CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS

School of Business and Management

Syllabus for
Bachelor of Science (Economics, Mathematics, Statistics)
Academic Year  (2021)

 
1 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN121 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
ECO131 PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS Core Courses 5 5 100
ENG121 ENGLISH - I Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 2 100
FRN121 FRENCH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
HIN121 HINDI Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
KAN121 KANNADA Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 03 100
MAT131 DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS Core Courses 4 4 100
MAT151 INTRODUCTION TO PYTHON PROGRAMMING-I Core Courses 2 2 50
SAN121 SANSKRIT Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
STA131 DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS AND PROBABILITY Core Courses 4 4 100
STA151 DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS AND PROBABILITY PRACTICAL Core Courses 2 2 50
TAM121 TAMIL Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
2 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN221 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
ECO231 PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS Core Courses 5 5 100
ENG221 ENGLISH - II Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 2 100
FRN221 FRENCH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
HIN221 HINDI Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
KAN221 KANNADA Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 03 100
MAT231 DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS Core Courses 4 4 100
MAT251 INTRODUCTION TO PYTHON PROGRAMMING-II Core Courses 2 2 50
SAN221 SANSKRIT Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
STA231 PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS Core Courses 4 4 100
STA251 PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS PRACTICAL Core Courses 2 2 50
STA271 R PROGRAMMING Core Courses 4 4 100
TAM221 TAMIL Discipline Specific Elective 3 3 100
3 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN321 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
ECO311 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY FOR ECONOMICS Skill Enhancement Course 2 2 50
ECO331 FUNDAMENTALS OF ECONOMIC GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT Core Courses 5 5 100
ENG321 ENGLISH-III Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 2 100
FRN321 FRENCH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
HIN321 HINDI Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
KAN321 KANNADA Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 03 100
MAT331 REAL ANALYSIS Core Courses 4 4 100
MAT351 PYTHON PROGRAMMING FOR MATHEMATICS Core Courses 2 2 50
SAN321 SANSKRIT Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
STA331 STATISTICAL INFERENCE Core Courses 4 4 100
STA351 STATISTICAL INFERENCE PRACTICAL Core Courses 2 2 50
STA371 APPLIED EXCEL Core Courses 4 4 100
TAM321 TAMIL Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
4 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN421 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
ECO411 ADVANCED MICRO AND MACROECONOMICS Skill Enhancement Course 2 2 50
ECO431 INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS Core Courses 5 5 100
ENG421 ENGLISH-IV Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 2 100
FRN421 FRENCH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
HIN421 HINDI Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
KAN421 KANNADA Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 03 100
MAT431 ALGEBRA Core Courses 4 4 100
MAT451 PYTHON PROGRAMMING FOR MATHEMATICAL MODELLING Core Courses 2 2 50
SAN421 SANSKRIT Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
STA431 SAMPLING TECHNIQUES Core Courses 4 4 100
STA451 SAMPLING TECHNIQUES PRACTICAL Core Courses 2 2 50
TAM421 TAMIL Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
5 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
ECO501 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY FOR ECONOMICS Skill Enhancement Course 2 2 50
ECO532 MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS Core Courses 4 4 100
ECO541A PUBLIC FINANCE Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
ECO541C ECONOMICS OF BANKING AND INSURANCE Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
MAT531 LINEAR ALGEBRA Core Courses 3 3 100
MAT541A INTEGRAL TRANSFORMS Discipline Specific Elective 3 3 100
MAT541B MATHEMATICAL MODELLING Discipline Specific Elective 3 3 100
MAT541C GRAPH THEORY Discipline Specific Elective 3 3 100
MAT541D CALCULUS OF SEVERAL VARIABLES Discipline Specific Elective 3 3 100
MAT541E OPERATIONS RESEARCH Discipline Specific Elective 3 3 100
MAT551 LINEAR ALGEBRA USING PYTHON Core Courses 2 2 50
MAT551A INTEGRAL TRANSFORMS USING PYTHON Discipline Specific Elective 2 2 50
MAT551B MATHEMATICAL MODELLING USING PYTHON Discipline Specific Elective 2 2 50
MAT551C GRAPH THEORY USING PYTHON Discipline Specific Elective 2 2 50
MAT551D CALCULUS OF SEVERAL VARIABLES USING PYTHON Discipline Specific Elective 2 2 50
MAT551E OPERATIONS RESEARCH USING PYTHON Discipline Specific Elective 2 2 50
STA531 LINEAR REGRESSION MODELS Core Courses 3 3 100
STA541A STATISTICAL QUALITY CONTROL Discipline Specific Elective 3 3 100
STA541B DESIGN OF EXPERIMENTS Discipline Specific Elective 3 3 100
STA541C ACTUARIAL STATISTICS Discipline Specific Elective 3 3 100
STA541D INTRODUCTION TO SPATIAL STATISTICS Discipline Specific Elective 3 3 100
STA551 LINEAR REGRESSION MODELS PRACTICAL Core Courses 2 2 50
STA552A STATISTICAL QUALITY CONTROL PRACTICAL Discipline Specific Elective 2 2 50
STA552B DESIGN OF EXPERIMENTS PRACTICAL Discipline Specific Elective 2 2 50
STA552C ACTUARIAL STATISTICS PRACTICAL Discipline Specific Elective 2 2 50
STA552D SPATIAL STATISTICS PRACTICAL Discipline Specific Elective 2 2 50
6 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
ECO632 INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMETRICS Core Courses 4 4 100
ECO641A ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
ECO641B FINANCIAL ECONOMICS Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
ECO681 DISSERTATION Core Courses 0 4 100
MAT631 COMPLEX ANALYSIS Core Courses 3 3 100
MAT641A MECHANICS Discipline Specific Elective 3 3 100
MAT641B NUMERICAL METHODS Discipline Specific Elective 3 3 100
MAT641C DISCRETE MATHEMATICS Discipline Specific Elective 3 3 100
MAT641D NUMBER THEORY Discipline Specific Elective 3 3 100
MAT641E FINANCIAL MATHEMATICS Discipline Specific Elective 3 3 100
MAT651 COMPLEX ANALYSIS USING PYTHON Core Courses 2 2 50
MAT651A MECHANICS USING PYTHON Discipline Specific Elective 2 2 50
MAT651B NUMERICAL METHODS USING PYTHON Discipline Specific Elective 2 2 50
MAT651C DISCRETE MATHEMATICS USING PYTHON Discipline Specific Elective 2 2 50
MAT651D NUMBER THEORY USING PYTHON Discipline Specific Elective 2 2 50
MAT651E FINANCIAL MATHEMATICS USING EXCEL AND PYTHON Discipline Specific Elective 2 2 50
MAT681 PROJECT ON MATHEMATICAL MODELS Core Courses 5 5 150
STA631 TIME SERIES ANALYSIS AND FORECASTING TECHNIQUES Core Courses 3 3 100
STA641A APPLIED STATISTICS Discipline Specific Elective 3 3 100
STA641B ELEMENTS OF STOCHASTIC PROCESS Discipline Specific Elective 3 3 100
STA641C BIOSTATISTICS Discipline Specific Elective 3 3 100
STA641D STATISTICAL GENETICS Discipline Specific Elective 3 3 100
STA651 TIME SERIES ANALYSIS AND FORECASTING TECHNIQUES PRACTICAL Core Courses 2 2 50
STA652A APPLIED STATISTICS PRACTICAL Discipline Specific Elective 2 2 50
STA652B ELEMENTS OF STOCHASTIC PROCESS PRACTICAL Discipline Specific Elective 2 2 50
STA652C BIOSTATISTICS PRACTICAL Discipline Specific Elective 2 2 50
STA652D STATISTICAL GENETICS PRACTICAL Discipline Specific Elective 2 2 50
      

    

Department Overview:

Established in 1969, the Department of Economics is one of the strongest and vibrant departments in the institution. The Department of Economics has distinguished itself to be one of the leading centers of learning Economics in the country. The Department has the distinction of having developed a unique and challenging curriculum and syllabi at the Undergraduate, Postgraduate, and Doctoral Research levels. Students and scholars are trained to analyse concrete problems with the help of conceptual frames, theoretical insights, and mathematical, statistical, and econometric tools along with computer applications. Various academic programmes offer a comprehensive package with a thrust on both theoretical and practical applications. Along with core courses such as Microeconomics, Macroeconomics, Developmental Economics, International Economics, Behavioural Economics, Financial Economics, Environmental Economics, Econometrics and Mathematical Economics, a wide range of specialized courses including Labour Economics, Public Economics, Health Economics, and Operations Research, are well integrated into the curriculum.

Mission Statement:

Vision- Achieving excellence, broadening horizons, building competencies, and developing a sustainable education model through critical thinking, ethical groundedness, and commitment to society.

Mission- Preparing students to understand and resolve the multitude of challenges in the economy through relevant research-based educati

Introduction to Program:

The Programme is designed to develop students with respectable intellectual levels. It seeks to expose the students to various concepts in Economics, Mathematics, and Statistics and encourage them to uphold scientific integrity and objectivity in professional endeavours. In Economics, the first four semesters are devoted to giving a firm background in microeconomics, macroeconomics, development economics & international economics. In the fifth and sixth semesters, the students take two compulsory courses namely Mathematical economics & Introductory econometrics. The elective courses encompass two options in each semester in the final year. In Mathematics the courses enable the students to develop a respectable intellectual level seeking to expose the various concepts in Mathematics. It also aims at enhancing the students' reasoning, analytical, and problem-solving skills. The first four semesters are devoted to appreciating the beauty of mathematics through Differential Calculus, Differential Equations, Real Analysis and Algebra. In order to help the

Program Objective:

On successful completion of the BSc Programme students will be able to PO1. Understand and apply the fundamental principles, concepts, and methods in key areas of science and multidisciplinary fields PO2. Demonstrate problem-solving, analytical, and logical skills to provide solutions for the scientific requirements PO3. Develop critical thinking with scientific temper PO4. Communicate the subject effectively PO5. Understand the importance and judicious use of technology for the sustainable growth of mankind in synergy with nature PO6. Understand the professional, ethical, and social responsibilities PO7. Enhance the research culture and uphold scientific integrity and objectivity PO8. Engage in continuous reflective learning in the context of technological and scientific advancements On successful completion of the BSc EMS Programme students will be able to PSO1. Demonstrate the problem-solving skills in mathematical sciences. PSO2. Use effectively the mathematical and statistical tools in the analysis of economic and social problems. PSO3. Address current economic issues and trends. PSO4. Acquire a strong foundation in Statistical analytics PSO5. Express proficiency in oral and written communications to appreciate innovation in research. PSO6. Develop industry-focused skills to lead a successful career.

Assesment Pattern

Exam pattern for theory courses

Components

Marks

CIA I

10

Mid Semester Examination (CIA II)

25

CIA III

10

Attendance

05

End Semester Exam

50

Total

100

For Mathematics Practical Courses:

The course is evaluated based on continuous internal assessments (CIA) and the lab e-record. The parameters for evaluation under each component and the mode of assessment are given below.

 Component

Parameter

Mode of  Assessment

Maximum

Points

CIA I

Mastery of the  concepts

Lab Assignments

20

CIA II

Conceptual clarity and analytical skills

Lab Exam - I

10

Lab Record

Systematic documentation of the lab sessions.

e-Record work

07

Attendance

Regularity and Punctuality

Lab attendance

03 (95-100%: 3, 90-94%: 2, 85-89%: 1)

CIA III

Proficiency in executing the commands appropriately,.

Lab Exam - II

10

Total

50

 Exam Pattern for Statistics practical

Components

Points

CIA of experiments

80

Test 1

25

Test 2

35

Viva-Voce Exam

10

Total

150

                  Total Marks: 50

Examination And Assesments

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) forms 50% and the end semester examination forms the other 50% of the marks in theory. CIA marks are awarded based on the performance in assignments, MSE, and class assignments (Quiz, presentations, Moodle-based tests, problem-solving, minor projects, MOOC, etc.). The MSE & ESE for each theory paper is of two & three hours respectively.

CIA I and CIA III are conducted by respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments.

MSE will be held for odd semesters in the month of August and even semesters in the month of January.

ESE: The theory as well as practical courses are held at the end of the semesters.

AEN121 - ADDITIONAL ENGLISH (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The Additional English course is offered as a second language course and seeks to introduce the students to the nuances of English literature in its varied forms and genres. The students who choose Additional English are generally proficient in the English language. Hence, instead of focusing on introducing them to language, challenging texts in terms of ideas, form, and technique are chosen. Additional English as a course is designed for students in place of a regional language. Non-Resident Indians (NRIs), foreign nationals and students who have not taken Hindi, Kannada, Tamil or French at the Plus 2 or Class XII levels are eligible to choose Additional English. The course is taught for students from different streams, namely, BA, BSc, BCom, and BBA in the first year and for BA, BSc and BCom (Regular) in the second year.

The first year syllabus is an attempt by the Department of English, Christ University to recognize and bring together the polyphonic Indian and Indian sub-continental voices in English in English translation for the Additional English students of the first year. This effort aims to familiarize the students with regional literatures in translation, Indian Writing in English (IWE) and literatures from Pakistan, Nepal and Srilanka, thereby, enabling the students to learn more about Indian culture and ethos through writings from different regions of the country. We have tried to represent in some way or the other the corners of India and the Indian sub-continent in this microcosmic world of short stories, poems and essays

 

There is a prescribed text bookfor the first year students, compiled by the Department of English, Christ University and intended for private circulation.

The first semester has a variety of writing from India, Pakistan and Nepal. The various essays, short stories and poems deal with various socio-economic, cultural and political issues that are relevant to modern day India and the Indian sub-continent and will enable students to comprehend issues of identity-politics, caste, religion, class, and gender. All of the selections either in the manner of their writing, the themes they deal with or the ideologies that govern them are contemporary in relevance and sensibility, whether written by contemporary writers or earlier writers. An important addition to this syllabus is the preponderance of North-Eastern writing which was hitherto not well represented. Excerpts from interviews, autobiographical writings, sports and city narratives are added to this section to introduce students to the varied genres of literature.

The objectives of this course are

to expose students to the rich literary and cultural diversity of  Indian literatures

to sensitise students on the social, political, historical and cultural ethos that has shaped the nation- INDIA

to enable to grasp and appreciate the variety and abundance of Indian writing, of which this compilation is just a passing glance

to learn and appreciate India through association of ideas in the texts and the external contexts (BhashaUtsav will be an intrinsic help in this endeavour)

  

 

Course Outcome

Learning Outcome

 

The students will become

sensitive to cultural, social, religious and ethnic diversities and help them engage with their peers and all around them in a more understanding and ‘educated’ manner.

 

it will also enable them through the activities conducted to become more proactive citizens/participants in society.

 

aware of the dynamics of gender, identity, communalism and politics of this vast nation through its literature.

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Poetry
 

1.      Keki N Daruwala     “Migrations”

 

2.      Kamala Das            “Forest Fire”

 

3.      Agha Shahid Ali      “Snow on the Desert”

 

4.      Eunice D Souza       “Marriages are Made”

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Short Stories
 

1.      Rabindranath Tagore    “Babus of Nayanjore”

 

2.      Ruskin Bond  “He said it with Arsenic”

 

3.      Bhisham Sahni       “The Boss Came to Dinner”

 

4.      N. Kunjamohan Singh    “The Taste of Hilsa”

 

5.      Mohan Thakuri                “Post Script”

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Essays
 

1.      Mahatma Gandhi       “What is True Civilization?” (Excerpts from Hind Swaraj)

 

2.      Ela Bhatt                    “Organising for Change”

 

3.      Sitakant Mahapatra     “Beyond the Ego: New Values for a Global Neighborhood

 

4.      B R Ambedkar             “Waiting for A Visa”

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Contemporary knowledge of the soci-political situation in the sub-continent

The text book copy "Reading Diversity"

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

On-line resources to appreciate the text through the Comprehension Questions

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1:  Classroom assignment for 20 marks keeping in mind the objectives and learning outcomes of the course.

CIA 2: Mid-semester written exam for 50 marks

CIA 3: Collage, tableaus, skits, talk shows, documentaries, Quizzes or any proactive            creative assignments that might help students engage with India as a cultural space. This is to be done keeping in mind the objectives and learning outcomes of the course.

Question Paper Pattern

Mid Semester Exam: 2 hrs

Section A: 4x5= 20

Section B: 2x15=30

Total                  50

 

End Semester Exam: 2 hrs

Section A: 4 x 5 = 20

Section B: 2 x 15= 30

Total                   50

ECO131 - PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Develop the conceptual foundations and analytical methods used in micro economics; Familiarize the students with the basics of consumer behaviour, behaviour of firms and market equilibrium; Analyse the market structures of perfect competition, oligopoly and monopolies; Introduce the game theory and welfare economics

Course Outcome

  • Understand that economics is about the allocation of scarce resources and how that results in trade-offs.
  • Understand the role of prices in allocating scarce resources in market economies and explain the consequences of government policies in the form of price controls.
  • Appreciate positive as well as normative view points on concepts of market failure and the need for government intervention.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:16
Micro Economics and the Theory of Consumption
 

Ten principles of economics: How people make decisions, how people interact and how the economy as a whole works- Role of observations and theory in economics- Role of assumptions- Role of Economic models- Wants and resources; Problem of choice, Production Possibility Frontier; Opportunity costs.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:14
Demand and supply
 

Law of demand, Reasons for the downward slope of the demand curve. Exceptions to the law; Changes in demand; Elasticity of Demand- Degrees of price elasticity with diagrams; Factors determining price elasticity, methods of measurement. Income elasticity demand; Cross elasticity demand; Laws of supply, Changes in supply- Consumers, Producers and the Efficiency of the Markets: Consumer‟s surplus (Marshall), Producer surplus and Market efficiency- Externalities and Market inefficiency- Public goods and common resources.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:16
Theory of Production and Cost
 

Production function; Law of Variable proportions; Laws of returns, Economies of scale; Producer's Equilibrium with the help of iso-quants and iso-cost lines. Cost function - Important cost concepts. Short run and long run cost analysis (traditional theory) Modern theory of cost- Long run and short run - Revenue analysis - AR and MR.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:19
Product Pricing
 

Market structure. Perfect competition, Price and output determination. Monopoly- Price output determination, Price discrimination Monopolistic Competition. Price and Output determination. Selling costs. Product differentiation. Wastes in monopolistic competition. Oligopoly Price determination (collusive pricing, price leadership)- Features of Duopoly

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Theory of Consumer Choice and New Frontiers in Microeconomics
 

Cardinal utility analysis; Consumer's surplus (Marshall), Ordinal utility analysis. Indifference curves- Properties, consumer's equilibrium, Price effect, Income Effect, and substitution effect. New Frontiers in Microeconomics: Introduction to concepts of Asymmetric Information, Political economy, Behavioral Economics.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. N. Gregory Mankiw (2012). Principles of Microeconomics, 4th Edition, Cengage Learning India.

2. Lipsey, R.G. and K.A. Chrystal (1999), Principles of Economics (IX Ed.), Oxford University Press, Oxford.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Ramsfield, E. (1997), Micro Economics (IX edition), W.W Norton and company, New York.

2. Pindyck and Rubinfield (2009), Micro Economics (VII edition), Pearson Education.

3. Ray,N.C.(1975), An Introduction to Micro economics, Macmillan company of India Ltd, New Delhi.

4. Samuelson, P.A. and W.D. Hague (1972), A textbook of Economic Theory, ELBS Longman group, London.

5. H.L. Ahuja, Principles ofMicroeconomics, S.Chand, New Delhi.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA - 1: 20 marks.

CIA - 2: Mid Semester Examination - 50 marks; 2 hours.

CIA - 3: 20 marks.

ENG121 - ENGLISH - I (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
  • To expose learners to a variety of texts to interact with
  • To help learners classify ideologies and be able to express the same
  • To expose learners to visual texts and its reading formulas
  • To help learners develop a taste to appreciate works of literature through the organization of language
  • To help develop critical thinking
  • To help learners appreciate literature and the language nuances that enhances its literary values
  • To help learners understand the relationship between the world around them and the text/literature
  • To help learners negotiate with content and infer meaning contextually
  • To help learners understand logical sequencing of content and process information

·         To help improve their communication skills for larger academic purposes and vocational purposes

·         To enable learners to learn the contextual use of words and the generic meaning

·         To enable learners to listen to audio content and infer contextual meaning

·         To enable learners to be able to speak for various purposes and occasions using context specific language and expressions

·         To enable learners to develop the ability to write for various purposes using suitable and precise language.

Course Outcome

·         Understand how to engage with texts from various countries, historical, cultural specificities and politics

 

·         Understand and develop the ability to reflect upon and comment on texts with various themes

 

·         Develop an analytical and critical bent of mind to compare and analyze the various literature they read and discuss in class

 

·         Develop the ability to communicate both orally and in writing for various purposes

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Unit 1 1. The Happy Prince By Oscar Wilde 2. Shakespeare Sonnet 18
 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

Common errors- subject-verb agreement, punctuation, tense errors 

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
unit 2
 

1. Why We Travel-Pico Iyer

2. What Solo Travel Has Taught Me About the World – and Myself -ShivyaNath- Blogpost

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

sentence fragments, dangling modifiers, faulty parallelism,

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

Note taking

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
unit 3
 

1. Thinking Like a Mountain

By Aldo Leopold

2. Short Text: On Cutting a Tree

By Gieve Patel

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
unit 4
 

1. Violence in the name of God is Violence against God

By Rev Dr Tveit

 

2. Poem: Holy Willie's Prayer

By Robert Burns

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

Paragraph writing

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Newspaper report

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
unit 5
 

1. The Story of B24

By Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

 2. Short Text: Aarushi Murder case 

 

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
unit 6
 

1.Long text:My Story- Nicole DeFreece

 

2. short text: Why You Should Never Aim for Six Packs

 

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Essay writing

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:6
unit 7
 

1.Long Text: Sir Ranjth Singh- Essay by SouravGanguly

2. Short text: Casey at the Bat-  Ernest Lawrence Thayer

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Paraphrasing and interpretation skills

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:3
visual text
 

Visual Text: Before the Flood

Text Books And Reference Books:

ENGlogue 1

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Addfitional  material as per teacher manual will be provided by the teachers

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1=20

CIA 2=50 

CIA 3= 20 

ESE= 50 marks online and 50 marks written exam

FRN121 - FRENCH (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

French as a second language in the UG program. The method Génération A1 consists of a student's book and an activity book, both included in the digital manual. It consists of 6 units preceded by an initial section of 'Welcome'. The structure of each unit marks a real learning journey.

 

Course Objectives

·       To develop linguistic competencies and sharpen oral and written communicative skills

·       To familiarize learners to certain aspects of francophone civilization.

·       To enable learners to engage in simple everyday situations

Course Outcome

Enhancement of linguistic competencies and sharpening of written and oral communicative skills. Being aware of francophone civilization. Ability to engage in simple conversations in French.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
I discover
 

Lesson 1: Good Morning, how are you?

 Lexicon – Countries and nationalities, domestic animals, days of the week

 Grammar -Subject pronouns, verbs ‘to be’ and ‘to have’, definite and indefinite articles

 Speech acts – Greeting, asking how one is

 

Lesson 2: Hello, my name is Agnes.

Lexicon – Months of the year, numbers 0-69, the family

Grammar – Formation of the feminine / plural, possessive adjectives

Speech acts -Introducing oneself and others, asking and saying dates

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Les fables de la Fontaine
 

La cigale et la fourmis (The grasshopper and the ant)

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Culture: Physical and Political France
 

 

Lesson 1: Who is it?

Lexicon - Professions

Grammar – Formation of the feminine, interrogative /negative phrases, it is

Speech acts – Asking and answering politely

   
 

Lesson 2: In my bag, I have......

Lexicon – Some objects, identity card

Grammar – First group verbs, verbs ‘to go’ and ‘to come’

Speech acts – Asking personal information

 

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Les fables de la Fontaine
 

Le renard et le corbeau (The fox and the crow)

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Video Workshop: How cute he is!
 

 

Lesson 1: How is he?

Lexicon – The physical aspect, character

Grammar – The formation of the feminine, contracted articles, tonique pronouns, there

                    is/are, interrogative adverbs

Speech acts – Describing the physical aspects and the character

   
 

Lesson 2: Hello?

Lexicon – Prepositions of place, numbers from 70

Grammar – Numbers, prepositions of place, second group verbs, verb ‘to do’

Speech acts – Speaking on the phone                                                                              

 

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
Visual text
 

A French movie

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Cocton, Marie-Noelle. Génération A1. Paris : Didier, 2016 

      2.  De Lafontaine, Jean. Les Fables de la Fontaine.

           Paris, 1668

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

French websites like Bonjour de France, Fluent U French, Learn French Lab, Point du FLE etc

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Pattern

CIA (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

CIA 1 – Assignments / Letter writing / Film review

10%

 

CIA 2 –Mid Sem Exam

25%

 

CIA 3 – Quiz / Role Play / Theatre / Creative projects 

10%

 

Attendance

05%

 

End Sem Exam

 

50%

Total

50%

50%

HIN121 - HINDI (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

The detailed text book “Samakaleen Hindi Kavitha” edited by Dr.N Mohanan is an anthology of contemporary Hindi Poems written by representative poets of Hindi Literature. From the medieval poetry ' Kabir Ke Dohe and Sur ke pad 'is also included.  The poets reflect on the social, cultural and political issues which are prevalent in our society since the medieval period. Hindusthani sangeeth-parampara eva kalakar is one of the module. Since translation is a significant area in language and literature, emphasis is being given on it in the syllabus.Bharath ki pramukh sanskruthik kalayein  Yakshagana,Kathakali,Ram Leela,Krishna Leela etc. included in the syllabus to enrich cultural values among students.

Course Objectves: 

Students will be exposed to read, analyse and appreciate poems by learning poetry. Through translation, students will be able to develop translation skills while translating from other language articles. Students will be able to analyses critically the different cultural art forms by learning about the Famous cultural art forms of India.

Course Outcome

 

At the end of the course, the student will be able to:

 

CO1: Improve their writing skill in literary Hindi by doing asynchronous session assignments.

 

●    CO2: Improve their analytical skills through critical analysis of the poems.

 

●    CO3: To appreciate the different aspects of Hindustani music.

 

●    CO4: To improve their basic research skills through creative and research oriented CIAs.

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Samakaleen Hindi Kavitha (Collection of contemporary Hindi Poems),Kabir Ke Dohe and Sur Ke Pad.
 

’  Samakaleen Hindi Kavitha (Collection ofcontemporary Poems)  Edited By: Mahendra Kulashreshta Rajpal and Son’s, New Delhi

 

Level of knowledge: Analytical

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Translation-Theory and Practice
 

                                                                                            

                                      

                                          

                                           

         

Translation-Practice                English to Hindi and vice- versa.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Bharath ki pramukh sanskruthic kalayen-
 

Ramleela,Krishnaleela,Yakshagaana,kathakali.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Hindusthani Sangeeth-parampara evam pramukh kalakar
 

Utbhav,Vikas aur paramparaein

Pramukh Sangeethkar-1.Bhimsen Joshi 2.Gulam Ali 3.Pandit Ravishankar 4. Bismillah Khan.

Text Books And Reference Books:

  1. 'Samakaleen Hindi Kavitha’ (Collection of Poems) Edited By: Dr.N Mohanan,  Rajpal and Son’s,New Delhi.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. A Hand Book of Translation Studies         By: Das Bijay Kumar.               

2. Saral Subodh Hindi Vyakaran,                 By: Motilal Chaturvedi. Vinod pustak mandir, Agra-2

3. Anuvad Evam Sanchar –                         Dr Pooranchand Tantan, Rajpal and Son’s, Kashmiri

4. Anuvad Vignan                                       By: Bholanath Tiwar

5. Anuvad Kala                                           By: N.E Vishwanath Iyer.

                                                                 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-1(Digital learning-Editing of Hindi article in Hindi Wikipedia )-20 marks

CIA-2(Mid semester examination)-50 marks

CIA-3(Digital learning-article creation in Hindi Wikipedia)-20 marks

End sem examination-50 marks

KAN121 - KANNADA (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:03

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Selections from Old Kannada, Medieval Kannada and Modern Kannada Literature are introduced for I Semester BA/ BSc. courses in the syllabus. This will enrich the students' Language and Communication skills, and also their critical and analytical skills.  This will help them to enhance their social sensitivity.  The rhythm of poetry helps the students to acquire natural speech rhythm.

Course Outcome

  • Initiates to compose a lyrical poem
  • Understands and appreciates poetry as literary art form.
  • Develops analytical and critical bent of mind to compare and analyse the various literature they read and discuss in class.
  • Develops a more humane and service oriented approach to all forms of life around them.
  • Develop awareness about the Kannada Language, Literature and Culture
  • Ability to communicate effectively in speech and in writing.
  • Ability to use better language to communicate effectively

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Old , Medieval and Modern Kannada Literature
 

1. Raghavanka- Harishchandra Kavya. Selected chapter( Purada Punyam Purusha Roopinde Pooguthide) 

2. Vachanas- Devara Dasimayya, Basavanna, Akkamahadevi, Aydakki Lakkamma, Gajesha Masanaiah.

    Keerthanegalu: Purandaradasa, Kanakadasa

3. Modern Kannada poetry: Mumbai Jataka- Dr. G.S. Shivarudrappa, Kari Heggadeya Magalu- B.M.Sri 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Prose- Selected Short Stories
 

1. Dheera Kumara- A Folk tale

2. Mandannana Marriage- (An episode in Novel Karvalo) K. P. Poornachandra Tejaswi

3. Gili Kathe-(Translation) -  Ravindranath Tagore

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Kannada Grammar
 

1. Differences in Prounounciation ( L-l) (A-H) 

2. Change of meanings

3. Translation: English to Kannada 

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Folk Art forms of Karnataka
 

1.Folk Art forms of Karnataka

1. Dollu Kunitha

2.Pooja Kunitha

3.Goravara Kunita

4. Patada Kunitha 

Text Books And Reference Books:

       1. Adipurana- Pampa (Selected Episode) 

       2. Yashodhara Charite- Janna (Selected Episode) 

       3. Harishchandra Kavya- Raghavanka (Selected Episode) 

       4. Shree Sahitya- B M Shreekantaiah

       5. Janapada Kathegalu- Jee sham paramashivaiah

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Pampa Ondu Adhyayana- G S Shivarudrappa

2. Vachana Chandrike- L Basavaraju

3. Purandara Sahitya Darshana- S K Ramachandra Rao

4. Kanakadasa- Basrur Subba Rao

5. Samagra Kannada Sahitya Charithre- Ed. G.S Shivarudrappa

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-1 Written Assignments- 20 Marks

CIA-2 Mid Semsester Examination- 50 Marks

CIA-3 Translation Assignment- English to Kannada -20 Marks

Attendance -05 Marks

End Semester Examination- 50 Marks

MAT131 - DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course aims at enabling the students to know various concepts and principles of differential calculus and its applications.  Sound knowledge of calculus is essential for the students of mathematics for the better perceptions of the subject and its development.

Course objectives​: This course will help the learner to

COBJ1. Gain familiarity with the concepts of limit, continuity and differentiability.

COBJ2. Understand the relationship between the concepts of differentiability and continuity.

COBJ3. Analyse and interpret the different versions of mean value theorems.

COBJ4. Learn successive differentiation and nth derivative of product of two functions.

COBJ5. Find derivative of functions of more than one variable.

COBJ6. Be familiar with curve tracing.

Course Outcome

On successful completion of the course, the students should be able to

CO1. Compute limits, derivatives and examine the continuity, differentiability of a function at a point.
CO2. Understand the properties of continuous functions and prove that differentiability implies continuity
CO3. Prove Mean value theorems and analyse its geometric interpretation.
CO4. Compute derivatives of any order and apply Leibniz’ theorem to find nth derivative of product of two functions.
CO5. Master the fundamental concepts of partial differentiation and apply Euler’s theorem for homogeneous functions.
CO6. Gain knowledge on the concepts such as asymptotes, concavity/convexity and singular points and apply the same for curve tracing.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Limits, Continuity, Differentiability and Mean Value Theorems
 

Definition of the limit of a function (ε-δ) form – Continuity, Uniform Continuity – Types of discontinuities – Properties of continuous functions on a closed interval - Boundedness theorem and extreme value theorem – Differentiability – Mean Value Theorems: Rolle’s theorem – Lagrange’s and Cauchy’s First Mean Value Theorems – Taylor’s theorem (Lagrange’s form and Cauchy’s forms of remainder) – Maclaurin’s theorem and expansions -Indeterminate forms. .

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Successive and Partial Differentiation
 

Successive differentiation – nth derivatives of functions – Leibnitz theorem and its applications – Partial differentiation – First and higher order derivatives – Differentiation of homogeneous functions – Euler’s theorem – Taylor’s theorem for two variables (only statements and problems)- Maxima and Minima of functions of two variables.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Curve Tracing
 

Tangents and Normals, Concavity and convexity, Curvature, Asymptotes, Singular points, Tracing of curves (Parametric representation of curves and tracing of parametric curves, Polar coordinates and tracing of curves in polar coordinates)..

Text Books And Reference Books:

G.B. Thomas, M.D.Weir and J. Hass, ThomasCalculus, 12th ed., Pearson Education India, 2015. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. H. Anton, I. Birens and S. Davis, Calculus, John Wiley and Sons Inc., 2002.
  2. F. Ayres and E. Mendelson, Schaum's Outline of Calculus, 6th ed. USA: Mc. Graw Hill., 2013.
  3. J. Stewart, Single Variable Essential Calculus: Early Transcendentals, 2nd ed.: Belmont, USA: Brooks/Cole Cengage Learning., 2013.
  4. S. Narayanan & T. K. M. Pillay, Calculus, Reprint, India: S. Viswanathan Pvt. Ltd., 2009. (vol. I & II.)
  5. M. Spivak, Calculus, 3rd ed., Cambridge University Press, 2006.
  6. T.M. Apostol, Calculus, Vol-II, Wiley India Pvt. Ltd., 2011.
  7. J. Edwards, An elementary treatise on the differential calculus: with applications and numerous examples, Reprint, Charleston, USA: BiblioBazaar, 2010.
  8. N. P. Bali, Differential Calculus, New ed. New Delhi, India: Laxmi Publications (P) Ltd., 2012.
Evaluation Pattern

 

Component

Mode of Assessment

Parameters

Points

CIA I

MCQ,

Written Assignment,

Reference work, etc.,

Mastery of the core concepts

Problem solving skills

 

10

CIA II

Mid-semester Examination

Basic, conceptual and analytical knowledge of the subject

25

CIA III

Written Assignment, Project

Problem solving skills

10

Attendance

Attendance

Regularity and Punctuality

05

ESE

 

Basic, conceptual and analytical knowledge of the subject

50

Total

100

MAT151 - INTRODUCTION TO PYTHON PROGRAMMING-I (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: Introduction to Python Programming1 provides a foundational background for programming in a mathematical setting. Students will learn the basics of object orientated programming, algorithm, flow chart, memory storage, variable scoping, modules, objects and classes, and basic data structures.

Course objectives​: This course will help the learner to

COBJ1: Acquire proficiency in using Python Programming.

COBJ2: Demonstrate the use of Python to understand and interpret the some concepts in Mathematics.

Course Outcome

On successful completion of the course, the students should be able to

CO1: Write algorithms, flow chart and codes.

CO2: Use modules and functions in python language.

CO3: Acquire proficiency in using conditional structures.

CO4: Solve problems using control structures.

CO5: Use python lists, tuples and dictionaries.

CO6: Write small programs using python programming.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
Proposed Topics:
 
  1. Getting started with Python
  2. Variable, Printing, input and output
  3. Modules and functions
  4. If statements, Conditional operators, elif
  5. For Loops, Break statements, The loop variable, the range function
  6. Numbers, Math Operators, Random numbers, Math functions
  7. Counting, Summing, Swapping, Flag variables, Maxes and mins, Comments, Simple debugging, Example programs
  8. Strings, Concatenation and repetition, The in operator, Indexing, Slices, Looping, String methods
  9. Lists, List methods, Tuples
Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. H. Brian, A Practical Introduction to Python Programming, Creative Commons Attribution, 2012.
  2. A. Saha, Doing Math with Python: Use Programming to Explore Algebra, Statistics, Calculus, and More!, No Starch Press, 2015.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. T. Hall, J. P. Stacey, Python 3 for absolute beginners, Apress, 2010.
Evaluation Pattern

The course is evaluated based on continuous internal assessments (CIA) and the lab e-record. The parameters for evaluation under each component and the mode of assessment are given below.

Component

Parameter

Mode of  Assessment

Maximum

Points

CIA I

Mastery of the  concepts

Lab Assignments

20

CIA II

Conceptual clarity and analytical skills

Lab Exam - I

10

Lab Record

Systematic documentation of the lab sessions.

e-Record work

07

Attendance

Regularity and Punctuality

Lab attendance

03

95-100% : 3

90-94%   : 2

85-89%   : 1

CIA III

Proficiency in executing the commands appropriately,.

Lab Exam - II

10

Total

50

SAN121 - SANSKRIT (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Janakiharana of Kumaradasa is the first Sanskrit mahakavya, so far as the extant literature goes, to deal solely with the whole of the Ramayana story. Its further interest is that it was produced in Ceylon, showing thereby the wider world over which Sanskrit had its sway. After manuscripts of the full text of the poem in twenty cantos had to come to light in South India, what is now presented was the first systematc and critical study to be undertaken to the author and the text and its position vis-a-vis other Mahakavyas. In addition to the above study and the critical edition of the cantos which were at that time unpublished the examination of the large number of extra-verses found in some MSS of the text and showing them as interpolations.

Course Outcome

To develop linguistic skills

To develop communication skills

To analyse and appreciate the poem and literature

To acquaint the students with the linguistic features, aesthetic sense and other specific key features of famous Sanskrit poetry.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:42
Janaki Haranam
 

Selected shlokas 1-60 shlokas

Kumāradāsa is the author of a Sanskrit Mahākāvya called the Jānakī-haraṇa or Jānakī’s abduction. Jānakī is another name of Sita, wife of Rama. Sita was abducted by Ravana when she along with Rama, exiled from his kingdom, and Lakshmana was living in a forest which incident is taken from Ramayana ('Rama’s Journey'), the great Hindu epic written by Valmiki.

The Sinhalese translation of his work, Jānakī-haraṇa, gave credence to the belief that Kumāradāsa was King Kumāradhātusena (513-522 A.D.) of Sri Lanka but scholars do not make any such identification even though the poet at the end of his poem says that his father, Mānita, a commander of the rearguard of the Sinhalese King Kumāramaṇi, died in battle on the day he was born and that his maternal uncles, Megha and Agrabodhi, brought him up. Rajasekhara, who lived around 900 A.D., in his Kāvyamīmāmsā refers to the poet as born blind - मेधाविरुद्रकुमारदासादयः जात्यन्धाः. There is also a tradition that this poem was written by Kalidasa. Kumāradāsa came after Kalidasa and lived around 500 A.D., later than Bhāravi but before Māgha. While writing Jānakī-haraṇa, he certainly had before him Raghuvaṃśa of Kalidasa.[1] 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:42
Grammar
 

 

Sandhis and lakaras          

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:3
grammar
 

Samasa prakaranam

Text Books And Reference Books:

Books for References: -

1)      Janakiharanam of Kumaradasa edited by  C K Swaminathan

2)      Janakiharanam edited by G.R. Nandargikar

3)      Sanskrit Grammar Translation from English to Sanskrit by M.R. Kale

Sanskrit Grammar Kannada version by Satish Hegde.                                   

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Ramayana of Valmiki

Champu Ramayana of Bhoja 

Evaluation Pattern

 

 

CIA 1 Wikipedia assignments

 

CIA 2 Mid semester examinations

 

CIA 3 Wikipedia assignments

 

STA131 - DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS AND PROBABILITY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is designed to introduce the historical development of statistics, presentation of data, descriptive measures and fitting mathematical curves for the data. This course also introduces measurement of relationship of quantitative and qualitative data and the concept of probability.  

Course Outcome

CO1.      Demonstrate the history of statistics and present the data in various forms.

CO2.      Apply the concept of correlation and regression for relating two or more related variables.

CO3.      Demonstrate the probabilities for various events.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Organization and presentation of data
 

Origin and development of Statistics - Scope - limitation and misuse of statistics - types of data: primary, secondary, quantitative and qualitative data - Types of Measurements: nominal, ordinal, ratio and scale - discrete and continuous data - Presentation of data by tables: construction of frequency distributions for discrete and continuous data - graphical representation of a frequency distribution by histogram and frequency polygon - cumulative frequency distributions (inclusive and exclusive methods).

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Descriptive Statistics
 

Measures of location or central tendency: Arthimetic mean - Median - Mode - Geometric mean - Harmonic mean - Partition values: Quartiles - Deciles and Percentiles - Measures of dispersion: Mean deviation - Quartile deviation - Standard deviation - Coefficient of variation - Moments: measures of skewness - kurtosis. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Correlation and Regression
 

Correlation: Scatter plot - Karl Pearson coefficient of correlation - Spearman's rank coefficient of correlation - Regression: Concept of errors - Principles of Least Square - Simple linear regression and its properties - multiple and partial correlations (for 3 variates only).

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Basics of Probability
 

Random experiment - sample point and sample space – event - algebra of events - Definition of Probability: classical - empirical and axiomatic approaches to probability - properties of probability - Theorems on probability - conditional probability and independent events - Laws of total probability - Baye’s theorem and its applications.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Association of Attributes
 

Relation between class frequencies - consistency of data - independence of attributes - criterion of independence - association of attributes: Yule’s coefficient of association - Yule’coefficient of colligation.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      Gupta S.C and Kapoor V.K, Fundamentals of Mathematical Statistics, 12th edition, Sultan Chand & Sons, New Delhi, 2020.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.      Mukhopadhyay P, Mathematical Statistics, Books and Allied (P) Ltd, Kolkata, 2018.

2.      Walpole R.E, Myers R.H, and Myers S.L, Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists, Pearson, New Delhi, 2017.

3.      Montgomery D.C and Runger G.C, Applied Statistics and Probability for Engineers, 7th Edition, Wiley India, New Delhi, 2018.

4.      Agarwal B.L, Basic Statistics, 6th Edition, New Age International (P) Limited Publishers, 2018.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 50%

ESE 50%

STA151 - DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS AND PROBABILITY PRACTICAL (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course is designed to provide a practical exposure to the students in basic concepts of Statistics using EXCEL.

Course Outcome

CO1.      Demonstrate the data entry and manipulation using EXCEL

CO2.      Demonstrate the given data graphically

CO3.      Demonstrate the basic statistical analysis for given data   

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
Practical Assignments using Excel:
 

1.      Basic data manipulation techniques: sorting, filtering, conditional formatting 

2.      Diagrammatic representation

3.      Measures of central tendency using Excel functions

4.      Measures of dispersion using Excel functions

5.      Descriptive statistics using Data Analysis Pack (DAP)

6.      Correlation and Correlation matrix

7.      Regression analysis and their significance

8.      Partial and multiple correlation coefficient

9.      Calculation of probabilities of different events using probability properties

10.  Calculation of posterior probabilities using Baye’s theorem

11.  Construction of Pivot table

12.  Calculation of consistency of data and Yule’s coefficient of association

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Alexander R, Kuselika R and Walkenbach J, Microsoft Excel 2019 Bible, Wiley India Pvt Ltd, New Delhi, 2018.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. McFedries P, Excel Data Analysis Visual Blueprint, 4th Edition, Wiley India Pvt Ltd, New Delhi, 2013.
Evaluation Pattern

CIA 50%

ESE 50%

TAM121 - TAMIL (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Poems of Bharatiyar and Bharatidasan and poems by women poets with feminine sensibilities  will initiate the students into the modern period with all its complexities. The short stories by Ambai offers a matured vision of life through a varied characters and situatins. A new concept, Cultural Studies, will take the students beyond prescribed syllabus to include music, theatre, painting and films out of whcih the art form of music is taken up for the first semester.

Course Outcome

To make the students experience the impact made by Bharathiyar and Bharathidasan during the 20th century and to bring them to the realities of 21st century. They will also learn, on their own, about the nuances of music and a unique aesthetic experience it offers 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Modern Poetry- Bharathiyar
 

1. Kannan yen sevagan

2. Kannan yen kozhandhai

3. Kannan yen vilayatu pillai

4. Kannan yen kadhalan

5. Kannan yen kadhali

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Bharathi dasan
 

1. Kadal

2. Kundram

3. Nyaairu

4. Aal

5. Chittrur

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Contemporary Cultural Issues
 

Prose including reference to contemporary literary issues

1. Oru karupu silanthi udan oru iravu- Ambai

Cultural studies, Indian festivals

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Penniya kavithaigal
 

1.Ottadai -Thamarai

2. Kapinaani thozhudhal- Ponmani vairamutu

3. Yendhan tozha- Subhathra

4. Kadal konda pen puram- Andal priya dharshini

5. Pen- P. Kalpana '

 

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:2
Grammer- Language skills
 

Pira mozhi chorkal

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:3
Common topic
 

Isai

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

Malliga, R et al (ed).Thamilppathirattu I.Bangalore: Prasaranga,2011

     ‘Oru Karuppuchilanthiyudan Or Iravu’ by Ambai,

 

      published by Kalachuvadu Publications, Nagercoil, 2014

 

 

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 Varadarajan, Mu.  Thamil Ilakkia Varalaru . New Delhi:Sahitya Akademi, 2008

 Sivathambi, Ka.Thamil Sirukathaiyin Thorramum Valarchiyum.Coimbatore: NCBH, 2009

 Ragunathan,C.Bharathi: Kalamum Karuthum, Chennai:NCBH, 1971

 

Ramakrishnan S 100 Sirantha Sirukathaigal, Chennai: Discovery Books, 2013

 

Evaluation Pattern

With a total of 100 marks, 50 marks will come from Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the remaining 50 marks will come from end semester exanination. While the end semester examination will be fully theory based the CIA will consist of Wikipedia entries, assignments, theatre production, book review and other activities

AEN221 - ADDITIONAL ENGLISH (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The second semester has a variety of writing from India, Pakistan and Srilanka. The various essays, short stories and poems deal with various socio-economic, cultural and political issues that are relevant to modern day India and the Indian sub-continent and will enable students to comprehend issues of identity-politics, caste, religion, class, and gender. All of the selections either in the manner of their writing, the themes they deal with or the ideologies that govern them are contemporary in relevance and sensibility, whether written by contemporary writers or earlier writers. Excerpts from interviews, autobiographical writings, sports and city narratives are added to this section to introduce students to the varied genres of literature.

The objectives of this course are

to expose students to the rich literary and cultural diversity of  Indian literatures

to sensitise students on the social, political, historical and cultural ethos that has shaped the nation- INDIA

to enable to grasp and appreciate the variety and abundance of Indian writing, of which this compilation is just a passing glance

 

to learn and appreciate India through association of ideas in the texts and the external contexts (BhashaUtsav will be an intrinsic help in this endeavour)

 

Course Outcome

The students will become

more aware culturally, ethically, socially and politically as citizens

the course will sensitize students towards cultural, social, religious and ethnic diversities and help them engage with their peers and all around them in a more understanding and ‘educated’ manner.

it will also enable them through the activities conducted to become more proactive citizens/participants in society.

aware of the dynamics of gender, identity, communalism and politics of this vast nation through its literature.

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Poetry
 

1.      Jayanta Mahapatra    “Grandfather”

 

2.      Meena Alexander    “Rites of Sense”

 

3.      K.Satchidanandan      “Cactus”

 

4.      Jean Arasanayagam   “Nallur”

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Short Stories
 

1.      Temsula Ao             “The Journey”

 

2.      A. K Ramanujan       “Annaya’s Anthropology”

 

3.      Sundara Ramswamy   “Waves”

 

4.      Ashfaq Ahmed            “Mohsin Mohalla”

 

5.      T.S Pillai                      “In the Floods”

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Essays
 

1.      Salman Rushdie        “Gandhi Now”

 

2.      Amartya Sen             “Sharing the World”

 

3.      Suketu Mehta            “Country of the No”

 

4.      Rahul Bhattacharya     “Pundits From Pakistan” (An Excerpt)

Text Books And Reference Books:

The textbook "Reading Diversity"

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Online references for Comprehension Questions in the textbook

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1: Classroom assignment/test for 20 marks keeping in tune with the course objectives and learning outcomes.

CIA 2: Mid-semester written exam for 50 marks

CIA 3: Collage, tableaus, skits, talk shows, documentaries, Quizzes or any proactive            creative assignments that might help students engage with India as a cultural space. This is to be done keeping in tune with the course objectives and learning outcomes.


Question Paper Pattern        

Mid Semester Exam: 2 Hrs

Section A: 4x5= 20

Section B: 2x15=30

Total                  50

End Semester Exam: 2 hrs

Section A: 5 x 5 = 25

Section B: 5 x 15= 75

Total                   100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ECO231 - PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

It aims at providing a systematic introduction to mainstream approaches to the study of macroeconomics in the current century. It has been designed in such a way that it stimulates awareness on macroeconomic challenges and policy management in progressive nations. It also aims at developing the ability for objective reasoning about macroeconomic issues.

Course Outcome

  • It provides the student a strong foundation in macroeconomics and helps in understanding the policy implications in emerging economies.
  • It helps in understanding the contribution of various macroeconomic schools and in evaluating their policy prescriptions.
  • It enables the student to evaluate the pros and cons of different macroeconomic policies in real situations.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:14
Measuring a Nation's Income and Cost of Living
 

Economy’s Income and Expenditure: Measurement of GDP, components of GDP, real versus nominal GDP, the GDP Deflator. The Consumer Price Index: calculation of CPI, GDP deflator versus the CPI, correcting the economic variables for the effects of inflation, real versus nominal interest rates

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Goods and Money Market
 

Saving and Investment in the National Income Accounts. The Market for Loanable Funds; Policy changes and impact on the market for loanable funds. Meaning and functions of Money. Banks and Money supply; Money creation with 100 per cent Reserve Banking and Fractional Reserve Banking. Central Bank tools of Monetary Control. Classical Theory of Inflation; Classical Dichotomy and Monetary Neutrality. Velocity and Quantity Equation; Fisher Effect. Costs of Inflation.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:18
Aggregate Demand, Aggregate Supply & Influence of Monetary and Fiscal Policy on Aggregate Demand
 

Three key facts about economic fluctuations. Short run Economic Fluctuations: Aggregate Demand Curve, Aggregate Supply Curve and the two causes of economic fluctuations. Monetary Policy influence on Aggregate Demand. The Theory of Liquidity Preference. Fiscal Policy influence Aggregate Demand: The Multiplier Effect and Crowding – out Effect.  Stabilisation Policy and Active versus Automatic Stabilisers.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:18
Short Run Trade-Off between Inflation and Unemployment
 

Philips Curve and shifts in Philips Curve: The Role of Expectations, shifts in Philips Curve and the Role of Supply Shocks. The Cost of reducing Inflation. Rational Expectations and the possibility of costless disinflation.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Six Debates over Macroeconomic Policy
 

Monetary and Fiscal Policy – pros and cons. Handling Recession: higher spending versus tax cuts. Monetary Policy: rule versus discretion; Central Bank: zero inflation. Balanced Budget debate. Tax Law reformation for savings debate.

Text Books And Reference Books:

  1. Mankiw, Gregory N (2012). Principles of Macroeconomics, 6th Edition, Cengage Learning India.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

  1. Sloman, John, (2006). Economics, 6th Ed., Pearson Education.
  2. Ackley,  G.  (1976). Macroeconomics, Theory  and  Policy, Macmillan Publishing Company, New York.
  3. Day.A.C.L.(1960). Outline of Monetary Economics, Oxford University Press, New Delhi.
  4. Heijdra,B.J. and F.V.Ploeg (2001). Foundations of Modern Macro economics, Oxford University Press, Oxford.
  5. Lewis, M.K. and P.D. Mizan (2000). Monetary Economics, Oxford University Press, New Delhi.
  6. Shapiro, E. (1996). Macro economics Analysis, Galgotia Publications, NewDelhi.
  7. Dillard, D.(1960), The Economics of John Maynard Keynes, Crossby Lockwood and Sons, London.
  8. Hanson, A.H. (1963). A Guide to Keynes, McGraw Hill, New York.
  9. Keynes, J.M. (1936). The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money, Macmillan, London.
  10. Farmer, Roger.(2001). Macro economics, II Edition. ISBN.
  11. Stanley Fischer and Rudiger Dornbusch. Macro Economics, London. MacGraw-Hill.
 
Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 : 20 Marks

CIA II : 50 Marks (Mid Semester Examination).  Time: 2 Hours

CIA III : 20 Marks

ESE      : 100 Marks (End Semester Examination).  Time: 3 Hours

ENG221 - ENGLISH - II (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
  • To expose learners to a variety of texts to interact with
  • To help learners classify ideologies and be able to express the same
  • To expose learners to visual texts and its reading formulas
  • To help learners develop a taste to appreciate works of literature through the organization of language
  • To help develop critical thinking
  • To help learners appreciate literature and the language nuances that enhances its literary values
  • To help learners understand the relationship between the world around them and the text/literature
  • To help learners negotiate with content and infer meaning contextually
  • To help learners understand logical sequencing of content and process information

·         To help improve their communication skills for larger academic purposes and vocational purposes

·         To enable learners to learn the contextual use of words and the generic meaning

·         To enable learners to listen to audio content and infer contextual meaning

·         To enable learners to be able to speak for various purposes and occasions using context specific language and expressions

·         To enable learners to develop the ability to write for various purposes using suitable and precise language.

Course Outcome

·         Understand how to engage with texts from various countries, historical, cultural specificities and politics

·         Understand and develop the ability to reflect upon and comment on texts with various themes

·         Develop an analytical and critical bent of mind to compare and analyze the various literature they read and discuss in class

·         Develop the ability to communicate both orally and in writing for various purposes

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
food
 

1.  Long text:    Witches’ Loaves

O Henry

2.   Short text:  Portion size is the trick!!!

By Ranjani Raman

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

Presentation skills

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Report writing

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Fashion
 

1.Long text: In the Height of Fashion-Henry Lawson

 

2. short text: Crazy for Fashion- BabatundeAremu

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Architecture
 

1.    long text:  Bharat Bhavan

By Charles Correa

2.   Short text:  The Plain Sense of Things

By Wallace Stevens

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Group Discussion

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Interview skills and CV writing

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Management
 

1.Long Text: The Amazing Dabbawalas of Mumbai- ShivaniPandita

 

2. Short Text:

If

By Rudyard Kupling

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
History
 

1.    Long tet: Whose Ambedkar is he anyway?

           By KanchaIlaiah

 

2. Short text: Dhauli

By JayantaMahapatra

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

Developing arguments- debating

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
War
 

1.    Long text: An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge

By Ambrose Bierce

2.     Short text: Strange meeting

By Wilfred Owen

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

Letter writing and email writing

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:6
Social Media
 

1.Long text: Facebook and the Epiphanator: An

End to Endings?

            By Paul Ford

2. Short text:  'Truth in the time of Social Media' by Girish Balachandran

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

Ethics of writing on social media platforms

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:3
visual text
 

BBC Documentary- Dabbawalas

Text Books And Reference Books:

ENGlogue 1

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

teacher manual and worksheets that teachers would provide. Listening skills worksheets.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1- 20

MSE-50

CIA3- 20

ESE- 50 online and 50 written

FRN221 - FRENCH (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

French as a second language in the UG program. The method Génération A1 consists of a student's book and an activity book, both included in the digital manual. It consists of 6 units preceded by an initial section of 'Welcome'. The structure of each unit marks a real learning journey.

 

Course Objectives

·       To develop linguistic competencies and sharpen oral and written communicative skills

·       To familiarize learners to certain aspects of francophone civilization.

·       To enable learners to engage in simple everyday situations

Course Outcome

Enhancement of linguistic competencies and sharpening of written and oral communicative skills. Being aware of francophone civilization. Ability to engage in simple conversations in French.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Culture: A country of vacation
 

Dossier 4- Culture: A country of vacation

 

Lesson 1: Hobbies

Lexicon – Hobbies, daily activities, matter

Grammar – Interrogative adjectives, ordinal numbers, time, direct object personal pronouns

Speech acts – Speaking about tastes and preferences

 

   
 

Lesson 2: The routine

Lexicon – Weather and time, frequency

Grammar – Pronominal verbs, first group verbs, verb ‘to take’

Speech acts – Describing one’s day

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Poem
 

1. Demain dès l'aube (Tomorrow from dawn)- Victor Hugo

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
I discover
 

Dossier 5 - I discover

Lesson 1: Where to shop?

Lexicon – Food, quantity, trade and traders

Grammar – Partitive articles, pronouns of quantity, very or very much

Speech acts – At the restaurant -ordering and commenting

   
 

Lesson 2: Discover and Taste

Lexicon – To ask and say the price, services, modes of payment

Grammar – It is/ He is, imperative tense, it is necessary, verbs ‘to owe’, ‘to be able,

                  ‘to know’, ‘to wish/want’

Speech acts -Inviting and responding to an invitation

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Poem
 

 

2. Le Lac (The Lake) - Alphonse de Lamartine

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Culture: Gourmet Countries
 

Dossier 6- Culture: Gourmet Countries

 

Lesson 1: Everyone is having fun

Lexicon- Outings, situating in time

Grammar – Demonstrative adjectives, formation of the feminine, indefinite pronoun ‘one’

                   Immediate future

Speech acts – Describing an outfit

   
 

Lesson 2: Daily routine of Teenagers

Lexicon – The family, clothes and accessories