CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE

School of Business and Management

Syllabus for
BSc (Computer Science, Mathematics/Honours/Honours with Research)
Academic Year  (2023)

 
1 Semester - 2023 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBA141D TALENT MANAGEMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
BBA141E UNDERSTANDING OF FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
BLS141 INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 03 100
CHE141A CHEMISTRY AND SOCIETY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
CHE141B NUTRICHEM Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
COM141 FUNDAMENTALS OF ACCOUNTING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
COM143 ENTREPRENEURSHIP DEVELOPMENT AND SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
COM144 FINANCIAL LITERACY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 03 100
COM146 INTRODUCTION TO EXCEL FOR MANAGERS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
CSC000-1M DCF AND C PROGRAMMING Bridge Courses 2 0 50
CSC101-1 DIGITAL COMPUTER FUNDAMENTALS AND C PROGRAMMING Major Core Courses-I 6 4 150
CSC161-1 WEB APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT Skill Enhancement Courses 3 3 100
CSC162-1 DATA ANALYSIS USING SPREADSHEET Skill Enhancement Courses 3 2 100
DMT141 DANCE MOVEMENT THERAPY Multidisciplinary Courses 2 3 100
DMT142 INTRODUCTION TO CARNATIC MUSIC Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
DSC141 PRINCIPLES OF DATA SCIENCE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
ECO143 DEMOCRACY AND ECONOMY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
ECO144 GLOBALISATION AND DEVELOPMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
ENG181-1 ENGLISH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses 2 2 50
EST142 READING SPORTS AND LITERATURE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
EST143 STORYTELLING, GAMES AND ETHICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
EST146 FOOD AND LITERATURE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
HIS141 HISTORY AND CINEMA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
LAW141 CYBER LAW Multidisciplinary Courses 3 4 100
LAW142 RIGHT TO INFORMATION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
LAW144 ENVIRONMENTAL LAW Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
LAW145 PARLIAMENTARY PROCEDURE AND PRACTICE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
MAT003 BRIDGE COURSE FOR DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS Bridge Courses 5 0 50
MAT101-1 DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
MAT141 FOUNDATIONS OF MATHEMATICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
MAT142 QUANTITAIVE TECHNIQUES FOR MANAGERS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PHY141 FUNDAMENTAL OF FORENSIC PHYSICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PHY142 ANALOG AND DIGITAL ELECTRONICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PHY142-1C ANALOG AND DIGITAL ELECTRONICS Allied Core Courses 3 3 100
POL141 DEMOCRACY AND ETHICAL VALUES Multidisciplinary Courses 2 2 100
POL142 SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY143 ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND HUMAN-MACHINE INTERACTION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY155 PSYCHOLOGY OF GENDER Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY156 PSYCHOLOGY OF RELATIONSHIPS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY158 STRESS MANAGEMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
SOC143 SOCIOLOGY THROUGH CINEMA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
THE141 THEATRE APPRECIATION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
THE142 IMPROVISATION AND DEVISED THEATRE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
2 Semester - 2023 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBA142A ADVERTISING AND SALES PROMOTION TECHNIQUES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
BBA142E WORKING WITH SPREAD SHEETS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
BLS143 PRINCIPLES OF HORTICULTURAL TECHNIQUES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 4 100
BLS144 PRINCIPLES OF AYURVEDA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
CHE141 CHEMISTRY IN ACTION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
COM147 E-COMMERCE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
COM148 PERSONAL TAX PLANNING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
COM149 INVESTMENTS AND TRADING STRATEGIES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
COM150 FINANCIAL LITERACY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
COM151 DIGITAL MARKETING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
CSC102-2 DATA STRUCTURES Major Core Courses-I 5 4 150
CSC103-2 OPERATING SYSTEMS Major Core Courses-II 4 4 150
DSC143 DATA VISUALIZATION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
ECO146 GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 50
ECO147 THINKING THROUGH THE ENVIRONMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 50
ENG181-2 ENGLISH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses 3 2 100
EST149 INTRODUCTION TO WRITING TAMIL MODERN POETRY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 100
EST150 GENDER AND POPULAR CULTURE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
EST151 COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY: DARSANA AND PHILOSOPHY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 50
EST154 LITERATURE FROM THE NORTHEAST Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
EST156 RETELLING OF EPICS IN INDIAN LITERATURE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
LAW142 RIGHT TO INFORMATION - 3 3 100
LAW144 ENVIRONMENTAL LAW - 3 3 100
LAW146 LAW AND PRACTICE OF INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 100
MAT101-2 INTRODUCTORY ALGEBRA Major Core Courses-I 3 3 100
MAT102-2 DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS Major Core Courses-II 4 4 100
MAT111-2 CALCULUS USING PYTHON Major Core Courses-I 2 1 50
MAT141 MATHEMATICS FOR MANAGERIAL DECISIONS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
MAT142 APPLIED ARITHMETICS - 3 3 100
MED147 MIDDLE CINEMA IN INDIA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
MED148 LANGUAGE OF CINEMA: A VISUAL APPROACH Multidisciplinary Courses 45 3 100
MED149 INTRODUCTION TO SEMIOTICS Multidisciplinary Courses 45 3 100
PHY141A INTRODUCTION TO ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PHY141B RENEWABLE ENERGY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PHY142-2C MICROCONTROLLER AND EMBEDDED SYSTEMS Allied Core Courses 3 3 100
POL141 DEMOCRACY AND ETHICAL VALUES Multidisciplinary Courses 2 2 100
PSY155 PSYCHOLOGY OF GENDER Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY158 STRESS MANAGEMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY160 UNDERSTANDING ADDICTION AND SUBSTANCE USE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
SOC142 CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL PROBLEMS AND CHALLENGES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
SOC143 SOCIOLOGY THROUGH CINEMA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
STA141 ELEMENTS OF STATISTICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
THE144 ACTING FOR MEDIA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
    

    

Introduction to Program:

 

The BSc (Computer Science, Mathematics) is a dual major graduate programme, to nurture the confidence and skills of the students in Computer Science and Mathematics. It aims to impart sound fundamentals and specialized aspects of computer science and mathematics. The curriculum includes various theoretical and practical courses along with industry relevant software tools to prepare young minds for the challenging opportunities available in the IT industries and research organizations. Also, based on the latest NEP guidelines, this programme offers a unique blend of flexible credit systems to support individual learning needs with a research bent.

Programme Outcome/Programme Learning Goals/Programme Learning Outcome:

PO1: Understand and apply the fundamental principles, concepts and methods in key areas of science and multidisciplinary fields

PO2: Demonstrate problem solving, analytical, and logical skills to provide solutions for the scientific requirements

PO3: Develop critical thinking with a scientific temper

PO4: Communicate the subject effectively

PO5: Understand the importance and judicious use of technology for the sustainable growth of mankind in synergy with nature.

PO6: Understand and apply fundamental principles, concepts and methods of mathematics.

PO7: Demonstrate problem solving skills using mathematical techniques.

PO8: Apply appropriate methods and tools for research and development in the chosen discipline.

Assesment Pattern

CIA: 50%

 

ESE: 50%

Examination And Assesments

Continuous Internal Assessment: 50% Weightage

 

End Semester Examination: 50% Weightage

BBA141D - TALENT MANAGEMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Human Resource is considered as a valuable resource in every organization. The world class companies compete among themselves to attract the best talent across the globe.  They view talent as competitive differentiator and one where the acquisition, engagement, development and retention of talent is considered as a strategic priority of business.  This course exposes the students to methods and practices to acquire, engage and develop talent, focus on development of strategic leaders within an organization and also deals with how talent and knowledge can be managed effectively for the development of the organization

Course Outcome

CO 1: 1. Demonstrate an understanding of key concepts, principles and models related to talent and knowledge management

CO 2: 2. Evaluate the importance of talent management in developing organizations

CO 3: 3. Learn to apply the theories and concepts studied in the classroom to practical situations

CO 4: 4. Analyse the various talent and knowledge management practices and their value to organizations

CO 5: 5. Solve the issues pertaining to talent and knowledge management

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
Introduction to Talent Management
 

Meaning and concept of talent management, need and scope for talent management, Talent vs Knowledge, Talent management models: Process and Integrated model, Talent management initiatives, Techniques for potential appraisal, Talent management grid, Benefits of talent management.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:7
Creating Talent Management Systems
 

Building blocks for talent management strategy, Developing and implementing Effective Talent Management System, Measuring the effectiveness of talent management, creating talent management system for organizational excellence.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:7
Competency mapping and approaches to talent management
 

Competency Mapping- Meaning, Importance and Steps in competency mapping, Competency model, Role of leaders and HR in talent management, Talent Management Approaches, Mapping Business Strategies and Talent Management Strategies, Achieving competitive advantage, Best practices in talent management- Case studies

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:7
Integrating Talent and Knowledge Management
 

Introduction to knowledge management, types of knowledge, Benefits of Knowledge Management, Integrating talent management and knowledge management, Role of Information technology in talent and knowledge management.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:7
Recent Trends and Best Practices in Talent Management
 

Introduction, Use of Technology in Talent Management, Use of AI in Talent Management, Talent Management using Design Thinking

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Project Work: Field study & Report Submission
 

Experiential Learning Activity: Identifying any one organization in the manufacturing or service sector- Interacting, observing and conducting interviews with their senior HR leaders to understand how they manage and retain talent in their organizations.  

Text Books And Reference Books:

       Lance A. Berger, Dorothy Berger (2017): Talent management handbook, McGraw Hill New York.

 

       Mohapatra.M & Dhir.S (2022); Talent Management-A contemporary perspective (2022), Sage Publications

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

       Mark Wilcox (2016), Effective Talent Management: Aligning strategy, people and performance, (1st ed.), Routledge Taylor and Francis Group.

       Marshal Gold Smith and Louis Carter (2018): Best practices in talent management, A Publication of the practice institute, Pfeiffer, A Wiley Imprint.

       Atheer Abdullah Mohammed (2019), Integrating Talent and Knowledge Management: Theory and practice, Lamber Publishing co.,

       Cappeli Peter: Talent on Demand –Managing Talent in an age of uncertainty, Harvard Business press.

Sphr Doris Sims, Sphr Matthew Gay(2007),Building Tomorrow’s Talent : A Practitioner’s Guide to Talent Management and Succession Planning, Author House

Evaluation Pattern

Component

 

Maximum marks

Weightage

Total Marks in Final Grade

CIA1

20

50%

10

CIA2

20

50%

10

CIA3

50

50%

25

Attendance

5

100 %

05

Total = 50

 

BBA141E - UNDERSTANDING OF FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 Course Description: This course aims at understanding the financial statements published by Indian companies and make a meaningful understanding of the same. The course gives the initiation towards terminology in accounting and takes the readers through Income statement and Balance sheet. The interpretation of the cash flow, Income statement and Balance sheet gives the reader an understanding of fundamentals of the company and gives a sense of financial soundness or not of any company. The growing need of adherence to rules and practice of ethics in accounting in its various aspects from public practice to reporting with case studies will explain the profoundness of Ethics in Accounting and corporate reporting.

Course Outcome

1: Relate to accounting terminologies

2: Explain the components of Financial statements

3: Interpret financial statements

4: Realise the importance of ethics in accounting practices

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Terminologies in Financial Statement
 

Assets- Current assts and fixed assets, Non-current Liabilities, current liabilities, Owners Equity, shareholders fund, External equity, Return on investment, operating expenses, Normal profit, Earnings per share private -Public Investors-Income Statement-Revenue-Expenses-Profit/loss-Balance sheet- Dual aspects of the balance sheet, Significant accounting policies and principles- Full Disclosure-Standalone statements-consolidated statements.

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Understanding Income Statement and Balance sheet
 

Meaning and Purpose of Income statement- Cost of goods Sold-Gross profit, Operating Income-EBITDA-EBIT-EBT-Depreciation-Tax provisions made-Deferred Taxation- EPS: Basic and Diluted- Purpose of Balance sheet- Share capital- Net Worth-Shareholders fund- Book value of assets-Face value of shares-Current and non-current liabilities and assets- Amortisation and Depreciation-Notes to accounts.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Cash Flow statements and Notes to accounts
 

Meaning and Purpose of cash flow statements- Meaning of cash flow,  sources of cash flow, Operating, Investing and Finance activities- Inflow and outflow of cash- Indirect method-Interpreting company growth rate from cash flow stage-Positive and Negative cash flow-Effect of changes in cash flow on performance – Interpretation of high cash balances-Exhibit of cash flow statements of Indian companies- Schedules or notes to accounts- preparation and  relevance- interpretation of schedules.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Interpretation of Financial Statements
 

Year On Year (YoY) comparison of Income statement and Balance sheet-Common size comparison-Interpreting EPS, DPS, MPS, PE Ratio, Intrinsic value, Liquidity ratio, Current ratio, Debt Equity Ratio- Dividend payout- Ascertaining performance of a company through exhibit of annual report of Indian companies

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
: Ethics in Accounting
 

Compliance of accounting standard in letter vs true spirit- window dressing- effects of unethical practices and non-disclosures-case study ethics in public practice of accounting, ethics in compliance, ethics in corporate reporting, ethics in non-profit organisations.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Gupta, A. (2020). Financial Accounting for Management: An Analytical Perspective, Noida, Pearson Education.
  2. Raman, B. S. (2014). Financial Accounting (1stedi).I & II, New Dehli:United Publishers.
  3. Porter, G.A., & Norton, C.L. (2013). Financial Accounting (IFRS update)( 6thedi), Cengage Learning.
  4. Jawahar Lal & Seema Srivastava (2013). Financial Accounting New Delhi:Himalaya Publishing House.
  5.  Sharma & Sashi Gupta (2020) Management Accounting, Kalyani Publishers 
  6. I M Pandey (2020) Management Accounting, Vikas Publishers 
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Financial Accounting By SP JAIN & NArang , Kalyani Publishers, Noida

Evaluation Pattern

Total 50 marks . 

CIA-1 20 marks (weightage 50% ie 10 marks ) 

CIA-2 20 marks(weightage 50% ie 10 marks ) 

CIA-3 - 50 marks (weightage 50% ie 25 marks ) 

For attendance 5marks 

This is a Submission paper .There is no MSE or ESE 

BLS141 - INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:03

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 This course introduces students to the basic principles of biology. Students will learn about the organization of life, including the cell theory and taxonomy, the chemistry of life, genetics, evolution, and ecology. The course will also cover current issues in biology such as biotechnology and environmental sustainability.

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will be able to describe the fundamental principles and concepts of biology, including the organization of life and the chemistry of living systems.

CO2: Students will be able to explain the role of genetics in inheritance, diversity, and evolution.

CO3: Students will be able to analyze the impact of human activities on the environment and the measures that can be taken to promote sustainability.

CO4: Students will be able to evaluate the ethical implications of advances in biotechnology and their impact on society.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Biology
 

 

The scientific method and experimental design; The organization of life: cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems; Taxonomy and the diversity of life; Chemical elements and molecules essential to living systems

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Genetics and Evolution
 

 

Mendelian genetics and inheritance patterns; DNA structure and function, gene expression and regulation; Genetic diversity and evolution; Natural selection and adaptation

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Ecology and Environmental Biology
 

 

Ecosystems and biomes; Population dynamics and community interactions; Biodiversity and conservation; Human impact on the environment and sustainability

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Biotechnology and Ethics
 

 

Applications of biotechnology in medicine, agriculture, and industry, Ethical issues related to biotechnology; The impact of biotechnology on society; Regulations and policies related to biotechnology

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Campbell, N. A., & Reece, J. B. (2018). Biology (11th ed.). Pearson.
  2. Freeman, S., Quillin, K., Allison, L., Black, M., Taylor, E., & Podgorski, G. (2017). Biological Science (6th ed.). Pearson.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1.  Begon, M., Townsend, C. R., & Harper, J. L. (2006). Ecology: From Individuals to Ecosystems (4th ed.). Blackwell Publishing.
  2. Ricklefs, R. E., & Relyea, R. A. (2019). The Economy of Nature (8th ed.). W.H. Freeman.

  3. Kuby, J., Owen, J., & Kindt, T. J. (2019). Kuby Immunology (8th ed.). W.H. Freeman.

  4. Thompson, P. B., & Kaplan, D. M. (2019). Encyclopedia of Food and Agricultural Ethics (2nd ed.). Springer.

Evaluation Pattern

Attendance and Class Participation- 10%

Midterm Examination- 30%

Review paper/Research Paper- 20%

Seminar presentation – 10%

Final Examination - 30%

 

CHE141A - CHEMISTRY AND SOCIETY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course gives an insight into the implications of chemistry in daily life. This course will equip the students with better understanding of how the different forms of matter influences human lives. This also sensitizes them on the judicious use and safe handling of chemicals.

Course Objectives: Non Science students get to know about the various constituents present in household chemicals and use them judiciously.

Course Outcome

CO1:: Ability to identify the influence of different chemical substances in daily lives

CO2:: Evaluate the judicious use of different chemicals and their safe handling in day today life

CO3: Ability to analyse the environmental issues and adopt sustainable practices

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:2
Introduction
 

Explanation of terms like Poison, toxic, irritant, flammable liquid, combustible liquid, corrosive, solvents, etc.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Environmental chemistry
 

Air quality, air pollution, green house effect, acid rain, destruction of ozone layer, control of air pollution. Water pollution, Water quality criteria for domestic and industrial uses, soil pollution and its causes. Pollution abatement methods.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Energy and environment
 

Mention the following- Mineral resources – Metals and non-metals Fuel and energy resources, different energy sources, Wood, Petroleum and natural gas Nuclear energy – Solar energy –energy sources of tomorrow and green energy sources. Batteries and fuel cells.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:7
House hold chemicals and its impact on environment
 

Ecofriendly chemicals, biodegradable and non degradable chemicals. (Bleach, ammonia, disinfectants, carpet freshener, air freshener, window cleaner, furniture polish, etc). Laundry products (laundry detergent, fabric softener, etc) Soaps, Detergents and special cleaners.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:2
Polymers
 

Classification, uses. Recycling of polymers.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:3
Acids and Bases
 

Acid and bases, their general characteristics. Household uses of acids and bases.

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:3
Biomolecules
 

Carbohydrates, proteins, Vitamins and minerals – Sources and Deficiency diseases.

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:3
Preservatives and additives
 

Chemicals used as colouring agents and as preservatives. Food adulteration.

Unit-9
Teaching Hours:5
Drugs and cosmetics
 

Analgesics, antivirals, antibiotics-examples. Health and beauty products (hairspray, hair remover, nail polish, nail polish remover, hair colouring products, talcum powder, lipstick etc).

Unit-10
Teaching Hours:6
Home maintenance
 

Paint, varnish, oils and stain removers. Garden chemicals (fertilizers, pesticides, insecticides, herbicides etc.) examples, advantages and disadvantages.

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1] A. K. De,. Environmental Chemistry 6 th ed, New Age International Pvt Ltd Publishers;2006.

[2] J. Toedt, D. Koza and K. Van Cleef-ToedChemical Composition of Everyday Products 2005.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1] Kerry k. Karukstis and Gerald R. Van Hecke Chemistry Connections, The Chemical Basis

of Everyday phenomena, 2 nd Ed., 2003.

[2] J. Schwarcz, All new commentaries on the science of everyday food and life, 2005.

[3] Raymond Chang Chemistry, 8 th Ed. Tata Mc Graw-Hill, 2005.

[4] Sriram and P.Yogeeswari, Dorling Medicinal Chemistry, Kindersley Pvt. Ltd., 2007.

Evaluation Pattern

Total Marks for each Semester – 100

1. CIA -1 ………………………. 25Marks

2. Mid-term Test (CIA-2)……………………… 25 Marks

3. End-semester examination ………………… 50 Marks

TOTAL 100 Marks

CHE141B - NUTRICHEM (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course gives an insight into nutrition and its importance in leading a healthy life.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Discuss about nutrition and its importance in leading a healthy life.

CO2: Explain the elements of nutrition and dietry requirement.

CO3: Summerise about food analysis, food microbiology and therapeutic nutrition

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Fundamentals of nutrition
 

FaFactors Influencing Food Selection: Flavours, appearance and other aspects of food,     Demographics Culture and Religion, Health, Social-Emotional Influences, and Environmental Concerns, Food Industry and the Media.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:4
Basic Nutrition Concepts
 

NNutrition, Energy content in food, Nutrients, Nutrient Density, Characteristics of a Nutritious Diet.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Nutrient Recommendations
 

Dietary Reference Intakes, Digestion, Absorption, and Metabolism, Gastrointestinal Tract and secretions, Food groups, Organic Foods, GM foods.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Nutrition biochemistry
 

Elements of nutrition - Dietary requirement of carbohydrates, lipids and proteins. Biological value of proteins. Concepts of protein quality. Protein sparing action of carbohydrates and fats. Essential amino acids, essential fatty acids and their physiological functions.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:3
Vitamins
 

Dietary sources, biochemical functions, requirements and deficiency diseases associated with vitamin B complex, C and A, D, E and K vitamins.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:3
Minerals
 

Nutritional significance of dietary sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, iron, iodine, zinc and copper.

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:2
Malnutrition
 

Prevention of malnutrition, supplementary foods.

     

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:2
Food science and food analysis
 

Food additives and preservatives.

Unit-9
Teaching Hours:6
Food microbiology
 

Food safety, Fermentation, food spoilage and food borne pathogens, food processing.

 

Unit-10
Teaching Hours:6
Therapeutic nutrition
 

Life style diseases and personalized nutrition therapy, nutraceuticals and its classifications.

Unit-11
Teaching Hours:2
Public nutrition
 

Health organizations, NGO’s etc. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1]  Ganesh Narayanan Chauhan,  5th ed Foods that heal. Popular Book Depot 2012

[2]   Mohinder Singh, 2nd ed. Health and  food Gyan Publishing House 2003.

[3]   S. A. Iqbal and Y. Mido 1st ed Food Chemistry. Discovery Publishing House, 2008.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1]  Kittler and Sucher, 5th ed. Food and Culture Thomson Wadsworth 2007.

[2]   Anita Tull, 3rd Food Nutritioned.Oxford University Press, 1997.

            

Evaluation Pattern

No.

Component

Schedule

Duration

Marks

CIA1

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

Before MST

--

10

 

CIA2

Mid-Sem Test

[MST]

2 Hrs (50 marks)

25

CIA3

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

After MST

--

10

CIA3

Attendance (75-79 = 1, 80-84 = 2, 85-89 = 3,

90-94 = 4, 95-100 = 5)

--

5

ESE

Internal

2 Hrs (50 marks)

50

Total

100

Final score is calculated out of 50

 

COM141 - FUNDAMENTALS OF ACCOUNTING (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course will enable the students to have fundamental knowledge about financial accounting. The topics covered are Book-keeping, Subsidiary Books, preparation of Ledger and Financial Statements and Analysis of Financial Statements.

Course Outcome

CO1: Define the concepts and terminology used in accounts.

CO2: Compare the book prepared through Single Entry System and Double Entry System.

CO3: Prepare the basic subsidiary books required by a business.

CO4: Rearrange the information in Journal to prepare the ledger accounts, Trial Balance and Financial Statements.

CO5: Compare and comment on the basic information provided by the Financial Statements of Real Companies and other organizations.

CO6: Analyse the Financial Statements of different organizations and take decisions.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Introduction to Accounting:
 

Accounting – Meaning, Objectives, Accounting as source of information, Internal and External users of accounting information and their needs. Qualitative Characteristics of Accounting Information– Reliability, Relevance, Understandability and Comparability. Book-Keeping – Meaning – Definition. Accounting, Difference between Book-keeping, and Accounting. Accounting Concepts and Conventions. Accounting terms – Capital – Assets – Liabilities – Expenses – Income – Fund – Net worth – Capital Expenditure – Revenue expenditure– Capital Receipts – Revenue Receipts – Debtors – Creditors – Goods – Cost – Gain – Stock – Purchase – Sales – Loss – Profit – Voucher – Discount – Transaction – Drawings, etc. System of Book Keeping: Single entry system and Double entry system of Book Keeping – Accounting Process - introduction.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:7
Books of Original Entry
 

Books of Accounts – Journal – Rules of Journalizing (Debit and Credit) – Steps in Journalizing - Meaning – Importance – Different types of Subsidiary books – Cash book – Petty cash book – Purchase book – Purchase returns book – Sales book – Sales return book – Bills receivables book – Bills payable book – Journal Proper – Process of recording transactions in the respective books.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Preparation of Ledger and Trial Balance
 

Ledger – Types of Accounts – Posting to Ledger accounts – Balancing the Ledger accounts – Trial Balance – Meaning – Objectives and Preparation of Trial Balance.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Final Accounts
 

Financial statements – Meaning – Objectives – Financial reporting through Financial Statements – Preparation of Trading account – Profit and Loss account – Balance Sheet, Cash Flow Statement

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:13
Analysis and Interpretation of Financial Statements
 

Methods of analysis of financial statements, techniques of analysis and interpretation – Comparative Income Statements, Comparative Balance Sheets, Common Size Income Statements, Common Size Balance Sheets, Trend Analysis, Ratio Analysis (problems on the above topics).

Text Books And Reference Books:

Grewal, T. S. (2020). Double Entry Bookkeeping. Delhi: Sultan and Sons.

Jain, S. P & Narang, K. L (2020). Advanced Accountancy (Vol 13 & Vol2). Kalyani Publication

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Raman, B. S (2016). Accountancy. Mangalore: United Publishers.

2. Khan,M.Y.&.Jain,P.K.(2021)Management Accounting(8ed). NewDelhi: TataMcGraw Hill

3. Arora,M.N. (2016).Cost and Management Accounting(3ed). Mumbai: Himalaya Publishing House.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I - 25 marks]

Other teste - 20 marks

Final Exam - 50 marks

Attemdance - 5 marks

 

COM143 - ENTREPRENEURSHIP DEVELOPMENT AND SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Entrepreneurship is not just about start-ups: it is a topic that is rapidly growing in importance in government policy and in the behaviour of established firms. The course provides students with an understanding of the role and personality of the entrepreneur, and a range of skills aimed at successful planning of entrepreneurial ventures. Material covered includes fostering creativity and open-mindedness, knowledge acquisition and management, innovation systems, screening and evaluating new venture concepts, market evaluation and developing a marketing plan, legal Issues Including intellectual property, preparation of venture budgets, and raising finance. The major piece of assessment is the writing of a comprehensive business plan for a new venture.

Course Outcome

CO 1: Discuss the fundamental concept and emerging trends of entrepreneurship.

CO 2: Elaborate the entrepreneurial process and classify the different styles of thinking.

CO 3: Develop and summarize the creative problem-solving technique and types of innovation.

CO 4: Compile the legal and regulatory framework and social responsibility relating to entrepreneur.

CO 5: Create a business model for a start-up.

CO 6: Build competence to identify the different sources of finance available for a start-up and relate their role in different stages of business.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to Entrepreneurship
 

Evolution, Characteristics, Nature of Entrepreneurship, Types, Functions of Entrepreneur, Distinction between an Entrepreneur and a Manager, Concept, Growth of Entrepreneurship in India, Role of Entrepreneurship in Economic Development, Emerging trends of contemporary entrepreneurship – Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Globalisation, changing demands, unemployment, changing demographics, Institutional support, ease of entry in the informal sector

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
The Entrepreneurial Process
 

Steps in the Entrepreneurial Process: Generating Ideas, Opportunity Identification, Business concepts, Businessconcepts,Resources(Financial,PhysicalandHuman), Implementing and managing the venture, Harvesting the venture, Design Thinking, Systems Thinking, Agile thinking and Lean thinking Blue Ocean Strategy, Role and relevance of mentors, Incubation cell, Methods of brainstorming ideas.

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Creativity and Innovation
 

Creativity, Principles of creativity, Source of New Idea, Ideas into Opportunities. CreativeProblemSolving:Heuristics,Brainstorming,Synectics, ValueAnalysisInnovationandEntrepreneurship: Profits and Innovation, Principles of Innovation, Disruptive, Incrementaland Open innovations, Nurturing and Managing Innovation, Globalization, Concept andModelsofInnovation, MethodsofprotectingInnovationandcreativity,SignificanceofIntellectualPropertyRights,Patents & Copy right, Business Model Canvas, and Lean Management. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Entrepreneurship Practice
 

EssentialsofBusinessOwnership:Typesofventures,RiskandBenefits,LegalandRegulatoryFramework,EthicsandSocialResponsibility,MarketResearch(ventureopportunityscreening), Feasibility Analysis, Introduction to the Business Plan, Developing the BusinessModel for starting a new venture, E-Commerce and Growing the Venture: The Internet andits impact on venture development

Approaches to E-Commerce, Strategies for E-CommerceSuccess,The nature of international entrepreneurship and their importance

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Sources of raising capital
 

Different sources of financing for start-ups, stages of financing involve in start-ups, advantages and disadvantages of the different sources of financing, Mezzanine finance, Specific financial assistance from government and financial institutions to promote entrepreneurship, Venture Valuation Methods

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Allen,K.R.(2011), “LaunchingNewVentures:AnEntrepreneurialApproach”,6thEdition.Mason,Ohio: South-WesternCengage Learning.
  2. Kuratko,DonaldF.Entrepreneurship:(2010) Theory,Process,Practice9thEdition.Mason,Ohio: South-WesternCengage Learning
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Scarborough,N.M.(2011),“EssentialsofEntrepreneurshipandSmallBusinessManagement”,6thEdition. NewJersey:PrenticeHall.
  2. Verstraete,T.and Jouioson-Laffitte,E.(2012),“ABusinessModelforEntrepreneurship”,
  3. Cheltenham:EdwardElgarPublishingLtd.
  4. Poornima Charantimath,(2007) “EntrepreneurshipDevelopment-SmallBusinessEnterprise”,Pearson Education.
  5. RoberDHisrich,MichaelPPeters,DeanAShepherd,(2007), Entrepreneurship,(6ed.), The McGraw-Hillcompanies.
  6. RajivRoy,(2011),Entrepreneurship,(2ed.)OxfordUniversityPress
Evaluation Pattern

CIA I (a) Multiple Choice Questions (MCQ)

CIA I (b) Video Content Creation

 

CIA II Case Study Analysis

 

CIA III (a) Multiple Choice Questions(MCQ)

CIA III (b) Business Plan Creation + VIVA

 

CIA I (a): Week 1 & 2: MCQ (5 Marks)


Google Form/Google Classroom based Quiz consisting of MCQs to test the basic concepts relating to Unit 1 and 2. The date of examination is on or before 05-08-2023.  This would be an individual assessment with a set of 10 questions, 5 each from unit 1 and 2.  The details of this assignment, and the penalties for not attending shall be posted in the Google Classroom.

 

CIA I (b) Preparing a video interview of an Entrepreneur (Individual Assignment) 10 marks

Every student shall identify an entrepreneur and prepare a 15 minutes video interview on them.  Orientation about the video preparation shall be given by the respective faculty in the first week of the semester itself. Later a Google spreadsheet of students list shall be sent to the students.  Within a week the students need to enter the name of the entrepreneurs identified so as to avoid repetition in their selections and start preparing the interview. Once the entrepreneur is finalized, an orientation about plagiarism policies shall be given by the faculty.  The last date of the video submission is 10-08-2023, before 06:00 PM.  Inability to submit the video on or before the due date should be priorly intimated to the faculty.  Any delay in submission without prior consent or approval shall lead to a penalty of marking the student ZERO in this component. 

 

The video shall be assessed based on the following rubrics. Report submitted will be valued for 10 marks.

More details of the report:

 

  1. The video should include genesis, growth, management contributions, challenges, how they overcome, achievements, major entrepreneurship inferences.
  2. References and sources should be mentioned as per APA 6th Edition, towards the end of the video.
  3. The video interview should be a minimum of 15 minutes.
  4. Last date for submission 10th August 2023, late submission within two days of the scheduled date, will carry a penalty deduction of two marks. 

 

CIA II - Case Study (15 marks)

Group of not more than six members in a team will be formed randomly in the class based on the subject teacher’s discretion. Each group shall gather content and solve the assigned case study and submit a written report of the same. Report shall include the introduction to the case, highlights and objectives, conceptual definitions, detailed analysis, findings and suggestion, conclusion.  Groups are free to use all authentic sources to gather information. Once the case study is finalized, an orientation about case analysis, report writing, and plagiarism policies shall be given by the faculty.  The last date of the case analysis report submission is 30-09-2022, before 06:00 PM.  The report can be supported with article reviews, statistical facts and examples and book references.


More Details of the Report:

1.      Case Study has to be based on growth of Entrepreneurship in India or Emerging trends of contemporary entrepreneurship.

 

  1. References as per APA 6th Edition, and Appendix.
  2. Detailed analysis of the problem and alternatives available should form part of the report.
  3. The written report should be a minimum of 6 pages.
  4. Last date for submission 30th September, 2023, late submission within two days of the scheduled date, will carry a penalty deduction of two marks. 

 

CIA III (a): Week 15 & 16: MCQ (5 Marks)

 


Google Form/Google Classroom based Quiz consisting of MCQs to test the basic concepts relating to Unit 1 and 2. The date of examination is on or before 02-11-2023.  This would be an individual assessment with a set of 10 questions, 5 each from Units 1 and 2.  The details of this assignment, and the penalties for not attending shall be posted in the Google Classroom.

 

CIA III (b) Business Plan and viva-voce (10 marks)


The same group allotted for Case Study report shall continue. Once the idea for the business plan is finalized, an orientation about various components of the business plan, report writing, and plagiarism policies shall be given by the faculty. However, every student shall contribute in the construction of a
creative and technical business plan in detail consisting details from idea to implementation stage. The report will be valued for 10 marks by a panel of three external reviewers. The assessment criteria shall be discussed and finalized before the final submission and in consonance with the inputs and suggestions 
of the reviewers identified.  This criterion shall also be presented and discussed with the students prior to the final submission.  Though this is a group assignment, the assessment of the contribution of each student would be done individually.

More Details of the Report:

§  The report shall include details on value proposition, business and revenue model, sustainability

§  The written report should be a minimum of 10 pages.

§  References as per APA 6th Edition, and Appendix.

Last date for submission 5th November 2023, late submission within two days of the scheduled date, will carry a penalty deduction of two mark 

COM144 - FINANCIAL LITERACY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:03

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course aims at enhancing their financial skills as well as training the students to be financial educators with family and friends. There is a need for students to effectively plan and monitor their spending. The course aims at effectively training students and equipping them with the knowledge and tools to manage their finances and also teach others the same.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the basic concepts of financial literacy.

CO2: Apply financial planning and budgeting decisions on a personal and professional front.

CO3: Understand the purpose and functions of the Banking system.

CO4: Understand the role and importance of financial instruments and insurance products.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to Financial Literacy
 

Introduction, Evolution, Meaning and importance of -  Income, Expenses, Savings, Budget, Money, Currency, Bank account, savings investment, JAM-balance sheet – purpose features, format – Technology in finance – FinTech, TechFin, Regtech, sandox, Mobile-based Banking – post offices – Savings vs investments – Power of Compounding – risk and Return-Time Value of Money- Simple Interest-Compound Interest-

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Planning and Budgeting
 

Introduction to Financial Planning - Analysing the resources of the person - Concepts in Financial Planning:The time value of money, Diversification - 'spreading risk', Investment Timing - Financial Products for Savers: Financial Products options for savers, personal budget – family budget – financial planning procedure.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Banking Products and Services
 

Introduction and evolution of Banking – Banking in India – RBI – Role of RBI in India– Savings and Deposits – Deposits, Accounts, KYC,e/v KYC Types of Deposits - Saving Bank Accounts, Fixed Deposit Accounts, Recurring Deposit Account, Special Term Deposit Schemes, Loans and Types of loan advanced by Banks and Other secondary functions of Bank – PAN, NSDL: PAN, Meaning of Cheque and types of cheques – CTS_MICR-IFSC – e- Banking – ATM, Debit, Credit, Smart Card, UPI, e-Wallets, Payment Banks-NPCI: Products and role in regulating the online payments, CIBIL – Banking complaints and Banking Ombudsman. Mutual Funds_ Types of Mutual Funds-NAV. Digital Currency-Bitcoin- NFO

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Post Office Products, Retirement planning and Investment Avenues
 

Post Office Savings Account(SB)​​​​​, National Savings Recurring Deposit Account (RD)​​, ​National Savings Time Deposit Account (TD), National Savings Monthly Income Account (MIS), Senior Citizens Savings Scheme Account (SCSS)​, Public Provident Fund Account (PPF)​, Sukanya Samriddhi Account (SSA)​, National Savings Certificates (VIIIth Issue) (NSC), Kisan Vikas Patra (KVP), PM CARES for Children Scheme, 2021, Interest rates (New)​, How to avail services, Schedule of Fee – IPBS – KYC. Employees Provident Fund (EPF) - Public Provident Fund (PPF), Superannuation Fund, Gratuity, Other Pension Plan, and Post-retire Counselling-National Pension Scheme(NPS)

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Life Insurance and Related Services
 

Life Insurance Policies: Life Insurance, Term Life Insurance, Pension Policies, ULIP, Health Insurance, Endowment Policies, Property Insurance: Policies offered by various general insurance companies. Post office life Insurance Schemes: Postal Life Insurance and Rural Postal Life Insurance (PLI/RPLI). Housing Loans: Institutions providing housing loans, loans under Pradhan Mantri Awas Yojana – Rural and Urban-Atal Pension Yojana (APS),

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Chandra, P. (2012). Investment Game: How to Win. New Delhi: Tata McGraw Hill Education
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

  1. Mittra, S., Rai, S. K., Sahu, A. P., & Starn, H. J. (2015). Financial Planning. New Delhi: Sage Publications India Pvt. Ltd.
  2. https://rbidocs.rbi.org.in/rdocs/content/pdfs/GUIDE310113_F.pdf

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1 25 marks

CIA2  25 marks 

ESE  50 marks 

COM146 - INTRODUCTION TO EXCEL FOR MANAGERS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course provides the knowledge base for understanding the workings of Excel. The primary objective of the course is to familiarize the students with the basics of Microsoft excel. The course introduces the students to financial analysis. Further, the course also deals with the practical application of Microsoft Excel in day-to-day business activities. As a prerequisite, the students should have basic knowledge of computers and MS Office.

Course Outcome

CO1: To provide students with the fundamental knowledge of the use of computers in business.

CO2: To provide exposure to the students on MS Office Excel.

CO3: To apply MS excel functions in business.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Introduction to Excel
 

Understanding the concept of a spreadsheet - Identifying the components of a spreadsheet

 

Navigating the Excel interface – Comparison of various version of Microsoft excel - Creating a new spreadsheet- Entering data into cells - Formatting data (fonts, colors, borders) - Adjusting column width and row height - Merging and splitting cells - Basic Excel functions: Structure of an excel function, functions such as SUM (), MIN (), MAX (), AVERAGE (), COUNT (), AUTOSUM, AUTOFILL. Working with an Excel List: Understanding Excel List Structure, Sorting a List Using Single Level Sort, Sorting a List Using Multi-Level Sorts, Using Custom Sorts in an Excel List, Filter an Excel List Using the AutoFilter, Creating Subtotals in a List, Format a List as a Table, Using Conditional Formatting to Find Duplicates, Removing Duplicates.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:2
Validation
 

Excel Data Validation: Understanding the Need for Data Validation, Creating a Validation. List, Adding a Custom Validation Error, Dynamic Formulas by Using Validation Techniques – Protecting range, formula, entire workbook – inserting header and footer

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Excel PivotTables
 

Understanding Excel PivotTables, Creating an Excel PivotTable, Modifying Excel PivotTable Calculations, Grouping PivotTable Data, Formatting PivotTable Data, Drilling Down into PivotTable Data, Creating Pivot Charts, Filtering PivotTable Data, Filtering with the Slicer Tool

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Conditional Functions and Working with Large Excel Data Sets
 

Conditional Functions: Working with Excel Name Ranges, Using Excel's IF () Function, Nesting Functions, Using Excel's COUNTIF () Function, Using Excel's SUMIF () Function, Using Excel's IFERROR () Function. Working with Large Sets of Excel Data: Using the Freeze Panes Tool, Grouping Data (Columns and/or Rows), Consolidating Data from Multiple Worksheets. Printing of excel worksheet – alignment, printing of selection, range, entire workbook – mail merge using excel

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
LookUp, Text Based Function and financial function
 

Excel's Lookup Functions: Using Excel's VLOOKUP() Function, Using Excel's HLOOKUP() Function, Using Excel's INDEX() and MATCH() Functions. Excel's Text-Based Functions: Using Excel's functions such as LEFT(), RIGHT() and MID(), LEN(), SEARCH(), CONCATENATE(). Time value of money - present value of money - capital budgeting, Net present value, Internal rate of return. Statistical function - Introduction to macros. Creation of simple macro functions

Text Books And Reference Books:

Microsoft Excel 2016 Step by Step Curtis Frye, Microsoft Press, A division of Microsoft Corporation, 2015 edition.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Microsoft Excel Essential Hints and Tips Fundamental hints and tips to kick start your Excel skills By Diane Griffiths Published, 2015 edition

 

Excel 2010 Formulas, by Wiley Publishing, 2010 Edition.

Evaluation Pattern

MCQ Test and Practical excercise 

CSC000-1M - DCF AND C PROGRAMMING (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:25
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:0

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This is an introductory course that provides required knowledge about digital fundamentals of computers, logic building and introduction to C programming. The course starts with an introduction to number systems and its applications in computers. The first part of the course covers a few topics like number systems, and logic gates. The discussion about working of basic adders like half adder, full adder, and parallel adder are dealt with. The second part of the course covers problem solving techniques and logic building using tools like flowchart and algorithm. This course also introduces the basic concepts of C programming language. Course includes a few exercises to make sure the student has not only gained the knowledge but can also apply and execute it.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the various number systems and their representation.

CO2: Analyse real life problem statements to enhance problem solving skills using flowchart and algorithm

CO3: Develop a C program that is the foundation of any programming language

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Computer Electronics
 

Number System - Decimal, Binary, Octal, Hexadecimal, Binary Arithmetic - Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication, Division, Digital Logic - AND, OR, NOT, NAND, NOR gates, Working of Half Adder, Full Adder, and Parallel Adder- Demonstration of working of Combinational and sequential circuits.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Problem Solving Techniques
 

Problem definition - Problem Analysis, Design of Problems - Algorithm - Flowchart - Basic programming constructs - sequential, selection, Iteration.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:7
Introduction to C programming
 

Structure of a C program - constants, variables and keywords. Expressions – Statements – Operators – Arithmetic, Unary, Relational and logical, Assignment, Conditional. if, if..else, for Loop.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Floyd, Thomas L: Digital Computer Fundamentals, 11 th Edition, Pearson International, 2015.

2. Balagurusamy E., Programming in ANSI C, 6 thEdition,Tata McGraw-Hill,2012.

3. Deitel H M and Deitel P J, C - How to Program, 5 thEdition, Prentice-Hall, 2006.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Floyd, Thomas L: Digital Computer Fundamentals, 11 th Edition, Pearson International, 2015.

2. Balagurusamy E., Programming in ANSI C, 6 thEdition,Tata McGraw-Hill,2012.

3. Deitel H M and Deitel P J, C - How to Program, 5 thEdition, Prentice-Hall, 2006.

Evaluation Pattern

ESE-50%

CIA-50%

CSC101-1 - DIGITAL COMPUTER FUNDAMENTALS AND C PROGRAMMING (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:90
No of Lecture Hours/Week:6
Max Marks:150
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Objectives

The course provides the fundamentals of C programming, number systems, Boolean algebra and logic gates. The C programming helps the students to solve problems through logical thinking and basic digital logic helps the students to understand the concepts of number systems and Boolean algebra.

 

Course Outcome

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS & NUMBER SYSTEMS
 

Different number systems and their conversions (Decimal, Binary, Octal and Hexadecimal) Binary arithmetic - Addition, subtraction, multiplication and division of binary numbers, 1’s and 2’s complement, Coding – BCD, Gray and ASCII.  Boolean Algebra -Boolean operations and expressions, Laws and rules of Boolean algebra, DE Morgan’s Theorem, Boolean expressions, Simplification of Boolean expression.

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:18
INTRODUCTION TO C AND CONTROL STRUCTURE
 

 

Data type Declaration.  The Decision Control Structure - The if - if-else- Nested if-else statements. Decisions Using switch - The Loop Control Structure While Loop - for Loop - break Statement - continue Statement- do-while Loop.

Lab Exercises: -

Program to implement conditional statements.

Program to implement the concepts of while loop, for and do while loops.

Program to implement the switch and nested switch statements

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
ARRAYS
 

A Simple Program Using Array -  Array Initialization - Two  Dimensional Arrays-  Initializing a 2-Dimensional Array - Memory Map of a 2-Dimensional Array – Strings - Standard Library String Functions - strlen( ) - strcpy( ) - strcat() - strcmp() - Two-Dimensional Array of Characters.
Lab Exercises: -

Program to implement 1D array concept and 2D array concepts

program to implement multidimensional array

Program based on string concepts.

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:20
FUNCTIONS AND POINTERS
 

Function - Passing Values between Functions - Scope Rule of Functions -  Calling Convention - Return Type of Function - Call by Value and Call by Reference -  An Introduction to Pointers - Pointer Notation – Recursion.

Lab Exercises: -

Program to implement functions.

Program demonstrating recursion functions.

 

Program to implement pointer expression

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:20
MACROS AND STRUCTURES
 

Introduction to macros, Structures - Declaring a Structure - Accessing Structure Elements - Storing structure elements and Unions.

Lab Exercises: -

Program to demonstrate call by value and call by reference.

Program to demonstrate structures and union.

Program to implement nested structures

 

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Yashavant P. Kanetkar, Let Us C, 15th Edition, BPB Publications, 2012.


Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Byron Gottfried and Jitender Chhabra, Programming with C, 3rd Ed, Tata McGrawHill, 2010.
  2. Balagurusamy E, Programming in ANSI C, 4th Edition, Tata-McGraw-Hill, 2007.
  3. Deitel H M and Deitel P J, C - How to Program, 7th Edition, Prentice-Hall, 2012.
  4. Susant K Rout, Cimple,C, Tata-McGraw-Hill Publishing Company Ltd., 2016.

 

Evaluation Pattern

ESE - 50%

CIA - 50%

CSC161-1 - WEB APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Objectives

This course is designed to introduce the students to web technologies in Hyper Text Mark-up Language, Cascade Style Sheet, JavaScript and XML for interactive web applications that use rich user interfaces and also understand the server-side web technologies for creating dynamic web applications. Students will learn the concepts of web site planning and hosting. This course will help them to create an interactive website with great look and functionality.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the World Wide Web and associated technologies.

CO2: Apply web development techniques for designing web pages.

CO3: Design an interactive website with web tools and scripting methods

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
WEB PROGRAMMING INTRODUCTION
 

Internet and web Technologies- Client/Server model -Web Search Engine-Web Services - Features of Web 3.0 - HTML5- HTML Basic Tags - Attributes - Formatting - Comments - Images - Tables - Lists - Text Links - Image links - Frames - Backgrounds - HTML Color codes / schemes - HTML Forms

Lab Exercise:

 

  1. HTML Program to Demonstrate basic web page with Headings, Paragraphs various formatting options and background / text color code

  2. HTML Program to Demonstrate Tables - Lists - Frames and HTML Forms

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
CSS - INTRODUCTION
 

Cascading style sheet –Benefits –CSS version History-Syntax-External-internal-inline-single style-multiple style-value lengths and percentage-ID selector –Class Selector-group Selector – universal selector- Color-background-cursor-list-Box model-display positioning-floats;

CSS - Backgrounds - Fonts - Text - Images - Links - Tables - Borders - Margin - Lists.

Lab Exercise:

 

  1. Web Page to Demonstrate to Implement Various Types of CSS 

  2. Web Page to Demonstrate a web page for your curriculum vitae using CSS

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
JAVA SCRIPT - FUNDAMENTALS
 

Java Script (JS Script) 

Introduction to Java Script (Jscript) – Installation – Syntax – Variables – Operators – If else – Switch case – Loop controls: for loop, do while loop; Functions – Events – Cookies – Page redirect – JavaScript Objects: Arrays, Date HTML DOM;

 

Lab Exercises: 

5. Program to demonstrate Jscript variables and operators

6.Program to demonstrate loop controls – decision controls and functions

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
HYPERTEXT PREPROCESSOR (PHP)
 

PHP Introduction – Installation version information – Environment setup – Variable types – Constants – Operator Types – Decision Making – Loop controls : for, do while ; Arrays – Strings – Web concepts – GET and POST methods – Functions – Cookies 

 

Lab Exercises:

7.Program to demonstrate PHP variable types – operators Decision and loop controls

8.Program to demonstrate GET and POST methods

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
DATABASE CONNECTION WITH MySQL
 

Introduction to MySQL, Installation version information – Connecting to MySQL database – PHP Introduction – Installation version information – Environment setup – Variable types – Constants – Operator Types – Decision Making – Loop controls : for, do while ; Arrays – Strings – Web concepts – GET and POST methods – Functions – Cookies 

 

Lab Exercises:

9.Program to demonstrate PHP variable types – operators Decision and loop controls

10.Program to demonstrate GET and POST methods

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1] Internet and World Wide Web: How to Program, Paul Deitel , Harvey Deitel & Abbey    Deitel, Pearson Education, 5th Edition, 2018.

[2] HTML 5 Black Book (Covers CSS3, JavaScript, XML, XHTML, AJAX, PHP, jQuery), DT Editorial Services, Dreamtech Press, 2nd Edition, 2016 

 [3] Jeremy McPeak and Paul Wilton,  “Beginning JavaScript”, Wrox publication

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1] Faithe Wempen, Microsoft,” Start Here! Learn HTML5" , 2012

[2] David McFarland, O’REILLY , “CSS 3 Missing Manual”, 2nd edition , 2014

Evaluation Pattern

ESE -50%

CIA- 50%

CSC162-1 - DATA ANALYSIS USING SPREADSHEET (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Objectives

This course will provide students with hands-on experience and skills with a spreadsheet. Students will learn the various functions and commands of the spreadsheet as well as how to plan, create, and program spreadsheets for common business applications. It is appropriate for accounting and business majors, programmers and spreadsheet application developers. 

 

Course Outcome

CO1: To use and leverage on the functionalities of spreadsheet

CO2: To familiarize the students with process and techniques of data analysis with the use of spreadsheet

CO3: To enable students to apply and take logical decisions

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
BASICS OF EXCEL
 

Exploring Data Types - Number Formatting - Working with Rows and Columns - Cells and Ranges - Working with Tables - Sorting and filtering a table - Applying a theme - Using AutoRecover - Password-Protection - Exploring Excel Templates

Lab Exercises:

 

  1. Simple arithmetic

  2. Text functions, Date and Time functions

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
FORMULAS AND FUNCTIONS
 

Using operators in formulas - Using functions in formulas - Using Formulas in Tables - Text Functions - Advanced Text Formulas - Date-Related Worksheet Functions - Time-Related Worksheet Functions - Working with Single-Cell Array Formulas 

Lab Exercises:

3.Logical operations

4.Decision making conditional statements

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
VISUALIZATION
 

Creating and Customizing a Chart - Choosing a chart type - Experimenting with different styles - Experimenting with different layouts - Line charts - Pie charts - XY (scatter) charts - Bubble charts - Radar charts - Histogram charts - Pareto charts - Waterfall charts - Box & whisker charts - Treemap charts 

 Lab Exercises:

5.Look up functions

6.Working with arrays

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
ANALYSING DATA WITH EXCEL
 

Importing Data - Data Cleanup Techniques - Exporting Data - Creating a Pivot Table Automatically Creating a Pivot Table - Manually Working with Nonnumeric Data - Creating Pivot Charts - Types of What-If Analyses - Data Sources for Get & Transform 

Lab Exercises:

7.Exploring different types of charts

8.Working with Pivot table 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
PROGRAMMING EXCEL WITH VBA
 

Introducing VBA Macros - Creating VBA Macros - Recording VBA macros  - Examining the macro - Testing the macro - Editing the macro - Writing VBA code - How VBA works - Objects and collections - Properties - Methods - Variables 

Lab Exercises:

9.Data analysis for a use case

10.Creation of VBA Macro

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

  1. Excel 2016 Bible, John Walkenbac, Wiley, 1st Edition, 2015.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Excel 2019 All-in-One for Dummies, Greg Harvey, For Dummies, 1st edition, 2018. 

  2. Slaying Excel Dragons, Mike Girvin, Holy Macro! Books, 1st edition, 2016.

 

Evaluation Pattern

ESE - 50%

CIA - 50%

DMT141 - DANCE MOVEMENT THERAPY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description:

This course has been conceptualized in order to Understanding and exploring theory and practice as two sides of the same coin for academic 

excellence in Performing Arts. Benchmarking quality, understanding and exploring adaptability to situations and taking leadership tasks.

Maintaining emotional and aesthetics sensitivity in verbal and non-verbal communication

Course Outcome

CO1: To work on the body schema, body image and physical self-concept To examine the concept of creativity and imagination.

CO2: To understand and gain practical understanding about the human body expression through the Gross Motor Skills Development, the Global Motor Coordination Schemes according Bartenieff, the Effort/Shape system of movement analysis according Laban.

CO3: To gain the ability to express emotions To improved confidence and self-esteem

CO4: To analyse and to gain practical understanding about the concept of Dance: from ancient social function to performance, from performance to therapy. To learn how Dance Movement Therapy dances with life: instances of different social areas in which Dmt is practised.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Introduction on Dance Movement
 

  Definition of Dance and its history 

 Definition of creativity 

 History of Dance Movement Therapy theory 

 

To understand and to gain practical understanding about the human body expression 

the Gross Motor Skills Development,

the Global Motor Coordination Schemes according Bartenieff,  

the Effort/Shape system of movement analysis according Laban.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:25
Practice
 

Explore the body: The warm –up in Dance Movement Therapy 

The social function of the dance 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Essential references: (in APA format)

- Bellia , V. (2020). A body among other bodies. Relational Expressive Dance Movement Therapy. Catania A&G

- Hackney, P. (1998). Making connections. Total body integration through Barrtenieff Fundamentals. Routledge, New York.

- Laban R. (1950). The mastery of movement on the stage. McDonald & Evans, London

- Laban R., Lawrence F.C. (1947). Effort. McDonald & Evans, London

- Schilder P., (1935) The image and appearance of the human body. Taylor & Francis

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Essential references: (in APA format)

- Bellia , V. (2020). A body among other bodies. Relational Expressive Dance Movement Therapy. Catania A&G

- Hackney, P. (1998). Making connections. Total body integration through Barrtenieff Fundamentals. Routledge, New 

- Schilder P., (1935) The image and appearance of the human body. Taylor & Francis

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation patterns  - final assessment 100 marks

DMT142 - INTRODUCTION TO CARNATIC MUSIC (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Introduction to Carnatic music focus on the basic fundamentals of Carnatic music. This course helps to improve the vocal quality as the lessons works as voice culture to the begginner.

Course Outcome

CO1: Ability to render the Swara-s in three speeds

CO2: Ability to identify and render the 7 Swara-s

CO3: Ability to render Sarala, Janta, Dhatu, Tarasthayi, and Alankara-s in three speeds.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Svaravali varisas and Janti varisas
 

Lessons in three speeds

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Tarasthayi and Dhattu varisas
 

All the lessons in to three speeds

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Alankaras and Geethams
 

Sapta tala alankaras and any for geethams

Text Books And Reference Books:

Carnatic music reader by Panchapakesha Iyer

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Ganamrutha Bodhini

Evaluation Pattern

Final assessment for 100 Marks

DSC141 - PRINCIPLES OF DATA SCIENCE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To provide a strong foundation for data science and the application area related to it, train toexplore the process of data pre-processing and machine learning, and to inculcate the importanceof ethics while handling data and problems in data science. To provide students with a fundamental understanding of the digital computing concepts from a hardware and software perspective.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the fundamental concepts of data science.

CO2: Explore the concepts of data pre-processing and visualization.

CO3: Learn the basic concepts of machine learning.

CO4: Practice the ethics while handling data

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:14
Introduction
 

INTRODUCTION TO DATA SCIENCE

What is data science? – Why data science? – Data science venn diagram – Terminologies – Application case studies. Types of data – Structured vs unstructured data – Quantitative vs qualitative data – Four levels of data.

Data Science Ethics – Doing good data science – Owners of the data - Valuing different aspects of privacy - Getting informed consent - The Five Cs – Diversity – Inclusion – Future Trends.

 

  

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:18
Data Science process and Machine Learning
 

 DATA SCIENCE PROCESS

Five steps of data science – Ask an interesting question? – Obtain the data - Explore the data – Model the data – Communicate and visualize results – Basic question for data explorations – case studies for EDA

 Machine Learning

Machine learning – Modeling Process – Training model – Validating model – Predicting new observations –Supervised learning algorithms-– Unsupervised learning algorithms. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:13
Data Visualization
 

DATA VISUALISATION

Communicating data – Identifying visualization – Importance of graphs and statistics – Verbal communication – The why, how and what strategy of presenting.

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1]Sinan Ozdemir, Principles of Data Science learn the techniques and math you need to start making sense of your data. Birmingham Packt December, 2016.

[2]Davy Cielen and Arno Meysman, Introducing Data Science. Simon and Schuster, 2016.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1]M. Loukides, H. Mason, and D. Patil, Ethics and Data Science. O’Reilly Media, 2018.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 100%

ECO143 - DEMOCRACY AND ECONOMY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is aimed at undergraduate students to introduce to them the prominent debates on democracy and emerging issues in economies.  The course discusses how various socioeconomic factors act as constraints on economic growth and development. This basic framework allows a student to delve into the causes and consequences of various strategies/methods taken/applied by policymakers and practitioners and how it affects the overall objective of the state/economy through a trifocal analysis of the economy, society, and market keeping the central theme of ‘Democracy.’This course will introduce students to:

  • Growing crisis of wealth distribution and income inequality.
  •  Sectoral significance and state intervention in policy making.
  • Informal sector and labor market participation and rights.
  • Analyze corruption in emerging economies through various case studies.
  • Discuss the informal economy through concepts, theory, and measurement.

Course Outcome

CO1: Recognise the growing crisis of wealth and income inequality among the members of the economy.

CO2: Understand the economic crisis in different sectors and government interventions in practices.

CO3: Get familiar informal sector and labour market participation and rights.

CO4: Understand debates about transparency, competition and privatization and its relevance to corruption.

CO5: Investigate issues from various perspectives, such as, viewing challenges in economies through the lens of democracy.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Democracy, Democratization and Society
 

Theories of Democratization; Democratic and Undemocratic States; Measuring Democracy and Democratization; The Global Wave of Democratization; Causes and Dimensions of Democratization: The Political Economy of Democracy; Political Culture, Mass Beliefs and Value Change; Gender and Democratization; Social Capital and Civil Society; Social Movements and Contention in Democratization Processes: Role, impact on policy reforms and cultural change.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Democracy, Democratisation and Society
 

Theories of Democratisation; Democratic and Undemocratic States; Measuring Democracy and Democratisation; The Global Wave of Democratisation; Causes and Dimensions of Democratisation: The Political Economy of Democracy: Political Culture, Mass Beliefs, and Value Change; Gender and Democratisation; Social Capital and Civil Society; Social Movements and Contention in Democratisation Processes: Role, Impact on Policy Reforms and Cultural Change

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Actors and Institutions
 

Conventional Citizen Participation;   Institutional Design in New Democracies; Gender and Democratization; A Decade of Democratic Decline and Stagnation.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Actors and Institutions
 

Conventional Citizen Participation; Institutional Design in New Democracies; Gender and Democratisation; A Decade of Democratic Decline and Stagnation.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Democracy and Redistribution
 

A Theory of political transitions: Choice of the economic and political regime; Theoretical extensions: growth, trade, political institutions; Democracy and the public sector; the state, the treat of expropriation and the possibility of development: Social and economic wellbeing and policy reforms.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Democracy and Redistribution
 

A Theory of Political Transitions: Choice of Economic and Political Regime; Theoretical Extensions: Growth, Trade, Political Institutions; Democracy and the Public Sector; the State, the Threat of Expropriation and the Possibility of Development: Social and Economic Wellbeing and Policy Reforms

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Democracy and Economic Growth and Development
 

A Marxian theory of democracy; The Importance of Social Class in Historical Comparative Perspective; Dependency and Development; Democracy in Developing Countries; Transitions from Authoritarian Rule: Tentative Conclusions about Uncertain Democracies.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Democracy and Economic Development
 

A Marxian Theory of Democracy; The Importance of Social Class in Historical Comparative Perspective; The Case Study of India; Dependency and Development; Democracy in Developing Countries; Transitions from Authoritarian Rule: Tentative Conclusions about Uncertain Democracies

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Democracy and Economic Growth and Development Indian Experience
 

India’s Tryst with Destiny; Democracy, Inequality, and Public Reasoning; A case study on Gujarat experience of development: Approaches, impact, and outcome; Kerala experience of development: Approaches, impact, and outcome.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Democracy and Economic Development: Indian Experience
 

India's Tryst with Destiny; Democracy, Inequality and Public Reasoning, A Case Study on Gujarat's Experience of Development: Approaches, Impact and Outcome; Kerala's Experience of Development: Approaches, Impact and Outcome

Text Books And Reference Books:

Bhagwati, J. N., & Panagariya, A. (2012). India's Tryst with Destiny: Debunking Myths that Undermine Progress and Addressing New Challenges. HarperCollins Publishers.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Boix, C. (2003). Democracy and Redistribution. Cambridge University Press.

Drèze, J., & Sen, A. (2015). An Uncertain Glory: India and Its Contradictions. Economics Books.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1: 20 marks

CIA 2: 20 Marks

CIA 3: 45 Marks

Attendance: 5 Marks

ECO144 - GLOBALISATION AND DEVELOPMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Liberalisation policies being pursued by most national economies in the world today, including India creates the need to acquire knowledge and comprehension of Globalisation as ideology along with its practical dynamics. The course intends to provide a sound understanding about the various components, and issues of this ideology at an introductory level. The methodology will be learning centered and so will be one of intensive facilitation by faculty of the reading to be done by students.

Course Outcome

CO1: Describe the various facets of globalisation.

CO2: Explain the various challenges of globalisation.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction
 

Globalisation: Brief History – The Marrakesh Meet – Globalisation as a contested concept – Debate of Globalisation as a new phenomenon

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
The Political Economy of Globalisation
 

Political Economy Debate of Comparative Advantage versus Imperialism – Introduction to Globalisation and the Political Economy of the External Sector.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Dimensions of Globalisation
 

The Economics Dimension – The Political Dimension – The Cultural Dimension

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Ideology
 

The Ideological Dimension of Globalisation – Challenges to Globalism – Assessing the Future of Globalisation.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Manfred Steger ‘Globalisation the new Market Ideology’.

2. Joseph Stiglitz ‘Discontents of Gloablisaton’

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Justin Ervin, Zachary A Smith "Globalisation: A Reference Hand Book."

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I - 25 Marks

CIA II - 25 Marks

ESE - 50 Marks

ENG181-1 - ENGLISH (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
  • To expose learners to a variety of texts to interact with
  • To help learners classify ideologies and be able to express the same
  • To expose learners to visual texts and its reading formulas
  • To help learners develop a taste to appreciate works of literature through the organization of language
  • To help develop critical thinking
  • To help learners appreciate literature and the language nuances that enhances its literary values
  • To help learners understand the relationship between the world around them and the text/literature
  • To help learners negotiate with content and infer meaning contextually
  • To help learners understand logical sequencing of content and process information

·         To help improve their communication skills for larger academic purposes and vocational purposes

·         To enable learners to learn the contextual use of words and the generic meaning

·         To enable learners to listen to audio content and infer contextual meaning

·         To enable learners to be able to speak for various purposes and occasions using context specific language and expressions

·         To enable learners to develop the ability to write for various purposes using suitable and precise language.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand how to engage with texts from various countries, historical, cultural specificities, and politics and develop the ability to reflect upon and comment on texts with various themes

CO2: Develop an analytical and critical bent of mind to compare and analyze the various literature they read and discuss in class

CO3: Develop the ability to communicate both orally and in writing for various purposes

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
1. The Happy Prince- Oscar Wilde 2. Sonnet 18- William Shakespeare
 
  • 1. The Happy Prince- Oscar Wilde
  • 2. Sonnet 18- William Shakespeare

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
Language
 

Common errors- subject-verb agreement, punctuation, tense errors  Just a minute talk, cubing

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
1. Why We Travel-Pico Iyer
 

 Why We Travel-Pico Iyer 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

Sentence fragments, dangling modifiers, faulty parallelism,

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:4
1. Thinking Like a Mountain By Aldo Leopold
 

Thinking Like a Mountain  By Aldo Leopold

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:4
language
 

Note taking

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Aarushi-Hemraj Murder Article
 

 

Aarushi-Hemraj Murder Article 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Language
 

Newspaper report

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:4
1. My Story- Nicole DeFreece
 

 

 My Story- Nicole DeFreece

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:4
Language
 

Essay writing

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:4
Language
 

Paraphrasing and interpretation skills

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:4
Casey at the Bat- Ernest Lawrence Thayer
 
  • Casey at the Bat-  Ernest Lawrence Thayer
Text Books And Reference Books:

ENGlogue 1

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Additional  material as per teacher manual will be provided by the teachers

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1=20 

CIA 2=50 

CIA 3= 20 

ESE= 50 marks

EST142 - READING SPORTS AND LITERATURE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:3
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Reading Sports and Literature

Course Description: The Sports and Literature course aims to explore the relationship between sports and literature through the analysis of various literary works. By examining texts that center around sports themes, this course will delve into the cultural, social, and personal aspects of sports as portrayed in literature. Students will develop critical thinking, analytical, and communication skills as they engage with a diverse range of texts, including novels, short stories, poems, and essays. Through class discussions, readings, and written assignments, students will gain a deeper understanding of the literary representation of sports and its significance in society.

Course Objectives:

To analyze and interpret literary works that feature sports themes.

To examine the portrayal of sports in literature and its reflection of cultural and social values.

To explore the personal and psychological dimensions of sports as depicted in literature.

To develop critical thinking and analytical skills through textual analysis.

 

To enhance written and oral communication skills through class discussions and written assignments.

Course Outcome

CO1: To analyze and interpret literary works that feature sports themes.

CO2: To examine the portrayal of sports in literature and its reflection of cultural and social values.

CO3: To explore the personal and psychological dimensions of sports as depicted in literature.

CO4: To develop critical thinking and analytical skills through textual analysis.

CO5: To enhance written and oral communication skills through class discussions and written assignments.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Introduction to Sports and Literature
 

Defining the relationship between sports and literature

Historical perspectives on sports in literature

 

The role of sports in society and culture

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
The Heroic Athlete
 

 

Exploring the archetype of the hero in sports literature

Analysis of sports heroes and their portrayal in literary works

 

Themes of triumph, perseverance, and sacrifice

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Gender and Sports
 

 

Gender representation in sports literature

Examination of gender roles and expectations in athletic contexts

 

Sports as a means of empowerment and resistance

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Sports and Identity
 

 

Sports as a vehicle for personal and collective identity

Intersectionality and the portrayal of race, ethnicity, and class in sports literature

 

The relationship between sports and national identity

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Sports and Coming-of-Age
 

 

Analysis of sports as a backdrop for personal growth and maturation

The challenges and conflicts faced by young athletes in literature

 

Themes of ambition, dreams, and disillusionment

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:8
Sports and Society
 

Unit 6: Sports and Society

Critical examination of the social issues depicted in sports literature

Sports as a reflection of broader societal dynamics

 

Ethics, values, and controversies in the world of sports

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. "The Natural" by Bernard Malamud
  2. "Friday Night Lights" by H.G. Bissinger
  3. "The Art of Fielding" by Chad Harbach
  4. "Seabiscuit: An American Legend" by Laura Hillenbrand
  5. "The Contender" by Robert Lipsyte
  6. "The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Runner" by Alan Sillitoe
  7. "A Fan's Notes" by Frederick Exley
  8. "The Boys of Summer" by Roger Kahn
  9. "The Sportswriter" by Richard Ford
  10. "Open" by Andre Agassi
  11. "Fever Pitch" by Nick Hornby
  12. "The Crossover" by Kwame Alexander (young adult literature)
  13. "The Runner" by Cynthia Voigt (young adult literature)
  14. "The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian" by Sherman Alexie (young adult literature)
  15. "The Fighter" by Michael Farris Smith
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. "The Boxer" by Joyce Carol Oates
  2. "The Runner" by Don DeLillo
  3. "Blindside" by Michael Lewis
  4. "The Tennis Partner" by Abraham Verghese
  5. "Basketball" by John Updike
  6. "The Chariot" by Ray Bradbury
  7. "The Trophy" by Alberto Alvaro Ríos
  8. "The Catch" by W.P. Kinsella
  9. "In the Ring" by Andre Dubus
  10. "Roller Derby Queen" by Margot Livesey
Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1-20

CIA 2- MSE 50

CIA 3- 30

ESE- 50

EST143 - STORYTELLING, GAMES AND ETHICS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: In the last 20-25 years the field of game studies has evolved significantly. It is globally recognised. Video games have been studied using inter, multi and transdisciplinary methods to understand culture, identity, media, narration and communication. The course will provide a historical, social, cultural and critical foundation about games, digitality, storytelling and its moral and ethical world. This will enable students to understand the connection between identities, moralities and our current engagement with the gaming world. This will help in broadening the interdisciplinary focus and assessment of storytelling in diverse forms and connect it with the ethical issues of the contemporary world.

 

Course Objectives: The course will survey the evolution of ideas connecting storytelling, gaming and ethics and morality. It will introduce the latest research in gaming and ethics as evidenced in the globalised world. It will provide a methodology for students to assess and critically evaluate the meaning, content, intent, narration (compared to other broader media), ideology and ethical implications of gaming in the contemporary world.

Course Outcome

CO1: ? will be able to understand the narrative conventions of gaming, their uses and ideological effects

CO2: ?will evaluate how narrative choices reflect ethical contextualisation

CO3: ?will be able to analyse and evaluate contemporary social, cultural and political issues and perspectives reflected in games

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Unit I: What is gaming ? Basic introduction
 

While gaming has been popular, studying games with its historical, social and cultural context requires a foundation in history of games. Locating games within cultures of social transactions and strategic implications will provide the required base to begin the course.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit II: Gaming, Society and Narration
 

This unit is divided into three smaller subunits. The students will be divided into smaller groups in class and asked to explore the following blog to choose any one area of interest within the subcategories mentioned. The class will progress accordingly. They have to choose between games and colonialism, games and gender, games and philosophy (utopia/dystopia).

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit III: Games and Ethics
 

This unit is focussed on ethical framework of games.

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Unit IV: Storyboard ? design a game (basic story line)
 

The students are expected to narrate and design a basic concept for a game to respond to the questions raised in the course.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Unit I: What is gaming – Basic introduction                                                         (10 hours)

While gaming has been popular, studying games with its historical, social and cultural context requires a foundation in history of games. Locating games within cultures of social transactions and strategic implications will provide the required base to begin the course.

1.     Roberts, J. M., Arth, M. J., & Bush, R. R. (1959). Games in culture. American anthropologist61(4), 597-605.

2.     Chapter 1 from Grace, L. D. (2019). Doing things with games: Social impact through play. CRC Press.

Unit II: Gaming, Society and Narration                                                                (15 hours)

This unit is divided into three smaller subunits. The students will be divided into smaller groups in class and asked to explore the following blog to choose any one area of interest within the subcategories mentioned. The class will progress accordingly. They have to choose between games and colonialism, games and gender, games and philosophy (utopia/dystopia).

https://coe-gamecult.org/

Reading: Shaw, A. (2010). What is video game culture? Cultural studies and game studies. Games and culture5(4), 403-424.

Salter, A., & Blodgett, B. (2017).  Toxic Geek Masculinity: Sexism, Trolling, and Identity Policing (Cham: Springer International Publishing, 2017), 73-99.

Case study: Hellblade: Senua’s Sacrifice

Unit III: Games and Ethics                                                                                      (15 hours)

Kowert, R., & Quandt, T. (Eds.). (2015). The video game debate: Unravelling the physical, social, and psychological effects of video games. Routledge. (Chapter 2/4/5).

Gotterbarn, D. The ethics of video games: Mayhem, death, and the training of the next generation. Inf Syst Front 12, 369–377 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10796-009-9204-x

Schrier, K. (2015). EPIC: A framework for using video games in ethics education. Journal of Moral Education44(4), 393-424.

Sicart, M. (2015). Playing the good life: Gamification and ethics. The gameful world: Approaches, issues, applications, 225-244.

Unit IV: Storyboard – design a game (basic story line)

The students are expected to narrate and design a basic concept for a game to respond to the questions raised in the course.

1.     Workshop by gaming planner/designer

2.     https://www.pluralsight.com/blog/film-games/creating-game-concept-first-step-getting-game-ground

3.     https://uxdesign.cc/a-board-game-design-process-a-game-is-a-system-5469dfa4536

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Recommended readings:

Bolter, J. et al. (1999). Remediation. Understanding New Media. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 20-52; 88-102.

Burrill, D. A. (2008). Die tryin': videogames, masculinity, culture (Vol. 18). Peter Lang. (13-44).

Mukherjee, S. (2017). Videogames and Postcolonialism. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 1-52. (Rise of the Tomb Raider).

Schrier, K. (2017). Designing role-playing video games for ethical thinking. Educational Technology Research and Development65(4), 831-868.

Sicart, M. (2013). Beyond choices: The design of ethical gameplay. MIT Press.

Zhang, Y. (2009). Ian Bogost, Persuasive Games: The Expressive Power of Videogames.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Examination and Assessment

Assessment Pattern    

20 (CIA 1)

20 (CIA 3)

50 (CIA 2)

50 (End Semester)

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I and III can be either written analysis/presentation of an author, book review, narrative analysis of a dominant idea of the contemporary time, debates or seminar/panel discussions.

Mid semester exam (class test) – A written paper on the modules covered for 50 marks. Section A (10 marks) will have objective questions (20, ½ marks each). Section B will have 4 questions (10 marks each) to assess conceptual clarity. Section B will have one compulsory question which will be analytical.

End-semester exam (class test) – Three sections: Section A (10 marks) will have objective questions (20, ½ marks each). Section B will have 1 conceptual question (10 marks each). They will be conceptual. Section C (15 marks each) will be having two case studies - one purely based on identification of features, styles, and narrative devices, and second question will be evaluative and analytical.

Consolidated marks will be sent after the final examination.

EST146 - FOOD AND LITERATURE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

 

This course offers an interdisciplinary exploration of the connections between food and literature, focusing on how food has been represented in literary works from different cultures and time periods. In addition, the course will provide an overview of the history and evolution of food culture, as well as the politics and economics of food production and consumption. By examining culinary themes in literary works, students will gain a deeper understanding of how food functions as a powerful symbol and narrative device in literature, reflecting social, cultural, and historical contexts. This course provides an opportunity for students to explore the rich connections between food and literature, fostering critical thinking, cultural awareness, and personal reflection.

 

 

 

 

 

Course Objectives

 

 

 

1.     To enhance the ability to identify and interpret the symbolic, metaphorical, and cultural significance of food within literary works.

 

2.     To help explore how food reflects and shapes social, historical, and cultural aspects of different societies and communities, shaping individual and collective identities and reflect social hierarchies and inequalities.

 

3.     To develop the ability to craft vivid and evocative descriptions by learning techniques for using sensory details, imagery, and figurative language to bring culinary experiences to life in their own writing.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will develop a deeper understanding of the cultural context of food and its representation in literature and its portrayal journalistic genres.

CO2: Students will be able to appreciate the influence of food on individual and collective identities.

CO3: They will understand how food can reinforce or challenge social hierarchies and inequalities.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:3
Unit I- Introduction to Food and Literature
 

Definition and scope; cultural, historical, and social significance of food; overview of how literature incorporates culinary themes

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Short Stories
 

Anton Chekhov: "Gooseberries"

 

Margaret Atwood: "Bread"

 

Borden Deal: “The Taste of Watermelon"

 

Mona Gardner: "The Dinner Party"

 

Shobha Narayan: “First Foods”Excerpt from Monsoon Diary: A Memoir with Recipes

 

 

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Poetry
 

Li-Young Lee: "Eating Together"

 

Gwendolyn Brooks: "Kitchenette Building"

 

Seamus Heaney: "At a Potato Digging "

 

Risa Potters: "In My Mother’s Things"

 

Choman Hardi: “My Mother’s Kitchen”

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Essays
 

Ligaya Mishan: What We Write About When We Write About Food (NY Times, 2022)

 

Roland Barthes: Wine and Milk

 

Jackie Varriano: “How Female Food writers penned their way out of the home kitchen” 

 

Nimisha Sinha: “Delicious Fictions: Reading Food in Literature”

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

§  Chekhov, Anton. Gooseberries. United Kingdom, Penguin Books Limited, 2015.

 

§  Atwood, Margaret. “Bread.Women on War: An International Anthology of Women's Writings from Antiquity to the Present. United States, Feminist Press at the City University of New York, 2003.

 

§  Deal, Bordan “The Taste of Watermelon”. 1979

 

§  Gardner, Mona. “The Dinner Party.” The Saturday Review of Literature. 1941.

 

§  Narayan, Shoba. Monsoon Diar:  A Memoir with Recipes. India, Penguin Group, 2004.

 

§  Lee, Young- Li. “Eating Together” Poetry Foundation.< https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/43015/eating-together-56d221af2bf26> Accessed on 22 July 2023.

 

§  Brooks, Gwendolyn. “kitchenette building” Poetry Foundation. < https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/43308/kitchenette-building> Accessed on 22 July 2023.

 

§  Heaney, Seamus. “At a Potato Digging” < https://genius.com/Seamus-heaney-at-a-potato-digging-annotated> Accessed on 22 July 2023.

 

§  Potters, Risa. “In My Mother’s Things”Rattle. https://www.rattle.com/in-my-mothers-things-by-risa-potters/ Accessed on 22 July 2023.

 

§  Hardi, Choman. “My Mother’s Kitchen” Poetry Archive. < https://poetryarchive.org/poem/my-mothers-kitchen/> Accessed on 22 July 2023.

 

§  Mishan, Ligaya. “What We Write About When We Write About Food” The new York Time Style Magazine. 18 February 2022. < https://www.nytimes.com/2022/02/18/t-magazine/food-writing-journalism-criticism.html> Accessed on 22 July 2023.

 

§  Varriano, Jackie. “How Female Food writers penned their way out of the home kitchen”  02 March 2022. < https://www.seattletimes.com/life/food-drink/how-women-food-writers-penned-their-way-out-of-the-home-kitchen/ > Accessed on 22 July 2023.

 

§  Barthes, Roland. “Wine and Milk.”Mythologies: The Complete Edition, in a New Translation. United States, Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2013.

 

§  Sinha, Nimisha.Delicious Fictions: Reading Food in Literature.” Caffe Dissensus. 28 January 2020. < https://cafedissensus.com/2020/01/28/delicious-fictions-reading-food-in-literature/> Accessed on 22 July 2023

 

§  Shahani, Gitanjali G. Food and Literature. United States, Cambridge University Press, 2018.

 

§  Fitzpatrick, Joan. 2012a. "Food and Literature: An Overview." The Routlege International Handbook of Food Studies. Edited by Ken Albala. Routledge International Handbooks. London. Routledge. pp. 122-34

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

§  Gilbert, Sandra M.. The Culinary Imagination: From Myth to Modernity. United States, W. W. Norton, 2014.

 

§  Hosking, Richard. Food and Language: Proceedings of the Oxford Symposium of Food and Cookery 2009. United Kingdom, Prospect Books, 2010.

 

§  Waxman, Barbara Frey. “Food Memoirs: What They Are, Why They Are Popular, and Why They Belong in the Literature Classroom.” College English, Vol. 70, No. 4, Special Focus: Food (Mar., 2008): 363-383

 

§  Ferrier, Peyton. “Food in Popular Literature.” Choices, Vol. 29, No. 1 (1st Quarter 2014): 1-6

 

§  Jones, Michael Owen . “Food Choice, Symbolism, and Identity: Bread-and-Butter Issues for Folkloristics and Nutrition Studies (American Folklore Society Presidential Address, October 2005)” The Journal of American Folklore, Vol. 120, No. 476 (Spring, 2007), pp. 129-177

 

§  Daly. Suzanne, and Ross G. Forman. “Introduction: Cooking Culture: Situating Food and Drink in the Nineteenth Century.” Victorian Literature and Culture, Vol. 36, No. 2 (2008), pp. 363-373

 

§  Holtzman, Jon D. “Food and Memory.” Annual Review of Anthropology, Vol. 35 (2006), pp. 361-378

 

§  Tigner, Amy L., and Carruth, Allison. Literature and Food Studies. United Kingdom, Taylor & Francis, 2017.

 

§  Fisher, Mary Frances Kennedy. The Gastronomical Me. United States, World Publishing Company, 1948.

 

§  "Feast and Famine: Food Imagery and Class Identity in Victorian Literature" by Debra L. Gimlin (Victorian Literature and Culture)

 

§  Albala, Ken. Routledge International Handbook of Food Studies. United States, Taylor & Francis, 2013.The Routledge Companion to Literature and Food. United States, Taylor & Francis, 2018.

 

§  Counihan, Carole, and Penny Van Esterik. Food and Culture: A Reader. New York: Routledge, 2013. Print.

 

§  Humble, Nicola. The Literature of Food: An Introduction from 1830 to Present. India, Bloomsbury Publishing.

 

§  J. Michelle Coghlan. The Cambridge Companion to Literature and Food. India, Cambridge University Press, 2020.

 

§  Fitzpatrick, Joan, and Boyce, Charlotte. A History of Food in Literature: From the Fourteenth Century to the Present. United Kingdom, Taylor & Francis, 2017.

 

§  Kara K. Keeling, Scott T. Pollard. Critical Approaches to Food in Children's Literature. N.p., Taylor & Francis, 2012. Print.

 

§  < https://www.nytimes.com/2022/02/18/t-magazine/food-writing-journalism-criticism.html>

 

§  Julia Rappaport: “Take a bite out of food writing”

 

§  < https://www.writermag.com/improve-your-writing/nonfiction/take-bite-food-writing/>

 

§  < https://www.seattletimes.com/life/food-drink/how-women-food-writers-penned-their-way-out-of-the-home-kitchen/>

 

§  Ceillie Clark- Keane: “Women Writing Food” < https://blog.pshares.org/women-writing-food/>

 

§  Barthes, Rolan. “Wine and Mild.” Mythologies. New York: Hill and Wang, 195: 58-61. Print.

 

§  Kapla, David M. “Introduction: The Philosophy of Food.” The Philosophy of Food. University of California Press, 2012:1-23. <https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/j.ctt7zw2cx.3 >

 

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

 

CIA 1: Presentation (20 Marks)

 

Create a character diary or character letter in the voice of a character from any chosen literary work.

 

 

 

Mid Semester: Research paper (50 Marks)

 

Analyze literary works (novel/ poem/short story/ play) for food-related social issue addressed in their narrative and write a research paper in 1000- 1500 words considering the broader social, political or cultural significance of these issues/ representations.

 

 

 

CIA 3: Photo Essay (20 Marks)

 

Create a photo essay on a particular cuisine, street food, or food markets in Bangalore focusing on any kind of its presentation.

 

 

 

End Semester: Food Narrative Project (50 Marks)

 

Create a food narrative project based on a specific food culture (local/regional) or a family/ community recipe. The foodscape should focus on these four aspects- recipe, anecdote, history and relevance, the transformative culinary experience and the rationale for the choice of recipe. Recall specific sensory details associated with your chosen theme or focus. Consider the taste, smell, texture, and appearance of the food. Reflect on the ambiance, sounds, and emotions evoked by the culinary experience. Conduct research to explore the cultural, historical, or social context to your food narrative. It should include photographs, videos, or any other visual or auditory elements.

 

HIS141 - HISTORY AND CINEMA (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course attempts to map out the connection between history and cinema. It aims to look at how cinema can be treated as a visual text and a source for understanding history. 

Course Outcome

CO1: To enhance and deepen the understanding of history through cinema.

CO2: To enable the students to develop their understanding and awareness of the rich possibilities of cinema and its connection with history.

CO3: To enhance the analytical skills of students and develop an understanding of how cinema engages with socio-cultural and political concerns, by placing the cinema in their historical context and engage with the current debates and future challenges with cinema as a medium.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Unit 1
 

a)   History as a narrative – History and Truth Contested Notions –Ideology, Sources and Historian

b)   Multiple Identities and Histories – History as a point of reference – Issues of Legitimacy & Justification.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Unit 2
 

a)     Cinema as a narrative – Words and Images – Genre- Representation Vs. Reality – Propaganda – selling History. 

b)    Language of Cinema- Color – Angles – Movement

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
UNIT 2
 

a)     Cinema as a narrative – Words and Images – Genre- Representation Vs. Reality – Propaganda – selling History. 

b)    Language of Cinema- Color – Angles – Movement

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Unit 3
 

a)     Between History and Cinema:  The problem of linear narratives and flash back – questions of authenticity – definition of authenticity.

b)    Cinema as a political, social and historical text.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Chapman, J. (2003). Cinemas of the World: Film and Society from 1895 to the Present. Reaktion Books.

Chapman, J., Glancy, M., & Harper, S. (Eds.). (2007). The new film history: sources, methods, approaches. Springer.

Ferro, M. (1988). Cinema and history. Wayne State University Press.

Chapman, J. (2005). Past and present: national identity and the British historical. London: IB Tauris.

Miskell, P. (2004). Historians and film. In Making History (pp. 253-264). Routledge.

Nowell-Smith, G. (Ed.). (1996). The Oxford history of world cinema. OUP Oxford.

Raghavendra, M. K. (2014). Seduced by the Familiar: Narration and Meaning in Indian Popular Cinema. Oxford University Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Chapman, J. (2013). Cinema, propaganda and national identity: British film and the Second World War. In British Cinema, Past and Present (pp. 213-226). Routledge.

Miskell, P. (2005). Seduced by the silver screen: Film addicts, critics and cinema regulation in Britain in the 1930s and 1940s. Business History47(3), 433-448.

Sedgwick, J., Miskell, P., & Nicoli, M. (2019). The market for films in postwar Italy: Evidence for both national and regional patterns of taste. Enterprise & Society20(1), 199-228.

Raghavendra, M. K. (2011). Bipolar identity: Region, nation, and the Kannada language film. Oxford University Press.

Raghavendra, M. K. (2014). The Politics of Hindi Cinema in the New Millennium: Bollywood and the Anglophone Indian Nation.

Sanyal, D. (2021). MK Raghavendra, “Locating World Cinema: Interpretations of Film as Culture” (Bloomsbury Academic India, 2020).

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1:  10 Marks            

CIA 2:  Mid Semester Examinations 25 Marks

CIA 3:  10 Marks

End semester examination: 50 Marks

Attendance: 5 Marks

LAW141 - CYBER LAW (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Cyber law has emerged as a medium for growth with immense potential for solving many new and interesting challenges.  The course aims at appreciating one of the important emerging areas of law and the nitty-gritty involved in it. This introduces the students to the underlying philosophy of the subject and its relation to other areas focusing on human rights.

UNIT 1 is designed to introduce students to the role of law in technology, especially the internet and is designed to give a brief overview of the historical aspects of the internet. UNIT 2 acquaints the students with the regulation of cyberspace. UNIT 3 deals with digital contracts and information technology, while UNIT 4 deals entirely on cyber crimes which are rampant in the digital era.  UNIT 5 issues in E-commerce. Unit 6 deals with IPR issues in cyberspace and UNIT 7 deals with international regulation of cyberspace.

Course Outcome

CO1: Gain an understanding of the underlying philosophy of cyber law and its relation to information technology.

CO2: Facilitate an overall understanding on needs for regulation of information technology in India

CO3: Impart basic idea of information technology and its relation with digital signature

CO4: Acquaint with legal challenges arising out of privacy issues awareness about the various kinds of cyber crimes and legal issues and cases

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:3
UNIT 1 FUNDAMENTALS OF CYBER LAW
 

An overview of cyber world – Jurisprudence of cyber law – Scope of cyber law – Introduction to Indian cyber law

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:2
UNIT 2 CYBERSPACE
 

Meaning, nature and emergence of cyberspace – Attributes of cyberspace – Classification of cyberspace – Legal framework for cyberspace

 

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:2
UNIT 3 DIGITAL CONTRACTS
 

Law of digital contracts – Functions of digital signature – Electronic and digital signature – procedural and functional issues – Legal issues of digital signatures – Certifying authority – Regulatory framework of digital signatures

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:2
UNIT 4 CYBER CRIMES
 

Salient features – Cyber crime and related concepts – Types of crimes – Regulation of cyber crime – International perspective

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:2
UNIT 5 E-COMMERCE
 

Emerging significant of – e-Commerce – Transactions and Technology of e-Commerce – e-Commerce Contracts – Legal Issues of e-Commerce and Case Laws – e-Commerce Legislations

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:2
UNIT 6 IPR ISSUES
 

IPR - An overview – Copyright issues in Cyberspace – Trademark issues in Cyberspace – Computer software and related IPR issues – Domain names and related issues

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:2
UNIT 7 INTERNATIONAL SCENARIO IN CYBER LAWS
 

European convention of Cyber Crimes – UNCITRAL Model Law on e-commerce 1996 – International Legal Regime relating to IPR – Berne Convention, Rome Convention, WIPO Copyright, UDRP, OECD Convention on Database Protection – Domestic legal regime – Information Technology Act , 2000. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Seth Karnika, Computers Internet and New Technology Laws. Gurgaon: Lexis Nexis, 2013

Cyber Security & Cyber Laws - by Nilakshi Jain & Ramesh Menon, Wiley 2020

Cyber Crimes & Law - by Dr Vishwanath Paranjepe, 2nd Edtn 2019, Central Law Agency

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Cyber Crimes & Law - by Dr Vishwanath Paranjepe, 2nd Edtn 2019, Central Law Agency

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-I:   Assessment Description: Class test for 20 marks on assessing the understanding of the fundamentals of Cyber law. It is a class room test. 2 questions for 25 marks each carrying 12.5 marks.

CIA-II: Oral Presentation, shall be accompanied by PPT by a group of 5 students for maximum of 15 minutes on any Cyber  law issues.

CIA-III: Students will be given a specific topic or case law. They are required to identify the research issues and find an answer to it by analysing the available literature.

LAW142 - RIGHT TO INFORMATION (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

There is no gainsaying the fact that knowledge is the paramount source of empowerment and empowerment enriches democracy. The attributes of democracy, viz. the government- of, by and for the people, can be realized successfully if the people are well informed and participate in decision making.

To achieve this goal, the Parliament has enacted the Right to Information Act, 2005, and the same has conferred, the most invaluable right to be informed, on the people. Hailed widely as a vaccine against corruption and a multi-vitamin for nourishment of democracy, law relating to Right to Information has become an indispensable weapon for the citizens.

Course Outcome

CO1: To comprehensively understand the legal framework regarding the Right to Information in India.

CO2: To contextualise Right to Information in the broader realm of public law along with allied concepts such as open governance, rule of law, accountability, transparency etc.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction
 

Historical background; Shift in attitudes- secrecy, privilege, open government; Citizens’ right to know; Campaign for freedom of information; Constitutional Provisions; Technological revolution – Information technology

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Legal Framework
 

Right to information Act. 2005  –  Overview – Objectives and reasons – Scope of the Act and Overall Scheme of the Act – What concerned citizens will want to know – Definitions

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
OBLIGATIONS OF PUBLIC AUTHORITIES
 

Right to information; Obligations of public authorities; Public information officers; Request for information; Disposal of request

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
RIGHT TO INFORMATION ? EXEMPTIONS
 

Grounds for rejection to access in certain cases; Severability; Third party information; Statutory exemptions

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
INFORMATION COMMISSIONS
 

Constitution of Central Information Commission; State information commission; Powers and functions of commission; Appeal and Penalties; Freedom of information in commercial disputes; Right to Privacy v Right to information

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Sudhir NaibThe Right to Information Act 2005: A Handbook (1st edition ed. 2011).
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. N. V. Paranjape, Right To Information Law In India (First Edition ed. 2014).
Evaluation Pattern

As per University norms

LAW144 - ENVIRONMENTAL LAW (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The present decline in environmental quality calls for a stricter enforcement of laws relating to protection of environment. The objective of this course is to give an insight into various legislations that has been enacted in our country for protection of environment and also to create awareness among the citizens of the country about the duties cast on them under various legislations in relation to protection of environment.

 

Course Objectives:

  • To impart an in-depth knowledge of environmental legislations to students from diverse backgrounds.
  • To interpret, analyse and make a critique of the legislations and Case laws relating to environment
  • To provide a brief understanding of various developments that has taken place at international level to check various environmental harms.

Course Outcome

CO1: learn about environmental law

C02: make students environmentally conscious

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
INTRODUCTION
 

INTRODUCTION

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
INDIAN CONSTITUTION AND ENVIRONMENT
 

INDIAN CONSTITUTION AND ENVIRONMENT

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
JUDICIAL REMEDIES AND PROCEDURES AVAILABLE FOR ABATEMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION
 

JUDICIAL REMEDIES AND PROCEDURES AVAILABLE FOR ABATEMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
ENVIRONMENT (PROTECTION) ACT, 1986
 

ENVIRONMENT (PROTECTION) ACT, 1986

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
ENVIRONMENT (PROTECTION) ACT, 1986
 

ENVIRONMENT (PROTECTION) ACT, 1986

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
WATER (PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF POLLUTION) ACT 1974
 

WATER (PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF POLLUTION) ACT 1974

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:5
FORESTS AND CONSERVATION LAWS
 

FORESTS AND CONSERVATION LAWS

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:5
WILD LIFE PROTECTION AND THE LAW
 

 WILD LIFE PROTECTION AND THE LAW

Unit-9
Teaching Hours:5
INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENTS FOR PROTECTION OF ENVIRONMENT
 

INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENTS FOR PROTECTION OF ENVIRONMENT

Text Books And Reference Books:

MC Mehta Enviromental Law Book

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

MC Mehta Enviromental Law Book

Evaluation Pattern

Class Discussion: 50 Marks

MCQ exam: 50 Marks

LAW145 - PARLIAMENTARY PROCEDURE AND PRACTICE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Parliament is the heart and soul of any parliamentary democracy which is envisaged to reflect the expectations and aspirations of the people. In fact, it is the chief law-making organ and it comprises of members from different backgrounds, so as to represent the varied expectations of the people. As such, it has an onerous responsibility of making laws in a manner which caters to the requirements of the society cutting across the party lines.

In twenty-first century, the age of technology and information, the role of Parliament has increased manyfold as the impressions of “We the People” have also undergone a sea change with respect to the quality of the law made. In this context, a fundamental knowledge of the law-making process and the requisites of the same is essential for the citizens. Hence this course is devised to introduce the students to the essentials of law-making process by the Parliament as well as the privileges conferred on the members of Parliament.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the Constitutional framework on Parliamentary Practice and Procedure in India

CO2: Analyse the Parliamentary Privileges in India

CO3: Examine the Law-making process and role of Parliamentary Committees in India

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
INDIAN PARLIAMENT AND POLITY
 

Structure, powers and functions of Houses of Parliament – Loksabha,  Rajya  Sabha, Joint Sessions

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
CONSTITUTION OF HOUSES
 

Members and presiding officers, election, powers and functions, Powers of President in relation to Parliament

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
LAW-MAKING PROCESS
 

Classification of Bills, procedures relating to passing of Bills, presentation of Budget

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:7
RULES OF BUSINESS IN PARLIAMENT
 

Summoning, petitions, resolutions, motions, question-answers, matters of urgent public importance

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
PARLIAMENTARY PRIVILEGES
 

Sources of Parliamentary privileges, immunities, procedure

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:7
PARLIAMENTARY COMMITTEES
 

Parliamentary Committees, Government Committee, Ad hoc Committees, Joint Committee

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

Anoop Mishra (Ed.), Practice and Procedure of Parliament, Metropolitan Book Co. Ltd. New Delhi (2016)

Durga Das Basu, Introduction to the Constitution of India (2022), Lexis Nexis, Gurgaon

Lok Sabha Secretariate, Parliamentary Privileges (2019), New Delhi

Ministry of Parliamentary Affairs, Manual of Parliamentary Procedures in India (2018), New Delhi

 

Subhash Kashyap, Our Parliament, National Book Trust (2020), New Delhi

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Apoorva Shankar and Shreya Singh, Parliamentary Procedures: A Primer [Rajya Sabha] (2015), PRS Legislative Research, New Delhi

Lok Sabha Secretariate, Budgetary Process (2019), New Delhi

M.P. Jain, Indian Constitutional Law (8th Edn., 2018) Lexis Nexis, Gurgaon

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-I : 25 Marks (25%)

CIA-II: 25 Marks (25%)

CIA-III: 50 Marks (50%) 

 

MAT003 - BRIDGE COURSE FOR DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:15
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:50
Credits:0

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course aims to enable the students to bridge the gap between the knowledge of the topics studied earlier and the current course, Differential Calculus.

Course Outcome

CO1: To lay the foundations of the preliminaries of Differential Calculus.

CO2: Gain conceptual clarity on Sets, Relations and Functions.

CO3: Acquire problem-solving skills in differential calculus.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Limits, Continuity and Differentiability
 

Sets and Relations, Functions: Representations, types, properties;   Limits and Continuity: Basic concepts; Differentiability: Derivatives of standard functions, rules of differentiation.

Text Books And Reference Books:

G.B. Thomas, M.D.Weir and J. Hass, Thomas Calculus, 12th ed., Pearson Education India, 2015.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. N. P. Bali, Differential Calculus, New ed. New Delhi, India: Laxmi Publications (P) Ltd., 2012.
  2. Ralph P. Grimaldi, Discrete and Combinatorial Mathematics – An applied introduction, Pearson Addison Wesley, 5th Edition, 2004.
Evaluation Pattern

Internal Assessment: 40%;

End Semester Examination: 60%

MAT101-1 - DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:Calculus is a discipline of mathematics that studies limits, motion, and rates of change. Proficiency in calculus is vital for math students for a better understanding of the subject and the advancement of the field. This course offers a modern introduction to calculus with a conceptual knowledge of the underlying mathematical concepts as its primary objective.

Course objectives​: This course will help the learner to

COBJ1:  develop a solid understanding of the concepts in differential calculus such as limit, continuity and differentiability and their inter-relationships.

COBJ2to acquire the ability to think logically and precisely; understand, apply and generalise mathematical ideas.

COBJ3. recognize the appropriate tools of calculus to solve applied problems.

Course Outcome

CO1: understand limits, continuity, and derivatives of functions.

CO2: apply mean value theorems, Taylor series and optimality tests in practical problems.

CO3: demonstrate mastery of partial differentiation of functions of several variables and their applications to various fields.

CO4: employ the knowledge in differential calculus to tackle practical problems.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Limits, Continuity and Differentiability
 

Rates of change and tangent lines to curves, limit of a function and limit laws, the precise definition of a limit, one-sided limits, continuity, limits involving infinity; asymptotes of graphs, derivative at a point, derivative as a function, differentiation rules, derivative as a rate of change, rules of differentiation.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Application of Derivatives
 

Extreme values of functions on closed intervals, Rolle's theorem, mean value theorem, monotonic functions and the first derivative test, indeterminate forms, Taylor and Maclaurin series, curvature, and radius of curvature.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Partial Derivatives
 

Functions of several variables, limits and continuity in higher dimensions, partial derivatives, the chain rule, Jacobians, directional derivatives and gradient vectors, tangent planes and differentials, extreme values and saddle points, Lagrange multipliers, Taylor’s formula for two variables, partial derivatives with constrained variables.

Text Books And Reference Books:

G. B. Thomas, J. Hass, C. Heil, and M. D. Weir, Thomas’ Calculus, 14th ed. New Jersey, USA: Pearson Education, Inc., 2018.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. H. Anton, I. Bivens, and S. Davis, Calculus: Early Transcendentals, 11th ed., New York, USA: Wiley, 2016.
  2. E. Mendelson, Schaum's Outlines Calculus, 6th Ed., USA: Mc. Graw Hill, 2021.
  3. N. P Bali, Differential Calculus, New Delhi: Laxmi Publications, 2019. 
  4. J. Stewart, Single Variable Essential Calculus: Early Transcendentals, 2nd Ed., Belmont, USA: Brooks/Cole Cengage Learning., 2013.