CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL

School of Business and Management

Syllabus for
Bachelor of Technology (Civil Engineering)
Academic Year  (2023)

 
3 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BS351 ENGINEERING BIOLOGY LABORATORY Core Courses 2 2 50
CE332 DISASTER PREPARDNRSS AND PLANNING Core Courses 2 2 50
CE333P INTRODUCTION TO SOLID MECHANICS Core Courses 4 4 100
CE334P SURVEYING AND GEOMATICS Core Courses 5 4 100
CE335 INTRODUCTION TO FLUID MECHANICS Core Courses 4 3 100
CE351 COMPUTER AIDED CIVIL ENGINEERING DRAWING Core Courses 4 2 50
CEHO331CP FORMWORK ENGINEERING Minors and Honours 4 4 100
EVS321 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE Core Courses 2 0 0
MA331 MATHEMATICS - III Core Courses 3 3 100
VCE311 APPLICATION OF MATLAB IN STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS BASICS - 2 2 50
4 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
CE431P HYDRAULIC ENGINEERING Core Courses 5 4 100
CE432 MECHANICS OF MATERIALS Core Courses 4 4 100
CE433P CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS AND CONCRETE TECHNOLOGY Core Courses 5 4 100
CE434P INSTRUMENTATION AND SENSOR TECHNOLOGIES FOR CIVIL ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS Core Courses 5 3 100
CEHO431CP DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF PILE FOUNDATIONS Minors and Honours 4 4 100
CY421 CYBER SECURITY Skill Enhancement Courses 2 0 0
HS423 PROFESSIONAL ETHICS Core Courses 2 2 50
MICSAI432 DATA STRUCTURES AND ALGORITHMS Minors and Honours 5 4 100
5 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
CE531 STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING Core Courses 4 4 100
CE532P GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING Core Courses 5 4 100
CE533 HYDROLOGY AND WATER RESOURCES ENGINEERING Core Courses 3 3 100
CE541E06 STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS I Discipline Specific Elective Courses 3 3 100
CH536OE1 ELECTRONIC MATERIALS AND ITS FABRICATION Interdisciplinary Elective Courses 3 3 50
HS523 CONSTRUCTION PROJECT MANAGEMENT Core Courses 4 3 100
IC521 INDIAN CONSTITUTION Skill Enhancement Courses 2 0 50
MA536OE6 APPLIED STATISTICS Interdisciplinary Elective Courses 3 2 50
6 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BTGE631 CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY Generic Elective Courses 2 2 100
BTGE632 DIGITAL MEDIA Generic Elective Courses 2 2 100
BTGE633 FUNCTIONAL ENGLISH Generic Elective Courses 2 2 100
BTGE634 GERMAN Generic Elective Courses 2 2 100
BTGE635 INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS Generic Elective Courses 2 2 100
BTGE636 INTRODUCTION TO AVIATION Generic Elective Courses 2 2 100
BTGE637 PROFESSIONAL PSYCHOLOGY Generic Elective Courses 2 2 100
BTGE651 DATA ANALYTICS THROUGH SPSS Generic Elective Courses 2 2 100
BTGE652 DIGITAL MARKETING Generic Elective Courses 2 2 100
BTGE653 DIGITAL WRITING Generic Elective Courses 2 2 100
BTGE654 PHOTOGRAPHY Generic Elective Courses 2 2 100
BTGE655 ACTING COURSE Generic Elective Courses 2 2 100
BTGE656 CREATIVITY AND INNOVATION Generic Elective Courses 2 2 100
BTGE657 PAINTING AND SKETCHING Generic Elective Courses 2 2 100
BTGE658 DESIGN THINKING Generic Elective Courses 2 2 100
CE631P ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING Core Courses 5 4 100
CE632P HIGHWAY ENGINEERING Core Courses 5 4 100
CE641E07 FOUNDATION ENGINEERING Discipline Specific Elective Courses 3 3 100
CE642E01 CONSTRUCTION COST ANALYSIS Discipline Specific Elective Courses 3 3 100
CE651 EXTENSIVE SURVEY PROJECT Core Courses 2 2 50
CE652 SERVICE LEARNING Core Courses 2 2 50
7 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
CE731 QUANTITY SURVEYING AND COST ESTIMATION Core Courses 3 3 100
CE741E06 PRESTRESSED CONCRETE Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 3 100
CE742E07 DESIGN OF STEEL STRUCTURES Discipline Specific Elective Courses 3 3 100
CE781 INTERNSHIP Core Courses 4 2 50
CE782 FIELD PRACTICE Core Courses 2 1 50
CE783 Project Work I Core Courses 4 2 100
CSOE763E04 BASICS OF MOBILE APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT Generic Elective Courses 3 3 100
ECOE7601 AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRONICS Generic Elective Courses 3 3 100
EEOE731 BATTERY MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS FOR ELECTRICAL VEHICLES Generic Elective Courses 3 3 100
8 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
CE841E02 SUSTAINABLE AND GREEN TECHNOLOGY Discipline Specific Elective Courses 3 3 100
CE841E05 OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH Discipline Specific Elective Courses 3 3 100
CE881 SEMINAR Core Courses 2 1 50
CE882 Project Work Phase II Core Courses 20 10 300
    

Introduction to Program:

ASSESSMENT OF ENGINEERING GRAPHICS AND COMPUTER AIDED MACHINE DRAWING

·         Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA): 50% (50 marks out of 100 marks)

·         End Semester Examination (E2SE)         : 50% (50 marks out of 100 marks) 

 Components of the CIA

 CIA I   :  Assignments                                   : 10 marks

 CIA II  :  Mid Semester Examination             : 25 marks                  

 CIA III: Assignments                                     : 10 marks

 Attendance                                                     : 05 marks

             Total                                                               : 50 marks

 End Semester Examination

3 hrs duration for 100 marks

 1. ENGINEERING GRAPHICS

 Projections of points, lines and plane surfaces –Manual Drawing               : 30 marks

  • Projections of Solids                                       - Computer Aided                 : 40 marks
  • Development of surfaces and Isometric Projections - Computer Aided       : 30 marks
Examination And Assesments

DETAILS OF ASSESSMENT

 Following are the details of assessment pattern - BTech course AY 2022-23 

 

  ·         Minimum marks required to pass in practical component is 40%.

 ·         Pass in practical component is eligibility criteria to attend Theory End semester examination for the same course.

 ·         A minimum of 40 % required to pass in ESE -Theory component of a course.

 ·         Overall, 40 % aggregate marks in Theory and practical component, is required to pass a course.

 ·         There are no minimum pass marks for the Theory - CIA component.

 ·         Less than 40% in practical component is refereed as FAIL

 ·         Less than 40% in Theory ESE is declared as fail in the theory component.

 ·         Students who filed in theory ESE have to attend only theory ESE to pass in the course.

 

BS351 - ENGINEERING BIOLOGY LABORATORY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Understanding and application of MATLAB and TINKERCAD for biological analysis which would results in better healthcare and any engineer, irrespective of the parent discipline (mechanical, electrical, civil, computer, electronics, etc.,) can use the disciplinary skills toward designing/improving biological systems. This course is designed to convey the essentials of human physiology.

 

The course will introduce to the students the various fundamental concepts in MATLAB and TINKERCAD for numerical analysis and circuit design using arduino.

 

 

 

Course Outcome

CO1Perform basic mathematical operation and analysis on biological parameters as BMI, ECG using MATLAB.L4

CO2Perform basic image processing on RGB images pertaining to medical data using MATLABL4

CO3Perform analysis on biological parameters using TinkerCad and design mini projects applicable for healthcare and biosensing.L4

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
LIST OF EXPERIMENTS
 

1.      To familiarize with Matlab Online and getting used to basic functionalities used in Matlab (arrays, matrices, tables, functions)

2.      To calculate the Body Mass Index (BMI) of a person and determine under what category the person falls under – underweight, normal, overweight

3.      To determine the R peaks in given ECG and to find HRV using Matlab.

4.      To determine the R peaks in given ECG and to find HRV using Matlab.

5.      To determine the R peaks in given ECG and to find HRV using Matlab.

6.      Introduction to Tinkercad and using the various tools available for running a simple program of lighting a LED bulb using Arduino (digital).

7.      To design a driver motor in Tinkercad using Arduino and driver motor

8.      To design a temperature sensor in Tinkercad using Arduino and TMP36

9.      To design and simulate gas sensors using potentiometers, Arduino and servo motors

10.  To design and simulate measuring pulse sensors using photodiodes, IR LED and Arduino

11.  Preparation of biopolymers (polylactic acid) at home using home-based ingredients.

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

 

 

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

 

 

 

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

As per university norms

CE332 - DISASTER PREPARDNRSS AND PLANNING (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course objectives:  To understand the scope and relevance of Disaster Management in a changing world and to realize the responsibilities of individuals and institutions in a multidisciplinary setting.

Course Outcome

CO1: Describe the basic concepts and terminologies in disaster management (L2)

CO2: Illustrate hazards and disasters (L3)

CO3: Classify disaster impacts (L4)

CO4: Evaluate Disaster Risk Mitigation and Adaptation

CO5: Compare development practices (L5)

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to Disaster Management
 

Concepts and definitions: disaster, hazard, vulnerability, risk severity, frequency, capacity, impact, prevention and mitigation, Introduction to Disaster Management Cycle.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Classification of Hazards and Disasters
 

Classification system for Hazards and Disasters; Physical dimensions; Magnitude-Frequency Relations; Disaster effects and impacts; Case studies representing different hazard types such as Floods, Drought, Earthquake, Epidemics, Terrorism, Conflicts (indicative list); Role of Multi disciplines in Disaster Management. Concept of vulnerability.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Disaster Impacts
 

Disaster impacts (environmental, physical, social, ecological, economic, political, etc.); health, psycho-social issues; demographic aspects (gender, age, special needs); hazard locations; global and national disaster trends; climate change and urban disasters. Disaster Response Mechanisms. Humanitarian logistics and supply chain management.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Disaster Risk Management
 

Detailing disaster management cycle – its phases; prevention, mitigation, preparedness, relief and recovery; early warning systems, Roles and responsibilities of government, community, local institutions, NGOs and other stakeholders; Policies and legislation for disaster risk reduction, DRR programs in India and the activities of National Disaster Management Authority.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Disasters, Environment and Development
 

Factors affecting vulnerability such as impact of developmental projects and environmental modifications (including of dams, land use changes, urbanization etc.), sustainable and environmental friendly recovery; reconstruction and development methods. GIS applications in  Planning.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1  Paul, B.K, “Environmental Hazards and Disasters: Contexts, Perspectives and Management”, Wiley-Blackwell, 2011. (Unit 1 – Chapter 1; Unit 2 – Chapter 1, 3; Unit 3 – Chapter 4; Unit 4 – Chapter 5 and 6)

T2 Keller, Edward, and Duane DeVecchio. “Natural hazards: earth's processes as hazards, disasters, and catastrophe”s. Pearson Higher Education AU, 2015. (Unit 5 –          Chapters 6 and 7)

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1.Coppola, D, “Introduction to International Disaster Management “Elsevier, 2015.

R2.Fookes, Peter G., E. Mark Lee, and James S. Griffiths. "Engineering geomorphology: theory and practice." Whittles Publications, 2007.

 

Online Resources:

W1. http://www.training.fema.gov/emiweb/edu/ddemtextbook.asp

W2. https://www.weadapt.org/

W3. https://nagt.org/nagt/search_nagt.html?search_text=hazards&search=Go

W4. https://www.unisdr.org/

W5. https://emdat.be/

W6. http://bhuvan.nrsc.gov.in/bhuvan_links.php

W7. https://www.usgs.gov/

Evaluation Pattern

CIA (Continuus Internal Assessment) -50 

ESE (End Semester Exam) - 50

 

CIA 3 would consider critical thinking approach case studies

 

 

CE333P - INTRODUCTION TO SOLID MECHANICS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course objectives:  The objective of this course is to introduce to continuum mechanics and material modeling of engineering materials based on first energy principles: deformation and strain; momentum balance, stress, and stress states; elasticity and elasticity bounds; plasticity and yield design.

Course Outcome

CO1: CO1: Compute stresses and strain in axial members (L3) (PO1) (PO2)

CO2: CO2: Compute bending moment and shear force in beams (L3) (PO1, PO2)

CO3: CO3: Compute stresses in beams under symmetrical loading (L3) (PO1, PO2)

CO4: CO4: Compute deflection in beams under symmetrical loading (L3) (PO1, PO2)

CO5: CO5: Analyze torsion in hollow and solid circular shafts. (L3) (PO1)

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Simple Stresses and Strains
 

Concept of stress and strain, St. Venant’s principle, stress and strain diagram, Elasticity, and plasticity – Types of stresses and strains, Hooke’s law – stress–strain diagram for mild steel – Working stress – Factor of safety – Lateral strain, Poisson’s ratio, and volumetric strain – Elastic moduli and the relationship between them – Bars of varying section –composite bars – Temperature stresses.

Compound Stresses and Strains Two-dimensional system, stress at a point on a plane, principal stresses, and principal planes, Mohr circle of stress, the ellipse of stress, and their applications. Two-dimensional stress-strain system, principal strains and principal axis of strain, circle of strain, and ellipse of strain. Relationship between elastic constants.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Bending Moment and Shear Force Diagrams
 

Simply Supported and Cantilever beams: Differential relationship between Load, Shear force and bending moment, Bending Moment and Shear Force Diagrams, Determination of Maximum bending moment and shear force for a given loading (uniformly distributed load, Gradually Varying load and concentrated loads).

Numerical problems to be solved analytically and using commercially available software.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Flexural Stresses-Theory of Sime Bending
 

Flexural Stresses-Theory of simple bending – Assumptions – Derivation of the bending equation: M/I = f/y = E/R - Neutral axis – Determination of bending stresses – Section modulus of rectangular and circular sections (Solid and Hollow), I,T, Angle and Channel sections – Design of simple beam sections.

 Shear Stresses- Derivation of formula – Shear stress distribution across various beam sections like rectangular, circular, triangular, I, T angle sections.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Slope and Deflection in statically determinate structures
 

Slope and deflection- Relationship between moment, slope and deflection. Double integration method

Macaulay’s method: Concepts and Application of this method to determine slope and deflection in beams.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Torsion
 

Derivation of torsion equation and its assumptions. Applications of the equation of the hollow and solid circular shafts, torsional rigidity, Combined torsion and bending of circular shafts, principal stress, and maximum shear stresses under combined loading of bending and torsion. Analysis of close-coiled-helical springs

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:15
PRACTICALS
 

MATERIALS TESTING LABORATORY: LIST OF EXPERIMENTS

1. Tension test on Mild steel and HYSD bars.

2. Compression test of Mild Steel, Cast iron and Wood.

3. Torsion test on Mild Steel circular sections.

4. Bending Test on Wood Under two point loading.

5. Shear Test on Mild steel.

6. Impact test on Mild Steel (Charpy and Izod).

7. Hardness tests on ferrous and non-ferrous metals – Brinell’s, Rockwell and Vicker’s.

8. Determination of Poisson’s Ratio and Bulk Modulus

9. Demonstration of Strain gauges and Strain indicators.

NOTE: All tests to be carried out as per relevant BIS Codes

Text Books And Reference Books:

Textbooks:

T1   Timoshenko, S. and Young, D. H., “Elements of Strength of Materials”,5th ed DVNC, New York, USA, 2003

T2   Kazmi, S. M. A., “Solid Mechanics” TMH, Delhi, India, 2017

T3   Hibbeler, R. C. Mechanics of Materials. 6th ed. East Rutherford, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall,2004

R. Subramanian, Strength of Materials , Oxford University Press, New Delhi, 2016

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reference Books:

R1.Crandall, S. H., N. C. Dahl, and T. J. Lardner. An Introduction to the Mechanics of Solids.2nd ed. New York, NY: McGraw Hill, 1979

R2.Laboratory Manual of Testing Materials - William Kendrick Hall, 2006

Mechanics of Materials - Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russel Jhonston Jr., John T. DEwolf – TMH 2002.

Evaluation Pattern

DETAILS OF ASSESSMENT

Following are the details of the modifications proposed for assessment pattern - BTech course AY 2021-22

 

Category

Weightage for CIA

Weightage for ESE

1

Courses with theory and practical

70

30

2

Courses with only theory

50

50

3

Courses with only Practical

50

50

 

COURSES WITH THEORY AND PRACTICAL

 

Component

Assessed for

Minimum marks

 to pass

Maximum

marks

1

Theory CIA

30

-

30

2

Theory ESE

30

12

30

3

Practical CIA

35

14

35

4

Attendance

05

-

05

4

Aggregate

100

40

100

 

DETAIL OF MARK FOR COURSES WITH THOERY AND PRACTICAL

THEORY

PRACTICAL

 

Component

Assessed for

Scaled down to

Minimum marks to pass

Maximum marks

Component

Assessed for

Scaled down to

Minimum marks to pass

Maximum marks

 

1

CIA-1

20

10

-

10

Overall CIA

50

35

14

35

 

2

CIA-2

50

10

-

10

 

3

CIA-3

20

10

-

10

 

4

Attendance

05

05

-

05

Attendance

NA

NA

-

-

 

5

ESE

100

30

12

30

ESE

NA

NA

-

-

 

 

 

TOTAL

65

-

65

TOTAL

 

35

14

35

 

                               

 

·         Minimum marks required to pass in practical component is 40%.

·         Pass in practical component is eligibility criteria to attend Theory End semester examination for the same course.

·         A minimum of 40 % required to pass in ESE -Theory component of a course.

·         Overall, 40 % aggregate marks in Theory and practical component, is required to pass a course.

·         There are no minimum pass marks for the Theory - CIA component.

·         Less than 40% in practical component is refereed as FAIL

·         Less than 40% in Theory ESE is declared as fail in the theory component.

·         Students who failed in theory ESE have to attend only theory ESE to pass in the course.

CE334P - SURVEYING AND GEOMATICS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

In this course, the students will be taught to use the various conventional and modern survey instruments and analyze the data collected  from survey equipment. They will also be introduced to advanced surveying and mapping techniques like Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing, GIS, and GPS.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the concepts of conventional survey methods and principles. { L3}{PO1, PO5, PO9, PO10}{PSO3}

CO2: Classify the modern survey instruments and operate Total Station for surveying and levelling { L5}{ PO1, PO5, PO9, PO10}{PSO3}

CO3: Analyze the Drone images using photogrammetric concepts {L5}{ PO1, PO5, PO9, PO10}{PSO3}

CO4: Analyze the passive remote sensing images visually and digitally {L5}{ PO1, PO5, PO9, PO10}{PSO3}

CO5: Perform overlay analysis using GIS concepts to prepare thematic maps {L5, L5}{ PO1, PO5, PO9, PO10}{PSO3}

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to Surveying
 

Basics of Surveying: Basics of Surveying: Introduction to Surveying, importance of surveying in civil engineering, Objective of Surveying, Principles of surveying, Classification of surveying, Introduction to Chain, Compass, Plane Table, Theodolite surveying , Levelling: Trigonometric and Spirit Levelling, Principles of levelling-profile levelling, contouring: Characteristics, methods, uses; Areas and volumes,

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Modern methods of field measurements
 

 

Total Station Surveying and GPS Surveying: Working principle of Total Station, Advantages and Applications, corrections in total station data, Surveying with Total Station, Field Procedure for total station survey, Errors in Total Station Survey; Global Positioning Systems- Segments, GPS measurements, errors and biases, surveying with hand held GPS, Projection systems and coordinate transformation

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Unit-3 Photogrammetry
 

Elementary Photogrammetry: Photogrammetry Surveying : Introduction, Types of Photogrammetry, Basic concepts, perspective geometry of aerial photograph, relief and tilt displacements, flight planning; Stereoscopy: Determination of ground coordinates with parallax measurements.

Digital Photogrammetry: Aero Triangulation, Bundle block adjustment, Ortho Mosaic generation, Drone Based Surveying for large scale stereoscopic Mapping, processing of Drone based data in open ware software’s. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Remote Sensing
 

Basics of Remote Sensing: Introduction–Electromagnetic Spectrum, interaction of electromagnetic radiation with the atmosphere (types of scattering and its effect on remote sensing images) and earth surface features, Typical reflectance curves of Water, Soil and Vegetation, remote sensing data acquisition: platforms and sensors; IRS satellite Constellation,

Processing of Satellite Images: visual image interpretation keys, digital image: pre- and post-processing, classification techniques (Supervised, unsupervised and hybrid techniques), accuracy assessment of classified data

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
 

Fundamentals of GIS:Definitions: components of a GIS The four M’s concept – Domain expertise for GIS, GIS objectives –– Topology – Data structures –Database management –Errors in GIS Vector and Raster Data Analysis Techniques: Vector data models, Raster Data Models, GIS modelling, Spatial data analysis techniques, Integration of GPS, Drone and Remote Sensing Data in GIS environment, Introduction to GIS software packages  and thematic Map generation.

Fundamentals of GIS: Definitions: components of a GIS The four M’s concept – Domain expertise for GIS, GIS objectives –– Topology – Data structures –Database management –Errors in GIS Vector and Raster Data Analysis Techniques: Vector data models, Raster Data Models, GIS modelling, Spatial data analysis techniques, Integration of GPS, drone and Remote Sensing Data in GIS environment, GIS software packages (openware and commercial) thematic Map Generation.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Textbooks:

T1    B.C. Punmia., Surveying, Vol-1& II, 16th edition, New Delhi,Laxmi Publications, 2018. (UNIT 1)

T2    M. A. Reddy, Text Book of Remote Sensing and Geographical Information Systems, 4thEdition, Hyderabad, BS Publications, 2013. (UNIT 4 and  UNIT 5)

T3    B.C. Punmia, “Advanced Surveying”, Laxmi Publications, New Delhi, 2018 (UNIT 2, 3, 4)

T4    Remote Sensing and Image Interpretation – Lillesand , John Wiley and Sons, 2014 (UNIT 4)

T5    Reddy. M. A, “Text Book of Remote Sensing and Geographical Information Systems”, BS Publications, Hyderabad, Fourth Edition, 2013. (UNIT 4 and UNIT 5)

P.R Wolf & B.A. Dewitt Elementary Photogrammetry, 4th  edition, TMH publishing, 2014 (UNIT 3)

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reference Books:

R1. S. Kumar, Basics of Remote Sensing sand GIS, New Delhi, Laxmi Publications, 2016. (UNIT 4 AND UNIT 5)

R2. T.P Kanitkar & S.V Kulkarni, Surveying Levelling, Part I & II, Pune, Vidhyarthi Gruha Prakashana, 2006. (UNIT 1)

R3. Alak De, Plane Surveying, 1St edition, New Delhi, S. Chand and Company Ltd, 2000.

R4. Arora S.K, Surveying, Vol-I & II, Standard Book House, Delhi, 2010. (UNIT 1 and UNIT 2)

R5. Arther Bannister, Dr Stanley Raymond & Dr.Raymond Baker, Surveying, India, Pearson Education, 1998. (UNIT 1)

R6. N.Basak, Surveying, India, Tata McGraw-Hill Education Pvt. Ltd, 2001. (UNIT 1)

R7. A.M.Chandra, Plane surveying, 3rd edition, New Delhi, New Age International Ltd, 2015. (UNIT 1)

R8. S.K.Ro., Fundamentals of Surveying, 2nd Edition, India, Prentice Hall of India, 2011.

R9. C.Venkataramiah, “Textbook of Surveying”, 2nd edition, New Delhi, Orient Blackswan, 2011. (UNIT 1  and UNIT 2)

Online Resources:

W1. http://www.gisresources.com/

W2. https://onlinecourses.nptel.ac.in/noc17_ce09

W3. https://nptel.ac.in/courses/105107122/1

W4. www.surveyofindia.gov.in/ 

 
Evaluation Pattern

Category

PCC

CIA Marks ( Continuous assessement of Theory and practicals with three components)

70

ESE Marks

30

Exam Hours

3

CE335 - INTRODUCTION TO FLUID MECHANICS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

1.      COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

              The subject is a core course for 3rd semester B.Tech. students. The syllabus covers Hydrostatics, Kinematics and Dynamics of fluid flow and, its measurements.

       COURSE OBJECTIVES

To understand the importance of fluid mechanics in civil Engineering by knowing the properties of fluids and their engineering behaviour in terms of Fluid Statics, Kinematics and Dynamics.

Course Outcome

CO-1: Classify the types of fluids based on Newton?s law of viscosity.

CO-2: Apply the Pascal?s law and hydrostatic law to determine the pressure in a fluid flow.

CO-3: Analyse types of fluid flow.

CO-4: Apply Continuity equation, Euler?s Equation and Bernoulli?s Equation to analyse pipe flow for various losses.

CO-5: Establish relationship between model and prototype using the concepts of dimensional analysis and model laws in fluid flow.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Introduction to fluid mechanics and basic properties of fluids
 

The distinction between a fluid and a solid; Density, Specific weight, Specific gravity, Kinematic and dynamic viscosity; variation of viscosity with temperature, Newton law of viscosity; vapour pressure, boiling point, cavitation; surface tension, capillarity, Bulk modulus of elasticity, compressibility.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Hydrostatics
 

Fluid Pressure: The pressure at a point, Pascal's law, pressure variation with temperature, density and altitude. Piezometer, U-Tube Manometer, Single Column Manometer, U-Tube Differential Manometer, Micromanometers. pressure gauges, Hydrostatic pressure and force: horizontal, vertical and inclined surfaces.  Buoyancy and stability of floating bodies.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Fluid Kinematics
 

Classification of fluid flow: steady and unsteady flow; uniform and non-uniform flow; laminar and turbulent flow; rotational and  irrotational flow; compressible and incompressible flow; ideal and real fluid flow; one, two and three dimensional flows; Stream line, path line, streak line and stream tube; stream function, velocity potential function.  One-, two- and three -dimensional continuity equations in Cartesian coordinates.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Fluid Dynamics
 

Surface and body forces; Equations of motion - Euler’s equation; Bernoulli’s equation – derivation; Energy Principle; Practical applications of Bernoulli’s equation: venturimeter, orifice meter and pitot tube; Momentum principle; Forces exerted by fluid flow on pipe bend; Vortex Flow – Free and Forced.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:13
Dimensional Analysis and Dynamic Similitude
 

Definitions of Reynolds Number, Froude Number, Mach Number, Weber Number and Euler Number; Buckingham’s π-Theorem. Model Analysis 

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

  1. P.N. Modi and S.M. Seth, Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulics, New Delhi, Standard Book House.21st edition, 2017. (Unit 1, 3, 5)

  2. R. K. Bansal, Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machines, New Delhi, Lakshmi Publications Revised Ninth Edition, 2018. (Unit 1, 2, 4)

  3. A.K. Jain, Fluid Mechanics, New Delhi, Khanna Publishers. 2016 edition. (Unit 1, 2)

  4. Cengel. Y. A and Cimbala. J. M, “Fluid Mechanics – Fundamentals and Applications”, Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi, Second Edition, 2011

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

  1. Frank,.M White, Fluid Mechanics in SI Units, Mcgraw Higher Ed, 8th Edition, 2016

  2. P. K. Kundu. P. K, Cohen. I. M and Dowling. D. R, “Fluid Mechanics”, Elsevier, New Delhi, Fifth Edition, 2012.

  3. Arora K.R., “Fluid Mechanics, Hydraulic and Hydraulics”, 2018, Standard Book House, New Delhi

  4. John F. Douglas et al., “Fluid Mechanics”, 1996, Pearson Education, India.

  5. Mohanty., “Fluid Mechanics”, 2008, PHI learning Private Limited

  6. Rao B. C. S., “Fluid Mechanics and Machinery”, 2016, Tata McGraw-Hill Education Pvt. Ltd

  7. Rathakrishnan., “Fluid Mechanics: An Introduction”, 2014, PHI learning Private Limited 

  8. Som S.K., “Introduction to Fluid Mechanics and Fluid Machines”, 2012, Tata McGraw-Hill Education Pvt. Ltd

  9. Subramanya. K., “1000 Solved Problems in Fluid Mechanics: Includes Hydraulic Machines”, 2016, Tata McGraw-Hill Education Pvt. Ltd

 

Online Resources:

W1. https://onlinecourses.nptel.ac.in/noc17_me04/preview

Evaluation Pattern

EVALUATION COMPONENT

MODULE

DURATION (Mins)

NATURE OF COMPONENT

WEIGHTAGE OF MODULE

VALIDATION

CIA I

Unit 1 & 2

 

 

Periodical Quizzes & Google drive Activities of smaller weightages adding upto 30%

Assignment (70%)

Assignment – 100%

Assignment and Test

CIA II

Unit 1, 2 & 3

120

Online Exam (Closed Book/Open Book)

Unit 1 and 2 - 50%

Unit 3 - 50%

Written Test

CIA III

Unit 4 & 5

 

Periodical Quizzes & Google drive Activities of smaller weightages adding upto 30%

Assignment (70%)

Unit 4 - 50%

Unit 5 - 50%

Written Test/Assignment

SEMESTER EXAM

All Units

120 Min

CLOSED BOOK/Open Book/ Viva Voce

Equal Weights  

Written Test/Viva Voce

CE351 - COMPUTER AIDED CIVIL ENGINEERING DRAWING (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The objective of this course aims at enabling the students to prepare Working drawing of Building Components and Building Drawing and Line diagram.

Course Outcome

CO1 : Draw working drawings of masonry and RCC Wall footing, panelled doors, windows and RCC staircase using AUTOCADD [L3] (PO1, PO2)

CO2 : Develop and draw plan, elevation and section for residential buildings using AUTOCADD [L3, L6] (PO1, PO2, PO8)

CO3: Draw water supply, sanitary and electrical layout in a line diagram using AUTOCADD [L2, L3] (PO1, PO2, PO8)

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to Formal Drawing
 

Basics of AutoCad, Symbols and sign conventions, Coordinate systems, Understanding Civil Engineering Drawings, Functional aspect of residential, institutional and commercial buildings and byelaws

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Preparing Working Drawing
 

Prepare working drawing of component of buildings i) Stepped wall footing and isolated RCC column footing, ii) Fully panelled and flush doors, iii) Half panelled and half-glazed window, iv) RCC staircase

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Building Drawing
 

Development of plan, elevation, section and schedule of openings from the given line diagram of residential buildings, i) Two-bedroom building, ii) Two storeyed building.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Single Line Diagram Drawing
 

For a given single line diagram, preparation of water supply, sanitary and electrical layouts.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
BIM
 

Fundamentals of Building Information Modelling (BIM).

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1 Subhash C Sharma & Gurucharan Singh (2005), “Civil Engineering Drawing”, Standard Publishers.


T2 Ajeet Singh (2002), “Working with AUTOCAD 2000 with updates on AUTOCAD 200I”, Tata- Mc Graw-Hill Company Limited, New Delhi.

T3 Venugopal (2007), “Engineering Drawing and Graphics + AUTOCAD”, New Age International Pvt. Ltd.,

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Balagopal and Prabhu (1987), “Building Drawing and Detailing”, Spades publishing KDR building, Calicut.


R2. Malik R.S., Meo, G.S. (2009) Civil Engineering Drawing, Computech Publication Ltd New Asian.


R3. Sikka, V.B. (2013), A Course in Civil Engineering Drawing, S.K.Kataria& Sons,

Evaluation Pattern

CIA marks : 25

ESE marks : 25

Exam hour : 2

CEHO331CP - FORMWORK ENGINEERING (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course will present the basics of formwork, selection criteria of formwork, its techniques, the industry requirements for design, decision making and the applications of formwork for RCC structures

Course Outcome

CO-1: Understand the basic concepts and types of formworks [L2]

CO-2: Design formworks for slab [L6]

CO-3: Appraise formwork BOQ for a given project [L4]

CO-4: Understand the importance of Modular formwork [L2]

CO-5: Understand the formwork assembly various structures [L2]

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Introduction
 

Introduction to Formwork, why form work is an Engineer's Job? Importance and examples of Formwork Classification, Objectives & Benefits Selection Criteria Working mechanism, Material Selection, Timber, shuttering plywood, steel, aluminum, plastic in formwork with examples, Accessories and its Applications, Formwork and its types, Formwork for foundation, wall, column, slab & beam, Conventional and System formwork. Vertical Applications of Conventional Foundation Formwork, Formwork Foundation System, Wall/Column formwork– Conventional-Components, Assembly & Deshuttering, Introduction to Modular Formwork, System Formwork, Flex System- Components, Assembly, Deshuttering & Drawings, Heavy Duty Tower System- Components, Assembly, Deshuttering, Formwork for Stairs, Load Bearing Towers

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Formwork Planning and Design
 

Formwork Planning and Monitoring, Configuration, Scope, Strategy & Costing of Formwork, Logistics of Formwork, Strategy & Productivity and improvement measures

Basics of Formwork Design, Design Loads and Design Methods, Pressures on Concrete, Basic Assumptions in design, Formwork Design concepts, Basics of Slab Design Basic Design concept of Vertical formwork and methods in design of wall formwork Checks for Before and after concreting.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Formwork Scheduling and Costing
 

Importance of Formwork Drawings, Basic requirements of formwork, detailing, Preparation of Effective Drawings, General Layout and Detailed Drawings BOQ Calculation using Scheme Drawings Checklist of Drawings Preparation BIM 3D Graphical Views of Formwork, Creating the schedule of formwork, Mobilization distribution and Requirement plan BOQ calculation for formwork and calculation sample exercise 

Formwork Cost: Material, Labour, Plant & Machinery, Overhead and Profit cost Formwork, costing Calculation exercise Cost optimization in formwork operations

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:11
Introduction to Modular Formwork
 

Introduction to Modular Formwork, Advantages, Limitations & Applications Vertical & Horizontal Application methodology 

Aluminum formwork: Basic principles, selection criteria, Drawings & Components Special formwork, 

Tunnel Formwork: Types of methods, Equipments & 3D design details High rise construction & formwork Climbing systems Table Lifting system & Applications Bridge construction systems and project applications Solutions for special projects

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Formwork Assembly
 

Formwork Assembly for Wall & Column Panels, Stop end & Box outs- Equipment and Layout, Formwork Erection and Safety, Inspections and Corrections, Requirement of Plant and Machinery, Codal & Contractual requirements, Formwork failure-Causes, Forces acting on formwork, Design deficiency & prevention strategies. Introduction to Scaffolding and History Modular scaffold Installation sequence, good practices and material specification, Scaffold loading, Classification. Types of system scaffold application, Components of LTMS & its application, Innovation and Global practices.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1Formwork for Concrete Structures, Kumar Neeraj Jha, Tata McGraw Hill Education, 2012.

T2Formwork for Concrete Structures, Peurify, Mc Graw Hill India, 2015. Sussman, J. M., “Perspective on ITS”, Artech House Publishers, 2005.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1.IS 14687: 1999, False work for Concrete Structures - Guidelines, BIS.

Evaluation Pattern

OVERALL CIA - 100 MARKS

EVS321 - ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:0
Credits:0

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To understand the scope and importance of environmental science towards developing a conscious community for environmental issues, both at global and local scale.  

Course Outcome

CO1: Explain the components and concept of various ecosystems in the environment (L2, PO7)

CO2: Explain the necessity of natural resources management (L2, PO1, PO2 and PO7)

CO3: Relate the causes and impacts of environmental pollution (L4, PO1, PO2, and PO3, PO4)

CO4: Relate climate change/global atmospheric changes and adaptation (L4,PO7)

CO5: Appraise the role of technology and institutional mechanisms for environmental protection (L5, PO8)

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction
 

Environment and Eco systems – Definition, Scope and importance. Components of environment. Concept and Structure of eco systems. Material Cycles – Nitrogen, Carbon, Sulphur, Phosphorous, Oxygen. Energy Flow and classification of Eco systems.   

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Natural Resources
 

Classification and importance- Forest, Water, Mineral, Food, Energy. Management of natural resources – challenges and methods. Sustainable development – Goals, Agriculture, Industries

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Environmental Pollution
 

Causes and Impacts – Air pollution, Water pollution, Soil Pollution, Noise Pollution, Marine Pollution, Municipal Solid Wastes, Bio Medical and E-Waste. Solid Waste Management

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Climate change/Global Atmospheric Change
 

Global Temperature, Greenhouse effect, global energy balance, Global warming potential, International Panel for Climate Change (IPCC) Emission scenarios, Oceans and climate change. Adaptation methods. Green Climate fund. Climate change related planning- small islands and coastal region. Impact on women, children, youths and marginalized communities

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Environmental Protection
 

Technology, Modern Tools – GIS and  Remote Sensing,. Institutional Mechanisms - Environmental Acts and Regulations, Role of government, Legal aspects. Role of Nongovernmental Organizations (NGOs) , Environmental Education and Entrepreneurship

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1Kaushik A and Kaushik. C. P, “Perspectives in Environmental Studies”New Age International Publishers, New Delhi, 2018 [Unit: I, II, III and IV]

T2Asthana and Asthana, “A text Book of Environmental Studies”, S. Chand, New Delhi, Revised Edition, 2010 [Unit: I, II, III and V]

T3Nandini. N, Sunitha. N and Tandon. S, “environmental Studies” , Sapana, Bangalore,  June 2019 [Unit: I, II, III and IV]

T4R Rajagopalan, “Environmental Studies – From Crisis to Cure”, Oxford, Seventh University Press, 2017, [Unit: I, II, III and IV]

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1.Miller. G. T and Spoolman. S. E, “Environmental Science”, CENAGE  Learning, New Delhi, 2015

R2.Masters, G andEla, W.P (2015), Introduction to environmental Engineering and Science, 3rd Edition. Pearson., New Delhi, 2013.

R3.Raman Sivakumar, “Principals of Environmental Science and Engineering”, Second Edition, Cengage learning Singapore, 2005.

R4.P. Meenakshi, “Elements of Environmental Science and Engineering”, Prentice Hall of India Private Limited, New Delhi, 2006.

R5.S.M. Prakash, “Environmental Studies”, Elite Publishers Mangalore, 2007

R6.ErachBharucha, “Textbook of Environmental Studies”, for UGC, University press, 2005.

R7. Dr. Pratiba Sing, Dr. AnoopSingh and Dr. PiyushMalaviya, “Textbook of Environmental and Ecology”, Acme Learning Pvt. Ltd. New Delhi.

Evaluation Pattern

No Evaluation

MA331 - MATHEMATICS - III (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description :

    This course, Mathematics III (MA331) is offered for three credits in the third semester for the branch of Mechanical, Automobile and Civil engineering. The concepts of Fourier series and Calculus of Variations, analytical methods of solving Partial Differential equations and Series solution of Ordinary Differential Equations along with Numerical methods to solve Algebraic as well Differential equations, various interpolation techniques are discussed in this course.

Course Objectives :

To enable the students to find the Fourier series and harmonic analysis of a periodic function, solve the boundary value problems using Fourier series, ordinary differential equations by series solution method and describe functionals and solve variational problems.

 

Course Outcome

CO-1: Develop the trigonometric series as Fourier expansion. {L4 }{PO1, PO2, PO3, PO4}

CO-2: Classify the nature of partial differential equations and hence solve it by different methods. {L3} {PO1, PO2, PO3}

CO-3: Solve boundary value problems using Fourier series {L3} {PO1, PO2, PO3}

CO-4: Solve ordinary differential equation using series solution method {L3} {PO1, PO2, PO3}

CO-5: Apply Euler?s equation to solve the optimal values of the functional. {L3} {PO1, PO2, PO3}

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
FOURIER SERIES
 

Periodic functions, Dirichlet’s conditions, General Fourier series, Odd and even functions, Half range sine and cosine series, Harmonic Analysis.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
 

Formation of PDE, Solution of homogeneous PDE involving derivative with respect to one independent variable only (Both types with given set of conditions), solution of non- homogeneous PDE by direct integration, Solution of Lagrange’s linear PDE of the type P p +Q q= R

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEMS
 

Various possible solutions of one-dimensional wave and heat equations, two-dimensional Laplace’s equation by the method of separation of variables. Solution of all these equations with specified boundary conditions.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
SERIES SOLUTION OF ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
 

Power Series solutions of differential equations, ordinary point, singular point, Frobenius method

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
CALCULUS OF VARIATIONS
 

Variation of a function, Variational problems, Euler’s equation and its solution, Standard variation problems including geodesics, minimal surface of revolution, hanging chain and Brachistochrone problems. Functional; functionals involving higher order derivatives.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1.  Dr. B. Grewal, “Higher Engineering Mathematics”, 43rd Edition, Khanna Publishers, July 2014.

T2.  H. K. Das & Rajnish Verma, “Higher Engineering Mathematics”, 20th Edition, S. Chand & Company Ltd., 2012

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Erwin Kreyszig, “Advanced Engineering Mathematics”, 10th Edition, John Wiley & Sons,Inc. 2011.

R2. B.V. Ramana, 6th Reprint, “Higher Engineering Mathematics”, Tata-Macgraw Hill, 2008

R3. George F. Simmons and Steven G. Krantz, “Differential Equation, Theory, Technique and Practice”, Tata McGraw – Hill, 2006.

R4. M. D. Raisinghania, “Ordinary and Partial Differential Equation”, Chand (S.) & Co. Ltd., India, March 17, 2005

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-1

10

CIA-2

25

CIA-3

10

Attendance

05

ESE

50

VCE311 - APPLICATION OF MATLAB IN STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS BASICS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:36
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

·       Describe and apply basic numerical methods for civil engineering problem solving.

·       Develop algorithms and programs for solving civil engineering problems involving: (i) use of loops, (ii) application of conditional statements, (iii) ordinary differential equations.

Course Outcome

CO 1: ? Describe and apply basic numerical methods for civil engineering problem solving

CO 2: Apply MATLAB to analyse simple supported beams

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:4
Introduction to MATLAB
 

·        Introduction to MATLAB UI, Key Parts

·        Fundamentals of MATLAB

·        Data Types of MATLAB

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:4
Basics of Programming
 

·       Mathematical Expressions

·       Colon Notations

·       Array Operations and Functions

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:4
Branching Statements and Program Design
 

·       Logical Operations

·       Branches

o   if – construct

o   switch – construct

o   try/catch – construct

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:4
Loops
 

·       Loop – for

·       Loop – while

·       Statement – break

·       Statement – continue

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:4
Scripts and Functions
 

·       Scripts vs. Functions

·       Sharing Data

·       Types of Functions (Sub, Nested and Private)

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:16
ANALYSIS USING MATLAB
 

·       Determining SF and BM for all types of Beams (4 hours)

·       Plotting SFD and BMD for all types of Beams (4 hours)

·       Analysis of Beams (8 hours)

Text Books And Reference Books:

Matlab for Beginners

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Getting started with matlab

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1 

CIA 2

CIA 3 ESE

CE431P - HYDRAULIC ENGINEERING (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To introduce the students to various hydraulic engineering problems like open channel flows and hydraulic machines. At the completion of the course, the student should be able to relate the theory and practice of problems in hydraulic engineering

Course Outcome

CO-1: Explain the concept of boundary layer theory.

CO-2: Determine most economical channel section and analyse Hydraulic jump.

CO-3: Analyse the impact on Jets on Surfaces

CO-4: Analyse Characteristics of hydraulic machines for efficiency.

CO-5: Explain the importance of computational fluid dynamics in modeling of water resources.

CO-6: Calibrate flow measuring devices and hydraulic machines.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Boundary Layer Theory
 

Boundary Layer Analysis, Assumption and concept of boundary layer theory. Boundary-layer thickness, displacement, momentum and energy thickness, laminar and Turbulent boundary layers on a flat plate; Laminar sub-layer, smooth and rough boundaries. Local and average friction coefficients. Separation and Control.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Open Channel Flow
 

Introduction - Comparison between open channel flow and pipe flow, geometrical parameters of a channel, classification of open channels, classification of open channel flow, Velocity Distribution of channel section. 

Uniform Flow - Continuity Equation, Energy Equation and Momentum Equation, Characteristics of uniform flow, Chezy’s formula, and Manning’s formula. Factors affecting Manning’s Roughness Coefficient, Most economical section of channel, Computation of Uniform flow, and Normal depth. Computation of economical section and bed roughness analytically as well as by using software

Non-Uniform Flow - Specific energy, Specific energy curve, critical flow, discharge curve, Specific force Specific depth, and Critical depth. Channel Transitions. . Hydraulic Jump- Theory of hydraulic jump, Elements and characteristics of hydraulic jump in a rectangular Channel, length and height of jump, location of jump, Types, applications and location of hydraulic jump. 

Measurement of Discharge and Velocity - Venturi Flume, Standing Wave Flume, Parshall Flume, Broad Crested Weir. Gradually Varied Flow-Dynamic Equation of Gradually Varied Flow, Classification of channel bottom slopes, Classification of surface profile, Characteristics of surface profile. Computation of water surface profile 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Impact of Jets
 

The force exerted by the jet on Stationary and Moving Plates and Vanes: Flat, Inclined and Curved.

Force exerted on a series of radial vanes – Flat and Curved

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Hydraulic Machines
 

Hydraulic Machines: Introduction to hydraulic machines, Classification of turbines, impulse and reaction turbines. Design features, the efficiency of turbines, operating and main characteristic curves

Hydraulic Pumps: Introduction, Classification of pumps: centrifugal and reciprocating pumps, pumps in series and parallel, efficiency of the pumps, characteristic curves

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
Computational Fluid Dynamics
 

Basic Equations of fluid dynamics, Grid generation, Introduction to in viscid incompressible flow, Boundary layer flow as applicable to C.F.D. Hydro informatics: Concept of hydro informatics –scope of internet and web-based modelling in water resources engineering.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:30
Practicals
 

Laboratory Components: List of Experiments

1. Calibration of V-notch

2. Calibration of rectangular or Trapezoidal notch.

3. Calibration of Ogee weir

4. Calibration of Broad crested weir.

5. Calibration of Venturi flume.

6. Calibration of Venturi meter.

7. Determination of Darcy’s friction factor for a straight pipe.

8. Determination of minor loss constants (Bend, Sudden contraction, sudden expansion).

9. Determination of vane coefficient for flat and hemispherical vanes.

10. Determination of hydraulic coefficient of a vertical orifice.

11. Performance tests on a single stage or multistage centrifugal pump (constant speed).

12. Performance tests on a Pelton wheel.

13. Performance tests on Francis

14. Performance tests on Kaplan turbine.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1 R. K. Bansal, Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machines, New Delhi, Lakshmi Publications Revised Ninth Edition, 2018.

T2 A.K. Jain, Fluid Mechanics, New Delhi, Khanna Publishers. 2016 edition.

T3 P.N. Modi and S.M. Seth, Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulics, New Delhi, Standard Book House.21st edition, 2017.

T4 K. Subramanya, “Theory and Applications of Fluid Mechanics”, 2014, Tata McGraw Hill.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1 Ven Te Chow, “Open Channel Hydraulics”, Tata McGraw Hill.

R2 Burnside, C.D., “Electromagnetic Distance Measurement,” Beekman Publishers, 1971.

R3 SS Rattan, “Fluid Mechanics & Hydraulic Machines”, 2014, Khanna Publishing House

R4 CSP Ojha, R Berndtsson & P.N. Chandramouli, “Fluid Mechanics and Machinery,” 2016, Oxford Universiy

R5 Sadhu Singh, “Fluid Machinery”, 2006, Khanna Publishing House, Delhi

R6 Raghunath. H.M., “Fluid Mechanics & Machinery”, 2014, CBS Publishers

R7 Arora.K.R., “Hydraulics & Fluid Mechanics”, 2000, Standard Book house, NewDelhi

R8 Gupta. S.C., “Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machines”, 2016, Pearson Education, India

R9 Jain, A.K., “Fluid Mechanics”, 2012, Khanna Publishers, New Delhi.

R10 James. F. Cruise, Vijay P. Singh, Mohsan M. Sherif, “Elementary Hydraulics”, (1st Edition, 2008) Thomson Learning.

R11 John F. Douglas et al., “Fluid Mechanics”,3rd edition, 2008, Pearson Education, India.

R12 Rao. B. C. S, “Fluid Mechanics and Machinery”, 2010, Tata McGraw-Hill Education Pvt. Ltd.

R13 Som S.K., “Introduction to Fluid Mechanics and Fluid Machines”, 2014, Tata McGraw-Hill Education Pvt. Ltd

R14 Subramanya K., “1000 Solved Problems in Fluid Mechanics: Includes Hydraulic Machines”, 2014, Tata Mc Graw-Hill Education Pvt. Ltd

R15 Subramanya K., “Flow in Open Channels”, 2016, Tata McGraw-Hill Education Pvt. Ltd.

Online Resources:

https://nptel.ac.in/courses/105103096/

https://nptel.ac.in/courses/105/106/105106114/

https://nptel.ac.in/courses/105103021/

Evaluation Pattern

CIA = 70 Marks

ESE = 30 Marks

Total = 100 Marks

CE432 - MECHANICS OF MATERIALS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The objective of this Course is to introduce to continuum mechanics and material modelling of engineering materials based on first energy principles: deformation and strain; momentum balance, stress and stress states; elasticity and elasticity bounds; plasticity and yield design. 

Course Outcome

CO-1: Analyse the stress and strain relationship of various structural members (L4, PO1, PO2)

CO-2: Determine the forces and moments in slender members (L5, PO1, PO2)

CO-3: Analyse the statically determinate and indeterminate trusses (L4, PO1, PO2)

CO-4: Analyse statically indeterminate beams and frames subjected to Bending, torsional and temperature stresses. (L4, PO1, PO2)

CO-5: Analyse the stability of columns and understand the energy approach in plastic theory. (L4, PO1, PO2)

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Theories of Stress and Strain
 

Description of finite deformation, Infinitesimal deformation; Analysis of statically determinate trusses; Stability of dams, retaining walls and chimneys; Stress analysis of thin, thick and compound cylinder; Generalized state of stress and strain: Stress and strain tensor, Yield criteria and theories of failure; Tresca, Von-Mises, Hill criteria, Heigh-Westerguard’s stress space.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Momentum Balance and Stresses
 

Forces and Moments Transmitted by Slender Members, Shear Force and Bending Moment Diagrams, Momentum Balance, Stress States / Failure Criterion.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:13
Mechanics of Deformable Bodies
 

Force-deformation Relationships and Static Indeterminacy, Uniaxial Loading and Material Properties, Trusses and Their Deformations, Statically Determinate and Indeterminate Trusses,

Force-Stress-Equilibrium covering Multiaxial Stress and Strain, Displacement – Strain covering Multiaxial Strain and Multiaxial Stress-strain Relationships, Elasticity and Elasticity Bounds covering Stress-strain-temperature Relationships and Thin-walled Pressure Vessels, Stress and strain Transformations and Principal Stress, Failure of Materials,

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:13
Theory of Bending
 

Stress and Strains; Deflections and Torsion covering Pure Bending, Moment-curvature Relationship, Beam Deflection, Symmetry, Superposition, and Statically Indeterminate Beams, Shear and Torsion, Torsion and Twisting, Thermoelasticity, Energy methods, Variational Methods; Strain energy, elastic, complementary and total strain energy, Strain energy of axially loaded bar, Beam in bending, shear and torsion; General energy theorems, Castigliano’s theorem, Maxwell Bettie’s reciprocal theorem; Virtual work and unit load method for deflection, Application to problems of beams and frames.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Structural Stability
 

Stability of columns, Euler’s formula, end conditions and effective length factor, Columns with eccentric and lateral load; Plasticity and Yield Design covering 1D-Plasticity – An Energy Approach, Plasticity Models, Limit Analysis and Yield Design.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1 Norris, C.H. and Wilber, J. B. and Utku, S. “Elementary Structural Analysis” McGraw Hill, Tokyo, Japan

T2 R. Agor, “Structural Analysis”, Khanna Publishing House

T3 BC Punmia and A.K. Jain, “Mechanics of Materials”, Laxmi Publications

T4 Timoshenko, S. and Young, D. H., “Elements of Strength of Materials”, DVNC, New York, USA.

T5 Kazmi, S. M. A., ‘Solid Mechanics” TMH, Delhi, India.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Hibbeler, R. C., "Mechanics of Materials", 6th ed. East Rutherford, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall, 2004

R2. Crandall, S. H., N. C. Dahl, and T. J. Lardner, "An Introduction to the Mechanics of Solids", 2nd ed. New York, NY: McGraw Hill, 1979

R3. Gere, J. M., and S. P. Timoshenko, "Mechanics of Materials", 5th ed. Boston: PWS Kent Publishing, 1970.

R4. Ashby, M. F., and D. R. H. Jones, "Engineering Materials, An Introduction to their Properties and Applications", 2nd ed. Butterworth Heinemann.

R5. Collins, J. A. "Failure of Materials in Mechanical Design", 2nd ed. John Wiley and Sons, 1993.

R6. Courtney, T. H. "Mechanical Behavior of Materials", McGraw-Hill, 1990.

R7. Hertzberg, R. W. "Deformation and Fracture Mechanics of Engineering Materials", 4th ed. John Wiley and Sons, 1996.

R8. Nash, W. A., "Strength of Materials", 3d ed. Schaum's Outline Series, McGraw-Hill, 1994.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-1 : 10 MARKS

CIA-2 : 25 MARKS

CIA-3 : 10 MARKS

ATTENDANCE : 5 MARKS

END SEMESTER EXAM : 50 MARKS

TOTAL: 100 MARKS

CE433P - CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS AND CONCRETE TECHNOLOGY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course deals with an experimental determination and evaluation of mechanical characteristics and advanced behavior of metallic and non-metallic structural materials. The course deals with explanation of deformation and fracture behavior of structural materials. The main goal of this course is to provide students with all information concerning principle, way of measurement, as well as practical application of mechanical characteristics

Course Outcome

CO1: CO1 Understand to know about different construction materials (L2, PO1, PO2)

CO2: CO2 Understand and Choose the components and functions of buildings (L3, PO1, PO2)

CO3: Analyse and test fresh concrete and hardened concrete in the laboratory as per BIS standards (L2, PO1,PO2)

CO4: Design concrete mix proportion as per ACI and BIS standards(L2, L6,PO1,PO2)

CO5: Understand advances in concrete and knowledge of alternative building (L2,PO2)

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Construction materials
 

Stones, bricks, aggregates, brick masonry, stone masonry, tiles, timber, glass, ceramic materials, bitumen, asphalt, cement, composites 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Construction process
 

Types of structure-load bearing, frame, foundations, structural components (beam, slab, column, staircase), truss, arches, ventilators-Openings (window, door) specification, flooring, plastering, painting

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Cement and concrete
 

Cement  - manufacturing process (Industry process),types of cement, properties of cement, Concrete- properties of concrete, fresh properties of concrete –IS code 1199-1959, hardened properties of concrete –IS 516(1959),IS 5816(1999) factors affecting strength, workability, durability

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Concrete mix design
 

Basic principles of concrete mix design, methods of mix design, ACI and IS method of concrete mix design

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Special concrete
 

Ready mix concrete, Self-compacting concrete, High strength, high performance concrete, Light weight concrete, heavy weight concrete, mass concrete, Fiber-reinforced concrete, self-curing concrete, geo-polymer concrete and other special concretes

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Alternate building materials
 

Energy in building materials, Environmental issues concerned to building materials, Characteristics of building blocks for walls, Environmental friendly and cost effective building technologies,.   Stabilized blocks: mud blocks, steam cured blocks

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. S.K.Duggal , “Building Materials” Fifth  Edition, New Age International (P) Limited, Publishers

2 Medan Mehta, Walter Scarborough, Diane Armpriest“Building Construction : Principles, Materials and Systems” , Pearson

3. Shetty. M. S, “Concrete Technology – Theory and Practice”, S. Chand, New Delhi, 2012.

4.Neville. A. M and Brooks. J. J, “Concrete Technology”, Pearson, New Delhi, 2012.

5.Gambir. M. L, “Concrete Technology – Theory and Practice”, Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi, 2010.

6. Gupta. B. L and Gupta. A, “Concrete Technology”, Standard Publishers Distributors, New Delhi, Fourth Edition, 2010

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.Chudley, R., Greeno, "Building Construction Handbook", 6th ed., Butterworth-Heinemann, 2006

2. PC verghese Building construction PHI

3.“ACI: Code for Mix Design”

4.“IS: 10262-2019”

5.Neville. A. M, “Properties of Concrete”, Pearson New Delhi, 5th Edition, 2018

6.Santhakumar. A. R, “Concrete Technology”, Oxford University Press, New Delhi, 2017.

7.Metha. P. K and Monteiro P. J. M, “Concrete – Microstructure, Properties and Materials”, Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi, 2015.

8.Dhir. R. K and Newlands. M.D, “New Developments in Concrete Construction”,

Evaluation Pattern

Criteria

Exemplary

Satisfactory

Developing

Unsatisfactory

5 Marks

4 Marks

3 Marks

1 Marks

Performance

Submitted Great deal of information relates to topic

 

Submitted Some basic information most related to topics

Submitted very little information some relates to topics

Does not submitted any information related to topics

Explanation

Clear Explanation

Basic explanation

Minimal explanation

No explanation

Clarity   and Coherence

Sentences are structured and words are chosen to communicate content clearly.

Sentence structure and/or word choice sometimes interfere with clarity

Sentence structure, word choice, lack of transitions reading and understanding difficult

Sentence structure and words are  irrelevant

Resources

Accurate information taken from several sources in a systematic manner

Accurate information taken from a couple of sources in a systematic manner

Accurate information taken from a couple of sources but not systematically

Information taken from only one source and/or information not accurate.

CE434P - INSTRUMENTATION AND SENSOR TECHNOLOGIES FOR CIVIL ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

 

Course objectives:

 

1. To understand instrumentation, sensor theory and technology, data acquisition, digital signal processing.

 

2. Based on the study from objective 1, the student will be able to make decision for sensor installation.

 

For lab work, the course will allow students:

 

1. To explore various sensors and their response.

 

2. To analyse the sensor performance through the performance characteristics.

3. To understand how the data is processing through analog and digital systems and removal of noise through appropriate filters.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the principles of operation of various sensors and characteristics of instrumentation.

CO2: Make decision to install sensor in the target location.

CO3: Analyse the data obtained from sensor through statistical analysis.

CO4: Understand various signals generated from measurement system and reduction of noise through filters.

CO5: Apply the sensor technologies for civil engineering applications.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Fundamentals of Measurement, Sensing and Instrumentation
 

Definition of measurement and instrumentation, physical variables, common types of sensors; Describe the function of these sensors; Use appropriate terminology to discuss sensor applications; and qualitatively interpret signals from a known sensor type, types of instrumentation, Sensor Specifics, Permanent installations, Temporary installations;

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Sensor Installation and Operation
 

Predict the response of sensors to various inputs; Construct a conceptual instrumentation and monitoring program; Describe the order and methodology for sensor installation;  Differentiate between types of sensors and their modes of operation and measurement and Approach to Planning Monitoring Programs, Define target, Sensor selection, Sensor siting, Sensor Installation & Configuration, Advanced topic, Sensor design, Measurement uncertainty

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:11
Data Analysis and Interpretation
 

a) Fundamental statistical concepts

b) Data reduction and interpretation

c) Piezometer, Inclinometer, Strain gauge, etc.

d) Time domain signal processing

e) Discrete signals, Signals and noise and

f) a few examples of statistical information to calculate are:

Average value (mean), On average, how much each measurement deviates from the mean (standard deviation), Midpoint between the lowest and highest value of the set (median), Most frequently occurring value (mode), Span of values over which your data set occurs (range)

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Frequency Domain Signal Processing and Analysis
 

Explain the need for frequency domain analysis and its principles; Draw conclusions about physical processes based on analysis of sensor data; Combine signals in a meaningful way to gain deeper insight into physical phenomena, Basic concepts in frequency domain signal processing and analysis, Fourier Transform, FFT (Fast Fourier Transform), Example problems: Noise reduction with filters, Leakage, Frequency resolution.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:7
Civil Engineering Applications
 

Application of instrumentation and sensing in civil engineering laboratories. Understanding various instruments from basics of instrumentation. Measurements and observations with equipment, analysis of observed data, Interpretation of results and errors involved in equipment and preparation of evaluation report.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:30
PRACTICALS
 

1)      1. Use of different sensors, strain gauges, inclinometers,

2)     2.  Performance characteristics

3)     3.  Errors during the measurement process

4)     4.  Calibration of measuring sensors and instruments

5)      5. Measurement, noise and signal processing

6)      6. Analog Signal processing

7)      7. Digital Signal Processing

8. Demonstration & use of sensor technologies

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1    J.G. Joshi,"Electronics Measurements & Instrumentation", Khanna Publishing House

T2: A.K. Sahwney, "A Course in Electronics Measurements and Instrumentation”, Dhanpat Rai and Sons, New Delhi

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1.Alan S Morris, "Measurement and Instrumentation Principles", 3rd/e, Butterworth Hienemann,2001

R2.David A. Bell, "Electronic Instrumentation and Measurements" 2nd/e, Oxford Press, 2007

R3.S. Tumanski, “Principle of Electrical Measurement”, Taylor & Francis,2006

R5: Ilya Gertsbakh, "Measurement Theory for Engineers", Springer, 2010

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-1: 20 Marks

CIA-2(MSE)- 50 Marks

CIA-3: 20 MArks

Overall CIA: 50 Marks

ESE: 100 MArks

CEHO431CP - DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF PILE FOUNDATIONS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
  • Introduce the concept of Piling works and design requirements for a pile
  • Elaborate the construction procedures which are involved in the Piling works
  • Explain the different load test which need to be conducted on the pile
  • Understand the Environmental, Health and Safety standards which need to be place for the handling of the pile works.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the different codal requirements for the Pile Foundations

CO2: Be able to perform the Design calculation based on the different soil conditions

CO3: Correlate the codal requirements with the different design conditions

CO4: Understand the construction procedure for the different types of Pile Foundation

CO5: CO5 Understand the different types of Piles which are being used

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Introduction
 

Introduction to pile foundation Selection criteria of foundation Selection criteria of piles Terminologies used in Pile Foundation Common Design Considerations, Requirements for Driven Cast In - Situ pile, Requirements for Bored Cast In - Situ pile, Requirements for Driven Precast Concrete pile, Requirements for Precast Concrete pile Requirements for Under Reamed pile

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Design of Driven Piles
 

Design Procedure for Driven Cast In - situ Pile, Step by step Procedure for construction of DCIS pile, Case study showing the design of DCIS pile.

Design Procedure for Precast Driven Piles Step by step Procedure for construction of Precast Driven piles Part I, Step by step Procedure for construction of Precast Driven Pile, Case study showing the design of Precast Driven pile

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Design of Bored Piles
 

Design Procedure for Bored Cast In - situ Pile, Step by step Procedure for construction of bored cast in situ piles Part I, Case study showing the design of bored pile in soil Part I, Case study showing the design of bored pile in Rock Part II, 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Underreamed Piles
 

Design Procedure for Under-Reamed piles, Step by step Procedure for construction of Under-Reamed piles, Case study showing the design of Under- Reamed piles, Settlement calculations for Pile

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Pile Load Tests
 

Types of Load Tests on Piles and its methodology Part I, Types of Load Tests on Piles and its methodology Part II, Types of Load Tests on Piles and its methodology Part III, Quality Assurance and control of Piling works Health Safety and environment plan for piling works Part I, Quality Assurance and control of Piling works Health Safety and environment plan for piling works Part II.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Special Piles
 

Basic understanding of Micro Pile, Basic understanding of Steel or composite pile, Basic understanding of Spun Piles, Basic understanding of CFA piles, Basic understanding of Helical Piles, Bill of Quantities for all types of piles Challenges in construction of pile.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Analysis and Design of Substructures, 2/E, Sawmi Saran, Oxford and IBH Publishing Co. Pvt. Ltd, New Delhi, 2006

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Design of foundation system, 3/E, N.P. Kurian, Narosa Publishing House, 2006.

Foundation Analysis and Design, 5/E, J. E. Bowles, Tata McGraw Hill New York, 2001

 

Evaluation Pattern

Overall CIA

CY421 - CYBER SECURITY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:0
Credits:0

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This mandatory course is aimed at providing a comprehensive overview of the different facets of Cyber Security.  In addition, the course will detail into specifics of Cyber Security with Cyber Laws both in Global and Indian Legal environments

Course Outcome

CO1: Describe the basic security fundamentals and cyber laws and legalities.

CO2: Describe various cyber security vulnerabilities and threats such as virus, worms, online attacks, Dos and others.

CO3: Explain the regulations and acts to prevent cyber-attacks such as Risk assessment and security policy management.

CO4: Explain various vulnerability assessment and penetration testing tools.

CO5: Explain various protection methods to safeguard from cyber-attacks using technologies like cryptography and Intrusion prevention systems.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
UNIT 1
 

Security Fundamentals-4 As Architecture Authentication Authorization Accountability, Social Media, Social Networking and Cyber Security.Cyber Laws, IT Act 2000-IT Act 2008-Laws for Cyber-Security, Comprehensive National Cyber-Security Initiative CNCI – Legalities

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
UNIT 2
 

Cyber Attack and Cyber Services Computer Virus – Computer Worms – Trojan horse.Vulnerabilities -  Phishing -  Online Attacks – Pharming - Phoarging  –  Cyber Attacks  -  Cyber Threats -  Zombie- stuxnet - Denial of Service Vulnerabilities  - Server Hardening-TCP/IP attack-SYN Flood

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
UNIT 3
 

Cyber Security Management Risk Management and Assessment - Risk Management Process - Threat Determination Process -Risk Assessment - Risk Management Lifecycle.Security Policy Management - Security Policies - Coverage Matrix Business Continuity Planning - DisasterTypes  -  Disaster Recovery Plan - Business Continuity Planning Process

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
UNIT 4
 

Vulnerability - Assessment and Tools: Vulnerability Testing - Penetration Testing Black box- white box.Architectural Integration:  Security Zones - Devicesviz Routers, Firewalls, DMZ. Configuration Management - Certification and Accreditation for Cyber-Security.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
UNIT 5
 

Authentication and Cryptography: Authentication - Cryptosystems - Certificate Services, Securing Communications:  Securing Services -  Transport  –  Wireless  -  Steganography and NTFS Data Streams. Intrusion Detection and Prevention Systems:   Intrusion -  Defense in Depth  -  IDS/IPS  -IDS/IPS Weakness and Forensic AnalysisCyber Evolution: Cyber Organization – Cyber Future

Text Books And Reference Books:

R1. Matt Bishop, “Introduction to Computer Security”, Pearson, 6th impression, ISBN: 978-81-7758-425-7.

R2. Thomas R, Justin Peltier, John, “Information Security Fundamentals”, Auerbach Publications.

R3. AtulKahate, “Cryptography and Network Security”,  2nd Edition, Tata McGrawHill.2003

R4. Nina Godbole, SunitBelapure, “Cyber Security”, Wiley India 1st Edition 2011

R5. Jennifer L. Bayuk and Jason Healey and Paul Rohmeyer and Marcus Sachs, “Cyber Security Policy Guidebook”, Wiley; 1 edition , 2012

R6. Dan Shoemaker and Wm. Arthur Conklin, “Cyber security: The Essential Body Of Knowledge”,   Delmar Cengage Learning; 1 edition, 2011

R7. Stallings, “Cryptography & Network Security - Principles & Practice”, Prentice Hall, 6th Edition 2014

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

--

Evaluation Pattern

Only CIA will be conducted as per the University norms. No ESE

Maximum Marks : 50

HS423 - PROFESSIONAL ETHICS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Basic elements of civil engineering professional practice are introduced in this course. Roles of all participants in the process-owners, developers, designers, consultants, architects, contractors, and suppliers - are described. Basic concepts in professional practice, business management, public policy, leadership, and professional licensure are introduced. 

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the importance of planning, management and organization in engineering firms (L2, P11)

CO2: Understand the importance of leadership qualities and controlling the processes and work force in organization (L2, P7, P9 P10 and P11).

CO3: Understand the importance of professional practice and ethics in engineering (L2, P8).

CO4: Understand the basics of contract management (L3, P8 and P11).

CO5: Understand the basics of arbitration laws and agreements (L3, P8 and 10).

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Principles of Planning and Management
 

Managerial Roles, Essential Managerial Skills, Key personal characteristics for Managerial success. Evolution and various schools to management thoughts, continuing management themes – quality and performance excellence, global awareness, learning organization, Characteristics of 21st century Executives. Social responsibility of managers. Planning: steps in planning process; setting and managing objectives – MBO method, Strategies: importance, formulation of policies; Programs: Planning premises: concept, developing effective planning premises; Decision making, approaches to decision making, various techniques used for decision making. Organizing: organization structure, formal and informal organization. Traditional Organization Structures Directions in organizational Structures – Team structure, network structure, boundary less structure, Organizing Trends and Practices – Chain of command, unity of command, span of control, delegation and empowerment, decentralization and use of staff, organizational design and organizational configuration.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Leadership and Control in Management
 

Leadership: Leadership and vision, Leadership traits, classic Leadership styles. Leaders behaviour – Likert’s four systems, Managerial Grid. Overlapping role of leader and managers. The organizational context of communication, Directions of communications, channels of communication, Barriers to communication. Motivation and rewards, rewards and performance. Hierarchy of need theory and two factor theory. Integrated model of motivation.

Controlling: Control function in management, The basic control process. Types of control – feed forward, concurrent and feedback controls. Factors in control effectiveness.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Professional Practice & Ethics
 

Professional Practice: Respective roles of various stakeholders: Government (constituting regulatory bodies and standardization organizations, prescribing norms to ensure safety of the citizens); Standardization Bodies (ex. BIS, IRC)(formulating standards of practice); professional bodies (ex. Institution of Engineers(India), Indian Roads Congress, IIA/ COA, ECI, Local Bodies/ Planning Authorities) (certifying professionals and offering platforms for interaction); Clients/ owners (role governed by contracts); Developers (role governed by regulations such as RERA); Consultants (role governed by bodies such as CEAI); Contractors (role governed by contracts and regulatory Acts and Standards); Manufacturers/ Vendors/ Service agencies (role governed by contracts and regulatory Acts and Standards), Professional Ethics – Definition of Ethics, Professional Ethics, Business Ethics, Corporate , Ethics, Engineering Ethics, Personal Ethics; Code of Ethics as defined in the website of Institution of Engineers (India); Profession, Professionalism, Professional Responsibility, Professional Ethics; Conflict of Interest, Gift Vs Bribery, Environmental breaches, Negligence, Deficiencies in state-of-the-art; Vigil Mechanism, Whistleblowing, protected disclosures.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Contract Management
 

General Principles of Contracts Management: Indian Contract Act, 1972 and amendments covering General principles of contracting; Contract Formation & Law; Privacy of contract; Various types of contract and their features; Valid & Voidable Contracts; Prime and sub-contracts; Joint Ventures & Consortium; Complex contract terminology; Tenders, Request For Proposals, Bids & Proposals; Bid Evaluation; Contract Conditions & Specifications; Critical /“Red Flag” conditions; Contract award & Notice To Proceed; Variations & Changes in Contracts; Differing site conditions; Cost escalation; Delays, Suspensions & Terminations; Time extensions & Force Majeure; Delay Analysis; Liquidated damages & Penalties; Insurance & Taxation; Performance and Excusable Non-performance; Contract documentation; Contract Notices; Wrong practices in contracting (Bid shopping, Bid fixing, Cartels); Reverse auction; Case Studies; Build-Own-Operate & variations; Public- Private Partnerships; International Commercial Terms;

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Arbitration, Conciliation and Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) System
 

Arbitration – meaning, scope and types – distinction between laws of 1940 and 1996; UNCITRAL model law – Arbitration and expert determination; Extent of judicial intervention; International commercial arbitration; Arbitration agreements – essential and kinds, validity, reference and interim measures by court; Arbitration tribunal – appointment, challenge, jurisdiction of arbitral tribunal, powers, grounds of challenge, procedure and court assistance; Award including Form and content, Grounds for setting aside an award, Enforcement, Appeal and Revision; Enforcement of foreign awards – New York and Geneva Convention Awards; Distinction between conciliation, negotiation, mediation and arbitration, confidentiality, resort to judicial proceedings, costs; Dispute Resolution Boards; Lok Adalats

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1 R.R. Gaur, R. Sangal, G.P. Bagaria,” A Foundation Course in Human Values and Professional Ethics” Excel Books, Delhi, [Unit: III]

T2 Premvir Kapoor, “Professional Ethics and Human Values”, Khanna Book Publishing, [Unit: III]

T3 Nair. C. G. K, “Engineering Ethics”, Harshree Publishing Company, Bangalore, 2006 [Unit:III]

T4 Raman. B.S and Yaji. R. K, “Constitution of India and Professional Ethics”, United Publishers, Mangalore, 2006 [Unit: III]

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. CB Gupta, “A Textbook of Organizational Behaviour”, S. Chand Publications New Delhi, [Unit: II]

R2. LM Prasad, “Organizational Behaviour”, Sutan Chand and Sons [Unit:II]

R3. B.S. Patil, "Legal Aspects of Building and Engineering Contracts", 1974. [Unit: II and III]

R4. The National Building Code, BIS, 2017 [Unit: II and III]

R5. RERA Act, 2017 [Unit: III]

R6. Meena Rao, "Fundamental concepts in Law of Contract", 3rd Edn. Professional Offset, 2006

R7. NeelimaChandiramani, "The Law of Contract: An Outline", 2nd Edn. Avinash Publications Mumbai,2000 [Unit: IV]

R8. Avtar Singh, "Law of Contract", Eastern Book Co., 2002 [Unit: IV]

R9. Dutt, "Indian Contract Act", Eastern Law House,1994 [Unit: IV]

R10. Anson W.R., "Law of Contract, Oxford University Press,1979, [Unit:IV]

R11. Kwatra G.K., "The Arbitration and Conciliation of Law in India with case law on UNCITRAL Model Law on Arbitration, Indian Council of Arbitration", 2005 [Unit: V]

R12. Wadhera, "Intellectual Property Rights", Universal Law Publishing Co.,2005 [Unit:V]

R13. T. Ramappa, “Intellectual Property Rights Law in India, Asia Law House", 2010 [Unit:V]

Evaluation Pattern

CIA: 25 Marks

ESE:25 Marks

Exam: 2 Hours

MICSAI432 - DATA STRUCTURES AND ALGORITHMS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To understand the basic concept of data structures for storage and retrieval of ordered or unordered data. Data structures include: arrays, linked lists, binary

trees, heaps, and hash tables.

Course Outcome

CO1: Explain the basic concepts of data structures and solve the time complexity of the algorithm

CO2: Experiment with various operations on Linear Data structures

CO3: Examine the Structures and Operations of Trees and Heaps Data Structures

CO4: Compare various given sorting techniques with respect to time complexity

CO5: Choose various shortest path algorithms to determine the minimum spanning path for the given graphs

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
INTRODUCTION
 

Definition- Classification of data structures: primitive and non-primitive-

Operations on data structures- Algorithm Analysis

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:11
LISTS, STACKS AND QUEUES
 

Abstract Data Type (ADT) – The List ADT – The Stack ADT: Definition,

Array representation of stack, Operations on stack: Infix, prefix and postfix

notations Conversion of an arithmetic

Expression from Infix to postfix. Applications of stacks.

The Queue ADT: Definition, Array representation of queue, Types of queue:

Simple queue, circular queue, double ended queue (de-queue) priority

queue, operations on all types of Queues

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
TREES
 

Preliminaries – Binary Trees – The Search Tree ADT – Binary Search Trees –

AVL Trees – Tree Traversals – Hashing – General Idea – Hash Function –

Separate Chaining – Open Addressing –Linear Probing – Priority Queues

(Heaps) – Model – Simple implementations – Binary Heap

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
SORTING
 

Preliminaries – Insertion Sort – Shell sort – Heap sort – Merge sort –

Quicksort – External Sorting

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
GRAPHS
 

Definitions – Topological Sort – Shortest-Path Algorithms – Unweighted

Shortest Paths – Dijkstra’s Algorithm – Minimum Spanning Tree – Prim’s

Algorithm – Applications of Depth- First Search – Undirected Graphs –

Bi-connectivity – Introduction to NP-Completeness-case study

Text Books And Reference Books:

Mark Allen Weiss, “Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis in Java”, 3rd Edition,

Pearson Education 2013.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Fundamentals of data structure in C by Ellis Horowitz, Sarataj Shani 3rd edition,

Galgotia book source PVT,2010.

R2.Classic Data Structures , Debasis Samanta ,2nd Edition, PHI Learning PVT,2011

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 20 MarKs

CIA 2 50 MarKs

CIA 3 20 MarKs

ESE 100 Marks

CE531 - STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course aims at providing students with the necessary background on principles of structural engineering and design. Students will be exposed to the theories and concepts of reinforced concrete design, steel design, and the design of prestressed concrete structures at the elementary level. 

Course Outcome

CO1: Identify the various structural systems.

CO2: Calculate various types of loads acting on a structure.

CO3: Design reinforced concrete elements such as beams, slabs, and columns.

CO4: Design bolted and welded connections for steel sections.

CO5: Calculate stresses and losses in prestressed concrete sections.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Introduction to Structural Engineering
 

Definition of structure, history of structural engineering, requirements of structural analysis, steps involved in structural engineering, Forms of structures, one-two- and three-dimensional structural systems, the role of an architect, structural engineer, architectural plan, structural framing plan, and building services. The first principle of the design process. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Introduction to national building code and loading standards
 

Static Load: Dead Load, Super Imposed Dead Load, and Live Load 

Dynamic load: Earthquake Load and Wind Load.

Pressure loads: Active and Passive earth pressure and Hydrostatic Load.

Self-Straining Loads: Temperature stresses, creek, and shrinkage loads. Provisions for structural design in national building codes. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Structural Design Criteria ? Design of Reinforced Concrete Elements
 

Concept of reinforced concrete, stress-strain characteristics, stress block parameters, the concept of singly reinforced sections. Introduction to design of reinforced RC elements using IS 456:2000. Design of singly and doubly reinforced beam sections, design of one-way and two-way slabs, Design of axially loaded columns. [Analysis and Design of RCC frames using commercially available software]

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Structural Design Criteria - Design of Steel Structures
 

Advantages and drawbacks of steel constructions, Steel sections, Introduction to steel design, IS 800:2007, Types of connections, bolted connections, advantages, disadvantages, welded connections, advantages, disadvantages. Numerical problems on bolted and welded connections. 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Structural Design Criteria ? Prestressed Concrete Structures
 

Basic Principles of Prestressing: Fundamentals, Load balancing concept, Stress concept, the centre of Thrust. Pre-tensioning and post-tensioning systems, tensioning methods, and end anchorages. Analysis of Sections for Flexure: Stresses in concrete due to pre-stress and loads, stresses in steel due to loads, Cable profiles. Losses of Pre-Stress: Various losses are encountered in pre-tensioning and post-tensioning methods.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1 Daniel L Schodek & Martin Bechthold “Structures”, 7th Edition, Pearson Publications. (Unit 1)

T2 Punmia BC, Jain AK, “Theory of Structures”, 12th edition, Laxmi Publications. (Unit 1 & 2)

T3 Unnikrishnan Pillai and Devadas Menon, “Reinforced Concrete Design”, 4th Edition, Tata McGraw Hill publications. (Unit 3)

T4 Varghese P C, “Limit State Design of Reinforced Concrete”, 2nd Edition, PHI Learning publications. (Unit 3)

T5 Subramanian N, “Design of Steel Structures”, 3rd Edition, Oxford University Press. (Unit 4)

T6 Krishna Raju N, “Prestressed Concrete”, 6th Edition, McGraw Hill publications. (Unit 5)

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1 Hibbeler R C, “Structural Analysis”, 9th Edition, Pearson Publications. (Unit 1 & Unit 2)

R2 Park and Paulay, “Reinforced Concrete Structures”, 1st Edition, Wiley Publications. (Unit 3)

R3 Duggal S K, “Limit State Design of Steel Structures”, 3rd Edition, McGraw Hill Publications. (Unit 4)

R4 Edward G N, “Prestressed Concrete: A Fundamental Approach”, 3rd Edition, Pearson Publication. ((Unit 5))

 

IS 875: 1987 (Part 1), “Code of Practice for Design Loads - Dead Loads”

IS 875: 1987 (Part 2), “Code of Practice for Design Loads - Live Loads”

IS 1893: 2016 (Part 1), “Criteria for Earthquake Resistant Design”

IS 456: 2000, “Plain and reinforced concrete – Code of practice.”

IS 800: 2007, “General Construction in Steel - Code of Practice.”

IS 1343: 2012, “Prestressed Concrete – Code of Practice”

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 - Test and Assignment

CIA 2 - Mid Semester Examination

CIA 3 - Test and Assignment

 

CE532P - GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The objective of this subject is to study and understand the basic concepts of Soil mechanics and Properties, behavior of soil and their significance under Compaction, Consolidation and Shear strength.

Course Outcome

1: Understand the different types of soil based on their formation mechanism, various phase diagrams and behavior of soils based on their moisture contents. Investing the index properties practically.(L2, PO1, P05, PO9, PO10. PSO2)

2: Determine the permeability of soils through various laboratory and field tests and Plot various stress distribution diagrams along the depth of the soil mass (L3, PO1, PO2, PO5, PO9, PSO2)

3: Determine the compactive effort required to obtain necessary degree of compaction in-situ and evaluate ground settlements against time with consolidation. (L3, PO1, PO5, PO9, PO10, PSO2)

4: Evaluate the stiffness of soil using shear strength parameters in various conditions and investigate practically. (L5, PO1, PO2, PO5, PSO1)

5: Evaluate factor of safety of infinite slopes based on different ground conditions and specify a strategy for site investigation to identify the soil deposits and determine the depth and spatial extent within the ground. (L5, PO1, PO2, PO5, PO9, PO10, PSO1)

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction
 

Types of soils, their formation and deposition, Definitions: soil mechanics, soil engineering, rock mechanics, geotechnical engineering. Scope of soil engineering. Comparison and difference between soil and rock. Basic Definitions and Relationships-Soil as three-phase system in terms of weight, volume, voids ratio, and porosity. Definitions: moisture content, unit weights, degree of saturation, voids ratio, porosity, specific gravity, mass specific gravity, etc. Relationship between volume weight, voids ratio- moisture content, unit weight- percent air voids, saturation- moisture content, moisture content- specific gravity etc

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Plasticity Characteristics of Soil
 

Introduction to definitions of: plasticity of soil, consistency limits-liquid limit, plastic limit, shrinkage limit, plasticity, liquidity and consistency indices, flow and toughness indices, definitions of activity and sensitivity. Determination of: liquid limit, plastic limit and shrinkage limit. Use of consistency limits. Classification of Soils Introduction of soil classification: particle size classification, textural classification, unified soil classification system, Indian standard soil classification system. Classification of soils using commercially available softwares.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Effective Stress Principle
 

Introduction, effective stress principle, nature of effective stress, effect of water table. Fluctuations of effective stress, effective stress in soils saturated by capillary action, seepage pressure, quick sand condition. Solving permeability problems analytically and using commercially available softwares.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Permeability of Soil
 

Darcy’s law, validity of Darcy’s law. Determination of coefficient of permeability: Laboratory method: constant-head method, falling-head method. Field method: pumping- in test, pumping- out test. Permeability aspects: permeability of stratified soils, factors affecting permeability of soil. Seepage Analysis- Introduction, stream and potential functions, characteristics of flow nets, graphical method to plot flow nets.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Compaction of Soil
 

Introduction, theory of compaction, laboratory determination of optimum moisture content and maximum dry density. Compaction in field, compaction specifications and field control.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Consolidation of Soil
 

Introduction, comparison between compaction and consolidation, initial, primary and secondary consolidation, spring analogy for primary consolidation, interpretation of consolidation test results, Terzaghi’s theory of consolidation, final settlement of soil deposits, computation of consolidation settlement and secondary consolidation. Calculation of Compaction and Consolidation characteristics analytically and using softwares

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Types of shear tests
 

Direct shear test, merits of direct shear test, triaxial compression tests, test behaviour of UU, CU and CD tests, pore-pressure measurement, computation of effective shear strength parameters. unconfined compression test, vane shear test. Solving problems on shear strength using commercially available software.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Shear Strength
 

Mohr circle and its characteristics, principal planes, relation between major and minor principal stresses, Mohr-Coulomb theory.                           

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Stability of Slopes
 

Introduction, types of slopes and their failure mechanisms, factor of safety, analysis of finite and infinite slopes, wedge failure Swedish circle method, friction circle method, stability numbers and charts. 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Soil Exploration
 

Introduction, methods of site exploration and soil investigation, methods of boring, soil samplers, sampling procedures, trail pits, borings, penetrometer tests, analysis of borehole logs, geophysical and advance soil exploration methods. Solving problems on stability of slopes and preparing borelogs using software.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1 K.R Arora, “Soil Mechanics and Foundations Engineering”, 9th edition, UBS Publishers and Distributors, New Delhi, 2014.[Unit 1,2,3]

T2 V.N.S. Murthy, “Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering”, 4th Edition, UBS Publishers and Distributors, New Delhi, 2009. [Unit1, 4]

T3 B.C. Punmia, “Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering”, 16th Edition Laxmi Publications Co, New Delhi,2015. [Unit 1, 4, 5]

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Karl Terzaghi, Soil Mechanics and Engineering Practices, 3rd edition, Wiley and Sons publishers and distributes, 2017

R2. Alam Singh and G. R. Chowdhary, “Soil Engineering in Theory and Practice”, CBS Publishers and Distributors Ltd., New Delhi, 1994.

R3. J. E. Bowles, “Foundation Analysis and Design”, 5th Edition, McGraw Hill Pub. Co. New York, 1996.

R4. Braja M. Das, “Principles of Geotechnical Engineering”, 5th Edition, Thomson Business Information India Pvt. Ltd., India, 2002.

R5. Craig R. F, “Soil Mechanics”, Van Nostrand Reinhold Co. Ltd, 1987.

R6. Gopal Ranjan and A.S.R. Rao, “Basic and Applied Soil Mechanics”, New Age International (P) Ltd., New Delhi, 2000.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA(CIA1+CIA2+CIA3+Practicals/Lab) - 70 Marks

ESE - 30 Marks 

Total - 100 Marks

Credits - 4

CE533 - HYDROLOGY AND WATER RESOURCES ENGINEERING (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

Hydrology deals with aspects of water as a resource. It’s the science that deals with space-time characteristics of the quantity and quality of the waters of the earth, encompassing their occurrence, movement, distribution, circulation, storage, exploration, development and management. Hydrology is partitioned into surface water hydrology and groundwater hydrology. The course would primarily address elementary and intermediate level aspects of both surface and ground water hydrology regarding space-time characteristics of the water quantity of the earth. As Earth’s fresh water resources are limited and unevenly distributed, understanding hydrology is critically important for water supply and management issues

Course Objectives:

 The objective of this subject is to study the basics and importance of Hydrologyand Water Resources

Course Outcome

CO-1: Explain the components of the hydrological cycle and Analyse the precipitation data

CO-2: Estimate evaporation, infiltration, evapo-transportation and runoff

CO-3: Develop and interpret hydrographs

CO-4: Explain the stream flow measurement techniques and Analyse inflow and outflow hydrographs using flood routing

CO-5: Estimate yield in Aquifers and compare rainwater harvesting methods.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction
 

Definition of hydrology. Importance of hydrology. Hydrologic cycle.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Precipitation
 

Definition. Forms and types of precipitation. Measurement of rainfall using Symon’s and Syphon type of rain gauges. Optimum number of rain gauge stations. Consistency of rainfall data (double mass curve method). Computation of mean rainfall (arithmetic average, Thiessen’s polygon and Isohyetal methods). Estimation of missing rainfall data (Arithmetic average, normal ratio and regression methods). Presentation of precipitation data (moving average curve, mass curve, rainfall hyetographs, intensity – duration - frequency curves). Creation of Thiessen polygon map from meteorological data

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Runoff
 

Definition. Concept of the catchment. Water budget equation. Components. Factors affecting. Rainfall-runoff relationship using simple regression analysis. Evapotranspiration: AET, PET, Factors affecting evapotranspiration, Measurement of evapotranspiration, Pennman’s equation and Blaney Criddle’s formula and problems. Verification of losses analytically and by using commercially available software

Creation of Rainfall-Runoff model using GIS

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Losses from Precipitation
 

Introduction. Evaporation: Definition, Process, factors affecting, measurement using IS Class A Pan. Estimation using empirical formulae. Infiltration: Definition, factors affecting infiltration capacity, measurement (double ring infiltrometer). Harton’s infiltration equation, infiltration indices

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Hydrographs
 

Definition. Components of Hydrograph. Unit hydrograph and its derivation from simple storm hydrographs. Base flow separation. S–curve and its uses

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Stream Flow Measurement
 

Introduction. Measurement of stage. Measurement of discharge by Area–Velocity method and slope area method. Simple stage-discharge relation. Measurement of streamflow by using commercially available software

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Flood Routing
 

Introduction to hydrological flood routing, reservoir and channel routing methods, flood frequency studies and forecasting, analysis of extreme events

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Rainwater Harvesting
 

Introduction. Small scale and small tank harvesting. Urban rainwater harvesting. Methods of ground water recharge

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Ground Water Hydrology
 

Scope and importance of ground water hydrology. Aquifer parameters. Steady radial flow into wells in unconfined and confined aquifers. Types of wells, Methods of construction

Text Books And Reference Books: