participants would also learn about various financial institutions and in what ways they can benefit from these institutions. The course helps participants to become aware of different products through which they can meet their financial needs and learn about the benefits of prudent financial behavior.

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate an understanding of key concepts, principles, and models related to financial education.

CO2: Evaluate the importance of financial education in personal life.

CO3: Learn to apply the theories and concepts of finance to practical situations

CO4: Analyze various investment avenues that are suitable for personal financial goals.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
Introduction to Financial Education
 

Need for Financial Literacy, Role of financial education in achieving financial well-being, Importance of Financial Planning, Key concepts of Personal Finance: Savings, Investment, Borrowing, Income and Expenses, Surplus/Deficit, Assets and Liabilities, Inflation, Time Value of Money, Active and Passive Income, Instant and Delayed Gratification, etc. Power of compounding and Rule of 72, Concept of Rupee Cost Averaging.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:7
Financial Planning and Budgeting
 

Define Financial Planning, Financial Planning Process, Steps involved in Financial Planning Process, SMART financial goals, and three pillars of investments. Concepts of risk and return, Budgeting and its importance in financial planning.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:7
Savings-related products
 

Types of bank accounts: Savings account, Current account, fixed deposits, recurring deposits. Various modes of transfer through banking channels: NEFT, RTGS, IMPS, UPI. Account opening process and importance of KYC norms. Do’s and don’ts while using digital payments. Credit cards and Debit cards. Role of Reserve Bank of India.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Investment in Securities Market
 

Investment avenues offered by Securities Markets, Primary Market and Secondary Market, Operational aspects of securities markets: placement of orders, contract note, pay-in, and pay-out, trading and settlement cycle. Various risks involved in investing in securities markets. Benefits of investing through Mutual Funds. Mutual Fund categorization and product labeling of mutual funds. Systematic Investment Plan (SIP) and its advantages. The role played by Commodity Derivatives markets in the hedging of commodity price risk. Products traded in Commodity Derivatives Exchanges and their usefulness to various stakeholders.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:7
Insurance-related Products and Pension Planning
 

Role of Insurance as a risk management tool, various types of Insurance products and their key features. Regulatory role of IRDAI. Importance of Pension and its Role in providing financial security in old age. National Pension System (NPS).

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:7
Borrowing Related Products
 

Borrowing, Collateral and Equated Monthly Instalments (EMI). Documents required for obtaining Loans. Various loan products offered by Financial Institutions and their key features. 5Cs of Credit. Credit Information Organizations and Credit Score.

Text Books And Reference Books:
  • Zvi Bodie;Alex Kane;Alan J. Marcus;Pitabas Mohanty. (2019): Investments, Pearson Publications, New Delhi.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • RBI Financial Education Handbook
  • NSE Knowledge Hub, an AI-powered Learning Experience Platform for BFSI
  • NSE Academy Certification in Financial Markets (NCFM) Modules.
Evaluation Pattern

CIA DETAILS      MARKS DETAILS

CIA 1                        20

CIA II                       20

CIA III                     50

Attendance marks will be added as per the attendance policy

BLS143 - PRINCIPLES OF HORTICULTURAL TECHNIQUES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course introduces students to the principles and techniques of horticulture. Students will learn the basics of plant growth, propagation, and cultivation. The course will cover soil management, irrigation, pruning, pest control, and greenhouse production. Students will also explore sustainable horticultural practices and their applications in various horticultural settings.

Course Outcome

CO1: Explain the principles and practices of plant growth and development.

CO2: Demonstrate proficiency in plant propagation techniques.

CO3: Apply soil management and irrigation techniques to promote plant growth and health

CO4: Design and implement a pest management plan for a horticultural operation.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Horticulture
 
  • Principles and practices of horticulture
  • Plant anatomy and physiology
  • Plant propagation techniques: seed, cuttings, and grafting
  • Introduction to sustainable horticulture practices
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Soil Management and Irrigation
 
  • Soil properties and nutrient management
  • Soil fertility and composting
  • Irrigation principles and techniques
  • Greenhouse production and management
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Pruning and Pest Control
 
  • Pruning techniques and tools
  • Insect and disease management
  • Integrated pest management (IPM)
  • Biological control of pests
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Sustainable Horticulture Practices
 
  • Sustainable practices in horticulture
  • Environmental stewardship in horticulture
  • Marketing sustainable horticulture products
  • Horticultural entrepreneurship
Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Hartmann, H. T., Kester, D. E., Davies Jr, F. T., & Geneve, R. L. (2014). Plant propagation: Principles and practices (9th ed.). Prentice Hall.
  2. Grubinger, V. (2002). Introduction to sustainable horticulture. University of Vermont Extension.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Lambers, H., Chapin III, F. S., & Pons, T. L. (2008). Plant physiological ecology (2nd ed.). Springer.
  • Stanghellini, C. (2004). Greenhouse production science in horticulture. CRC Press.
Evaluation Pattern

Attendance and Class Participation- 10%

Midterm Examination- 30%

Review paper/Research Paper- 20%

Seminar presentation – 10%

Final Examination - 30%

BLS144 - PRINCIPLES OF AYURVEDA (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is an introduction to Ayurveda, the traditional Indian system of medicine. The course covers topics such as the history and philosophy of Ayurveda, principles of Ayurvedic diagnosis and treatment, and the use of Ayurveda in maintaining health and preventing disease. Students will also learn about the role of Ayurveda in contemporary medicine and the current state of Ayurvedic research.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the history and philosophy of Ayurveda.

CO2: Identify the basic principles of Ayurvedic diagnosis and treatment

CO3: Apply Ayurvedic principles in maintaining health and preventing disease

CO4: Evaluate the role of Ayurveda in contemporary medicine

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Introduction to Ayurveda
 
  • History and philosophy of Ayurveda
  • Basic principles of Ayurveda
  • Doshas and their functions
  • The importance of digestion in Ayurveda
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:11
Ayurvedic Diagnosis and Treatment
 
  • Pulse diagnosis in Ayurveda
  • Ayurvedic herbs and their uses
  • Ayurvedic therapies, including Panchakarma
  • Yoga and Ayurveda
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:11
Ayurveda for Health and Wellness
 
  • Ayurvedic diet and nutrition
  • Ayurvedic lifestyle practices
  • Ayurvedic approaches to mental health
  • Ayurveda and women's health
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:11
Ayurveda in Contemporary Medicine
 
  • The role of Ayurveda in integrative medicine
  • The regulation of Ayurvedic products and practices
  • The current state of Ayurvedic research
  • The future of Ayurveda
Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Lad, V. (1998). The complete book of Ayurvedic home remedies. Harmony.
  2. Frawley, D., & Ranade, S. (2001). Ayurveda, nature's medicine. Lotus Press.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Sharma, H. (2011). Ayurvedic healing: A comprehensive guide. Singing Dragon.
  2. Svoboda, R. (1999). Prakriti: Your Ayurvedic constitution. Lotus Press.
Evaluation Pattern

·        Attendance and Class Participation- 10%

·        Midterm Examination- 30%

·        Review paper/Research Paper- 20%

·        Seminar presentation – 10%

·        Final Examination - 30%

CHE141 - CHEMISTRY IN ACTION (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course deals with the abundance of elements on earth and in biological systems and their inevitable role in the functioning of the living systems and the universe

This course highlights the chemistry in action in drug usage, detection of disease, infection, drunken drive, in metal extraction process, in working principle of home appliances, in recreation, in archaeology, and in human system

This course deals with the application of chemistry in forensics

This course emphasis the need for sustainable energy and environment.

This course is intended to

Evoke an understanding on the inevitable role of chemistry in biological system as well as the environment

Make students appreciate chemistry in action in different fields of application and in daily life

Create an awareness regarding need for sustainable energy and environment.

Course Outcome

CO1: Gains understanding on the inevitable chemistry in action in biological system

CO2: Gains understanding on the abundance of different elements and their action in biological system and in the universe

CO3: Able to practice the principles of sustainable chemistry and proper usage of energy in daily life

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Distribution of elements on Earth and in living systems
 

Natural abundance of elements, Elemental composition of human body.

Sodium chloride a common and important ionic compound- hydrated salts and their applications (cement).

 

Eg.Alums, plaster of paris- 1 hr (asynchronous)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Carbon atom: The building block of life
 

Carbon based molecules in Biological systems-proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, fats. Carbon cycle,

Changes in carbon cycle. Allotropes of carbon-2 hr (asynchronous)

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Design in molecules
 

Molecules and perception- the molecular basis of smell and taste.

The design in light and

Fire- (synchronous)

 

The versatile molecule: water.

The design in oxygen-

 

(asynchronous)

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Common drugs including drugs of abuse
 

Classification of drugs and their effects.

1. Paracetamol

2. Ibuprofen

 

3. botox

4. chloramphenicol (synchronous)

 

 

5. cocaine, 6. Cannabis (asynchronous)

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Chemistry of Atmosphere
 

Phenomena in the outer layers of atmosphere, Depletion of ozone in the stratosphere,

volcanoes, The greenhouse effect, Photochemical smog (synchronous)

 

 Acid rain, Indoor pollution(asynchronous)

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:4
Out of Oxygen
 

Industrial, commercial, medical and scientific applications of oxygen-Steel making, in rocket

engines, water and waste treatment processes.

 

Oxygen crisis-Does the earth run out of oxygen. Burning oil, coal, gas, wood or other organic materials, the O2 we breathe, to break carbon-hydrogen bonds and release energy. Combustion, carbon dioxide. The concept of oxygen bar- (synchronous)

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:5
Chemistry in Daily Life
 

Breath analyser, metals from sea, microwave ovens-dipole moments at work. Ice skating,

desalination-reverse osmosis. Determining the age of artifacts.

(synchronous)

 

Haemoglobin, pH of blood.

antacids and pH balance in stomach. How an egg shell is made ?- (asynchronous)

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:2
Chemical Mysteries
 

Who killed Napolean-Arsenic poisoning, Marsh test for arsenic.

Gold finger printing by mass spectrometry 

Unit-9
Teaching Hours:5
Future Chemistry
 

What is in store for the near future, Energy and environment Energy production and energy

utilization.

 

The nature of energy and types of energy. (synchronous)

Radioactivity-Demand for energy (asynchronous)

Unit-10
Teaching Hours:5
Green Chemistry
 

Waste minimization, design of safer and more efficient processes for waste management.

waste management (synchronous).

 

Sustainable Chemistry. (asynchronous)

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1] Nina Morgan Chemistry in Action: The Molecules of Everyday Life, 1 st ed, Oxford

University Press, 1995.

 

[2] John T. Moore Chemistry for Dummies 1 st ed. For Dummies, 2002.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[3] Raymond Chang, Chemistry. 8 th ed, Mc Graw Hill, 2002..

[4] Kirpal Singh Chemistry in Daily Life, 2 nd ed Prentice-Hall of India Private

 

Limited, 2008.

Evaluation Pattern

1.  CIA -1 ……………………….                           25Marks

2.  Mid-term Test (CIA-2)………………………   25 Marks

3.  End-semester examination …………………    50 Marks

       

                                TOTAL                              100 Marks

COM147 - E-COMMERCE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course intends to make the students familiar with the essential concepts for steering business transactions through the various resources of E-Commerce. As a prerequisite, the students should be having a basic knowledge about computers, networks and information technology.

Course Outcome

CO1: To provide exposure to the students about the various avenues of e-commerce.

CO2: To develop e-business plans.

CO3: To understand the various principles, models and concepts of e-commerce business models and revenue models

CO4: To understand, develop and apply the concepts of e-marketing strategies.

CO5: To understand the various electronic payment systems available.

CO6: To get equipped with the knowledge of creating simple websites.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
E-Commerce Framework
 

E-Commerce Concepts: Electronic   Commerce   –   Mobile   Commerce   -   Social   E-Commerce and Wisdom of Crowds – Local Commerce – Conversational Commerce; B2C, B2B – Private Industrial Network, Net Marketplace, C2C; Indian E-Commerce Environment; Creating Business Plans – Creating Business Plans for E-Business Ideas.


Practical: Creating an e-business plan through brainstorming and ideation.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Business Models and Revenue Models
 

Business Models: E-Tailer – Market Creator – Content Provider – Community Provider – Portal – Service Provider; Revenue Models: Advertising Revenue Model – Sales Revenue Model – Subscription Revenue Model – Freemium Revenue Model – Transaction Fee Revenue Model – Affiliate Revenue Model.

 


Practical: Choosing suitable e-business model and revenue model for the chosen business plan.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
E-Marketing
 

Electronic Marketing: Traditional Marketing, Concepts of STP, Identifying Web Presence Goals, Achieving Web Presence Goals, Uniqueness of Web, Meeting the Needs of Website Visitors, E-Marketing Value Chain, Site Adhesions, Maintaining a Website. Internet Advertising: Types, Advantages, Guidelines; Push and Pull Marketing, E-Cycle of Internet Marketing, Measuring the Effectiveness of E- Advertising, E-Branding.


Practical: Designing an electronic marketing strategy for the chosen business plan.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
E-Payment Systems & Website Creation
 

Electronic Payment Systems: Electronic Clearing System, NEFT, RTGS, Digital Cash, Currency Servers, Virtual Currencies, Bitcoins, Debit Cards, Credit Cards, Digital Credit Cards, Smart Cards, Digital Wallets, Electronic Cheques, Online Stored Valued Systems, Mobile Payment Systems, Emerging Financial Instruments.


Practical: Creating websites using online website building tools like wix.com,

 

godaddy.com, for the chosen business plan with appropriate electronic payment system.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Careers and Threats in E Commerce
 

Impact of E Commerce on Business, Banking, E Governance, Tourism, Real Estate, Book Publishing, Careers in E Commerce as Business Analyst, E Business Consultant, Customer Relationship Manager, Supply Chain Manager, Project Manager, Database Administrator.  E Commerce certification courses.  E-Commerce Threats and Security – Virus, Cyber Crime, Firewall, Proxy Server, Privacy and Cyber Law.

Practical:  Introduction to MOOC courses in E Commerce (Coursera, edEx, Udacity, Udemy, FutureLearn)

 

 

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Kamlesh.K.Bajaj and Debjani Nag, “E-Commerce: The Cutting Edge of Business”, Tata McGraw-Hill Education, (Latest Edition).
  2. C.S.V.Murthy; “E-Commerce”, Himalaya Publishing House, (2018).
  3. Manjot Kaur; “Introduction to E-Commerce”, Kalyani Publishers, (2018).
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Gray P. Schneider, “E- Commerce”, Course Technology, (Latest Edition)
  2. Henry Chan, Raymond Lee, Tharam Dillon, Elizabeth Chang, “E-Commerce: Fundamentals and Applications”, John Wiley & Sons Ltd (Latest Edition)
  3. https://www.bplans.com/e-commerce_startup_business_plan/executive_summary_fc.php
Evaluation Pattern
  • CIA ONE: Caselet Presentation + MCQ 
  • CIA TWO: Case Study Analysis 
  • CIA THREE: Group Presentation
  • End Semester Examination

 Learning Outcomes of the Course

 CIA ONE

 CIA TWO

 CIA THREE

 END SEMESTER EXAMINATION

 ATTENDANCE

 

Part A = CASELET + Part B = MCQ

 CASE STUDY ANALYSIS

 GROUP PRESENTATIONS

 Written Examination conducated for 3 hours

 As per university guidelines

CO 1: Explain basic terminologies and functionalities of E-Commerce.

 

 5

10

 

 20

 As per university norms

CO 2: Apply the principles, models and concepts of e-commerce for meeting the requirements of business.

 

 5

 20

 

 20

 As per university norms

CO 3: Develop e-business plans with electronic marketing strategies for e-business platforms.

 

 

 20

 10

 20

 As per university norms

 CO 4: Understand and embed suitable electronic payment systems for the websites.

 

 

 

 10

 20

 As per university norms

CO 5: Create and maintain simple websites for business.

 

 

 

 10

 20

 As per university norms

 

COM148 - PERSONAL TAX PLANNING (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

 

The course provides an overview of Income-tax Law. The course intends to provide a basic understanding of various concepts under the taxation system in India. It familiarises students with the multiple heads of income, deductions under each head, deductions from gross total income and computation of Gross Total Income. The course provides basic knowledge on the calculation of the income of individuals and also gives an insight into the tax planning that arises to reduce tax liability.

Course Objectives

        To help students understand the concept of taxation and compute the total income of an individual taxpayer at the conceptual level.

        To enable students to compute the tax liability of an individual

        To familiarise students with different Income tax return forms and procedures for filing

Course Outcome

CO1: Recall concepts of assessee and income as defined under the Act

CO2: Compute income under each head as per the legal provisions

CO3: Recall the due dates for filing income tax returns and time limits for completion of assessments

CO4: Determine the deductions applicable for individuals and determine the amount of deduction.

CO5: Compute the tax liability of individuals

CO6: Design a tax planning mechanism to reduce the tax payable to the individual taxpayer

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Unit- 1 Basics Concepts
 

Basic concepts: Assessment year, previous year, person, assessee, Income, charges on income, gross total income, capital and revenue receipts, and residential status.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Unit-2 Income from Salary and House Property
 

Brief note /provisions on various heads/sources of Income-Income from Salary - Definition; Characteristics of Salary Income; Deduction from Gross Salary u/s 16 – Computation of income from salary. Income from House property - Computation of Income from Let-Out House Property, Income from Self Occupied House Property.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Unit-3 Income from Business, Capital Gain and Other Sources
 

Business income, capital gains & income from other sources

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:7
Unit-4 Deductions from Gross Total Income
 

Permissible deductions –under Chapter VI-A -Claim of Deductions under section 80 for Individual Assesses- 80C, 80D,80DD,80DDB, 80E, 80G

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
Unit-5 Computation of tax liability
 

Computation of Tax liability for individuals – old and new regime, slab rates for different age groups, surcharge and cess rates.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
Unit-6 Return of Income and Procedure for Filing
 

Procedure for filing Tax Returns, types of returns, Requirement of PAN, form 16 and 16A, ITR -1 and ITR- 2

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Income tax Law and practice (2023). Dr.Vinod K Singhania and Dr Monica Singhania. New Delhi: Taxman Publications.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.