CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

School of Business and Management

Syllabus for
BCom (Accountancy and Taxation/Honours/Honours with Research)
Academic Year  (2023)

 
1 Semester - 2023 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBA141A DIGITAL FINANCE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
BBA141B MARKETING AND SELLING SKILLS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
BBA141D TALENT MANAGEMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
BBA141E UNDERSTANDING OF FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
BBA141F SUSTAINABILITY?AND GREEN MARKETING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
BLS141 INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 03 100
BLS142 PRINCIPLES OF FORENSIC SCIENCE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
CHE141B NUTRICHEM Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
COAT101-1 FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING-I Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
COAT161-1 SPREADSHEETS FOR BUSINESS Skill Enhancement Courses 3 3 100
COM001-1 INTRODUCTION TO ACCOUNTANCY Bridge Courses 4 0 0
COM101-1 LEGAL ASPECTS OF BUSINESS Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
COM102-1 BUSINESS ECONOMICS Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
CSC141 PROGRAMMING IN C Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
CSC143 WEB DESIGNING USING HTML, PHP AND MYSQL Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
DMT141 DANCE MOVEMENT THERAPY Multidisciplinary Courses 2 3 100
DMT142 INTRODUCTION TO CARNATIC MUSIC Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
DSC141 PRINCIPLES OF DATA SCIENCE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
DSC142 PYTHON PROGRAMMING FOR DATA SCIENCE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
ECO144 GLOBALISATION AND DEVELOPMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
ECO145 ECOLOGY AND DEVELOPMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
ENG181-1 ENGLISH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses 2 2 50
EST141 TRAVEL AND TRAVEL NARRATIVES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
EST142 READING SPORTS AND LITERATURE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
EST143 STORYTELLING, GAMES AND ETHICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
EST144 DESIGN THINKING AND SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP Multidisciplinary Courses 45 3 100
EST145 POETICS , POLITICS AND PIVOTAL PEOPLE OF ROCK N ROLL Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
EST146 FOOD AND LITERATURE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
EST147 HISTORY OF INDIAN BUSINESS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
HIS141 HISTORY AND CINEMA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
LAW141 CYBER LAW Multidisciplinary Courses 3 4 100
LAW142 RIGHT TO INFORMATION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
LAW143 LABOUR AND SOCIAL WELFARE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
LAW144 ENVIRONMENTAL LAW Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
LAW145 PARLIAMENTARY PROCEDURE AND PRACTICE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
MAT142 QUANTITAIVE TECHNIQUES FOR MANAGERS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
MED143 CELEBRITY PR Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 50
MED145 SOCIAL MEDIA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
PHY141 FUNDAMENTAL OF FORENSIC PHYSICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PHY142 ANALOG AND DIGITAL ELECTRONICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
POL141 DEMOCRACY AND ETHICAL VALUES Multidisciplinary Courses 2 2 100
PSY155 PSYCHOLOGY OF GENDER Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY156 PSYCHOLOGY OF RELATIONSHIPS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY158 STRESS MANAGEMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
SOC141 WOMEN'S ISSUES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
SOC142 CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL PROBLEMS AND CHALLENGES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
SOC143 SOCIOLOGY THROUGH CINEMA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
THE141 THEATRE APPRECIATION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
THE142 IMPROVISATION AND DEVISED THEATRE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
2 Semester - 2023 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBA142A ADVERTISING AND SALES PROMOTION TECHNIQUES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
BBA142B EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE AND MANAGERIAL EFFECTIVENESS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
BBA142C FUNDAMENTALS OF DIGITAL MARKETING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
BBA142D WEALTH MANAGEMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 03 100
BBA142F FINANCIAL EDUCATION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
BBA142G GROUP AND TEAM EFFECTIVENESS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
BLS143 PRINCIPLES OF HORTICULTURAL TECHNIQUES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 4 100
BLS144 PRINCIPLES OF AYURVEDA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
CHE141 CHEMISTRY IN ACTION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
COAT101-2 BUSINESS STATISTICS AND MATHEMATICS Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
COAT201-2 FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING-II Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
COAT261-2 ACCOUNTING USING SOFTWARE Skill Enhancement Courses 3 3 75
COM101-2 PRACTICES OF BANKING AND INSURANCE Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
COM102-2 CORPORATE LAW AND ADMINISTRATION Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
CSC152 INTRODUCTION TO BLOCKCHAIN Multidisciplinary Courses 3 4 100
CSC153 INTRODUCTION TO DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS (DBMS) Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
CSC154 INTRODUCTION TO PYTHON PROGRAMMING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
CSC155 USER DESIGN EXPERIENCE (UX) Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
ECO143 DEMOCRACY AND ECONOMY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
ECO146 GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 50
ECO147 THINKING THROUGH THE ENVIRONMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 50
ENG181-2 ENGLISH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses 3 2 100
EST149 INTRODUCTION TO WRITING TAMIL MODERN POETRY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 100
EST152 SKILLS FOR PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 50
EST154 LITERATURE FROM THE NORTHEAST Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
EST156 RETELLING OF EPICS IN INDIAN LITERATURE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
LAW142 RIGHT TO INFORMATION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
LAW144 ENVIRONMENTAL LAW Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
LAW147 CORPORATE LAW Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 50
LAW150C CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND HUMAN RIGHTS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
MAT141 MATHEMATICS FOR MANAGERIAL DECISIONS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
MAT143 MATHEMATICS FOR ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
MED147 MIDDLE CINEMA IN INDIA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
MED148 LANGUAGE OF CINEMA: A VISUAL APPROACH Multidisciplinary Courses 45 3 100
MED150 ARTS APPROACHES TO PEACEBUILDING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PHY141A INTRODUCTION TO ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PHY141B RENEWABLE ENERGY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
POL141 DEMOCRACY AND ETHICAL VALUES Multidisciplinary Courses 2 2 100
POL143 POLITICS AND SOCIETY OF INDIA SINCE INDEPENDENCE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY144 BASICS OF CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY155 PSYCHOLOGY OF GENDER Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY157 SCIENCE OF WELLBEING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
SOC141 WOMEN'S ISSUES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
SOC142 CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL PROBLEMS AND CHALLENGES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
SOC143 SOCIOLOGY THROUGH CINEMA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
STA141 ELEMENTS OF STATISTICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
SW141 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK AND SOCIAL WELFARE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
SW142 INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISATIONAL BEHAVIOUR Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
  

    

Introduction to Program:

There has been growing demand for accounting and tax professionals who are proficient and have expertise on Accounting skills, Regulatory aspects, Reporting framework, Taxation of different entities, Budget preparation, Forecasting cash flows and Analysis of Complex Business Transactions. The programme aims to develop industry ready Accounting and Tax professionals by honing skills on in-demand tools and techniques and standard accounting practices. The programme also provides strong theoretical foundation to critical components like Goods and Services Tax (GST), Customs Procedure, Transfer Pricing Methods and issues in Cross Border Tax Compliance. The curriculum is designed to provide advanced knowledge in the practical aspects of Accountancy and Taxation.

The Programme is designed in line with the requirements of the National Education Policy (NEP) spanning across six semesters comprising of Major courses, Minor courses, Skill Enhancement Courses and Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses, Internships and Project work and Value-Added Courses. The students who successfully complete one year (two semesters) with the required number of credits has an option to exit the programme, They will be awarded a Certificate,  The students who successfully complete two years (four semesters) with required number of credits and opt to exit the programme will be awarded an UG Diploma in Accounting Taxation.The students who successfully complete three years (six semesters) and opt to exit the program, will be awarded a Degree in Bachelor of Commerce (Accountancy and Taxation).

Introduction to BComBCom (Accountancy and Taxation/ Honours/ Honours with Research) 

The fourth year will focus on the advanced level of knowledge in the field of Accountancy and Taxation. The students will have project work in the final semester. The students who successfully complete the fourth year/eight semesters and satisfy the minimum credit requirement as per NEP guidelines, will be awarded with a BComBCom (Accountancy and Taxation/ Honours/ Honours with Research) degree.
  

Programme Outcome/Programme Learning Goals/Programme Learning Outcome:

PO1: Apply knowledge of core disciplines of commerce to support strategic decision-making. and fulfillment of business goals.

PO2: Create, design, and develop business ideas into value-generating enterprises.

PO3: Demonstrate holistic values, skills pertaining to physical and emotional well-being, moral principles, and community engagement skills in both personal and professional life

PO4: Apply a multi-disciplinary approach to gain a deeper understanding of concepts, drive new business initiatives and solve complex problems creatively.

PO5: Use accounting skills to analyse the financial position of business.

PO6: Apply tax laws to assess taxes for individuals and businesses.

Assesment Pattern

Assessment Pattern

Students are evaluated for each paper on the basis of written examination and continuous internal assessment (CIA). Each paper carries maximum of 100 marks and is evaluated as follows:

Assessment Component

Description

Weightage

CIA I

Quizzes, role plays, objective type tests, written assignments, discussion forums, article reviews, case analysis etc.

10%

CIA II

Mid semester written examination conducted for 2 hours duration

25%

CIA III

Group work consisting of presentations, viva voce, and report submission.

10%

ESE

Written examination conducted for 3 hours duration

50%

Attendance

 

05%

 

TOTAL

100%

 

Examination And Assesments

Question Paper Pattern - MSE

The question paper pattern will be as specified below: 

 

Sections

Type

Marks

A

Short Answer Questions – Answer any 5 out of 7

5 X 2 = 10

B

Conceptual / Descriptive Type questions – Answer any 2 out of 3

2 x 8 =   16

C

Analytical / Essay Type Questions -  – Answer any 2 out of 3

2 x 12 = 24

 

Question Paper Pattern - ESE

The question paper pattern will be as specified below: 

 

Sections

Type

Marks

A

Short Answer Questions– Answer any 12 out of 14

12 X 2 = 24

B

Conceptual / Descriptive Type questions – Answer any 5 out of 7

5 x 8 =   40

C

Analytical / Essay Type Questions- Answer any 3 out of 5

3 x 12 = 36

BBA141A - DIGITAL FINANCE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

 

This course provides the participants with a bird’s-eye view of the FinTech landscape and an appreciation of the history of financial innovation. The course examines the technology fundamentals driving the FinTech revolution to develop an appreciation of their application in a comprehensive array of financial sectors.  This course builds on the foundation of elementary financial theory and complements financial intermediation and capital market courses with a unique yet essential technology and innovation perspective. 

Course Objective:

CO1: To give an overview of digital finance, Fintech, and its trend.

CO2: To understand the role of Fintech in the financial system.

CO3: To give awareness about the application of Fintech in various fields of Finance.

CO4:To give an understanding of contemporary issues related to FinTech 

Course Outcome

CO1: Develop an overview of Digital Finance and its trend

CO2: Develop an appreciation of the global FinTech landscape

CO3: Understands the application of fintech in various fields

CO4: Develops insight into contemporary issues related to digital finance

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Digital Finance ?An Introduction
 

Digital Finance meaning, Landscape of digital finance, Ecosystem of digital finance, Digital Financial Services, Benefits of DFS, Importance of digital financial transformation. Types of Digital Finance Services, Evolution and Trend of digital finance in India. Case -Study

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Overview of FinTech
 

Definition of Fintech, Traditional financial services vs. today, History of FinTech,. Fintech trends. Factors driving Evolution of FinTech, Overview of Fintech Ecosystem. Fintech applications, Machine Learning and AI: AI/ML Introduction, Application, Changing Business Landscape, Cloud Computing:

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Digitalisation of Payment System
 

Evolution from credit card to CBDC, B2B, B2C, C2C payment mechanisms, EMV, NFC, Tokenization, Mobile wallet, UPI, QR code, Cross-border digital payments, Payment platforms & Ecosystem, Open/Neo banking,  ..Digital Payment system of India – Case Study

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Bitcoin and Blockchains.
 

Introduction:4the economic function of currency in the economy.  Problems with issuer¿s credibility. Analysis of bitcoin as a currency. The blockchain as a registration mechanism. The integration of bitcoin and blockchain and issuer’s incentive problems. Possible alternative uses of blockchain technology in the economy and difficulties in its implementation. Use of bitcoin in money laundering. The regulatory debate, CBDC. Current status of blockchain & CBDC in India

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
Regtech, Insurtech and BancTec
 

Insurtech: How does InsurTech work, Business model disruption, Aggregators, AI/ML in InsurTech, IoT, and InsurTech, Risk Modelling, Fraud Detection, Processing claims, and Underwriting, Innovations in Insurance Services.

 

Banktech: Regulatory Framework for Product Pricing, loan origination, and servicing, Social media-based profiling, comparison tools and aggregators, Dynamic credit rating, Risk management & underwriting, Using Credit Counsellor Robo/Bot for faster approvals & funding, Utilizing data science tools and machine learning for data mining/ cross sale, Hybrid Lending Products

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
The Future of Data-Driven Finance
 

Introduction. Contemporary issues in digital finance and fintech,  Fintech Big trends- looking forward. Case study

Text Books And Reference Books:

Lynn, T., Mooney, J.G., & Rosati, P., & Cummins, M. (2019). Disrupting Finance: FinTech and Strategy in the 21st Century. (DF)  

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Cheun, D.L.K. (2015). Handbook of Digital Currency, Bitcoin, Innovation, Financial Instruments, and Big Data. Elsevier.

 2. Chishti, S., & Barberis, J. (2016). The FinTech book: the financial technology handbook for investors, entrepreneurs and visionaries. John Wiley & Sons.

3. Chishti, S., & Puschmann, T. (2018). The Wealthtech Book: The FinTech Handbook for Investors, Entrepreneurs and Finance Visionaries. John Wiley & Sons.

 4. Loesch, S. (2018). A Guide to Financial Regulation for Fintech Entrepreneurs. John Wiley & Sons.

5. Metawa, N., Elhoseney, M., Hassanein, A.E., & Hassan, M.K.H. (2019). Expert Systems in Finance: Smart Financial Applications in Big Data Environments. Routledge. 

6. Sironi, P. (2016). FinTech Innovation, From Robo-Advisors to Goal Based Investing and Gamification.

7. VanderLinden, S. L., Millie, S. M., Anderson, N., & Chishti, S. (2018). The INSURTECH Book: The Insurance Technology Handbook for Investors, Entrepreneurs and FinTech Visionaries. John Wiley & Sons.

Evaluation Pattern
Evaluation Pattern
 

CIA 1: 20 MARKS ( LATER CONVERTED TO 10 MARKS)

CIA 2: 20 MARKS ( LATER CONVERTED TO 10 MARKS)

CIA 3: 50 MARKS ( LATER CONVERTED TO 25 MARKS)

Attendance 5 marks 

Total 50 marks 

BBA141B - MARKETING AND SELLING SKILLS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

This is the basic course in Marketing and Selling Skills where students will get the exposure of Marketing and sales. The subject gives them a vast and wide insight of the traditional and contemporary aspects in Marketing and sales. The input of basic fundamentals, coupled with the practical knowledge will be given to the students to help them in understanding and designing the sales & marketing tactics and strategies.

 

Course Objective:

      To understand and appreciate the concept of marketing & sales in theory and practice

      To evaluate the environment of marketing and develop a feasible marketing &selling plan 

      To understand and apply the STP of marketing (segmentation, targeting, positioning)

      To have an elementary knowledge of consumer behaviour its determinants and selling skills

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of marketing and sales principles, theories, and their practical applications (RBTL 2)

CO2: Identify the key elements of the marketing environment and their impact on marketing and selling activities. (RBTL 3)

CO3: Apply segmentation techniques to categorize target market segments effectively. (RBTL 3)

CO4: Demonstrate basic selling skills, such as effective communication and relationship building, through practical exercises and simulations. (RBTL 2)

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Unit 1: An Introduction to Marketing
 

Introduction, genesis & evolution of marketing in society, Importance and Scope of Marketing, Elements of Marketing – Need, Want, Demand, Desire, Marketing Philosophies, Mccarthy’s 4P classification, Lauterborn’s 4C’s classification & 4A’s Framework of rural marketing, Product service continuum.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Marketing Environment ? An Understanding
 

Basics of Marketing Environment, Factors Affecting Marketing Environment, Environmental analysis – SWOT & PESTLE, Marketing Environment in India, Legal & regulatory framework in India, Marketing Mix (Four Ps of Marketing).

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Unit 3: Segmentation, Targeting and Positioning
 

Market Segmentation, Basis of segmentation & its types - Demographic, Geographic, Psychographic and behavioral Segmentation etc, Targeting- Five Patterns of Target Market Selection, Positioning-Concept of Positioning, Perceptual Mapping.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Unit 4: Product Life Cycle and Consumer Behaviour
 

Product Life Cycle concept, marketing implications of PLC stages, corresponding strategies, dealing with competition, Perceptual Mapping, Consumer Behaviour – Rational V/s Emotional, Consumer proposition & acquisition process, buying motives, its types, Consumer Behaviour process

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Unit 5: Selling ? An Introduction
 

Nature, Meaning and Significance of Sales Management and Personal selling; Evolution of Sales Management, Role of Selling in Marketing, Characteristics of a successful Salesman; Types of Selling, Selling Functions, Sales Funnel; Process of Effective Selling: Sales strategies; Prospecting: Meaning, process & methods; Ways to approach a customer

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:7
Unit 6: Effective Sales management and Sales Force Organisation
 

Sales presentation; Handling objections; Closing a sale; Current issues in sales management; Case lets and applications, Meaning of Sales Force Management; Determining the sales force and size of the sales force, Introduction to: Sales organization concepts; Sales territories

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Books: 

  1. Kotler, P., & Keller, K. (2015). Marketing management 15th edition. Prentice Hall.
  2. Kotler, P. (2013). Marketing management: A south Asian perspective.  13th edition, Pearson Education India.
  3. Panda, T. K., & Sahadev, S. (2nd Edition, 2011). Sales and distribution management. Oxford Publication.
  4. Spiro, R. L., Rich, G. A., & Stanton, W. J. (12th Edition, 2008). Management of a sales force. McGraw-Hill/Irwin.

 

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Suggested Readings: 

  1. Ramaswami, S., Namakumari. S,(2013) marketing management–Global Perspective Indian Context, Macmillan Publishers India Ltd, 5th Edition
  2. Rajan Saxena, Marketing Management, (2009) 4th edition, Tata McGraw-Hill Education
  3. Etzel M.J., Walker B.J. and Stanton William J - Marketing concept & Cases special Indian 14th Edition Tata Mc Graw Hill.
  4. Czinkota, Kotabe, Marketing Management, II edition, Thomson Publications.
  5. Still, R. R., Cundiff, E. W., & Govoni, N. A. (1988). Sales management: decisions, strategies, and    cases, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall.
  6. Coughlan, A. T., Anderson, E., Stern, L. W., & Adel, I. (2006). El-Ansary. Marketing Channels. Prentice-Hall.
  7. Jobber, D., & Lancaster, G. (2007). Selling and sales management. Painos. Harlow: Pearson Education.
  8. Cron, Decarlo T. E. (2016). Sales Management concepts and cases: Wiley India
  9. Pingali Venugopal (2008). Sales and Distribution Management, Sage Publication 
Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1: 20 MARKS ( LATER CONVERTED TO 10 MARKS)

CIA 2: 20 MARKS ( LATER CONVERTED TO 10 MARKS)

CIA 3: 50 MARKS ( LATER CONVERTED TO 25 MARKS)

Attendance 5 marks 

Total 50 marks 

BBA141D - TALENT MANAGEMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Human Resource is considered as a valuable resource in every organization. The world class companies compete among themselves to attract the best talent across the globe.  They view talent as competitive differentiator and one where the acquisition, engagement, development and retention of talent is considered as a strategic priority of business.  This course exposes the students to methods and practices to acquire, engage and develop talent, focus on development of strategic leaders within an organization and also deals with how talent and knowledge can be managed effectively for the development of the organization

Course Outcome

CO 1: 1. Demonstrate an understanding of key concepts, principles and models related to talent and knowledge management

CO 2: 2. Evaluate the importance of talent management in developing organizations

CO 3: 3. Learn to apply the theories and concepts studied in the classroom to practical situations

CO 4: 4. Analyse the various talent and knowledge management practices and their value to organizations

CO 5: 5. Solve the issues pertaining to talent and knowledge management

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
Introduction to Talent Management
 

Meaning and concept of talent management, need and scope for talent management, Talent vs Knowledge, Talent management models: Process and Integrated model, Talent management initiatives, Techniques for potential appraisal, Talent management grid, Benefits of talent management.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:7
Creating Talent Management Systems
 

Building blocks for talent management strategy, Developing and implementing Effective Talent Management System, Measuring the effectiveness of talent management, creating talent management system for organizational excellence.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:7
Competency mapping and approaches to talent management
 

Competency Mapping- Meaning, Importance and Steps in competency mapping, Competency model, Role of leaders and HR in talent management, Talent Management Approaches, Mapping Business Strategies and Talent Management Strategies, Achieving competitive advantage, Best practices in talent management- Case studies

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:7
Integrating Talent and Knowledge Management
 

Introduction to knowledge management, types of knowledge, Benefits of Knowledge Management, Integrating talent management and knowledge management, Role of Information technology in talent and knowledge management.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:7
Recent Trends and Best Practices in Talent Management
 

Introduction, Use of Technology in Talent Management, Use of AI in Talent Management, Talent Management using Design Thinking

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Project Work: Field study & Report Submission
 

Experiential Learning Activity: Identifying any one organization in the manufacturing or service sector- Interacting, observing and conducting interviews with their senior HR leaders to understand how they manage and retain talent in their organizations.  

Text Books And Reference Books:

       Lance A. Berger, Dorothy Berger (2017): Talent management handbook, McGraw Hill New York.

 

       Mohapatra.M & Dhir.S (2022); Talent Management-A contemporary perspective (2022), Sage Publications

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

       Mark Wilcox (2016), Effective Talent Management: Aligning strategy, people and performance, (1st ed.), Routledge Taylor and Francis Group.

       Marshal Gold Smith and Louis Carter (2018): Best practices in talent management, A Publication of the practice institute, Pfeiffer, A Wiley Imprint.

       Atheer Abdullah Mohammed (2019), Integrating Talent and Knowledge Management: Theory and practice, Lamber Publishing co.,

       Cappeli Peter: Talent on Demand –Managing Talent in an age of uncertainty, Harvard Business press.

Sphr Doris Sims, Sphr Matthew Gay(2007),Building Tomorrow’s Talent : A Practitioner’s Guide to Talent Management and Succession Planning, Author House

Evaluation Pattern

Component

 

Maximum marks

Weightage

Total Marks in Final Grade

CIA1

20

50%

10

CIA2

20

50%

10

CIA3

50

50%

25

Attendance

5

100 %

05

Total = 50

 

BBA141E - UNDERSTANDING OF FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 Course Description: This course aims at understanding the financial statements published by Indian companies and make a meaningful understanding of the same. The course gives the initiation towards terminology in accounting and takes the readers through Income statement and Balance sheet. The interpretation of the cash flow, Income statement and Balance sheet gives the reader an understanding of fundamentals of the company and gives a sense of financial soundness or not of any company. The growing need of adherence to rules and practice of ethics in accounting in its various aspects from public practice to reporting with case studies will explain the profoundness of Ethics in Accounting and corporate reporting.

Course Outcome

1: Relate to accounting terminologies

2: Explain the components of Financial statements

3: Interpret financial statements

4: Realise the importance of ethics in accounting practices

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Terminologies in Financial Statement
 

Assets- Current assts and fixed assets, Non-current Liabilities, current liabilities, Owners Equity, shareholders fund, External equity, Return on investment, operating expenses, Normal profit, Earnings per share private -Public Investors-Income Statement-Revenue-Expenses-Profit/loss-Balance sheet- Dual aspects of the balance sheet, Significant accounting policies and principles- Full Disclosure-Standalone statements-consolidated statements.

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Understanding Income Statement and Balance sheet
 

Meaning and Purpose of Income statement- Cost of goods Sold-Gross profit, Operating Income-EBITDA-EBIT-EBT-Depreciation-Tax provisions made-Deferred Taxation- EPS: Basic and Diluted- Purpose of Balance sheet- Share capital- Net Worth-Shareholders fund- Book value of assets-Face value of shares-Current and non-current liabilities and assets- Amortisation and Depreciation-Notes to accounts.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Cash Flow statements and Notes to accounts
 

Meaning and Purpose of cash flow statements- Meaning of cash flow,  sources of cash flow, Operating, Investing and Finance activities- Inflow and outflow of cash- Indirect method-Interpreting company growth rate from cash flow stage-Positive and Negative cash flow-Effect of changes in cash flow on performance – Interpretation of high cash balances-Exhibit of cash flow statements of Indian companies- Schedules or notes to accounts- preparation and  relevance- interpretation of schedules.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Interpretation of Financial Statements
 

Year On Year (YoY) comparison of Income statement and Balance sheet-Common size comparison-Interpreting EPS, DPS, MPS, PE Ratio, Intrinsic value, Liquidity ratio, Current ratio, Debt Equity Ratio- Dividend payout- Ascertaining performance of a company through exhibit of annual report of Indian companies

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
: Ethics in Accounting
 

Compliance of accounting standard in letter vs true spirit- window dressing- effects of unethical practices and non-disclosures-case study ethics in public practice of accounting, ethics in compliance, ethics in corporate reporting, ethics in non-profit organisations.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Gupta, A. (2020). Financial Accounting for Management: An Analytical Perspective, Noida, Pearson Education.
  2. Raman, B. S. (2014). Financial Accounting (1stedi).I & II, New Dehli:United Publishers.
  3. Porter, G.A., & Norton, C.L. (2013). Financial Accounting (IFRS update)( 6thedi), Cengage Learning.
  4. Jawahar Lal & Seema Srivastava (2013). Financial Accounting New Delhi:Himalaya Publishing House.
  5.  Sharma & Sashi Gupta (2020) Management Accounting, Kalyani Publishers 
  6. I M Pandey (2020) Management Accounting, Vikas Publishers 
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Financial Accounting By SP JAIN & NArang , Kalyani Publishers, Noida

Evaluation Pattern

Total 50 marks . 

CIA-1 20 marks (weightage 50% ie 10 marks ) 

CIA-2 20 marks(weightage 50% ie 10 marks ) 

CIA-3 - 50 marks (weightage 50% ie 25 marks ) 

For attendance 5marks 

This is a Submission paper .There is no MSE or ESE 

BBA141F - SUSTAINABILITY?AND GREEN MARKETING (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course is designed to understand the importance of Sustainability and Green Marketing on consumer satisfaction and environmental safety. Green revolution, going green, environment protection, and sustainable development have become the buzz words today. Consumers are gradually becoming conscious buying eco-friendly products. This course aims at understanding the concept of Green Products and Marketing. This course also revisits the factors that affect consumers’ purchase decision in general. This course will lead the exploration of the leading edge of this paradigm shift that is now underway. This course introduces students to the concepts and processes of Green marketing and takes them deeper into the world of Green marketing.

Course Objectives: This course intends

 

  • To examine green marketing and its importance from the perspective of consumers and businesses.

  • To evaluate evidence of emerging green consumer segments and how marketers address those needs.

  • To explain the current state of the environment resulting from past and present human consumption practices.

  • To elaborate on opportunities, challenges, and issues in designing and implementing sustainable green marketing strategies.

 

 

Course Outcome

CLO1: Analyze green marketing and its importance from the perspective of consumers and businesses.

CLO2: Assess evidence of emerging green consumer segments and how marketers address those needs.

CLO3 : Interpret the current state of the environment resulting from past and present human consumption practices.

CLO4: Discuss the opportunities, challenges, and issues in designing and implementing sustainable green marketing strategies.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Sustainability and Fundamentals of Green Marketing
 

Meaning, Concept and Evolution of Sustainability, Green Marketing, Types of Green Marketing, Difference  between Marketing and Green Marketing, Green Product, Green Marketing, Importance of Green Marketing, Benefits of Green Marketing, Adoption of Green Marketing, Green Marketing Mix, Strategies for Green Marketing

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Segmentation of Green Marketing
 

Green Spinning, Green Selling, Green Harvesting, Enviropreneur Marketing, Compliance Marketing, Green Washing, Climate Performance Leadership Index, Promotional Channels of Green Marketing.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Green Marketing Initiatives
 

Green Firms, HCL’s Green Management Policy, IBM’s Green Solutions, IndusInd Bank’s Solar Powered ATMs, ITCs Paperkraft, Maruti’s Green Supply Chain, ONCGs Mokshada Green Crematorium, Reva’s Electric Car, Samsung’s Eco-friendly handsets, Wipro Infotech’s Eco-friendly computer peripherals

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Environmental consciousness
 

 

Introduction to Environment, Importance of environmentalism, Environmental movement, Benefits of green environment to society, E-waste exchange, Extended Producer Responsibility Plan, Guidelines for Collection and Storage of E-Waste, Guidelines for Transportation of E-Waste, Guidelines for Environmentally Sound Recycling of E-Waste

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Socially Responsible Marketing
 

Sustainable Marketing, Social Criticisms of Marketing, Marketing’s Impact on Individuals, Marketing’s Impact on Society as a Whole, Marketing’s Impact on Other Businesses, Actions to Promote Sustainable Marketing, Business Actions Toward Sustainable Marketing, Principles and Marketing Ethics.

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Ottman, J. A. (2011). The new rules of Green Marketing: Strategies, tools, and inspiration for Sustainable Branding. Barrett-Koehler Publisher. 

  2. Ottman, J. A. (2001). Green Marketing: Opportunity for Innovation. NTC Business Books.

  3. Dahlstrom, R. (2011). Green Marketing Management. South-Western Cengage Learning.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Esty, D. C., & Simmons, P. J. (2011). The green to gold business playbook: How to implement sustainability practices for bottom-line results in every business function. Wiley. 

  2. Grant, J. (2009). The Green Marketing Manifesto. Wiley.  
Evaluation Pattern
CIA 1: 20 MARKS ( LATER CONVERTED TO 10 MARKS)

CIA 2: 20 MARKS ( LATER CONVERTED TO 10 MARKS)

CIA 3: 50 MARKS ( LATER CONVERTED TO 25 MARKS)

Attendance 5 marks 

Total 50 marks 

 

BLS141 - INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:03

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 This course introduces students to the basic principles of biology. Students will learn about the organization of life, including the cell theory and taxonomy, the chemistry of life, genetics, evolution, and ecology. The course will also cover current issues in biology such as biotechnology and environmental sustainability.

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will be able to describe the fundamental principles and concepts of biology, including the organization of life and the chemistry of living systems.

CO2: Students will be able to explain the role of genetics in inheritance, diversity, and evolution.

CO3: Students will be able to analyze the impact of human activities on the environment and the measures that can be taken to promote sustainability.

CO4: Students will be able to evaluate the ethical implications of advances in biotechnology and their impact on society.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Biology
 

 

The scientific method and experimental design; The organization of life: cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems; Taxonomy and the diversity of life; Chemical elements and molecules essential to living systems

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Genetics and Evolution
 

 

Mendelian genetics and inheritance patterns; DNA structure and function, gene expression and regulation; Genetic diversity and evolution; Natural selection and adaptation

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Ecology and Environmental Biology
 

 

Ecosystems and biomes; Population dynamics and community interactions; Biodiversity and conservation; Human impact on the environment and sustainability

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Biotechnology and Ethics
 

 

Applications of biotechnology in medicine, agriculture, and industry, Ethical issues related to biotechnology; The impact of biotechnology on society; Regulations and policies related to biotechnology

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Campbell, N. A., & Reece, J. B. (2018). Biology (11th ed.). Pearson.
  2. Freeman, S., Quillin, K., Allison, L., Black, M., Taylor, E., & Podgorski, G. (2017). Biological Science (6th ed.). Pearson.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1.  Begon, M., Townsend, C. R., & Harper, J. L. (2006). Ecology: From Individuals to Ecosystems (4th ed.). Blackwell Publishing.
  2. Ricklefs, R. E., & Relyea, R. A. (2019). The Economy of Nature (8th ed.). W.H. Freeman.

  3. Kuby, J., Owen, J., & Kindt, T. J. (2019). Kuby Immunology (8th ed.). W.H. Freeman.

  4. Thompson, P. B., & Kaplan, D. M. (2019). Encyclopedia of Food and Agricultural Ethics (2nd ed.). Springer.

Evaluation Pattern

Attendance and Class Participation- 10%

Midterm Examination- 30%

Review paper/Research Paper- 20%

Seminar presentation – 10%

Final Examination - 30%

 

BLS142 - PRINCIPLES OF FORENSIC SCIENCE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Forensic science is the application of scientific principles and techniques to the investigation of crimes and legal issues. This course covers the fundamental principles of forensic science, including various scientific analysis techniques used in criminal investigations, legal and ethical issues, and types of evidence collected at crime scenes.

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will be able to Understand the principles and techniques used in forensic science investigations

CO2: Students will be able to describe the legal and ethical considerations associated with forensic science.

CO3: Students will be able to identify and analyze different types of evidence collected at crime scenes

CO4: Students will be able to evaluate scientific evidence in a legal context using proper documentation and reporting techniques

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Forensic Science
 

 

Introduction to forensic science; Historical development of forensic science; Branches and applications of forensic science; Legal and ethical issues in forensic science

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Physical Evidence
 

 

Types of physical evidence; Collection and preservation of physical evidence; Analysis of physical evidence; Interpretation and evaluation of physical evidence

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Biological Evidence
 

 

Types of biological evidence; DNA analysis; Serology analysis; Analyzing and interpreting biological evidence

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Digital Forensics
 

 Digital forensic investigations; Evidence collection in digital forensics; Analyzing and interpreting digital evidence; Legal and ethical considerations in digital forensics

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

  1. Saferstein, R. (2019). Forensic science: From the crime scene to the crime lab. Pearson Education.

  2. Criminal Justice & Forensics. (2017). Cengage.

  3. Fisher, B. A. (2019). Techniques of crime scene investigation. Taylor & Francis Group.

  4. Richard Saferstein, R. (2018). Criminalistics: An Introduction to Forensic Science. Pearson Education.

  5. Houck, M. M., & Siegel, J. A. (2010). Fundamentals of forensic science. Academic Press.

  6. Casey, E. (2018). Digital evidence and computer crime: Forensic science, computers, and the internet. Academic Press.

  7. Nelson, B., Phillips, A., & Steuart, C. (2016). Guide to computer forensics and investigations. Cengage

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

  1. Lee, H. C. (2016). Forensic science : an illustrated dictionary. CRC Press.

  2. Barry, J., & Cooper, J. (2018). Introduction to forensic science. Routledge.

  3. Houck, M. (2018). Trace evidence analysis: More cases in mute witnesses. Academic Press. 

  4. Brown, T. W. (2018). Handbook of Forensic Pathology, Second Edition. CRC Press.

  5. Barbara, J. (2011). Forensic anthropology: An introduction. CRC Press.

  6. Hall, M. (2017). Current practice in forensic medicine. John Wiley & Sons.

  7. Sammons, J., & Jenks, M. (2017). Digital forensics trial graphics: Teaching the jury through effective use of visual aids. Academic Press.

Evaluation Pattern

Attendance and Class Participation- 10%

Midterm Examination- 30%

Review paper/Research Paper- 20%

Seminar presentation – 10%

 

Final Examination - 30%

CHE141B - NUTRICHEM (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course gives an insight into nutrition and its importance in leading a healthy life.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Discuss about nutrition and its importance in leading a healthy life.

CO2: Explain the elements of nutrition and dietry requirement.

CO3: Summerise about food analysis, food microbiology and therapeutic nutrition

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Fundamentals of nutrition
 

FaFactors Influencing Food Selection: Flavours, appearance and other aspects of food,     Demographics Culture and Religion, Health, Social-Emotional Influences, and Environmental Concerns, Food Industry and the Media.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:4
Basic Nutrition Concepts
 

NNutrition, Energy content in food, Nutrients, Nutrient Density, Characteristics of a Nutritious Diet.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Nutrient Recommendations
 

Dietary Reference Intakes, Digestion, Absorption, and Metabolism, Gastrointestinal Tract and secretions, Food groups, Organic Foods, GM foods.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Nutrition biochemistry
 

Elements of nutrition - Dietary requirement of carbohydrates, lipids and proteins. Biological value of proteins. Concepts of protein quality. Protein sparing action of carbohydrates and fats. Essential amino acids, essential fatty acids and their physiological functions.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:3
Vitamins
 

Dietary sources, biochemical functions, requirements and deficiency diseases associated with vitamin B complex, C and A, D, E and K vitamins.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:3
Minerals
 

Nutritional significance of dietary sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, iron, iodine, zinc and copper.

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:2
Malnutrition
 

Prevention of malnutrition, supplementary foods.

     

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:2
Food science and food analysis
 

Food additives and preservatives.

Unit-9
Teaching Hours:6
Food microbiology
 

Food safety, Fermentation, food spoilage and food borne pathogens, food processing.

 

Unit-10
Teaching Hours:6
Therapeutic nutrition
 

Life style diseases and personalized nutrition therapy, nutraceuticals and its classifications.

Unit-11
Teaching Hours:2
Public nutrition
 

Health organizations, NGO’s etc. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1]  Ganesh Narayanan Chauhan,  5th ed Foods that heal. Popular Book Depot 2012

[2]   Mohinder Singh, 2nd ed. Health and  food Gyan Publishing House 2003.

[3]   S. A. Iqbal and Y. Mido 1st ed Food Chemistry. Discovery Publishing House, 2008.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1]  Kittler and Sucher, 5th ed. Food and Culture Thomson Wadsworth 2007.

[2]   Anita Tull, 3rd Food Nutritioned.Oxford University Press, 1997.

            

Evaluation Pattern

No.

Component

Schedule

Duration

Marks

CIA1

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

Before MST

--

10

 

CIA2

Mid-Sem Test

[MST]

2 Hrs (50 marks)

25

CIA3

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

After MST

--

10

CIA3

Attendance (75-79 = 1, 80-84 = 2, 85-89 = 3,

90-94 = 4, 95-100 = 5)

--

5

ESE

Internal

2 Hrs (50 marks)

50

Total

100

Final score is calculated out of 50

 

COAT101-1 - FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING-I (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

Accounting is referred to as the language of business. This course presents the underlying framework and concepts of Financial Accounting in the context of how accounting fits into the overall business environment of contemporary society. This course on Financial Accounting is offered as a compulsory paper in the first semester. Students will learn how accounting functions as an information development and communication system that supports economic decision-making and provides value to entities and society. As a prerequisite, the students should have the basic knowledge of Accountancy.

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate the basics of accounting and its concepts.

CO2: Prepare the accounts for non-profit organisations.

CO3: Compare the accounting system adopted in the hire purchase and installment system.

CO4: Determine the amount of interest in transactions of hire purchase.

CO5: Apply the knowledge gained to compute royalty under different situations.

CO6: Explain the process of conversion of partnership firms to a limited company.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Fundamental principles of Accounting
 

Meaning and Definition- Accountancy - accounting concepts and Conventions, Bank reconciliation statement- Errors and Rectification – Accounting Equation.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Accounting for Non-profit Organisation
 

Meaning-Distinction between a profit seeking organisation and a not for profit organisation-Accounting for not for profit organisation-receipts and payments account-income and expenditure account-meaning and accounting treatment of some peculiar items – Treatment of consumable items consumed during the year- Treatment of Profit/Loss from Trading Activities – Preparation of income and expenditure account- preparation of a Receipts and payments account and Balance sheet of a Non-profit seeking Entity

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Accounting for Hire-Purchase and Instalment Systems
 

Hire Purchase - Meaning - Legal provisions, [including repossession] - Calculation of interest - when rate of interest and cash price is given - when cash price and the total amount payable is given when rate of interest and installments amount are given but cash price is not given - Calculation of cash price under annuity method - Journal entries and Ledger accounts in the books of hire-purchaser and hire-vendor.

 

Installment system- Meaning - Difference between hire purchase and installment system.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:14
Royalty Accounts
 

Introduction - meaning - technical terms - royalty - the landlord - tenant - minimum rent - short workings - recoupment of short working under - fixed period - floating period - recoupment within the life of a lease - treatment of strike, stoppage of work and sub-lease - accounting treatment in the books of lessee(tenant) - when royalty is less than minimum rent - when royalty is equal to minimum rent - when the right of recoupment is lost - when minimum rent account method is followed - preparation of ledger accounts - royalty account - landlord account – short workings account - minimum rent account when minimum rent account is followed.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:14
Accounting for sale of partnership firm
 

Sale to a limited company - need for conversion - meaning of purchase consideration - methods of calculating purchase consideration - net payment method - net asset method - passing of journal entries and preparation of ledger accounts in the books of vendor - treatment of certain items - dissolution expenses - unrecorded assets and liabilities - assets and liabilities not taken over by the purchasing company - contingent liabilities - non-assumption of trade liabilities - in the books of purchasing company - passing of incorporation entries - treatment of security premium.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.       Gupta, R. L., & Radhaswamy, M.(2017).Financial Accounting. New Delhi: Sultan Chand & Sons.

2.       Jain &Narang. (2016). Advanced Accountancy. Mumbai: Kalyani. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Maheswari, S. N., & Maheswari S. K. (2017). Advanced accountancy. New Delhi: Vikas

2. Shukla M. C., & Grewall  T. S. (2017).Advanced accountancy (15ed.).New Delhi: S. Chand

3. Gupta, R. L., & Radhaswamy, (2018), Advanced Accountancy – Vol I, Sultan Chand & Sons

Evaluation Pattern

Students are evaluated based on written examination and continuous internal assessment (CIA). The course carries a maximum of 100 marks and is evaluated as follows:

Assessment Component

Description

Weightage

CIA I

Quizzes, role plays, objective type tests, written assignments, discussion forums, article reviews, case analysis etc.

10%

CIA II

Mid semester written examination conducted for 2 hours duration

25%

CIA III

Group work consisting of presentations, viva voce, and report submission.

10%

ESE

Written examination conducted for 3 hours duration

50%

Attendance

 

05%

 

TOTAL

100%

COAT161-1 - SPREADSHEETS FOR BUSINESS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Basic proficiency in Excel has become a prerequisite skill in most of the organizations. This course intends to make the students familiar with the basics of Microsoft excel.  The course introduces the students to financial and statistical analysis, further the course also deals with practical application of Microsoft excel in day to day business activities.  As a prerequisite, the students should have basic knowledge about computers and MS Office.

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate basic data cleaning and pre-processing in Excel

CO2: Apply Financial, Logical, Statistical, Reference and Text Excel functions to solve Accounting and finance problems

CO3: Construct payroll, Ratio analysis, Cash flow statement of a business using Excel VBA

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:16
Introduction (8 hours Lectures + 8 hours Practical)
 

Spreadsheets - Workbook - Cell Referencing, Cell Addressing, File Menu; Home Menu, Conditional Formatting, Formatting as a Table, Cell Styles, AutoSum, Sort and Filter; Insert Menu, Inserting Tables and Pivot Tables, Smart Arts, Charts;   Page Layout, Review and View Menus; Converting Text to Columns, Removing Duplicates, Data Validation, Grouping and Ungrouping. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:14
Financial, Logical and Text Functions (7 hours Lectures + 7 hours Practical)
 

Financial Functions: Depreciation (DB, DDB, VDB), Simple Interest (PMT, NPER, INTRATE) - Present Value, Net Present Value, Future Value ( PV, NPV, FV) - Internal Rate of Return (IRR, MIRR); Logical Functions: AND, OR,NOT, IF, TRUE; Text Functions: UPPER, LOWER, LEFT, RIGHT, TRIM, T, TEXT, LEN, DOLLAR, EXACT; Practical exercises based on Financial, Logical and Text functions.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:14
Statistical and Reference Functions (7 hours Lectures + 7 hours Practical)
 

Statistical Functions: Mean, Median, Mode, Standard Deviation, Correlation, Skewness, F Test, Z Test, Chi-Square Analysis; Date & Time Functions: DATE, DATEVALUE, DAY, DAYS360, NOW, TIME, TIMEVALUE, WORKDAY, WEEKDAY, YEAR; Lookup and Reference Functions: HLOOKUP, VLOOKUP, TRANSPOSE, GETPIVOTDATA, HYPERLINK; Practical Exercises based on Statistical, Date & Time, Lookup and Reference functions.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:16
Projects and Applications (8 hours Lectures + 8 hours Practical)
 

Ratio Analysis, Cash Flow Statement, Payroll Processing, Marketing, Sales and Advertising Data Analytics, Social Media Marketing Analysis, Basic applications with Macros and VBAs; Trending business applications using MS Excel.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. https://ptgmedia.pearsoncmg.com/images/9780735699236/.../9780735699236.pdf

2. www.excel-easy.com

3. https://excelexposure.com

4 .https://www.microsoft.com/en-in/education/products/office/default.aspx

5. www.excelmadeeasy.com

6. Excel is fun on YouTube

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Statistics for Managers Using Microsoft Excel.  David F. Stephan, Kathryn A. Szabat, David M. Levine. Pearson Education 

2. Microsoft Excel Essential Hints and Tips Fundamental hints and tips to kick start your Excel skills. Diane Griffiths.  2015 edition.

3. Excel 2010 Formulas. John Walkenbach, Wiley Publishing. 2010 Edition.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Students are evaluated through continuous internal assessment (CIA). It is evaluated as follows:

 

 

Assessment Component

Description

Marks

CIA I

Quizzes, objective type tests, written assignments, discussion forums, article reviews, case analysis etc

30%

CIA II

Demonstration & Presentation, Quizzes, Assignments, Discussion etc

30%

CIA III

Comprehensive Practical Test, Viva-Voce, Report Book Submission

35%

Attendance

 

5%

 

Total

100%

 

 

COM001-1 - INTRODUCTION TO ACCOUNTANCY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:0
Credits:0

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is designed to impart basic knowledge of accounting to non-commerce student who have taken up Bachelor of Commerce in their graduation. Detail about the Basic fundamentals and concept of accounting will be covered along with passing of journal entries for different type of transactions and posting them in the ledger accounts. Preparation of subsidiary books and trial balance will also be taught to students so that they will be able to prepare different types of books. The course ends with the preparation of financial statements by calculating gross profit, net profit and finally preparing balance sheet involving different types of adjustments.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Recall the basic fundamental concepts of accounting and understand some of the basic terminologies used in accounting.

CO2: Pass journal entries for different type of transactions and post them in ledger account.

CO3: Differentiate between trial balance and ledger accounts and prepare a trial balance.

CO4: Ascertain gross profit and net profit by allocating different income and expenses.

CO5: Prepare financial statements of an organization.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Introduction to Accounting
 

Accounting – Meaning, Objectives, Internal and External users of accounting information and their needs, Basic Accounting Terms – Asset, Liability, Capital, Expense, Income, Expenditure, Revenue, Debtors, Creditors, Goods, Cost, Gain, Stock, Purchase, Sales, Loss, Profit, Voucher, Discount, Transaction, Drawings.

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Subsidiary Books
 

Introduction, Objectives, advantages & limitations of subsidiary books, preparation of cash book, purchase book, sales book, purchase return books, sales return books, Bills receivables book, bills payable book. 

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Journal entries
 

Meaning, features and importance of journal entries, passing of journal entries for different type of transactions.

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Preparation of Ledger Accounts
 

Meaning, definition, features, objectives, advantages and preparation of different types of ledger accounts, difference between subsidiary books and ledger accounts.

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Financial statements
 

Meaning, features, objectives, advantages and limitation of financial statements, preparation of trading account, objectives of trading account, profit & loss account, objectives of profit & loss account, Balance sheet, objectives of balance sheet, preparation of balance sheet, classification of assets, classification of liabilities, adjustment relating to outstanding expenses, Prepaid expenses, Accrued income, Income received in advance, Depreciation, Bad debts, Provision for doubtful debts etc. 

 

Text Books And Reference Books:
  • Jain S.P. &Narang K.L (2019). Corporate Accounting. New Delhi: Kalyani Publishers, REP/Edition
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Jain S.P. &Narang K.L (2019). Corporate Accounting. New Delhi: Kalyani Publishers, REP/Edition

 

Evaluation Pattern

The students are assessed at the end of the bridge course to compare with entry level assessment scores.

COM101-1 - LEGAL ASPECTS OF BUSINESS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

In the ever changing dynamic business environment, it is important that students are aware of the laws of the land, legislative systems and relevant applications of the provisions of the law. This course enables students to recognize, appreciate and apply the relevant provisions of the legislations in business. 

Course Outcome

CO1: Recognize the relevant legislation in business and the applicability of its relevant provisions.

CO2: Comprehend provisions and applicability of the Sale of Goods Act and The Insolvency Introduction, need and objective of Information Technology Act, Definitions, Cyber Law in India, Cyber Crimes and its meaning and types, offences and penalties, Cyberspace, digital and Bankruptcy Code.

CO3: Familiarize the aspects of IT Act and its relevance and applicability in the present environment.

CO4: Comprehend the Companies Act for its application in the current business environment.

CO5: Acquire the knowledge and understand the applicability of competition and consumer laws.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
The Indian Contract Act, 1872
 

Introduction and Salient Features Nature of contract and essential elements of valid contract, Offer - General offer- Specific offer, Acceptance- essentials of acceptance, Consideration, Misrepresentation, Free consent,  Fraud, Mistake -Types. Minor agreements Special Contracts – Indemnity and guarantee, Contracts of Bailment, Pledge and Agency - Breach of Contracts – Remedies for Breach of Contracts. (Relevant case laws)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
The Sale of Goods Act Law and Insolvency
 

The Sale of Goods Act, 1930: Formation of the contract of sale, Conditions and Warranties, Transfer of property, Finder of goods, Performance of contract of sale, Rights of an unpaid seller.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
The Information Technology Act 2000
 

Introduction, need and objective of Information Technology Act, Definitions, Cyber Law in India, Cyber Crimes – meaning and types, offences and penalties, Cyber space, digital signature, private key, public key, encryption, digital signature certificate, Cyber regulations appellate tribunal – Role and authority (Relevant case laws)

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Competition and Consumer Laws
 

Competition Act 2002 – Objectives, Features, Competition Appellate Tribunal, Offences and Penalties under this Act, Competition Commission of India - Powers and Duties. 

Consumer Protection Act 1986 – Introduction, objectives and need of the act, Definitions of Consumer, Consumer Dispute, Defect, Deficiency, Unfair Trade Practices and Services. Rights of Consumer, Consumer Redressal Agencies- District Forum, State Commission and National Commission.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Prevention of Money Laundering Act, 2002
 

Concept and Definitions, Offence of money laundering, Attachment, adjudication and confiscation - Obligations of Banking companies, Financial Institutions and Intermediaries – Summons, Search and Seizure – Appellate Tribunal  (Relevant case laws)

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Maheshwari SN and Maheshwari SK. (2018). Business Law, National Publishing House, New Delhi.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.Kapoor N.D. (2019). Mercantile Law, Sultan Chand & Sons

2.Tulsian P C and Tulsian Bharat. (2018). Business Law, McGraw Hill Education 

3.Sharma, J.P. and Kanojia Sunaina. (2018) Business Laws, Ane Books Pvt. Ltd., New, Delhi

4.Mulla. (2017). The Law of Insolvency in India, 6th ed., Lexis-Nexis. 

Evaluation Pattern

Students are evaluated for each paper on the basis of written examination and continuous internal assessment (CIA). Each paper carries maximum of 100 marks and is evaluated as follows:

 

Assessment Component

Description

Weightage

CIA I

Quizzes, role plays, objective type tests, written assignments, discussion forums, article reviews, case analysis etc.

10%

CIA II

Mid semester written examination conducted for 2 hours duration

25%

CIA III

Group work consisting of presentations, viva voce, and report submission.

10%

ESE

Written examination conducted for 3 hours duration

50%

Attendance

 

05%

 

TOTAL

100%

COM102-1 - BUSINESS ECONOMICS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The modules incorporated in this paper deal with the nature and scope of economics, the theory of consumer behaviour, analysis of production function and equilibrium of a producer, the price formation in different market structures and the equilibrium of a firm and industry. In addition to this, students get acquainted with the trade policy, the fiscal policy, and monetary policy within the context of a country.

Course Outcome

CO1: Develop the conceptual foundations and analytical methods used in micro economics.

CO2: Develop the ability to understand and appreciate the economic theories and their application in real economic life.

CO3: Understand the role of prices in allocating scarce resources in market economies and explain the consequences of government policies in the form of price controls.

CO4: Appraise the monetary policy and fiscal policy prevalent within a country.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Demand and supply Analysis and Applications
 

Economic models- Production Possibility Frontier; Demand Analysis: Law of demand, Exceptions to the law; Changes in demand, Elasticity of Demand: Definition, degrees and measurement - Supply Analysis: Laws of supply, Changes in supply, and elasticity of supply - Market equilibrium, Applications in real life: Price Ceiling and Price Floor and Extrality - Consumer’s surplus (Marshall) and Producer surplus.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Theory of Consumer Choice
 

The Budget Constraint: What the Consumer Can Afford, Preferences: What the Consumer Wants, Indifference curves- Properties, Optimization: What the Consumer Chooses, Decomposition of Price Effect into Income and Substitution Effects

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Theory of Production and Cost
 

Producer’s Equilibrium with the help of iso-quants and iso-cost lines, Cost FunctionImportant cost concepts. Short run and long run cost analysis (traditional theory) Modern theory of cost- Revenue analysis. TR, AR and MR.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Market Structure
 

Market structure- Perfect competition, Price and output determination- Monopoly- Price output determination, Price discrimination Monopolistic Competition. Price and Output determination. Selling costs. Product differentiation- oligopoly; Price determination – Non Collusive: Kinked Demand Curve and Collusive Oligopoly: Cartel and price leadership.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Measuring Nation's Income and Cost of Living
 

Measuring GDP - Real and Nominal GDP and GDP Deflator – Inflation: Consumer Price Index, Comparison of CPI an GDP Deflator and Adjusting economic variables to inflation – Money Supply Measures

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Economic Fluctuations and Keynesian Economics
 

Economic Fluctuations and its features – Modelling Short Run Fluctuations: Aggregate Demand and Aggregate Supply – Influence of Monetary and Fiscal Policies on AD and As - Multiplier and Crowding Out Effects – Balance of Payments Accounts and Exchange Rate.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Gregory Mankiw, N. (2022). Principles of Economics, 8th Edition, Cengage Learning India.

2. Pindyk and Rubinfeld (2017). - Microeconomics (Pearson Education), Eighth Edition

3. Maheshwari, Yogesh (2012). Managerial Economics, New Delhi: PHI Learning Pvt. Ltd.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. CORE’s The Economy (https://www.core-econ.org/)

2. CORE’s The Economy: A South Asian Perspective

3. Lipsey, R.G. and K.A. Chrystal (2011). Principles of Economics (IX ed.). Oxford University Press: Oxford

4. Ramsfield, E. (2012). Micro Economics (IX ed.). New York: W.W Norton and company.

5. Ray, N.C. (2014). An introduction to Microeconomics, Macmillan Company of India Ltd: Delhi. 

 

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Pattern

Students are evaluated for each paper on the basis of written examination and continuous internal assessment (CIA). Each paper carries maximum of 100 marks and is evaluated as follows:

 

Assessment Component

Description

Weightage

CIA I

Quizzes, role plays, objective type tests, written assignments, discussion forums, article reviews, case analysis etc.

10%

CIA II

Mid semester written examination conducted for 2 hours duration

25%

CIA III

Group work consisting of presentations, viva voce, and report submission.

10%

ESE

Written examination conducted for 3 hours duration

50%

Attendance

 

05%

 

TOTAL

100%

CSC141 - PROGRAMMING IN C (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course introduces students to the C programming language, covering its history, features, data types, and program structure. Students will learn to apply decision control and loop structures, along with various operators, to create basic programs. Additionally, the course covers functions, recursion, arrays, and pointers to provide a solid foundation for C programming and problem-solving.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the fundamentals of C programming, including its history, features, variables, and data types.

CO2: Apply decision control statements, loop control structures, and various operators to write basic C programs.

CO3: Analyze and design functions, including recursion and passing values/arrays, and understand storage classes in C.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to C
 

 

Types of Programming Language- History of C, Features of C , C Tokens, variables and keywords and identifiers ,Types of C constants and variables, Rules for constructing variable names, Structure of C program, Input /output statements in C

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Data types and Control Structures
 

Data Types, Type declaration, Different Operators in C - Arithmetic, Logical, Relational, Bitwise, Conditional, Expressions, Hierarchy of operations.

Control structures

 

Decision control statements-if, switch, go to statement, conditional operator statement. Loop control structures- while, do-while, for loop, Break statement, Continue statement.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Function
 

Introduction, function definition and prototyping, Types of functions, passing values to function, recursion, passing arrays to functions. I/O functions- formatted & unformatted console I/O functions Storage classes in C- Automatic, Register, Extern and Static Variables.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Arrays
 

 

One dimensional and multidimensional arrays, Declaration, initialization, Reading values into an array, Displaying array contents and Array Manipulations. String-Basic Concepts, Library Functions

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Pointers
 

Definition, notation, pointer and arrays, pointers and functions-call by value and call by reference.

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1] Balagurusamy, E. Programming in ANSI C 4th Edition. Tata McGraw-Hill, 2010.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1] Kanetkar, Yashavant. Let Us C. 4th Edition. BPB Publications, 2012.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 50%

ESE 50%

CSC143 - WEB DESIGNING USING HTML, PHP AND MYSQL (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course covers the fundamentals of HTML and PHP for web development. Students will learn HTML tags for content structuring and essential PHP scripting concepts, including variables, conditional statements, and error handling. Additionally, they will explore form handling, loops, and MySQL database interactions using PHP. By the end, students will be equipped to create dynamic web applications and understand the essentials of web programming.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand and apply HTML basics, including tags for structure, lists, images, hyperlinks, and tables.

CO2: Develop PHP scripts with variables, data types, conditional statements, and error handling techniques.

CO3: Utilize PHP for form handling, switch-case statements, loop structures, and working with arrays in MySQL database.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Unit-1
 

 

Basic HTML tags- HTML, HEAD, BODY, TITLE, Paragraphs, Headings, Line Breaks, Dividers- P, H1, …H6, BR, HR, Character Entity References- Quotes, ampersands, angle brackets, and non-breaking spaces Lists- OL, UL, DL, Formatting-URL and Paths, Images- IMG, Hyperlinks, Table-TABLE, TR, TD, TH, Form-FORM, INPUT, TEXTAREA, SELECT, OPTION, Frames-FRAMESET, FRAME

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
PHP Basic
 

Writing PHP scripts - Writing PHP scripts, learn about PHP code structure, how to write and execute a simple PHP script and to add comments within your code.

Variables and Data Types- Learn about Variables, values and Data Types in PHP: boolean, integer, float, string, array, object, Resource, null.

Numbers and mathematical Operators- Introducing Numbers and mathematical 0perators, some PHP functions for more complex operations with numbers.

PHP Strings- Working with strings, using simple and double quotes, escaping quotes and other characters, concatenating strings, some functions for strings.

 Constants- Introducing Constants, syntax for defining constants, differences between variables and defined constants.

PHP Error Handling and Debugging-Error Handling, debugging and trigger errors and how to adjust the level of error reporting, handling exceptions.

 

If ... Else conditionals, Comparative and Logical operators - Make PHP script takes decisions with If, Else, Elseif conditional statements. Compare two values with Comparative and Logical operators. The ternary operator.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Unit-3
 

Using HTML Forms - Using HTML Forms, PHP form handling, get data sent from form fields through GET and POST method, form validation.

$_GET, $_POST Variables - How to send data with get and post methods to a PHP script and access it with superglobal $_GET, $_POST variables.

Switch ... Case ... - PHP MySQL course - Switch ... Case ... conditional statement, switch with break and default instructions.

While Loops - Using While and Do Wile Loops. End the While loops with the break instruction. Syntax and examples.

For and For each Loops - Using for () and for each () Loops. End the "For" loops with the break instruction. Syntax and examples.

 

PHP Arrays - Creating Numeric (indexed) Arrays and Associative arrays. Accessing, modifying and traversing array elements.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Unit-4
 

PHP MySQL Introduction, Data Types - PHP MySQL Introduction, database structure, tables. MySQL naming rules, and column's data types.

PHP MySQL - INSERT INTO - Insert data in MySQL table, INSERT INTO query. Insert data from a form into a database.

 

PHP MySQL - SELECT, ORDER BY - Retrieve and display data from a MySQL table, SELECT SQL command. Determine the number of records. Sort query results with ORDER BY clause (ASC and DESC).

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Unit-5
 

PHP MySQL - WHERE and LIKE - Selecting specific data from a database with the WHERE clause and Conditionals. Check for string matching with LIKE and NOT LIKE terms.

PHP MySQL – UPDATE - UPDATE query to edit / change existing records in MySQL table.

 

PHP MySQL – DELETE - The DELETE statement, used to entirely remove records from a database table.

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1] Powell, HTML & XHTM: The Complete Reference, 4th Edition, Tata McGraw-Hill Edition
[2] Steven Holzner, PHP: The Complete Reference, McGraw-Hill Higher Education, 2008


Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

[1] Robin Nixon, Learning PHP, My SQL and Java Script, Kindle Edition, O'Reilly Media 2009.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 50%

ESE 50%

DMT141 - DANCE MOVEMENT THERAPY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description:

This course has been conceptualized in order to Understanding and exploring theory and practice as two sides of the same coin for academic 

excellence in Performing Arts. Benchmarking quality, understanding and exploring adaptability to situations and taking leadership tasks.

Maintaining emotional and aesthetics sensitivity in verbal and non-verbal communication

Course Outcome

CO1: To work on the body schema, body image and physical self-concept To examine the concept of creativity and imagination.

CO2: To understand and gain practical understanding about the human body expression through the Gross Motor Skills Development, the Global Motor Coordination Schemes according Bartenieff, the Effort/Shape system of movement analysis according Laban.

CO3: To gain the ability to express emotions To improved confidence and self-esteem

CO4: To analyse and to gain practical understanding about the concept of Dance: from ancient social function to performance, from performance to therapy. To learn how Dance Movement Therapy dances with life: instances of different social areas in which Dmt is practised.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Introduction on Dance Movement
 

  Definition of Dance and its history 

 Definition of creativity 

 History of Dance Movement Therapy theory 

 

To understand and to gain practical understanding about the human body expression 

the Gross Motor Skills Development,

the Global Motor Coordination Schemes according Bartenieff,  

the Effort/Shape system of movement analysis according Laban.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:25
Practice
 

Explore the body: The warm –up in Dance Movement Therapy 

The social function of the dance 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Essential references: (in APA format)

- Bellia , V. (2020). A body among other bodies. Relational Expressive Dance Movement Therapy. Catania A&G

- Hackney, P. (1998). Making connections. Total body integration through Barrtenieff Fundamentals. Routledge, New York.

- Laban R. (1950). The mastery of movement on the stage. McDonald & Evans, London

- Laban R., Lawrence F.C. (1947). Effort. McDonald & Evans, London

- Schilder P., (1935) The image and appearance of the human body. Taylor & Francis

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Essential references: (in APA format)

- Bellia , V. (2020). A body among other bodies. Relational Expressive Dance Movement Therapy. Catania A&G

- Hackney, P. (1998). Making connections. Total body integration through Barrtenieff Fundamentals. Routledge, New 

- Schilder P., (1935) The image and appearance of the human body. Taylor & Francis

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation patterns  - final assessment 100 marks

DMT142 - INTRODUCTION TO CARNATIC MUSIC (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Introduction to Carnatic music focus on the basic fundamentals of Carnatic music. This course helps to improve the vocal quality as the lessons works as voice culture to the begginner.

Course Outcome

CO1: Ability to render the Swara-s in three speeds

CO2: Ability to identify and render the 7 Swara-s

CO3: Ability to render Sarala, Janta, Dhatu, Tarasthayi, and Alankara-s in three speeds.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Svaravali varisas and Janti varisas
 

Lessons in three speeds

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Tarasthayi and Dhattu varisas
 

All the lessons in to three speeds

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Alankaras and Geethams
 

Sapta tala alankaras and any for geethams

Text Books And Reference Books:

Carnatic music reader by Panchapakesha Iyer

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Ganamrutha Bodhini

Evaluation Pattern

Final assessment for 100 Marks

DSC141 - PRINCIPLES OF DATA SCIENCE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To provide a strong foundation for data science and the application area related to it, train toexplore the process of data pre-processing and machine learning, and to inculcate the importanceof ethics while handling data and problems in data science. To provide students with a fundamental understanding of the digital computing concepts from a hardware and software perspective.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the fundamental concepts of data science.

CO2: Explore the concepts of data pre-processing and visualization.

CO3: Learn the basic concepts of machine learning.

CO4: Practice the ethics while handling data

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:14
Introduction
 

INTRODUCTION TO DATA SCIENCE

What is data science? – Why data science? – Data science venn diagram – Terminologies – Application case studies. Types of data – Structured vs unstructured data – Quantitative vs qualitative data – Four levels of data.

Data Science Ethics – Doing good data science – Owners of the data - Valuing different aspects of privacy - Getting informed consent - The Five Cs – Diversity – Inclusion – Future Trends.

 

  

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:18
Data Science process and Machine Learning
 

 DATA SCIENCE PROCESS

Five steps of data science – Ask an interesting question? – Obtain the data - Explore the data – Model the data – Communicate and visualize results – Basic question for data explorations – case studies for EDA

 Machine Learning

Machine learning – Modeling Process – Training model – Validating model – Predicting new observations –Supervised learning algorithms-– Unsupervised learning algorithms. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:13
Data Visualization
 

DATA VISUALISATION

Communicating data – Identifying visualization – Importance of graphs and statistics – Verbal communication – The why, how and what strategy of presenting.

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1]Sinan Ozdemir, Principles of Data Science learn the techniques and math you need to start making sense of your data. Birmingham Packt December, 2016.

[2]Davy Cielen and Arno Meysman, Introducing Data Science. Simon and Schuster, 2016.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1]M. Loukides, H. Mason, and D. Patil, Ethics and Data Science. O’Reilly Media, 2018.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 100%

DSC142 - PYTHON PROGRAMMING FOR DATA SCIENCE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course covers the programming paradigms associated with Python. It provides a comprehensive understanding of Python data types, functions and modules with a focus on modular programming.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand and apply core programming concepts.

CO2: Demonstrate significant experience with python program development environment.

CO3: Design and implement fully-functional programs using commonly used modules and custom functions.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
INTRODUCTION
 

INTRODUCING PYTHON

Introduction, Python Fundamentals, Features of Python, Components of a Python Program, Understanding the interpreter.

Python basics:

Identifiers, Basic Types, Operators, Precedence and Associativity, Decision Control Structures, Looping Structures, Console input, output.

Practical Exercises:

1.Implement Basic data types, Control structures and operators.

2.Exercise on console input and output.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:18
Programming Fundamentals
 

PYTHON DATA TYPES

Strings,Lists:Accessingelements,Basic List operations, Built-in methods

Tuples: working with elements, Basic Tuple operation, Tuple methods and Type of Tuples 

Sets: Definition, Set Elements, Built-in methods, basic set operations, Mathematical Set operation, Variety of Sets.

Dictionaries: Defining a dictionary, accessing elements, basic operations, methods.

COMPREHENSIONS and FUNCTIONS

 Comprehensions:ListComprehensions, Set Comprehension, Dictionary Comprehension.

Functions: Defining a function, Types of arguments, unpacking arguments.

Recursive functions.Main module, built-in, custommodules, importing a module.

 

Practical Exercises:

    1. Implement Tuples

    2. Implement Dictionary

    3. Implement Set

    4.ImplementList, Set and Dictionary Comprehensions

    5.Implement Recursive function

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to NUMPY AND PANDAS
 

NUMPY 

Introduction to NumPy, Aggregations Computation on Arrays, Comparisons, Sorting Arrays.

PANDAS

Introduction to Pandas: Data indexing and Selection, Operating on Data, Handling Missing Data.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

[1]Martin Brown, Python:The Complete Reference,     McGraw Hill Publications,4th Edition March 2018.

[2]Yashavant Kanetkar,Aditya Kanetkar, Let Us Python, BPB Publications ,4th Edition 2022.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1]Reema Thareja ,Python Programming using problem solving Approach , Oxford University, Higher Education Oxford University Press, 2017

[2]Zhang.Y      ,An      Introduction     to         Pythonand      Computer            Programming,Springer Publications,2015

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 100%

ECO144 - GLOBALISATION AND DEVELOPMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Liberalisation policies being pursued by most national economies in the world today, including India creates the need to acquire knowledge and comprehension of Globalisation as ideology along with its practical dynamics. The course intends to provide a sound understanding about the various components, and issues of this ideology at an introductory level. The methodology will be learning centered and so will be one of intensive facilitation by faculty of the reading to be done by students.

Course Outcome

CO1: Describe the various facets of globalisation.

CO2: Explain the various challenges of globalisation.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction
 

Globalisation: Brief History – The Marrakesh Meet – Globalisation as a contested concept – Debate of Globalisation as a new phenomenon

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
The Political Economy of Globalisation
 

Political Economy Debate of Comparative Advantage versus Imperialism – Introduction to Globalisation and the Political Economy of the External Sector.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Dimensions of Globalisation
 

The Economics Dimension – The Political Dimension – The Cultural Dimension

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Ideology
 

The Ideological Dimension of Globalisation – Challenges to Globalism – Assessing the Future of Globalisation.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Manfred Steger ‘Globalisation the new Market Ideology’.

2. Joseph Stiglitz ‘Discontents of Gloablisaton’

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Justin Ervin, Zachary A Smith "Globalisation: A Reference Hand Book."

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I - 25 Marks

CIA II - 25 Marks

ESE - 50 Marks

ECO145 - ECOLOGY AND DEVELOPMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course aims to provide a holistic and a deeper understanding of the trade-off between ecology and development. Through an inter-disciplinary lens an organic approach is adopted to understand the trade-off. This course, therefore, seeks to cultivate not only the moral and ethical thinking of the ecology but also it tries to put forth an action plan from a policy front. 

Course Outcome

CO1: To evoke a sense of deep ecology and social justice.

CO2: To familiarize the students with the development paradigms and how it affects the ecology.

CO3: To examine the problems behind value designations

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Ecology and Value
 

The Value Problem in Ecological Economics- Values in Ecological Value Analysis: What Should We Be Learning from Contingent Valuation Studies? - Natural Capital in Ecological Economics-Entropy in Ecological Economics.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Ecology and Development
 

The environmental impact of land development-Development of water resources-Development and changing air quality- Urban development and environmental change-Environmental economics and ecological economics: Where they can converge?- Power Inequality and the Environment.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Ecofeminism and Ecocriticism
 

Gender and environment; Ecofeminism; androcentrism; Deep ecology – ecofeminism debate; Ecocriticism; Nature writings; Thinking like a mountain; The forgetting and remembering of the air - The Varna Trophic System An Ecological Theory of Caste Formation. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:11
Action Plans
 

Reading Ecology, Reinventing Democracy-Scientists or Spies?- Revisiting the Debates on Man-Nature Relation- Lecture of Medha Patkar- Ecological Fiscal Transfers and State-level Budgetary Spending in India- -Bourgeois Environmentalism, the State, the Judiciary, Urban Poor, Significance of Silent Valley- Silent Valley: A controversy that focused global attention on a rainforest 40 years ago- Equity and Justice

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      1.Burkett, Paul. (2006). Marxism and Ecological Economics. Brill

2.Daly & Farley. (2011). Ecological Economics (Principles and Applications). Island Press

3.Pepper, D. (2002). Eco-socialism: from deep ecology to social justice. Routledge

1.      4.Gupta, Avijit. (1998).Ecology and Development in Third World. Routledge

4. Patel, S. (1997). Ecology and Development. Economic and Political Weekly, 2388-2391.

5. Sankar, U. (ed.) (2000). Environmental Economics. Oxford University Press

6. Burkett, Paul. (2006). Marxism and Ecological Economics. Brill

7.Venkatachalam, L. (2007). Environmental economics and ecological economics: Where they can converge?. Ecological economics, 61(2-3), 550-558.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.    1. Plumwood, V. (1993).  Feminism and the Mastery of Nature. London: Routledge

2. Warren, K.J. (ed), (1994).  Ecological Feminism. London: Routledge.

3.Shiva, V. (2016). Staying alive: Women, ecology, and development. North Atlantic Books.

4.Kavoori, P. S. (2002). The Varna Trophic system: an ecological theory of caste formation. Economic and Political Weekly, 1156-1164. 

5.Gill, K. (2009). Bourgeois environmentalism’, the State, the Judiciary, and the ‘urban poor’: The political mobilization of a scheduled caste market. Of Poverty and Plastic (Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 2010), 209.

6. Kaur, A., Mohanty, R. K., Chakraborty, L., & Rangan, D. (2021). Ecological fiscal transfers and state-level budgetary spending in India: Analyzing the flypaper effects. Levy Economics Institute, Working Papers Series July.

7.Parameswaran, M. P. (1979). Significance of Silent Valley. Economic and Political Weekly, 1117-1119.

8. Lewis, M. (2002). Scientists or spies? Ecology in a climate of Cold War suspicion. Economic and Political Weekly, 2323-2332.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 - 25 Marks

CIA 2- 25 Marks

CIA 3- 50 Marks 

ENG181-1 - ENGLISH (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
  • To expose learners to a variety of texts to interact with
  • To help learners classify ideologies and be able to express the same
  • To expose learners to visual texts and its reading formulas
  • To help learners develop a taste to appreciate works of literature through the organization of language
  • To help develop critical thinking
  • To help learners appreciate literature and the language nuances that enhances its literary values
  • To help learners understand the relationship between the world around them and the text/literature
  • To help learners negotiate with content and infer meaning contextually
  • To help learners understand logical sequencing of content and process information

·         To help improve their communication skills for larger academic purposes and vocational purposes

·         To enable learners to learn the contextual use of words and the generic meaning

·         To enable learners to listen to audio content and infer contextual meaning

·         To enable learners to be able to speak for various purposes and occasions using context specific language and expressions

·         To enable learners to develop the ability to write for various purposes using suitable and precise language.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand how to engage with texts from various countries, historical, cultural specificities, and politics and develop the ability to reflect upon and comment on texts with various themes

CO2: Develop an analytical and critical bent of mind to compare and analyze the various literature they read and discuss in class

CO3: Develop the ability to communicate both orally and in writing for various purposes

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
1. The Happy Prince- Oscar Wilde 2. Sonnet 18- William Shakespeare
 
  • 1. The Happy Prince- Oscar Wilde
  • 2. Sonnet 18- William Shakespeare

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
Language
 

Common errors- subject-verb agreement, punctuation, tense errors  Just a minute talk, cubing

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
1. Why We Travel-Pico Iyer
 

 Why We Travel-Pico Iyer 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

Sentence fragments, dangling modifiers, faulty parallelism,

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:4
1. Thinking Like a Mountain By Aldo Leopold
 

Thinking Like a Mountain  By Aldo Leopold

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:4
language
 

Note taking

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Aarushi-Hemraj Murder Article
 

 

Aarushi-Hemraj Murder Article 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Language
 

Newspaper report

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:4
1. My Story- Nicole DeFreece
 

 

 My Story- Nicole DeFreece

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:4
Language
 

Essay writing

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:4
Language
 

Paraphrasing and interpretation skills

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:4
Casey at the Bat- Ernest Lawrence Thayer
 
  • Casey at the Bat-  Ernest Lawrence Thayer
Text Books And Reference Books:

ENGlogue 1

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Additional  material as per teacher manual will be provided by the teachers

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1=20 

CIA 2=50 

CIA 3= 20 

ESE= 50 marks

EST141 - TRAVEL AND TRAVEL NARRATIVES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Travel Literature is one of the most popular areas of study and research today. Theoretical and practical understanding of travel and Travel Literature has evolved a lot in its journey to the present. We discuss journeys at multiple levels; physical, philosophical, psychological, religious, internal, external etc. The involvement of multidisciplinary perspectives has enriched the whole understanding of travel. Questions like why people travel and what happens when one sets out on a journey becomes so pertinent to the whole discipline. This course will try to engage with the ideas of travel and writing on travel from a chronological and historical perspective. This course will also provide students with a modern and comprehensive way of understanding the world of travel and travel narratives.

 

Course Objective: This course is aimed at providing a comprehensive introduction and survey on the contemporary world of travel and travel narratives. The course is aimed at providing students a direct engagement with the modern theoretical understanding of the travel narratives.

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will be able to understand the history and development of travel literature

CO2: Students will be able to get an idea of Travel narratives in India

CO3: This will provide an introductory peek into the theory of Travel and Travel writing

CO4: Students will Will be able to critically and academically engage with travel writings

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
What is Travel ? A Basic introduction
 

Travel is the buzz word of the day. In the fast-changing modern world travel plays a vital role in shaping up thoughts and aspirations of people. People travel for multiple reasons like to enjoy, to study, as a profession, etc and the theoretical understanding of travel needs to be taken into account at the beginning itself. Understanding travel in the light of modern socio-political and economic scenario is also very important in today’s global scenario. These basic positions of the course would enable students to look at travel in a broader context to create a better world with diversity and inclusivity.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Travel Writing: An Overview
 

This unit is intended to give students an over view of the evolution of the genre of Travel Writing. Some important theories of travel writing will be introduced in this module along with the evolution of travel narratives in India.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Indian Travel Narratives
 

This module focuses on the evolution of Indian Travel Narratives.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Women and Travel Writing in India
 

This unit is trying to look at the rise and development of women travellers historically and sociologically. This will enable students to critically evaluate the Indian scenario of travel narratives.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Unit I: What is Travel – Basic introduction

1.     Pratt, Mary Louise. Imperial Eyes: Studies in Travel Writing and Transculturation.Routledge, 1992.

2.     Lislie, Debbie. The Global Politics of Contemporary Travel Writing, Cambridge University Press, 2009 Print.

Unit II: Travel Writing: An Overview

1)    Hulme, Peter, and Tim Youngs, eds., 2002. The Cambridge Companion to Travel Writing. Cambridge: Cambridge UP.

2)    Said, Edward (1983). ‘Traveling Theory.’ The World, the Text, and the Critic. [1982]. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP. 226–47.

Unit III: Indian Travel Narratives

1)    Bhattacharji, Shobhana(ed). 2008. Travel Writing in India, Sahitya Academy, New Delhi.

        2)    Mandal, Somadatta.  Indian Travel Narratives, Rawat Publications, New Delhi. 2010. 

Unit IV: Women and Travel Writing in India

1.     Ghose, Indira. Women Travellers in Colonial India: The Power of the Female Gaze OUP Delhi 1998 Print. Pp.1-19

2.     Nath, Shivya. The Shooting Star: A girl, her backpack and the World, Penguin 2017.

      

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1)    Pratt, Mary louis. 1992. Imperial Eyes, Travel Writing and Transculturation, London: Routledge.

2)    Tagore, Rabindranath. 1962. Diary of a Westward Voyage. Asia Publishing House.

3)    Dalrymple, William. Nine Lives: In Search of the Sacred in Modern India. Bloomsbury, New Delhi.2010.

1.                 4)    Jung, Anees. Unveiling India: A Woman’s Journey, Penguin India,1986.

 5) Bohls, E. A. (1995). Women travel writers and the language of aesthetics, 1716-1818 (No. 13). Cambridge University Press.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Examination and Assessment

Assessment Pattern    

 

20 (CIA 1)

20 (CIA 3)

50 (CIA 2)

50 (End Semester)

CIA I and III can be either written analysis/presentation of a travel narrative analysis of a popular writer of contemporary time, debates or seminar/panel discussions.

Mid semester exam – A written paper on the modules covered for 50 marks. Section A will have questions (6x5 =30 marks). Section B will have 2 analytical questions (10 marks each) to assess conceptual clarity and understanding of the domain.

End-semester exam – Two sections: Section A (30 marks) will have 3 questions (10 marks each) testing the knowledge on the evolution of the genre. Section B (20 Marks)will have 2 conceptual/Analytical question (10 marks each).

EST142 - READING SPORTS AND LITERATURE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:3
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Reading Sports and Literature

Course Description: The Sports and Literature course aims to explore the relationship between sports and literature through the analysis of various literary works. By examining texts that center around sports themes, this course will delve into the cultural, social, and personal aspects of sports as portrayed in literature. Students will develop critical thinking, analytical, and communication skills as they engage with a diverse range of texts, including novels, short stories, poems, and essays. Through class discussions, readings, and written assignments, students will gain a deeper understanding of the literary representation of sports and its significance in society.

Course Objectives:

To analyze and interpret literary works that feature sports themes.

To examine the portrayal of sports in literature and its reflection of cultural and social values.

To explore the personal and psychological dimensions of sports as depicted in literature.

To develop critical thinking and analytical skills through textual analysis.

 

To enhance written and oral communication skills through class discussions and written assignments.

Course Outcome

CO1: To analyze and interpret literary works that feature sports themes.

CO2: To examine the portrayal of sports in literature and its reflection of cultural and social values.

CO3: To explore the personal and psychological dimensions of sports as depicted in literature.

CO4: To develop critical thinking and analytical skills through textual analysis.

CO5: To enhance written and oral communication skills through class discussions and written assignments.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Introduction to Sports and Literature
 

Defining the relationship between sports and literature

Historical perspectives on sports in literature

 

The role of sports in society and culture

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
The Heroic Athlete
 

 

Exploring the archetype of the hero in sports literature

Analysis of sports heroes and their portrayal in literary works

 

Themes of triumph, perseverance, and sacrifice

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Gender and Sports
 

 

Gender representation in sports literature

Examination of gender roles and expectations in athletic contexts

 

Sports as a means of empowerment and resistance

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Sports and Identity
 

 

Sports as a vehicle for personal and collective identity

Intersectionality and the portrayal of race, ethnicity, and class in sports literature

 

The relationship between sports and national identity

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Sports and Coming-of-Age
 

 

Analysis of sports as a backdrop for personal growth and maturation

The challenges and conflicts faced by young athletes in literature

 

Themes of ambition, dreams, and disillusionment

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:8
Sports and Society
 

Unit 6: Sports and Society

Critical examination of the social issues depicted in sports literature

Sports as a reflection of broader societal dynamics

 

Ethics, values, and controversies in the world of sports

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. "The Natural" by Bernard Malamud
  2. "Friday Night Lights" by H.G. Bissinger
  3. "The Art of Fielding" by Chad Harbach
  4. "Seabiscuit: An American Legend" by Laura Hillenbrand
  5. "The Contender" by Robert Lipsyte
  6. "The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Runner" by Alan Sillitoe
  7. "A Fan's Notes" by Frederick Exley
  8. "The Boys of Summer" by Roger Kahn
  9. "The Sportswriter" by Richard Ford
  10. "Open" by Andre Agassi
  11. "Fever Pitch" by Nick Hornby
  12. "The Crossover" by Kwame Alexander (young adult literature)
  13. "The Runner" by Cynthia Voigt (young adult literature)
  14. "The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian" by Sherman Alexie (young adult literature)
  15. "The Fighter" by Michael Farris Smith
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. "The Boxer" by Joyce Carol Oates
  2. "The Runner" by Don DeLillo
  3. "Blindside" by Michael Lewis
  4. "The Tennis Partner" by Abraham Verghese
  5. "Basketball" by John Updike
  6. "The Chariot" by Ray Bradbury
  7. "The Trophy" by Alberto Alvaro Ríos
  8. "The Catch" by W.P. Kinsella
  9. "In the Ring" by Andre Dubus
  10. "Roller Derby Queen" by Margot Livesey
Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1-20

CIA 2- MSE 50

CIA 3- 30

ESE- 50

EST143 - STORYTELLING, GAMES AND ETHICS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: In the last 20-25 years the field of game studies has evolved significantly. It is globally recognised. Video games have been studied using inter, multi and transdisciplinary methods to understand culture, identity, media, narration and communication. The course will provide a historical, social, cultural and critical foundation about games, digitality, storytelling and its moral and ethical world. This will enable students to understand the connection between identities, moralities and our current engagement with the gaming world. This will help in broadening the interdisciplinary focus and assessment of storytelling in diverse forms and connect it with the ethical issues of the contemporary world.

 

Course Objectives: The course will survey the evolution of ideas connecting storytelling, gaming and ethics and morality. It will introduce the latest research in gaming and ethics as evidenced in the globalised world. It will provide a methodology for students to assess and critically evaluate the meaning, content, intent, narration (compared to other broader media), ideology and ethical implications of gaming in the contemporary world.

Course Outcome

CO1: ? will be able to understand the narrative conventions of gaming, their uses and ideological effects

CO2: ?will evaluate how narrative choices reflect ethical contextualisation

CO3: ?will be able to analyse and evaluate contemporary social, cultural and political issues and perspectives reflected in games

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Unit I: What is gaming ? Basic introduction
 

While gaming has been popular, studying games with its historical, social and cultural context requires a foundation in history of games. Locating games within cultures of social transactions and strategic implications will provide the required base to begin the course.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit II: Gaming, Society and Narration
 

This unit is divided into three smaller subunits. The students will be divided into smaller groups in class and asked to explore the following blog to choose any one area of interest within the subcategories mentioned. The class will progress accordingly. They have to choose between games and colonialism, games and gender, games and philosophy (utopia/dystopia).

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit III: Games and Ethics
 

This unit is focussed on ethical framework of games.

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Unit IV: Storyboard ? design a game (basic story line)
 

The students are expected to narrate and design a basic concept for a game to respond to the questions raised in the course.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Unit I: What is gaming – Basic introduction                                                         (10 hours)

While gaming has been popular, studying games with its historical, social and cultural context requires a foundation in history of games. Locating games within cultures of social transactions and strategic implications will provide the required base to begin the course.

1.     Roberts, J. M., Arth, M. J., & Bush, R. R. (1959). Games in culture. American anthropologist61(4), 597-605.

2.     Chapter 1 from Grace, L. D. (2019). Doing things with games: Social impact through play. CRC Press.

Unit II: Gaming, Society and Narration                                                                (15 hours)

This unit is divided into three smaller subunits. The students will be divided into smaller groups in class and asked to explore the following blog to choose any one area of interest within the subcategories mentioned. The class will progress accordingly. They have to choose between games and colonialism, games and gender, games and philosophy (utopia/dystopia).

https://coe-gamecult.org/

Reading: Shaw, A. (2010). What is video game culture? Cultural studies and game studies. Games and culture5(4), 403-424.

Salter, A., & Blodgett, B. (2017).  Toxic Geek Masculinity: Sexism, Trolling, and Identity Policing (Cham: Springer International Publishing, 2017), 73-99.

Case study: Hellblade: Senua’s Sacrifice

Unit III: Games and Ethics                                                                                      (15 hours)

Kowert, R., & Quandt, T. (Eds.). (2015). The video game debate: Unravelling the physical, social, and psychological effects of video games. Routledge. (Chapter 2/4/5).

Gotterbarn, D. The ethics of video games: Mayhem, death, and the training of the next generation. Inf Syst Front 12, 369–377 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10796-009-9204-x

Schrier, K. (2015). EPIC: A framework for using video games in ethics education. Journal of Moral Education44(4), 393-424.

Sicart, M. (2015). Playing the good life: Gamification and ethics. The gameful world: Approaches, issues, applications, 225-244.

Unit IV: Storyboard – design a game (basic story line)

The students are expected to narrate and design a basic concept for a game to respond to the questions raised in the course.

1.     Workshop by gaming planner/designer

2.     https://www.pluralsight.com/blog/film-games/creating-game-concept-first-step-getting-game-ground

3.     https://uxdesign.cc/a-board-game-design-process-a-game-is-a-system-5469dfa4536

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Recommended readings:

Bolter, J. et al. (1999). Remediation. Understanding New Media. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 20-52; 88-102.

Burrill, D. A. (2008). Die tryin': videogames, masculinity, culture (Vol. 18). Peter Lang. (13-44).

Mukherjee, S. (2017). Videogames and Postcolonialism. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 1-52. (Rise of the Tomb Raider).

Schrier, K. (2017). Designing role-playing video games for ethical thinking. Educational Technology Research and Development65(4), 831-868.

Sicart, M. (2013). Beyond choices: The design of ethical gameplay. MIT Press.

Zhang, Y. (2009). Ian Bogost, Persuasive Games: The Expressive Power of Videogames.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Examination and Assessment

Assessment Pattern    

20 (CIA 1)

20 (CIA 3)

50 (CIA 2)

50 (End Semester)

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I and III can be either written analysis/presentation of an author, book review, narrative analysis of a dominant idea of the contemporary time, debates or seminar/panel discussions.

Mid semester exam (class test) – A written paper on the modules covered for 50 marks. Section A (10 marks) will have objective questions (20, ½ marks each). Section B will have 4 questions (10 marks each) to assess conceptual clarity. Section B will have one compulsory question which will be analytical.

End-semester exam (class test) – Three sections: Section A (10 marks) will have objective questions (20, ½ marks each). Section B will have 1 conceptual question (10 marks each). They will be conceptual. Section C (15 marks each) will be having two case studies - one purely based on identification of features, styles, and narrative devices, and second question will be evaluative and analytical.

Consolidated marks will be sent after the final examination.

EST144 - DESIGN THINKING AND SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:45
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

 

Rural India comprises 66.46% of India’s population and contributes to a large portion of India’s GDP by way of agriculture, services, skilled and non-skilled labour.  Rural India suffers from socio-economic distress due to several factors, small land holding, rain dependent agriculture, and lack of alternative sources of income, migration to urban centers and due to several sociological factors. 

Rural India in its diverse geographies has a huge potential to provide solutions to some of the gravest global challenges pertaining to environment and sustainable development and which remains largely untapped.  This calls for a focused approach in exploring the potential opportunities through a scientific approach of critical thinking and creativity, pro-active engagement of rural communities, creating effective structures to implement and create global visibility for the proprietary products and services created. Such an approach will substantially mitigate socio-economic distress in rural communities by providing them income generating opportunities by engaging social enterprises and also contribute to the sustainability goals of the UN.

The course of Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship for students of English Language and Literature  seeks to sensitise students with an on field immersion with rural India and explore possibilities for enterprise through case studies on innovative rural enterprises.  The course seeks to apply their finer eye for aesthetics and culture and

Course Objectives

 

•           To familiarize students with the Sustainability goals envisioned by UN and motivate them to proactively contribute towards its attainment.

•           To create a firsthand awareness of rural India and challenges which can be translated into entrepreneurial opportunities.

•           To study and analyze different Social Enterprise models and their relative outcomes

•           To gain an understanding of the challenges of running a social enterprise.

•           To give students a firsthand experience of understanding the challenges of capacity building and leadership creation in rural communities for an enterprise and engage them proactively in building a sustainable business.

•           To stimulate curiosity in students to identify the areas of gaps in products and services and come up with creative solutions which can be translated into profitable enterprises.

•           To help students develop ethical business models founded on the principles of equity and fair play vis-à-vis the engagement of rural and grass root communities

•           To enable students to curate branding and market strategies for products and services emerging from a social enterprise to make them profitable and sustainable

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will have a comprehensive understanding of the U N Sustainability goals and get engaged in it proactively.

CO2: Students will have gained a firsthand awareness of rural India and challenges which can be translated into entrepreneurial opportunities.

CO3: Students will be exposed to different Social Enterprise models and their relative outcomes

CO4: Students will have envisaged the challenges of running a social enterprise.

CO5: Students will have gained on-field experience of engaging with rural communities for capacity building and leadership

CO6: Students will have envisaged the challenges of running a social enterprise.

CO7: Students will have identified at least one problem/gap area in a product or service and will have come up with creative solutions as part of their project.

CO8: Students will develop business models founded on the principles of equity and fair play vis-à-vis the engagement of rural and grass root communities

CO9: Students will develop branding and market strategies for products and services which they will have developed as part of their project work.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:4
Understanding UN Sustainability Development Goals
 

Session on 17 UN Sustainability Development Goals.   After the disucssion, students are asked to identify any two sustainability goals and asked to suggest any action steps that can be taken at the community level to reach the goals.  Students present their ideas.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Understanding Rural India
 

Field visit and online interaction with members of rural communities to understand how political, societal, and domestic realities vary among different geographies and how they impact life and living of rural communities.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Understanding Rural India
 

Field Visit and online interactive session

Students visit a village near Bangalore and interact with the communities.  Students also have online interactive sessions with women groups in three villages one each in Karnataka, Kerala, and Tamil Nadu.  

Students study how political, societal, and domestic spheres vary in different geographies of India and how they impact their life and living.  

Student groups present their finidings.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Rural Enterprise: Case Study
 

Student groups identify one Social Entrepreneur in India and analyze their social enterprise vis-a-vis problem identified and addressed, understanding how they converted the problem into a viable business,  the business model, challenges and opportunities.

Student groups make their presentation

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Grassroots Innovation: Problem Identification and Building the Value Proposition Canvas
 

Student groups are given the task of identifying one problem/gap in service which can be converted into an opportunity.

Students are taught how to build the value proposition around a problem or gap in service by identifying the pain points and possible gain creators which can result in a business opportunity

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
Buildling Proof of Concept, Prototyping/Piloting
 

Students are taught how to iterate and build a proof of concept of their solution.  Students are facilitated to prototype their products/pilot their innovative solutions i

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:9
Business Model Canvas/Pitch Deck/Presentation
 

Students are taught to build a Business Model Canvas of their solution, and prepare a pitch deck and make their final business presentation

Text Books And Reference Books:

Frugal Innovation: How to Do More With Less: Navi Radjou Jaideep Prabhu

           Jugaad Innovation: Navi Radjou, Jaideep Prabhu, Simone Ahuja

           Poor Economics: Abhijit Bannerjee, Esther Duflo

           The Open Book of Social Innovation: Geoff Mulgan, Robin Murray

           The 22 Immutable Laws of Branding: Al Ries

           Marketing Strategy- A Decision-Focused Approach: Walker, Mullins

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

A Handbook of Rural India (Readings on Economy, Polity and Society) Surinder S Jodka

           Women in Rural India: Vani Prabhakar

           Rural Development in India Strategies and Processes: G Sreedhar and D Rajasekar

           Communication for Rural Innovation: Cees Leeuwis, A. W. van den ban

Evaluation Pattern

Two Case Studies-40 Marks

Live Project-40 Marks

Presentation-20 Marks

EST145 - POETICS , POLITICS AND PIVOTAL PEOPLE OF ROCK N ROLL (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

 

 Rock Music is a sound and dissonance rich discourse with its own socio-cultural practices and aesthetics. This course is an academic introduction to this space and its role in the identity formation of a generation, of a people and a Nation in motion.

 

Course Objectives

 

  • To engage with popular music as aural texts 
  • To study the popular music practitioner as an activist and artist
  • To appreciate the significance of  social critique and a counter cultural aesthetic

Course Outcome

CO1: ? To critically appreciate characteristics and concerns of popular music

CO2: To read popular music as cultural artefact and socio-political entities

CO3: ? To regard popular music as the voice and identity of a generation and locate its historical trajectory

CO4: ? To engage with artists and performances as cultural texts

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
A brief history of Popular Music before the Beatles
 

Tin Pan Alley and song pluggers, World War II

Sheet Music

Swing and ragtime

Vaudeville

Frank Sinatra: My Way. Strangers in The Night, New York, New York

Nashville, Music Row, Elvis Presley

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Birth of a Genre (From Gospel to Rock)
 

 Bill Haley 

Chuck Berry

  Buddy Holly   

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Classic Rock and the British Invasion
 

The Beatles and Beatlemania

Establishing an aesthetic of Mod

  TV and bands 

The Rolling Stones  

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Art Rock and the Album Era: Concept Albums and Album Art
 

 

Bands as Artists                                                                                                                 

Beatles / Sgt Pepper’s  

Pink Floyd /The Wall

The Who / Tommy

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
The Politics of Rock n Roll Folk rock: People power; Guerrilla Minstrels Folksong as Protest
 

 

Counter Culture: Vietnam, Draft, Gender, the Mystic East, Woodstock, Ban the Bomb   

Woody Guthrie

Bob Dylan

Joan Baez

Janis Joplin

Simon and Garfunkel

Jimi Hendrix

Pearl Jam

Riot bands

Text Books And Reference Books:

Whats that sound? An introduction to Rock and its history .

 

Jon CovachUniversity of Rochester

and the Eastman School of Music

Andrew Flory

Carleton College

 

W. W. NORTON AND COMPANY

NEW YORK • LONDON

fifth Edition

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Baugh, Bruce. “Prolegomena to Any Aesthetics of Rock Music”. The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, Vol. 51, No. 1 (Winter, 1993): 23-29. JSTOR. The American Society for Aesthetics. Web. 26Jul, 2016. < http://www.jstor.org/stable/431967>

Camilleri, Lelio. “Shaping Sounds, Shaping Spaces”.  Popular Music, Vol. 29, No. 2 (May 2010): 199-211. JSTOR.  Cambridge University Press. Web. 16August, 2016. <http://www.jstor.org/stable/40926918>

Chrysalis, Thanos. “Spatio-Aural Terrains”. Leonardo Music Journal, Vol. 16, Noises Off: Sound Beyond Music (2006):40-42. JSTOR. The MIT Press. Web. 29 April, 2015. http://www.jstor.org/stable/4540592

Denisoff R.S. The Sounds of Social Change: Studies in Popular USA Culture. 1972. Rand Mcnally& Co.

Denisoff, R. S.  Great Day Coming.  1991. Ann Arbor, MI: U-M-I Out-of-Print Books on Demand.

Denisoff, R. S. "Sing a Song of Social Significance": Political Consciousness and the Song of Persuasion.  1972.  Ohio: Bowling Green State University Popular Press.

Denisoff, R. S. Solid Gold Popular Record Industry.  1975. New Brunswick, New Jersey Transactions Inc

Ewen, D. Great Men of American Popular Song: The History of the American Popular Song told through the Lives, Careers, Achievements, and Personalities of its Foremost Composers and Lyricists--from William Billings of the Revolutionary War through Bob Dylan, Johnny Cash, Burt Bacharach.  1972. Englewood Cliffs, NJ, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall.

Forcucci, S. L. A Folk Song History of America: America through its Songs.  1984. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall

Fox, Aaron A.. “The Jukebox of History: Narratives of Loss and Desire in the Discourse of Country Music”. Popular Music, Vol. 11, No. 1 (Jan,1992): 53-72. JSTOR, Cambridge University Press. Web. 18March, 2011. < http://www.jstor.org/stable/853227 >

Ganchrow, Raviv. “Perspectives on Sound-Space: The Story of Acoustic Defense”. Leonardo Music Journal, Vol. 19, Our Crowd—Four Composers Pick Composers (2009): 71-75. JSTOR. The MIT Press. Web. 29April, 2015. <http://www.jstor.org/stable/40926354>

Hamm, C.  Music in the New World. 1983. New York: W.W. Norton and Company.

Hampton, W. Guerrilla Minstrels.  1986. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Kingman, D.  American Music: A Panorama. 1979. New York: Schirmer books.

Klonsky, M. “Down in The Village: A Discourse on Hip”. New American Review, 13. 1971. New York: Simon and Schuster.

Kostelanetz, Richard. “Text-Sound Art: A Survey (Concluded)”. Performing Arts Journal, Vol. 2, No. 3 (Winter, 1978): 71-84. JSTOR. Performing Arts Journal, Inc. Web. 16 August,2016. <http://www.jstor.org/stable/3245364 >

 

Kramer, Lawrence. “Music, Metaphor and Metaphysics”.  The Musical Times, Vol. 145, No. 1888 (Autumn, 2004): 5-18. JSTOR.  Musical Times Publications Ltd. Web. 26 March,2011. < http://www.jstor.org/stable/4149109>

Kun, Josh D. “The Aural Border”. Theatre Journal, Vol. 52, No. 1, Latino Performance (March. 2000): 1-21. The John Hopkins University Press. Web. 18March, 2011. < http://www.jstor.org/stable/25068738 >

Poulin, A. The American Folk Scene: Dimensions of the Folksong Revival.  1967. New York: Dell Pub. Co.

Qureshi, Regula Burckhardt. “Music Anthropologies and Music Histories: A Preface and an Agenda”. Journal of the American Musicology Society, Vol. 48, No. 3 (Autumn 1995): 331-342. JSTOR. University of California Press. Web. 18March, 2011. < http://www.jstor.org/stable/3519830 >

 

Račić, Ladislav. “On the Aesthetics of Rock Music”. International Review of the Aesthetics and Sociology of Music, Vol. 12, No. 2 (Dec.1981): 199-202. JSTOR. Croatian Musicological Society. Web. 1Dec., 2017. < http://www.jstor.org/stable/836562>

Ricks, C.  The Force of Poetry. 1995. Oxford University Press.

Rodnitzky, J. L.  Minstrels of the Dawn: The Folk-Protest Singer as a Cultural Hero. 1976. Chicago: Nelson-Hall.

Tagg, Philip. “Analyzing popular music: theory, method and practice.” Popular Music 1 (1979): 68-70. Web.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment: (20 marks).

Choose a song that has been an effective anthem for a cause or genre and analyse it in about 500-750 words.  

CIA II: (Mid Sem 50 marks) Choose a pivotal figure from Rock history and trace their career and impact on society. Consider image and sound in the construction of this image.

CIA III:(20marks) The class in groups of 5-6 will anthologise a series of songs, artists and their work.

 

Archiving:

End Semester:

 Identify a Bangalore based band or genre of popular music with approval of your course instructor . Conduct a study of their work and evolution and impact on the city and vice versa. Use data beyond library sources and provide due evidence. Your archive entry must include a 750-1000word reflective essay that validates your choice of artist, understanding of the form and significance of the work. You must also identify, interview and record these interactions. Provide clips from concerts duly cited. Include memorabilia like tickets, album art, newspaper or magazine clips  

 

EST146 - FOOD AND LITERATURE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

 

This course offers an interdisciplinary exploration of the connections between food and literature, focusing on how food has been represented in literary works from different cultures and time periods. In addition, the course will provide an overview of the history and evolution of food culture, as well as the politics and economics of food production and consumption. By examining culinary themes in literary works, students will gain a deeper understanding of how food functions as a powerful symbol and narrative device in literature, reflecting social, cultural, and historical contexts. This course provides an opportunity for students to explore the rich connections between food and literature, fostering critical thinking, cultural awareness, and personal reflection.

 

 

 

 

 

Course Objectives

 

 

 

1.     To enhance the ability to identify and interpret the symbolic, metaphorical, and cultural significance of food within literary works.

 

2.     To help explore how food reflects and shapes social, historical, and cultural aspects of different societies and communities, shaping individual and collective identities and reflect social hierarchies and inequalities.

 

3.     To develop the ability to craft vivid and evocative descriptions by learning techniques for using sensory details, imagery, and figurative language to bring culinary experiences to life in their own writing.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will develop a deeper understanding of the cultural context of food and its representation in literature and its portrayal journalistic genres.

CO2: Students will be able to appreciate the influence of food on individual and collective identities.

CO3: They will understand how food can reinforce or challenge social hierarchies and inequalities.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:3
Unit I- Introduction to Food and Literature
 

Definition and scope; cultural, historical, and social significance of food; overview of how literature incorporates culinary themes

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Short Stories
 

Anton Chekhov: "Gooseberries"

 

Margaret Atwood: "Bread"

 

Borden Deal: “The Taste of Watermelon"

 

Mona Gardner: "The Dinner Party"

 

Shobha Narayan: “First Foods”Excerpt from Monsoon Diary: A Memoir with Recipes

 

 

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Poetry
 

Li-Young Lee: "Eating Together"

 

Gwendolyn Brooks: "Kitchenette Building"

 

Seamus Heaney: "At a Potato Digging "

 

Risa Potters: "In My Mother’s Things"

 

Choman Hardi: “My Mother’s Kitchen”

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Essays
 

Ligaya Mishan: What We Write About When We Write About Food (NY Times, 2022)

 

Roland Barthes: Wine and Milk

 

Jackie Varriano: “How Female Food writers penned their way out of the home kitchen” 

 

Nimisha Sinha: “Delicious Fictions: Reading Food in Literature”

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

§  Chekhov, Anton. Gooseberries. United Kingdom, Penguin Books Limited, 2015.

 

§  Atwood, Margaret. “Bread.Women on War: An International Anthology of Women's Writings from Antiquity to the Present. United States, Feminist Press at the City University of New York, 2003.

 

§  Deal, Bordan “The Taste of Watermelon”. 1979

 

§  Gardner, Mona. “The Dinner Party.” The Saturday Review of Literature. 1941.

 

§  Narayan, Shoba. Monsoon Diar:  A Memoir with Recipes. India, Penguin Group, 2004.

 

§  Lee, Young- Li. “Eating Together” Poetry Foundation.< https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/43015/eating-together-56d221af2bf26> Accessed on 22 July 2023.

 

§  Brooks, Gwendolyn. “kitchenette building” Poetry Foundation. < https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/43308/kitchenette-building> Accessed on 22 July 2023.

 

§  Heaney, Seamus. “At a Potato Digging” < https://genius.com/Seamus-heaney-at-a-potato-digging-annotated> Accessed on 22 July 2023.

 

§  Potters, Risa. “In My Mother’s Things”Rattle. https://www.rattle.com/in-my-mothers-things-by-risa-potters/ Accessed on 22 July 2023.

 

§  Hardi, Choman. “My Mother’s Kitchen” Poetry Archive. < https://poetryarchive.org/poem/my-mothers-kitchen/> Accessed on 22 July 2023.

 

§  Mishan, Ligaya. “What We Write About When We Write About Food” The new York Time Style Magazine. 18 February 2022. < https://www.nytimes.com/2022/02/18/t-magazine/food-writing-journalism-criticism.html> Accessed on 22 July 2023.

 

§  Varriano, Jackie. “How Female Food writers penned their way out of the home kitchen”  02 March 2022. < https://www.seattletimes.com/life/food-drink/how-women-food-writers-penned-their-way-out-of-the-home-kitchen/ > Accessed on 22 July 2023.

 

§  Barthes, Roland. “Wine and Milk.”Mythologies: The Complete Edition, in a New Translation. United States, Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2013.

 

§  Sinha, Nimisha.Delicious Fictions: Reading Food in Literature.” Caffe Dissensus. 28 January 2020. < https://cafedissensus.com/2020/01/28/delicious-fictions-reading-food-in-literature/> Accessed on 22 July 2023

 

§  Shahani, Gitanjali G. Food and Literature. United States, Cambridge University Press, 2018.

 

§  Fitzpatrick, Joan. 2012a. "Food and Literature: An Overview." The Routlege International Handbook of Food Studies. Edited by Ken Albala. Routledge International Handbooks. London. Routledge. pp. 122-34

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

§  Gilbert, Sandra M.. The Culinary Imagination: From Myth to Modernity. United States, W. W. Norton, 2014.

 

§  Hosking, Richard. Food and Language: Proceedings of the Oxford Symposium of Food and Cookery 2009. United Kingdom, Prospect Books, 2010.

 

§  Waxman, Barbara Frey. “Food Memoirs: What They Are, Why They Are Popular, and Why They Belong in the Literature Classroom.” College English, Vol. 70, No. 4, Special Focus: Food (Mar., 2008): 363-383

 

§  Ferrier, Peyton. “Food in Popular Literature.” Choices, Vol. 29, No. 1 (1st Quarter 2014): 1-6

 

§  Jones, Michael Owen . “Food Choice, Symbolism, and Identity: Bread-and-Butter Issues for Folkloristics and Nutrition Studies (American Folklore Society Presidential Address, October 2005)” The Journal of American Folklore, Vol. 120, No. 476 (Spring, 2007), pp. 129-177

 

§  Daly. Suzanne, and Ross G. Forman. “Introduction: Cooking Culture: Situating Food and Drink in the Nineteenth Century.” Victorian Literature and Culture, Vol. 36, No. 2 (2008), pp. 363-373

 

§  Holtzman, Jon D. “Food and Memory.” Annual Review of Anthropology, Vol. 35 (2006), pp. 361-378

 

§  Tigner, Amy L., and Carruth, Allison. Literature and Food Studies. United Kingdom, Taylor & Francis, 2017.

 

§  Fisher, Mary Frances Kennedy. The Gastronomical Me. United States, World Publishing Company, 1948.

 

§  "Feast and Famine: Food Imagery and Class Identity in Victorian Literature" by Debra L. Gimlin (Victorian Literature and Culture)

 

§  Albala, Ken. Routledge International Handbook of Food Studies. United States, Taylor & Francis, 2013.The Routledge Companion to Literature and Food. United States, Taylor & Francis, 2018.

 

§  Counihan, Carole, and Penny Van Esterik. Food and Culture: A Reader. New York: Routledge, 2013. Print.

 

§  Humble, Nicola. The Literature of Food: An Introduction from 1830 to Present. India, Bloomsbury Publishing.

 

§  J. Michelle Coghlan. The Cambridge Companion to Literature and Food. India, Cambridge University Press, 2020.

 

§  Fitzpatrick, Joan, and Boyce, Charlotte. A History of Food in Literature: From the Fourteenth Century to the Present. United Kingdom, Taylor & Francis, 2017.