CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY

School of Business and Management

Syllabus for
BSc (Physics, Chemistry/Honours/Honours with Research)
Academic Year  (2023)

 
1 Semester - 2023 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BLS141 INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 03 100
BLS142 PRINCIPLES OF FORENSIC SCIENCE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
CHE101-1 GENERAL CHEMISTRY Major Core Courses-I 3 3 100
CHE111-1 CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS I Major Core Courses-I 2 1 100
CHE161A-1 COSMETIC CHEMISTRY Skill Enhancement Courses 3 3 100
CHE161B-1 TECHNICAL JAPANESE FOR CHEMISTS Skill Enhancement Courses 3 3 100
COM143 ENTREPRENEURSHIP DEVELOPMENT AND SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
CSC143 WEB DESIGNING USING HTML, PHP AND MYSQL Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
ENG181-1 ENGLISH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses 2 2 50
EST141 TRAVEL AND TRAVEL NARRATIVES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
EST148 THE OCEANS IN CINEMA: A BLUE HUMANITIES READING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
LAW141 CYBER LAW Multidisciplinary Courses 3 4 100
LAW143 LABOUR AND SOCIAL WELFARE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
MAT001 BRIDGE COURSE FOR MATHEMATICS I Bridge Courses 3 0 50
MAT121-1 MATHEMATICS -I Allied Core Courses 3 3 100
MED144 HARRY POTTER AND CONTEMPORARY ISSUES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
PHCH001 BRIDGE COURSE IN PHYSICS AND CHEMISTRY Bridge Courses 3 0 50
PHY101-1 MECHANICS Major Core Courses-I 3 3 100
PHY111-1 MECHANICS LAB Major Core Courses-I 2 2 50
PHY161-1 BASIC ELECTRONICS Skill Enhancement Courses 3 3 100
POL143 SUBALTERN STUDIES: NARRATIVES OF THE COMMUNITIES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY155 PSYCHOLOGY OF GENDER Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY156 PSYCHOLOGY OF RELATIONSHIPS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY157 SCIENCE OF WELLBEING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
SOC141 WOMEN'S ISSUES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
2 Semester - 2023 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BLS144 PRINCIPLES OF AYURVEDA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
CHE101-2 INORGANIC CHEMISTRY-I: COORDINATION COMPOUNDS AND ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY Major Core Courses-II 3 3 100
CHE102-2 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY-I: FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS Major Core Courses-II 3 3 100
CHE111-2 CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS-II Major Core Courses-II 2 2 50
CHE112-2 CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS-III Major Core Courses-II 2 2 50
COM149 INVESTMENTS AND TRADING STRATEGIES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
COM150 FINANCIAL LITERACY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
CSC154 INTRODUCTION TO PYTHON PROGRAMMING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
ENG181-2 ENGLISH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses 3 2 100
EST151 COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY: DARSANA AND PHILOSOPHY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 50
EST153 PARTITION NARRATIVES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
EST155 FORENSIC LINGUISTICS THROUGH CASE STUDIES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
EST156 RETELLING OF EPICS IN INDIAN LITERATURE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
MED148 LANGUAGE OF CINEMA: A VISUAL APPROACH Multidisciplinary Courses 45 3 100
MED149 INTRODUCTION TO SEMIOTICS Multidisciplinary Courses 45 3 100
PHY102-2 ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM Major Core Courses-I 3 3 100
PHY103-2 THERMAL PHYSICS AND STATISTICAL MECHANICS Major Core Courses-I 3 3 100
PHY112-2 ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM LAB Major Core Courses-I 2 2 50
PHY113-2 THERMAL PHYSICS AND STATISTICAL MECHANICS LAB Major Core Courses-I 2 2 50
PSY160 UNDERSTANDING ADDICTION AND SUBSTANCE USE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
STA141 ELEMENTS OF STATISTICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
    

    

Introduction to Program:

The programme is offered to students opting for a BSc degree with the combinations of Physics and Chemistry and BSc (Physics Honours/Honours with Research). The programme leads the students to higher learning in Physics and Chemistry and contributes to the welfare of society. It is designed to help the students to understand the importance of physics in daily life and the role of physics in understanding nature. The courses in BSc (Physics, Chemistry/Honours/Honours with Research) provide students with vital core science concepts and an application-oriented undergraduate education. Students acquire foundational knowledge and skill sets covering fundamentals of sciences and technology. Given the need to improve undergraduate instruction that encourages interdisciplinary training and teamwork, this programme develops adaptable students with a strong foundation in competencies relevant to the evolving industry in physics and allied technology. It gives the students hands-on instruction in experimental skills and methods, where the students will be trained to use an experimental learning method to integrate the programme's laboratory and theory components.

Programme Outcome/Programme Learning Goals/Programme Learning Outcome:

PO1: Understand and analyse the concepts of physics and y apply them to real-world situations

PO2: Develop logical and analytical skills in physical sciences.

PO3: Exhibit professional skills to lead a successful career

PO4: Analyse the impact of chemicals in societal and environmental contexts.

Programme Specific Outcome:

PSO1: Understand and analyse the concepts of physics and Chemistry apply them to real-world situations

PSO2: Develop logical and analytical skills in physical and chemical sciences.

Programme Educational Objective:

PEO1: The courses in BSc (Physics, Chemistry/Honours/Honours with Research) provide students with vital core science concepts and an application-oriented undergraduate education.
Assesment Pattern

End Semester Examination Question Paper Pattern (Theory) 

Time: 3 hrs                                                                                           Max marks: 100         

The question paper will contain 6 questions (10 marks each) that are mandatory and 4 questions (10 marks each) that will have internal choice.

 

Questions could be designed to test conceptual knowledge, theory and analytical skills. A minimum of 40% of the questions would be to challenge the students for analytical ability.

 

              Grading: 

Percentage

Grade

Grade Point      (4 Point Scale)

Interpretation

Division

80 -100

A+

4.00

Outstanding 

First class with Distinction

73 - 79

A

3.67

Excellent

First Class

66 - 72

B+ 

3.33

Very good

60 - 65

B

3.00

Good 

55 - 59

B 

2.67

Average

 

Second Class

 

50 - 54

C+

2.33

Satisfactory

45 - 49

C

2.00

Pass 

Pass Class

40 - 44

D

1.00

Pass

0 -39

F

0

Fail

 

 

 

Examination And Assesments

Evaluation Pattern

Theory

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) 50%,   End Semester Examination (ESE) 50%

 

Component

Schedule

Duration

Marks

Marks reduced to

CIA I

Assignment/test/group task/presentation

Before Mid

Semester

Exam

(MSE)

 

20

10

CIA II

Mid Semester Test (MST)

Centralised

2 hours

50

 

25

CIA III

Assignment/test/group task/presentation

After MST

 

20

 

10

Attendance

75 – 79: 1 mark, 80 – 84: 2 marks, 85 – 89: 3 marks, 90 – 94: 4 marks, 95 – 100: 5 marks

 

05

ESE

Centralised

3 hours

100

 

50

 

Total

 

100

BLS141 - INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:03

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 This course introduces students to the basic principles of biology. Students will learn about the organization of life, including the cell theory and taxonomy, the chemistry of life, genetics, evolution, and ecology. The course will also cover current issues in biology such as biotechnology and environmental sustainability.

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will be able to describe the fundamental principles and concepts of biology, including the organization of life and the chemistry of living systems.

CO2: Students will be able to explain the role of genetics in inheritance, diversity, and evolution.

CO3: Students will be able to analyze the impact of human activities on the environment and the measures that can be taken to promote sustainability.

CO4: Students will be able to evaluate the ethical implications of advances in biotechnology and their impact on society.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Biology
 

 

The scientific method and experimental design; The organization of life: cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems; Taxonomy and the diversity of life; Chemical elements and molecules essential to living systems

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Genetics and Evolution
 

 

Mendelian genetics and inheritance patterns; DNA structure and function, gene expression and regulation; Genetic diversity and evolution; Natural selection and adaptation

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Ecology and Environmental Biology
 

 

Ecosystems and biomes; Population dynamics and community interactions; Biodiversity and conservation; Human impact on the environment and sustainability

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Biotechnology and Ethics
 

 

Applications of biotechnology in medicine, agriculture, and industry, Ethical issues related to biotechnology; The impact of biotechnology on society; Regulations and policies related to biotechnology

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Campbell, N. A., & Reece, J. B. (2018). Biology (11th ed.). Pearson.
  2. Freeman, S., Quillin, K., Allison, L., Black, M., Taylor, E., & Podgorski, G. (2017). Biological Science (6th ed.). Pearson.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1.  Begon, M., Townsend, C. R., & Harper, J. L. (2006). Ecology: From Individuals to Ecosystems (4th ed.). Blackwell Publishing.
  2. Ricklefs, R. E., & Relyea, R. A. (2019). The Economy of Nature (8th ed.). W.H. Freeman.

  3. Kuby, J., Owen, J., & Kindt, T. J. (2019). Kuby Immunology (8th ed.). W.H. Freeman.

  4. Thompson, P. B., & Kaplan, D. M. (2019). Encyclopedia of Food and Agricultural Ethics (2nd ed.). Springer.

Evaluation Pattern

Attendance and Class Participation- 10%

Midterm Examination- 30%

Review paper/Research Paper- 20%

Seminar presentation – 10%

Final Examination - 30%

 

BLS142 - PRINCIPLES OF FORENSIC SCIENCE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Forensic science is the application of scientific principles and techniques to the investigation of crimes and legal issues. This course covers the fundamental principles of forensic science, including various scientific analysis techniques used in criminal investigations, legal and ethical issues, and types of evidence collected at crime scenes.

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will be able to Understand the principles and techniques used in forensic science investigations

CO2: Students will be able to describe the legal and ethical considerations associated with forensic science.

CO3: Students will be able to identify and analyze different types of evidence collected at crime scenes

CO4: Students will be able to evaluate scientific evidence in a legal context using proper documentation and reporting techniques

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Forensic Science
 

 

Introduction to forensic science; Historical development of forensic science; Branches and applications of forensic science; Legal and ethical issues in forensic science

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Physical Evidence
 

 

Types of physical evidence; Collection and preservation of physical evidence; Analysis of physical evidence; Interpretation and evaluation of physical evidence

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Biological Evidence
 

 

Types of biological evidence; DNA analysis; Serology analysis; Analyzing and interpreting biological evidence

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Digital Forensics
 

 Digital forensic investigations; Evidence collection in digital forensics; Analyzing and interpreting digital evidence; Legal and ethical considerations in digital forensics

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

  1. Saferstein, R. (2019). Forensic science: From the crime scene to the crime lab. Pearson Education.

  2. Criminal Justice & Forensics. (2017). Cengage.

  3. Fisher, B. A. (2019). Techniques of crime scene investigation. Taylor & Francis Group.

  4. Richard Saferstein, R. (2018). Criminalistics: An Introduction to Forensic Science. Pearson Education.

  5. Houck, M. M., & Siegel, J. A. (2010). Fundamentals of forensic science. Academic Press.

  6. Casey, E. (2018). Digital evidence and computer crime: Forensic science, computers, and the internet. Academic Press.

  7. Nelson, B., Phillips, A., & Steuart, C. (2016). Guide to computer forensics and investigations. Cengage

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

  1. Lee, H. C. (2016). Forensic science : an illustrated dictionary. CRC Press.

  2. Barry, J., & Cooper, J. (2018). Introduction to forensic science. Routledge.

  3. Houck, M. (2018). Trace evidence analysis: More cases in mute witnesses. Academic Press. 

  4. Brown, T. W. (2018). Handbook of Forensic Pathology, Second Edition. CRC Press.

  5. Barbara, J. (2011). Forensic anthropology: An introduction. CRC Press.

  6. Hall, M. (2017). Current practice in forensic medicine. John Wiley & Sons.

  7. Sammons, J., & Jenks, M. (2017). Digital forensics trial graphics: Teaching the jury through effective use of visual aids. Academic Press.

Evaluation Pattern

Attendance and Class Participation- 10%

Midterm Examination- 30%

Review paper/Research Paper- 20%

Seminar presentation – 10%

 

Final Examination - 30%

CHE101-1 - GENERAL CHEMISTRY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

In this introductory paper, the students acquire knowledge of the basic concepts of Physical, Organic, and Inorganic Chemistry. 

Course Outcome

CO1: Recall the fundamentals of structure and bonding.

CO2: Predict the chemical bonding in simple molecules.

CO3: Interpret the properties of organic molecules and reaction mechanisms.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Atomic Structure
 

Prelearning topics: Bohr’s theory and its limitations, Black body radiation, dual behaviour of matter and radiation, de Broglie’s relation, Heisenberg Uncertainty principle. Hydrogen atom spectra. Need of a new approach to Atomic structure.

 

 

Quantum mechanics: Postulates of quantum mechanics, Introduction, time independent Schrodinger equation and meaning of various terms in it. Significance of ψ and ψ2, Schrödinger equation for hydrogen atom. Radial and angular parts of the hydrogenic wave functions (atomic orbitals) and their variations for 1s, 2s, 2p, 3s, 3p and 3d orbitals (Only graphical representation). Radial and angular nodes and their significance. Radial distribution functions and the concept of the most probable distance with special reference to 1s and 2s atomic orbitals. Significance of quantum numbers, orbital angular momentum and quantum numbers ml and ms. Shapes of s, p and d atomic orbitals, nodal planes. Discovery of spin, spin quantum number (s) and magnetic spin quantum number (ms). Effective nuclear charge. Slater's Rules. *Stability of half-filled and completely filled orbitals,*concept of exchange energy. Relative energies of atomic orbitals, Anomalous electronic configurations.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Chemical Bonding and Molecular Structure
 

Ionic Bonding: General characteristics of ionic bonding. #Energy considerations in ionic bonding, lattice energy and solvation energy and their importance in the context of stability and solubility of ionic compounds. Statement of Born-Landé equation for calculation of lattice energy, Born-Haber cycle and its applications, polarizing power and polarizability. Fajan’s rules, ionic character in covalent compounds, bond moment, dipole moment and percentage ionic character.

Covalent bonding: VB Approach: Shapes of some inorganic molecules and ions on the basis of VSEPR and hybridization with suitable examples of linear, trigonal planar, square planar, tetrahedral, trigonal bipyramidal and octahedral arrangements. Concept of resonance and resonating structures in various inorganic compounds.

 

MO Approach: Rules for the LCAO method, bonding and antibonding MOs and their characteristics for s-s, s-p and p-p combinations of atomic orbitals, nonbonding combination of orbitals, MO treatment of homonuclear diatomic molecules (O2, N2) of 1st and 2nd periods (including idea of s-p mixing) and heteronuclear diatomic molecules such as CO, NO and NO+. Comparison of VB and MO approaches.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:7
Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry
 

Prelearning topics: Hybridizations, bond lengths, bond angles, bond energy. Localized and delocalized chemical bond, polarity of bonds, types of chemical reactions

 

 

Electronic Displacements: Inductive Effect, Electromeric Effect, Resonance, Hyperconjugation and steric effect. Effect of the above on strength of organic acids and bases: Comparative study with emphasis on factors affecting pK values. Cleavage of Bonds: Homolysis and Heterolysis. Nucleophiles and electrophiles. Reactive Intermediates: Carbocations, Carbanions, free radicals and carbenes - Structure, shape and reactivity of organic intermediates. Types of organic reactions: Addition, elimination, substitution, rearrangement and redox reactions (definition and one example each). 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Aliphatic Hydrocarbons
 

Prelearning topics: Classification, Nomenclature and sources of organic compounds.

 

Alkanes: (Upto 5 Carbons)

Preparation: Catalytic hydrogenation, from Grignard reagent. Reactions: Free radical Substitution: Halogenation. Selectivity and reactivity. (Mechanisms)

Cycloalkanes-Relative stabilities-Baeyer’s strain theory-Sache-Mohr theory of strainless rings.

Alkenes: (Upto 5 Carbons)

Preparation: Elimination reactions: Dehydration of alkenes and dehydrohalogenation of alkyl halides (Saytzeff’s rule); cis alkenes (Partial catalytic hydrogenation) and trans alkenes (Birch reduction). Mention stereoselective and regioselective reactions. Reactions: cis addition (alk. KMnO4) and trans-addition (bromine), Addition of HX (Markownikoff’s and anti-Markownikoff’s addition with mechanisms), Hydration, Ozonolysis, Hydroboration-oxidation.

Alkynes: (Upto 5 Carbons)                                                                                          

Prelearning topics: geminal and vicinal dihalides, basic concepts of addition and oxidation reactions.  Preparation: Acetylene from CaC2 and conversion into higher alkynes; by dehalogenation of tetra halides and dehydrohalogenation of vicinal-dihalides.

 

Reactions: formation of metal acetylides, addition of bromine and alkaline KMnO4, ozonolysis and oxidation with hot alkaline KMnO4.

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1]  B.R. Puri, L.R. Sharma and K.C. Kalia, Principles of Inorganic Chemistry, 31st Edition, Milestone Publishers and Distributors, New Delhi, 2013.

[2]  Bahl, A. &Bahl, B.S. Advanced Organic Chemistry, S. Chand, 2010.

[3]  B. Mehta, M. Mehta, Organic Chemistry, PHI Learning Private Limited, 2017.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1]  J.A. Lee, Scientific Endeavour, Addison Wesley Longman

[2]  D.A. Skoog, D.M. West, F.J. Holler and S.R. Crouch, Fundamentals of Analytical Chemistry, 8th Edition, Brooks/Cole, Thomson Learning, Inc., USA, 2004.

[3]  J. D. Lee, Concise Inorganic Chemistry, 5th ed., Blackwell Science, London, 2010.

[4]  Satya Prakash, Advanced Inorganic Chemistry, Volume 1, 5th Edition, S. Chand and Sons, New Delhi, 2012.

[5]  R.K. Prasad, Quantum Chemistry, New Age International, 2001

[6]  McQuarrie, J. D. Simon, Physical Chemistry – A molecular Approach, Viva Books.

[7]  I. N. Levine, Physical Chemistry, Tata McGraw Hill,

[8]  ManasChanda, Atomic structure and Chemical bonding in Molecular Spectroscopy” Tata McGraw Hill.

[9]  J. D. Lee, Concise Inorganic Chemistry, 5th edn., Blackwell Science, London.

[10]   B. R. Puri, L. R. Sharma, Kalia, Principles of Inorganic Chemistry, Milestone Publishers, New Delhi.

[11]   F. A. Cotton, G. Wilkinson and P. L. Gaus, Basic Inorganic Chemistry, 3rd ed., John Wiley.

[12]   B. Douglas, D. Mc Daniel, J. Alexander, Concepts and models in Inorganic Chemistry.

[13]   R. Gopalan, Inorganic Chemistry for Undergraduates, Universities Press, Hyderabad, 2009.

[14]   Jain and Sharma Modern Organic Chemistry 3rd edition, Vishal Publishing Company, 2009.

[15]   R. T Morrison, and R. N. Boyd. Organic Chemistry.  7thed. New Delhi: Prentice-Hall of India (P) Ltd., 2010.

[16]   S.M. Mukherji, S. P. Singh, and R. P. Kapoor. Organic Chemistry. 3rd, 12th Reprint, New Delhi: New Age International (P) Ltd. Publishers, 2009.

 

[17]   I. L Finar, Organic Chemistry Vol. II, 5thed. New Delhi: ELBS and Longman Ltd., reprint 2008.

Evaluation Pattern

No.

Component

Schedule

Duration

Marks

CIA1

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

Before MST

--

10

 

CIA2

Mid-Sem Test

[MST]

2 Hrs (50 marks)

25

CIA3

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

After MST

--

10

CIA3

Attendance (75-79 = 1, 80-84 = 2, 85-89 = 3, 

90-94 = 4, 95-100 = 5)

--

5

ESE

Centralized

3 Hrs (100 marks)

50

Total

100

CHE111-1 - CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS I (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:1

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is intended to impart basic analytical skills with an emphasis on volumetric analysis. It also emphasizes the importance of organized and systematic approach in carrying out experiments.

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate the physical parameters of liquids or solutions.

CO2: Perform the volumetric techniques for the quantitative analysis of various samples.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:60
Chemistry Practicals I
 

1.     Calibration of glassware.

2.     Determination of the surface tension of a liquid or a dilute solution using a stalagmometer.

3.     Study of the variation of surface tension of a detergent solution with concentration.

4.     Determination of viscosity of a liquid.

5.     Estimation of oxalic acid by titrating it with KMnO4.

6.     Estimation of water of crystallization in Mohr’s salt by titrating with KMnO4.

7.     Estimation of Fe (II) ions by titrating it with K2Cr2O7 using internal indicator.

8.     Estimation of Fe (II) ions by titrating it with K2Cr2O7 using external indicator.

9.     Estimation of Cu (II) ions iodometrically using Na2S2O3.

10.  Estimation of total alkalinity of water samples (CO32-, HCO3-) using double titration method.

 

11.  Measurement of chlorides in water samples by titrimetry (AgNO3 and potassium chromate)

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1]  Svehla, G. Vogel’s Qualitative Inorganic Analysis, Pearson Education, 2012.

 

[2]  Mendham, J. Vogel’s Quantitative Chemical Analysis, Pearson, 2009.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1]  Svehla, G. Vogel’s Qualitative Inorganic Analysis, Pearson Education, 2012.

 

[2]  Mendham, J. Vogel’s Quantitative Chemical Analysis, Pearson, 2009.

Evaluation Pattern

Scheme of assessment

 

1.  Continuous internal assessment of Practicals …………            20 Marks

2.  Mid-Sem practical Test …………………………………         20 Marks

3.  Record assessment ………………………………………         10 Marks

4.  End-semester Practical examination …………………..           50 Marks

  (Viva voce –10 marks; Performing experiment –  40 marks)      

                                        

                                 TOTAL                                                100 Marks

CHE161A-1 - COSMETIC CHEMISTRY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is aimed at creating awareness among the undergraduate students about the role of chemistry in day- to- day life. To learn more about cosmetics, their ingredients and other common chemicals used in daily life. This will help in selecting the appropriate products from the wide range available in the market. This will also develop in them, a sense of judicious use of cosmetics and other chemicals and also enhancement of self-esteem through proper grooming.

Course Outcome

CO1: Recall the various components present in cosmetics and their properties.

CO2: Understand the working of soaps, detergents and cleaners.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:3
Introduction to cosmetic chemistry
 

Introduction to cosmetic chemistry

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:4
Skin creams and lotions
 

Composition and property: Demonstration of Preparation of cold creams and vanishing cream

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Deodorants and antiperspirants
 

Composition and how they work       

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:4
Tooth pastes, mouth wash and tooth powder
 

Ccomposition and cleansing action, Demonstration of Preparation of a mouthwash, tooth powder and tooth paste                  

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Perfumes, colognes and aftershaves
 

Composition and properties Demonstration of Preparation of an aftershave lotion and shaving cream

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
Shampoos, hair colouring and hair removers
 

Composition and their action Demonstration of Preparation of shampoos

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:3
Nail polish, Face powder, pansticks, foundation and face masks
 

Composition and function Demonstration of  Preparation of face powders          

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:3
Lipsticks and Eye makeup
 

Demonstration of Preparation of lipsticks  

Unit-9
Teaching Hours:6
Soaps and detergents
 

Composition and cleansing action

Unit-10
Teaching Hours:6
Special purpose cleaners
 

Composition and working

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1].  Raymond Chang Chemistry, 8th Ed. Tata Mc Graw-Hill 2002

[2].  John Suchocki Conceptual Chemistry, 2nd Ed.Pearson Education. Inc. 2003

 

[3].John W. Hill, Doris K. Kolb Chemistry for changing times, 9th Ed. 2004

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1].  Raymond Chang Chemistry, 8th Ed. Tata Mc Graw-Hill 2002

[2].  John Suchocki Conceptual Chemistry, 2nd Ed.Pearson Education. Inc. 2003

 

[3].John W. Hill, Doris K. Kolb Chemistry for changing times, 9th Ed. 2004

Evaluation Pattern

No.

Component

Schedule

Duration

Marks

CIA1

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

Before MST

--

10

 

CIA2

Mid-Sem Test

[MST]

2 Hrs (50 marks)

25

CIA3

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

After MST

--

10

CIA3

Attendance (75-79 = 1, 80-84 = 2, 85-89 = 3, 

90-94 = 4, 95-100 = 5)

--

5

ESE

Centralized

3 Hrs (100 marks)

50

Total

100

CHE161B-1 - TECHNICAL JAPANESE FOR CHEMISTS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

It enables the students to understand the Japanese language essential for the translation of scientific literature which enhances the employment opportunities for the students.

Course Outcome

CO1: understand the writing system in Japanese scientific literature.

CO2: understand the basics of Japanese language used in scientific literature.

CO3: interpret the Japanese research papers and patents.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
Introduction
 

Sentence structure.Writing systems; Hiragana, Katakana, Kanji (On and Kun readings).Numbers, exercises

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:4
Particles
 

, , ,,,,, , , , , etc.  Exercises.                                   

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Adjectives, Adverbs and Verbs
 

-adjectives and -adjectives, past tense of adjectives. Adverbs. いちだ verbs, ごだ verbs and irregular verbs. Past forms, connective forms, conjunctive forms, passive forms and causative forms of verbs.

 

Transitive-Intransitive verb pairs. Examples and Exercises.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:4
Conditional forms, Comparative and Superlative Expressions
 

Conditional sentences with ,ければ,なら,たら, かった forms.Comparative expressions using ぐら, and ほど.Words implying a comparison (以上,以下,以外,以内,以前,以後).

 

Superlative expressions using一番 and最も.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:3
Miscellaneous Expressions
 

Construction with to, ,とす,とい, とよ,同時に,とき. Interrogative words with particles,.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
Chemical Nomenclature and Chemistry Vocabulary
 

Nomenclature of elements, binary compounds, bases, acids, salts, coordination compounds, organic compounds and biochemical compounds. Chemistry vocabulary.

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:3
Mathematical terminology
 

Numbers, units and counters. Numbers with prefixes and suffixes. Some mathematical expressions.

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:3
Vocabulary building in physics and biology
 

Vocabulary building in physics and biology

Unit-9
Teaching Hours:2
Utilization of online resources for translation
 

Utilization of online resources for translation

Unit-10
Teaching Hours:6
Online dictionaries and translators. Translation exercises
 

Online dictionaries and translators.  Translation exercises

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1]   Edward E.Daub, R.Byron Bird and Nobuo Inoue, Basic Technical

      Japanese, University of Wisconsin Press.

 

[2]   Different online resources available on internet.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1]   Edward E.Daub, R.Byron Bird and Nobuo Inoue, Basic Technical

      Japanese, University of Wisconsin Press.

 

[2]   Different online resources available on internet.

Evaluation Pattern

No.

Component

Schedule

Duration

Marks

CIA1

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

Before MST

--

10

 

CIA2

Mid-Sem Test

[MST]

2 Hrs (50 marks)

25

CIA3

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

After MST

--

10

CIA3

Attendance (75-79 = 1, 80-84 = 2, 85-89 = 3, 

90-94 = 4, 95-100 = 5)

--

5

ESE

Centralized

3 Hrs (100 marks)

50

Total

100

COM143 - ENTREPRENEURSHIP DEVELOPMENT AND SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Entrepreneurship is not just about start-ups: it is a topic that is rapidly growing in importance in government policy and in the behaviour of established firms. The course provides students with an understanding of the role and personality of the entrepreneur, and a range of skills aimed at successful planning of entrepreneurial ventures. Material covered includes fostering creativity and open-mindedness, knowledge acquisition and management, innovation systems, screening and evaluating new venture concepts, market evaluation and developing a marketing plan, legal Issues Including intellectual property, preparation of venture budgets, and raising finance. The major piece of assessment is the writing of a comprehensive business plan for a new venture.

Course Outcome

CO 1: Discuss the fundamental concept and emerging trends of entrepreneurship.

CO 2: Elaborate the entrepreneurial process and classify the different styles of thinking.

CO 3: Develop and summarize the creative problem-solving technique and types of innovation.

CO 4: Compile the legal and regulatory framework and social responsibility relating to entrepreneur.

CO 5: Create a business model for a start-up.

CO 6: Build competence to identify the different sources of finance available for a start-up and relate their role in different stages of business.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to Entrepreneurship
 

Evolution, Characteristics, Nature of Entrepreneurship, Types, Functions of Entrepreneur, Distinction between an Entrepreneur and a Manager, Concept, Growth of Entrepreneurship in India, Role of Entrepreneurship in Economic Development, Emerging trends of contemporary entrepreneurship – Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Globalisation, changing demands, unemployment, changing demographics, Institutional support, ease of entry in the informal sector

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
The Entrepreneurial Process
 

Steps in the Entrepreneurial Process: Generating Ideas, Opportunity Identification, Business concepts, Businessconcepts,Resources(Financial,PhysicalandHuman), Implementing and managing the venture, Harvesting the venture, Design Thinking, Systems Thinking, Agile thinking and Lean thinking Blue Ocean Strategy, Role and relevance of mentors, Incubation cell, Methods of brainstorming ideas.

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Creativity and Innovation
 

Creativity, Principles of creativity, Source of New Idea, Ideas into Opportunities. CreativeProblemSolving:Heuristics,Brainstorming,Synectics, ValueAnalysisInnovationandEntrepreneurship: Profits and Innovation, Principles of Innovation, Disruptive, Incrementaland Open innovations, Nurturing and Managing Innovation, Globalization, Concept andModelsofInnovation, MethodsofprotectingInnovationandcreativity,SignificanceofIntellectualPropertyRights,Patents & Copy right, Business Model Canvas, and Lean Management. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Entrepreneurship Practice
 

EssentialsofBusinessOwnership:Typesofventures,RiskandBenefits,LegalandRegulatoryFramework,EthicsandSocialResponsibility,MarketResearch(ventureopportunityscreening), Feasibility Analysis, Introduction to the Business Plan, Developing the BusinessModel for starting a new venture, E-Commerce and Growing the Venture: The Internet andits impact on venture development

Approaches to E-Commerce, Strategies for E-CommerceSuccess,The nature of international entrepreneurship and their importance

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Sources of raising capital
 

Different sources of financing for start-ups, stages of financing involve in start-ups, advantages and disadvantages of the different sources of financing, Mezzanine finance, Specific financial assistance from government and financial institutions to promote entrepreneurship, Venture Valuation Methods

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Allen,K.R.(2011), “LaunchingNewVentures:AnEntrepreneurialApproach”,6thEdition.Mason,Ohio: South-WesternCengage Learning.
  2. Kuratko,DonaldF.Entrepreneurship:(2010) Theory,Process,Practice9thEdition.Mason,Ohio: South-WesternCengage Learning
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Scarborough,N.M.(2011),“EssentialsofEntrepreneurshipandSmallBusinessManagement”,6thEdition. NewJersey:PrenticeHall.
  2. Verstraete,T.and Jouioson-Laffitte,E.(2012),“ABusinessModelforEntrepreneurship”,
  3. Cheltenham:EdwardElgarPublishingLtd.
  4. Poornima Charantimath,(2007) “EntrepreneurshipDevelopment-SmallBusinessEnterprise”,Pearson Education.
  5. RoberDHisrich,MichaelPPeters,DeanAShepherd,(2007), Entrepreneurship,(6ed.), The McGraw-Hillcompanies.
  6. RajivRoy,(2011),Entrepreneurship,(2ed.)OxfordUniversityPress
Evaluation Pattern

CIA I (a) Multiple Choice Questions (MCQ)

CIA I (b) Video Content Creation

 

CIA II Case Study Analysis

 

CIA III (a) Multiple Choice Questions(MCQ)

CIA III (b) Business Plan Creation + VIVA

 

CIA I (a): Week 1 & 2: MCQ (5 Marks)


Google Form/Google Classroom based Quiz consisting of MCQs to test the basic concepts relating to Unit 1 and 2. The date of examination is on or before 05-08-2023.  This would be an individual assessment with a set of 10 questions, 5 each from unit 1 and 2.  The details of this assignment, and the penalties for not attending shall be posted in the Google Classroom.

 

CIA I (b) Preparing a video interview of an Entrepreneur (Individual Assignment) 10 marks

Every student shall identify an entrepreneur and prepare a 15 minutes video interview on them.  Orientation about the video preparation shall be given by the respective faculty in the first week of the semester itself. Later a Google spreadsheet of students list shall be sent to the students.  Within a week the students need to enter the name of the entrepreneurs identified so as to avoid repetition in their selections and start preparing the interview. Once the entrepreneur is finalized, an orientation about plagiarism policies shall be given by the faculty.  The last date of the video submission is 10-08-2023, before 06:00 PM.  Inability to submit the video on or before the due date should be priorly intimated to the faculty.  Any delay in submission without prior consent or approval shall lead to a penalty of marking the student ZERO in this component. 

 

The video shall be assessed based on the following rubrics. Report submitted will be valued for 10 marks.

More details of the report:

 

  1. The video should include genesis, growth, management contributions, challenges, how they overcome, achievements, major entrepreneurship inferences.
  2. References and sources should be mentioned as per APA 6th Edition, towards the end of the video.
  3. The video interview should be a minimum of 15 minutes.
  4. Last date for submission 10th August 2023, late submission within two days of the scheduled date, will carry a penalty deduction of two marks. 

 

CIA II - Case Study (15 marks)

Group of not more than six members in a team will be formed randomly in the class based on the subject teacher’s discretion. Each group shall gather content and solve the assigned case study and submit a written report of the same. Report shall include the introduction to the case, highlights and objectives, conceptual definitions, detailed analysis, findings and suggestion, conclusion.  Groups are free to use all authentic sources to gather information. Once the case study is finalized, an orientation about case analysis, report writing, and plagiarism policies shall be given by the faculty.  The last date of the case analysis report submission is 30-09-2022, before 06:00 PM.  The report can be supported with article reviews, statistical facts and examples and book references.


More Details of the Report:

1.      Case Study has to be based on growth of Entrepreneurship in India or Emerging trends of contemporary entrepreneurship.

 

  1. References as per APA 6th Edition, and Appendix.
  2. Detailed analysis of the problem and alternatives available should form part of the report.
  3. The written report should be a minimum of 6 pages.
  4. Last date for submission 30th September, 2023, late submission within two days of the scheduled date, will carry a penalty deduction of two marks. 

 

CIA III (a): Week 15 & 16: MCQ (5 Marks)

 


Google Form/Google Classroom based Quiz consisting of MCQs to test the basic concepts relating to Unit 1 and 2. The date of examination is on or before 02-11-2023.  This would be an individual assessment with a set of 10 questions, 5 each from Units 1 and 2.  The details of this assignment, and the penalties for not attending shall be posted in the Google Classroom.

 

CIA III (b) Business Plan and viva-voce (10 marks)


The same group allotted for Case Study report shall continue. Once the idea for the business plan is finalized, an orientation about various components of the business plan, report writing, and plagiarism policies shall be given by the faculty. However, every student shall contribute in the construction of a
creative and technical business plan in detail consisting details from idea to implementation stage. The report will be valued for 10 marks by a panel of three external reviewers. The assessment criteria shall be discussed and finalized before the final submission and in consonance with the inputs and suggestions 
of the reviewers identified.  This criterion shall also be presented and discussed with the students prior to the final submission.  Though this is a group assignment, the assessment of the contribution of each student would be done individually.

More Details of the Report:

§  The report shall include details on value proposition, business and revenue model, sustainability

§  The written report should be a minimum of 10 pages.

§  References as per APA 6th Edition, and Appendix.

Last date for submission 5th November 2023, late submission within two days of the scheduled date, will carry a penalty deduction of two mark 

CSC143 - WEB DESIGNING USING HTML, PHP AND MYSQL (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course covers the fundamentals of HTML and PHP for web development. Students will learn HTML tags for content structuring and essential PHP scripting concepts, including variables, conditional statements, and error handling. Additionally, they will explore form handling, loops, and MySQL database interactions using PHP. By the end, students will be equipped to create dynamic web applications and understand the essentials of web programming.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand and apply HTML basics, including tags for structure, lists, images, hyperlinks, and tables.

CO2: Develop PHP scripts with variables, data types, conditional statements, and error handling techniques.

CO3: Utilize PHP for form handling, switch-case statements, loop structures, and working with arrays in MySQL database.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Unit-1
 

 

Basic HTML tags- HTML, HEAD, BODY, TITLE, Paragraphs, Headings, Line Breaks, Dividers- P, H1, …H6, BR, HR, Character Entity References- Quotes, ampersands, angle brackets, and non-breaking spaces Lists- OL, UL, DL, Formatting-URL and Paths, Images- IMG, Hyperlinks, Table-TABLE, TR, TD, TH, Form-FORM, INPUT, TEXTAREA, SELECT, OPTION, Frames-FRAMESET, FRAME

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
PHP Basic
 

Writing PHP scripts - Writing PHP scripts, learn about PHP code structure, how to write and execute a simple PHP script and to add comments within your code.

Variables and Data Types- Learn about Variables, values and Data Types in PHP: boolean, integer, float, string, array, object, Resource, null.

Numbers and mathematical Operators- Introducing Numbers and mathematical 0perators, some PHP functions for more complex operations with numbers.

PHP Strings- Working with strings, using simple and double quotes, escaping quotes and other characters, concatenating strings, some functions for strings.

 Constants- Introducing Constants, syntax for defining constants, differences between variables and defined constants.

PHP Error Handling and Debugging-Error Handling, debugging and trigger errors and how to adjust the level of error reporting, handling exceptions.

 

If ... Else conditionals, Comparative and Logical operators - Make PHP script takes decisions with If, Else, Elseif conditional statements. Compare two values with Comparative and Logical operators. The ternary operator.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Unit-3
 

Using HTML Forms - Using HTML Forms, PHP form handling, get data sent from form fields through GET and POST method, form validation.

$_GET, $_POST Variables - How to send data with get and post methods to a PHP script and access it with superglobal $_GET, $_POST variables.

Switch ... Case ... - PHP MySQL course - Switch ... Case ... conditional statement, switch with break and default instructions.

While Loops - Using While and Do Wile Loops. End the While loops with the break instruction. Syntax and examples.

For and For each Loops - Using for () and for each () Loops. End the "For" loops with the break instruction. Syntax and examples.

 

PHP Arrays - Creating Numeric (indexed) Arrays and Associative arrays. Accessing, modifying and traversing array elements.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Unit-4
 

PHP MySQL Introduction, Data Types - PHP MySQL Introduction, database structure, tables. MySQL naming rules, and column's data types.

PHP MySQL - INSERT INTO - Insert data in MySQL table, INSERT INTO query. Insert data from a form into a database.

 

PHP MySQL - SELECT, ORDER BY - Retrieve and display data from a MySQL table, SELECT SQL command. Determine the number of records. Sort query results with ORDER BY clause (ASC and DESC).

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Unit-5
 

PHP MySQL - WHERE and LIKE - Selecting specific data from a database with the WHERE clause and Conditionals. Check for string matching with LIKE and NOT LIKE terms.

PHP MySQL – UPDATE - UPDATE query to edit / change existing records in MySQL table.

 

PHP MySQL – DELETE - The DELETE statement, used to entirely remove records from a database table.

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1] Powell, HTML & XHTM: The Complete Reference, 4th Edition, Tata McGraw-Hill Edition
[2] Steven Holzner, PHP: The Complete Reference, McGraw-Hill Higher Education, 2008


Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

[1] Robin Nixon, Learning PHP, My SQL and Java Script, Kindle Edition, O'Reilly Media 2009.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 50%

ESE 50%

ENG181-1 - ENGLISH (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
  • To expose learners to a variety of texts to interact with
  • To help learners classify ideologies and be able to express the same
  • To expose learners to visual texts and its reading formulas
  • To help learners develop a taste to appreciate works of literature through the organization of language
  • To help develop critical thinking
  • To help learners appreciate literature and the language nuances that enhances its literary values
  • To help learners understand the relationship between the world around them and the text/literature
  • To help learners negotiate with content and infer meaning contextually
  • To help learners understand logical sequencing of content and process information

·         To help improve their communication skills for larger academic purposes and vocational purposes

·         To enable learners to learn the contextual use of words and the generic meaning

·         To enable learners to listen to audio content and infer contextual meaning

·         To enable learners to be able to speak for various purposes and occasions using context specific language and expressions

·         To enable learners to develop the ability to write for various purposes using suitable and precise language.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand how to engage with texts from various countries, historical, cultural specificities, and politics and develop the ability to reflect upon and comment on texts with various themes

CO2: Develop an analytical and critical bent of mind to compare and analyze the various literature they read and discuss in class

CO3: Develop the ability to communicate both orally and in writing for various purposes

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
1. The Happy Prince- Oscar Wilde 2. Sonnet 18- William Shakespeare
 
  • 1. The Happy Prince- Oscar Wilde
  • 2. Sonnet 18- William Shakespeare

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
Language
 

Common errors- subject-verb agreement, punctuation, tense errors  Just a minute talk, cubing

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
1. Why We Travel-Pico Iyer
 

 Why We Travel-Pico Iyer 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

Sentence fragments, dangling modifiers, faulty parallelism,

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:4
1. Thinking Like a Mountain By Aldo Leopold
 

Thinking Like a Mountain  By Aldo Leopold

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:4
language
 

Note taking

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Aarushi-Hemraj Murder Article
 

 

Aarushi-Hemraj Murder Article 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Language
 

Newspaper report

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:4
1. My Story- Nicole DeFreece
 

 

 My Story- Nicole DeFreece

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:4
Language
 

Essay writing

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:4
Language
 

Paraphrasing and interpretation skills

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:4
Casey at the Bat- Ernest Lawrence Thayer
 
  • Casey at the Bat-  Ernest Lawrence Thayer
Text Books And Reference Books:

ENGlogue 1

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Additional  material as per teacher manual will be provided by the teachers

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1=20 

CIA 2=50 

CIA 3= 20 

ESE= 50 marks

EST141 - TRAVEL AND TRAVEL NARRATIVES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Travel Literature is one of the most popular areas of study and research today. Theoretical and practical understanding of travel and Travel Literature has evolved a lot in its journey to the present. We discuss journeys at multiple levels; physical, philosophical, psychological, religious, internal, external etc. The involvement of multidisciplinary perspectives has enriched the whole understanding of travel. Questions like why people travel and what happens when one sets out on a journey becomes so pertinent to the whole discipline. This course will try to engage with the ideas of travel and writing on travel from a chronological and historical perspective. This course will also provide students with a modern and comprehensive way of understanding the world of travel and travel narratives.

 

Course Objective: This course is aimed at providing a comprehensive introduction and survey on the contemporary world of travel and travel narratives. The course is aimed at providing students a direct engagement with the modern theoretical understanding of the travel narratives.

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will be able to understand the history and development of travel literature

CO2: Students will be able to get an idea of Travel narratives in India

CO3: This will provide an introductory peek into the theory of Travel and Travel writing

CO4: Students will Will be able to critically and academically engage with travel writings

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
What is Travel ? A Basic introduction
 

Travel is the buzz word of the day. In the fast-changing modern world travel plays a vital role in shaping up thoughts and aspirations of people. People travel for multiple reasons like to enjoy, to study, as a profession, etc and the theoretical understanding of travel needs to be taken into account at the beginning itself. Understanding travel in the light of modern socio-political and economic scenario is also very important in today’s global scenario. These basic positions of the course would enable students to look at travel in a broader context to create a better world with diversity and inclusivity.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Travel Writing: An Overview
 

This unit is intended to give students an over view of the evolution of the genre of Travel Writing. Some important theories of travel writing will be introduced in this module along with the evolution of travel narratives in India.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Indian Travel Narratives
 

This module focuses on the evolution of Indian Travel Narratives.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Women and Travel Writing in India
 

This unit is trying to look at the rise and development of women travellers historically and sociologically. This will enable students to critically evaluate the Indian scenario of travel narratives.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Unit I: What is Travel – Basic introduction

1.     Pratt, Mary Louise. Imperial Eyes: Studies in Travel Writing and Transculturation.Routledge, 1992.

2.     Lislie, Debbie. The Global Politics of Contemporary Travel Writing, Cambridge University Press, 2009 Print.

Unit II: Travel Writing: An Overview

1)    Hulme, Peter, and Tim Youngs, eds., 2002. The Cambridge Companion to Travel Writing. Cambridge: Cambridge UP.

2)    Said, Edward (1983). ‘Traveling Theory.’ The World, the Text, and the Critic. [1982]. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP. 226–47.

Unit III: Indian Travel Narratives

1)    Bhattacharji, Shobhana(ed). 2008. Travel Writing in India, Sahitya Academy, New Delhi.

        2)    Mandal, Somadatta.  Indian Travel Narratives, Rawat Publications, New Delhi. 2010. 

Unit IV: Women and Travel Writing in India

1.     Ghose, Indira. Women Travellers in Colonial India: The Power of the Female Gaze OUP Delhi 1998 Print. Pp.1-19

2.     Nath, Shivya. The Shooting Star: A girl, her backpack and the World, Penguin 2017.

      

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1)    Pratt, Mary louis. 1992. Imperial Eyes, Travel Writing and Transculturation, London: Routledge.

2)    Tagore, Rabindranath. 1962. Diary of a Westward Voyage. Asia Publishing House.

3)    Dalrymple, William. Nine Lives: In Search of the Sacred in Modern India. Bloomsbury, New Delhi.2010.

1.                 4)    Jung, Anees. Unveiling India: A Woman’s Journey, Penguin India,1986.

 5) Bohls, E. A. (1995). Women travel writers and the language of aesthetics, 1716-1818 (No. 13). Cambridge University Press.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Examination and Assessment

Assessment Pattern    

 

20 (CIA 1)

20 (CIA 3)

50 (CIA 2)

50 (End Semester)

CIA I and III can be either written analysis/presentation of a travel narrative analysis of a popular writer of contemporary time, debates or seminar/panel discussions.

Mid semester exam – A written paper on the modules covered for 50 marks. Section A will have questions (6x5 =30 marks). Section B will have 2 analytical questions (10 marks each) to assess conceptual clarity and understanding of the domain.

End-semester exam – Two sections: Section A (30 marks) will have 3 questions (10 marks each) testing the knowledge on the evolution of the genre. Section B (20 Marks)will have 2 conceptual/Analytical question (10 marks each).

EST148 - THE OCEANS IN CINEMA: A BLUE HUMANITIES READING (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Moving from land to ocean marks a shift in our understanding with fluidity as the focal point. ‘Blue Humanities’ or ‘Blue Cultural Studies’ uses the ocean as the lens to foreground diverse historical, social, cultural, economic and political aspects. The expansive field of Blue Humanities adopts a multidisciplinary approach, weaving together insights from environmental studies, oceanography, marine studies, cultural studies, film studies, history, etc. The course specifically focuses on revisiting the cliched conceptualization of the ocean as vast, alien, terra nullis and ahistorical. The ‘Oceanic Turn’ transitions from the surface to the depths below to explore the three-dimensional ocean through socio-cultural representations. Reading the ocean and the sea through cinema from across the world will help understand how the ocean is portrayed in myriad ways ‘foregrounding and problematizing issues connected to gender, race, pollution, social justice, maritime activities, privatization, globalization, capitalism ontologies’ to revisit our established thought regimes. 

Course Outcome

CO1: ? Appreciate and interpret the ocean in the light of Blue Humanities

CO2: ? Analyze and understand the changing relationships between societies and the ocean through the cinematic representations

CO3: ? Rethink and initiate action towards oceanic thinking and sustainability

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Knowing the Ocean: Re-visiting History and Origins
 

The unit will provide an alternative reading of our established understanding of ‘Origins’ with reference to the ocean – formation of the earth, the oceans, plants and animals and human beings. Destabilizing the pre-set reading of the formation of the world and prioritizing the land over the sea, the unit will help refocus the establishment of life in the Universe.

 

·       Excerpts from Rachel Carson, The Sea Around Us

·       Steve Mentz, “Two Origins: Alien or Core?”

·       Philip E. Steinberg and Kimberley Peters, “Wet Ontologies, Fluid Spaces: Giving Depth to Volume Through Oceanic Thinking”

 

 

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:13
Mapping the Ocean: Reading through Blue Humanities
 

The unit will throw light on the field of Ecocriticism with specific focus on Blue Humanities and its emerging engagement with the oceans around the world. The unit will help position the study of the oceans in the field of Humanities with specific reference to Cultural studies to frame the Blue Cultural Studies.

·       Excerpts from Sidney I. Dobrin, “Unearthing Ecocriticism”

·       John R.  Gillis – “The Blue Humanities”https://www.neh.gov/humanities/2013/mayjune/feature/the-blue-humanities

 

·       Helen M Rozwadowski, Oceans in three Paradoxes: Knowing the Blue through Humanities – Virtual Exhibition https://www.environmentandsociety.org/exhibitions/oceans-three-paradoxes

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Seeing the Ocean: Re-viewing the ocean through cinema
 

The unit will probe into pivotal aspects surrounding the construction of the ocean space through filmic representations of the ocean. The intent is to analyze through a range of issues informing the oceanic representations in films to unearth the pluri-focussed politics, both explicit and otherwise, manoeuvring through them - Maritime histories and activities, Aquatic world, Disasters, Conquests, Wars, Exploration, Adventure, Folk Tales and Myths, Colonialism and Postcolonialism, Gender, Race, Capitalism, International Relations, Globalization, Ecology and Medical Humanities.

·       James L. Smith and Steve Mentz - Learning an Inclusive Blue Humanities: Oceania and Academia through the Lens of Cinema

·       Stefan Helmreich, “Massive movie waves and the Anthropic Ocean”

·       Dilip M Menon, “Sea-Ing Malayalam Cinema”

·       Rie Karatsu, The Representation of the Sea and the Feminine in Takeshi Kitano's A Scene at the Sea (1991) and Sonatine (1993)” (SLA)

 

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Carson, Rachel. The Sea Around Us. Canongate, 2021

Dobrin, Sidney I. Blue Ecocriticism and the Oceanic Imperative. Routledge, 2021.

Mentz, Steve. An Introduction to Blue Humanities. Routledge, 2023.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

·       Blum, Hester. “Introduction: Oceanic Studies.” Atlantic Studies, vol. 10, no. 2, June 2013, pp. 151–55. 

·       Chen, Cecilia, Janine MacLeod, and Astrida Neimanis, editors. Thinking with Water. McGill-Queens Univ. Press, 2013. 

·       DeLoughrey, Elizabeth. “Toward a Critical Ocean Studies for the Anthropocene.” English Language Notes, vol. 57, no. 1, Apr. 2019, pp. 21–36.

·       Di Leo, Jeffrey R., editor. “Blue Humanities,” Symploke, vol. 27 no. 1, 2019, pp. 7-10· 

·       Gillis, John R. “The Blue Humanities.” HUMANITIES, vol. 34, no. 3, May/June 2013.

·       Jue, Melody. Wild Blue Media: Thinking through Seawater. Duke Univ. Press, 2020.

·       Mentz, Steve. “Toward a Blue Cultural Studies: The Sea, Maritime Culture, and Early Modern English Literature.” Literature Compass, vol. 6, no. 5, Sept. 2009, pp. 997–1013. 

·       Mentz, Steve. Ocean. Bloomsbury Academic, 2020.

·       Mentz, Steve. Shipwreck Modernity: Ecologies of Globalization, 1550-1719. Univ. of Minnesota Press, 2016.

·       Raban, Jonathan, editor. The Oxford Book of the Sea. Oxford Univ. Press, 1993.

·       Roorda, Eric. The Ocean Reader: History, Culture, PoliticsDuke Univ. Press, 2020. 

·       Steinberg, Philip E. The Social Construction of the Ocean. Cambridge Univ. Press, 2001.

 

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

As the course is multidisciplinary, the assessments will be done periodically to gauge the student’s level of understanding and learning. Review writing, weaving together a scrapbook, review tests and photo essays will form part of the assessment.

 End semester evaluation will be based on students setting up an online archive. They shall create an online archive selecting topics and presenting them by blending texts, theory and research. The submission will also have a viva component.  

LAW141 - CYBER LAW (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Cyber law has emerged as a medium for growth with immense potential for solving many new and interesting challenges.  The course aims at appreciating one of the important emerging areas of law and the nitty-gritty involved in it. This introduces the students to the underlying philosophy of the subject and its relation to other areas focusing on human rights.

UNIT 1 is designed to introduce students to the role of law in technology, especially the internet and is designed to give a brief overview of the historical aspects of the internet. UNIT 2 acquaints the students with the regulation of cyberspace. UNIT 3 deals with digital contracts and information technology, while UNIT 4 deals entirely on cyber crimes which are rampant in the digital era.  UNIT 5 issues in E-commerce. Unit 6 deals with IPR issues in cyberspace and UNIT 7 deals with international regulation of cyberspace.

Course Outcome

CO1: Gain an understanding of the underlying philosophy of cyber law and its relation to information technology.

CO2: Facilitate an overall understanding on needs for regulation of information technology in India

CO3: Impart basic idea of information technology and its relation with digital signature

CO4: Acquaint with legal challenges arising out of privacy issues awareness about the various kinds of cyber crimes and legal issues and cases

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:3
UNIT 1 FUNDAMENTALS OF CYBER LAW
 

An overview of cyber world – Jurisprudence of cyber law – Scope of cyber law – Introduction to Indian cyber law

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:2
UNIT 2 CYBERSPACE
 

Meaning, nature and emergence of cyberspace – Attributes of cyberspace – Classification of cyberspace – Legal framework for cyberspace

 

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:2
UNIT 3 DIGITAL CONTRACTS
 

Law of digital contracts – Functions of digital signature – Electronic and digital signature – procedural and functional issues – Legal issues of digital signatures – Certifying authority – Regulatory framework of digital signatures

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:2
UNIT 4 CYBER CRIMES
 

Salient features – Cyber crime and related concepts – Types of crimes – Regulation of cyber crime – International perspective

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:2
UNIT 5 E-COMMERCE
 

Emerging significant of – e-Commerce – Transactions and Technology of e-Commerce – e-Commerce Contracts – Legal Issues of e-Commerce and Case Laws – e-Commerce Legislations

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:2
UNIT 6 IPR ISSUES
 

IPR - An overview – Copyright issues in Cyberspace – Trademark issues in Cyberspace – Computer software and related IPR issues – Domain names and related issues

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:2
UNIT 7 INTERNATIONAL SCENARIO IN CYBER LAWS
 

European convention of Cyber Crimes – UNCITRAL Model Law on e-commerce 1996 – International Legal Regime relating to IPR – Berne Convention, Rome Convention, WIPO Copyright, UDRP, OECD Convention on Database Protection – Domestic legal regime – Information Technology Act , 2000. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Seth Karnika, Computers Internet and New Technology Laws. Gurgaon: Lexis Nexis, 2013

Cyber Security & Cyber Laws - by Nilakshi Jain & Ramesh Menon, Wiley 2020

Cyber Crimes & Law - by Dr Vishwanath Paranjepe, 2nd Edtn 2019, Central Law Agency

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Cyber Crimes & Law - by Dr Vishwanath Paranjepe, 2nd Edtn 2019, Central Law Agency

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-I:   Assessment Description: Class test for 20 marks on assessing the understanding of the fundamentals of Cyber law. It is a class room test. 2 questions for 25 marks each carrying 12.5 marks.

CIA-II: Oral Presentation, shall be accompanied by PPT by a group of 5 students for maximum of 15 minutes on any Cyber  law issues.

CIA-III: Students will be given a specific topic or case law. They are required to identify the research issues and find an answer to it by analysing the available literature.

LAW143 - LABOUR AND SOCIAL WELFARE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

It is a solitary principle of industrial relations that a happy and content labourer is an indispensable asset for any employer. However, labourers have not received their due on account of historical wrongs, and in this era of a market economy, labourers do not seem to get the minimum standards of social security. As a result, industrial peace and harmony have remained a distant dream. Hence, constant efforts are being made by the governments to ameliorate the working conditions of labour in order to ensure minimum welfare for the workers.

Course Outcome

CO 1 : Explain the general concept of labour social welfare and also the constitutional foundation of the same

CO 2 : Analyse the role of the International Labour Organisation in the protection of Labour Welfare

CO 3 : Describe existing provisions relating to the working conditions of Labourers

CO 4 : Describe the legal provisions relating to the health, safety, and welfare conditions of the employees.

CO 5 : Analyze the legal provisions relating to Maternity benefits in workplaces

CO 6: Describe the legal provisions relating to and regulation of Contractual employment in India

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
INTRODUCTION
 

Meaning and nature of social security; Public assistance v. Public insurance; Constitutional foundations and the role of ILO

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
HEALTH, SAFETY AND WELFARE OF WORKERS
 

Introduction; Manufacturing and hazardous processes; Health, safety and welfare in factories; Working hours and employment of young persons 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
EMPLOYEES' INSURANCE
 

Introduction; Important definitions; ESI Corporation; Various benefits

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
MATERNITY BENEFIT
 

Introduction; Employment of or work by women; Right to payment of maternity benefit; Dismissal and deduction of wages

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
CONTRACT LABOUR
 

Introduction: nature and meaning; Licensing of contractors; Regulation and abolition of Contract Labour

Text Books And Reference Books:

Industrial Jurisprudence: A Critical Commentary by Dr EM Rao., Lexis Nexis., Second Edition 2015 p. 14-21

Labour and Industrial Law by H.L.Kumar., Universal Law Publishing Co., 2 volumes 15th edition 2010.,p.2082-2125

P.L.Malik‟s Industrial Law 2 Volumes., Eastern Book Company., 23rd Edition 2011.,p.2398-2405 

Pai, G. B. Labour Law in India. New Delhi: Butterworth, 2001. Rao, E. M. Industrial Jurisprudence, New Delhi: LexisNexis (India), 2004.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Industrial Jurisprudence: A Critical Commentary by Dr EM Rao., Lexis Nexis., Second Edition 2015 p. 14-21

Labour and Industrial Law by H.L.Kumar., Universal Law Publishing Co., 2 volumes 15th edition 2010.,p.2082-2125

P.L.Malik‟s Industrial Law 2 Volumes., Eastern Book Company., 23rd Edition 2011.,p.2398-2405 

Pai, G. B. Labour Law in India. New Delhi: Butterworth, 2001. Rao, E. M. Industrial Jurisprudence, New Delhi: LexisNexis (India), 2004.

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment outline: There are in all 3 components in the scheme of evaluation. Weightage for the components is indicated in percentage.

CIA I- Class Test carrying 25 marks

CIA II – Class Test carrying 25 marks

CIA III – Class Test carrying 50 marks

MAT001 - BRIDGE COURSE FOR MATHEMATICS I (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:15
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:0

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course aims at enabling the students to bridge the gap between the knowledge of the topics studied earlier and the current course Mathematics I.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand and apply fundamental mathematical concepts in geometry, algebra and calculus

CO2: Gain competency in solving problems involving functions, limits and continuity

CO3: Attain mastery on basic concepts and standard results in differential calculus

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Sets and Functions
 

Number System, Sets and Set operations, Funcions and Relations -  Properties and Representation 

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Algebra of Equations
 

Coordinate geometry - equations of standard curves and lines, Algebra - Solutions of simultaneous equations and quadratic equations, Resolving proper fractions into partial fractions

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Limits, continuity and differentiability
 

Limits, continuity and differentiability: basic concepts and standard results

Text Books And Reference Books:

G.B. Thomas, M.D.Weir and J. Hass, Thomas Calculus, 12th ed., Pearson Education India, 2015.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.   N. P. Bali, Differential Calculus, New ed. New Delhi, India: Laxmi Publications (P) Ltd., 2012.

2. Ralph P. Grimaldi, Discrete and Combinatorial Mathematics – An applied introduction, Pearson Addison Wesley, 5th Edition, 2004.

Evaluation Pattern

Assignment Description

Marks

Library work, Problem Solving Assignments

 30

Test

20

Total

50

MAT121-1 - MATHEMATICS -I (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course aims at enabling the students to know various concepts and principles of calculus and its applications. Sound knowledge of calculus is essential for the students of mathematics for the better perceptions of the subject and its development.

Course Objectives:

COBJ 1:  gain familiarity with the concepts of limit, continuity and differentiation.

COBJ 2:  understand the relationship between the concepts of limits, continuity and differentiability.

COBJ 3:analyse and interpret the different versions of mean value theorems.

Course Outcome

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Limit, Continuity and Differentiability
 

Limit of a function, continuity, types of discontinuities, differentiability, successive differentiation, Maxima and minima.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Mean value theorems and Applications
 

Mean value theorems: Rolle’s theorem, Lagrange’s and Cauchy’s first mean value theorems, Taylor’s theorem (Lagrange’s form and Cauchy’s forms of remainder), Maclaurin’s theorem, series expansions, indeterminate forms.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Functions of two variables
 

Introduction, partial derivatives, Euler's theorem, total derivatives, Taylor's theorem, McLaurin's expansion, Maxima and Minima.

Text Books And Reference Books:

N. P. Bali, Differential Calculus, New Delhi, Laxmi Publications (P) Ltd., India, 2012.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.      G. B. Thomas, J. Hass, C. Heil, and M. D.Weir, Thomas’ Calculus,  14th ed. New Jersey, USA: Pearson Education, Inc.,  2018.

2.      H. Anton, I. Bivens, S. Davis, Calculus, John Wiley and Sons Inc., 2002.

3.      F. Ayres and E. Mendelson, Schaum's Outline of Calculus, 6th Ed., USA: Mc. Graw Hill, 2013.

4.      J. Stewart, Single Variable Essential Calculus: Early Transcendentals, 2nd Ed., Belmont, USA: Brooks/Cole Cengage Learning., 2013.

5.      S. Narayanan, T. K. M. Pillay, Calculus, Reprint, S. Viswanathan Pvt. Ltd., India, 2009. (vol. I & II.)

6.      M. Spivak, Calculus, 3rd Ed. Cambridge University Press, 2006.

Evaluation Pattern

Component

Mode of Assessment

Parameters

Points

CIA I

MCQ,

Written Assignment,

Reference work, etc.,

Mastery of the core concepts

Problem solving skills.

 

10

CIA II

Mid-semester Examination

Basic, conceptual, and analytical knowledge of the subject

25

CIA III

Written Assignment, Project

Problem solving skills

10

Attendance

Attendance

Regularity and Punctuality

05

ESE

 

Basic, conceptual, and analytical knowledge of the subject

50

Total

100

MED144 - HARRY POTTER AND CONTEMPORARY ISSUES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course will provide students the opportunity to apply a variety of interdisciplinary approaches on popular young adult narratives. Students will be exposed to the real -world culture and physical environment that produced, shaped, and continues to inform the Harry Potter series, giving students greater insight into the importance of textual awareness and analysis.

Course Outcome

CO1: Explore the socio-cultural, historical, and technological perspectives behind Harry Potter phenomenon.

CO2: Develop critical thinking skills

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
History of wizards in cinema
 

History of wizards in cinema – P L Travers, Disney era, rise of Nanny McPhee, Arrival of Harry potter in bookstores, narrative development of book 1 – Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, Deconstruction of characters, significance of four houses, potions, beasts and spells.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Hogwarts a world class school
 

Hogwarts a world class school – dynamics of homework, relationship, bullying, teachers, team spirits and opponents, wizards and other, Debates on Morality, Technology and Media in Potter world, Privacy concerns with magical objects, Cultural Hegemony, Case Study on Snape and Dumbledore

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Sociological perspective
 

Sociological perspective – idea of home, community, clan and society, class struggle and dynamics, Aurora and Azkaban, Representation of Gender, Idea of family and institution, construction of power structures

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Film Screening
 

Screening of First and Last Harry Potter films

Text Books And Reference Books:

Harry Potter and Sorcerer’s Stone, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0590353427)

Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0439064873)

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0439136365)

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0439139601)

Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0439358071)

Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0439785969)

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0545139700)

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

Whited, L A & Grimes, K. (2015). Critical Insights: The Harry Potter Series. Salem Books.

Bell, C E (2018). Inside the World of Harry Potter: Critical Essays on the Books and Films.McFarland Publishers.

Evaluation Pattern

Assignments will be done through Google Classroom

CIA -1 – Class Test– 20 marks

CIA 2 –  – 50 marks

CIA 3 – Group Assignment – 20 marks

End Semester - Project – 50 marks

PHCH001 - BRIDGE COURSE IN PHYSICS AND CHEMISTRY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:0

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is an introduction to some of the basic understanding in physics required in the first year of undergraduate programme. One module of the course will be an introduction to the mathematical tools that is essential in understanding physics and basics of chemistry.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the basic physical aspects of logarithms, trigonometry, and calculus, and solve real world physical problems using these mathematical tools.

CO2: Students will also be able to apply the basics of mechanics in higher level concepts in these areas.

CO3: Recall the fundamentals concepts in chemistry

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Mathematical tools in Physics
 

Trigonometry: Basics of trigonometry, physical interpretation of the ratios, unit circle interpretation, graphs, identities, understanding the physical meaning of the identities and nature of the graphs, problem solving.

Logarithms: Natural and common log, inverse log and Euler’s number, physical phenomenon, human perception, and logarithm, problem solving.

 

Calculus: Physical origin of calculus, arriving at differential and integral formulae from graphical and physical basis, understanding the physical meaning of differentiation and integration, maxima and minima, problem solving. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Fundamentals of mechanics
 

Vectors: Scalars and vectors, basics of vectors, vector algebra.

Mechanics: Kinematic equations, Newton’s laws of motion, conservation laws, angular momentum, Torque.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Atomic Models
 

Black body radiation, photoelectic effect, /Compton effect, Thomson's model and its limitations Rutherford's model and its limitations Bohr's model and its limitations Dual nature of matter and light de Broglie's relationship Heisenberg uncertainty principle Concept of orbitals Concept of shells and subshells Quantum numbers Shapes of s, p and d orbitals 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Chemical Bonding and Molecular Structure
 

Valence electrons, Ionic bond, Covalent bond, Polar character of covalent bond, Covalent character of ionic bond, Valence bond theory, Resonance, Geometry of covalent molecules, VSEPR theory. Shapes of some simple molecules Molecular orbital theory of homonuclear diatomic molecules       

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Organic Chemistry
 

Hybridizations, bond lengths, bond angles, bond energy.

Localized and delocalized chemical bond, polarity of bonds, types of chemical reactions

Classification, Nomenclature and sources of organic compounds.

Text Books And Reference Books:

J. Nearing, Mathematical Tools for Physics, University of Miami Press, 2003

D. Halliday, J. Walker, R. Resnick, Fundamentals of Physics, Wiley India Pvt Ltd (6th Edition), 2006

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

K.F. Riley, M.P. Hobson, S.J. Bence, Mathematical Methods for Physics and Engineering, Cambridge University Press, 2006

 

M. L. Boas, Mathematical Methods in the Physical Sciences, John Wiley, 2005

Evaluation Pattern

Pre and post-assessment of the bridge course. The post-assessment will be out of 50 marks. 

PHY101-1 - MECHANICS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course aims to provide a thorough knowledge of the basic mechanics, such as kinematics, gravitation, work, energy, oscillations, properties of matter and solving problems on related topics, which develop the students' critical and analytical thinking skills.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand and conceptualize the forces acting on static and dynamic systems.

CO2: Solve problems related to the central force field and gravitation.

CO3: Analyze oscillatory motion, and evaluate simple harmonic motion. Understand the elastic properties and apply them to different materials.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Conservation of momentum and energy and fluid properties
 

Vector analysis: Review of vector algebra (Scalar and Vector product), applications for scalar and vector products, Vector derivatives, 1st order and second-order differential equations. Gradient, divergence, Curl and their significance, Vector Integration, Line, surface and volume integrals of Vector fields, Gauss divergence theorem and Stoke's theorem of vectors (statement only).

Conservation of momentum and energy: Review of Newton’s laws of motion - Conservative and non-conservative forces, Dynamics of a system of particles., Definition of centre of mass, centre of mass of two particles, group of particles. Conservation of momentum and energy, work–energy theorem and proof for the case of a falling body under gravity, the motion of rockets- equation of motion of space vehicle. Rotational motion: Angular velocity and angular momentum, torque, conservation of angular momentum.

Fluid properties: Surface tension - synclastic and anti-synclastic surface, excess of pressure, application to spherical and cylindrical drops and bubbles, variation of surface tension with temperature - Jaeger's method, drop weight method. Viscosity: Viscosity - Rate flow of liquid in a capillary tube - Poiseuille’s formula - Determination of coefficient of viscosity of a liquid - Stoke's method, variation of viscosity of a liquid with temperature. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Gravitation and oscillations
 

Gravitations: Newton’s law of gravitation. Motion of a particle in a central force field (general equation of motion in a plane, prove that angular momentum is conserved, areal velocity is constant). Kepler’s laws (qualitative). Satellite in circular orbit and applications. Geosynchronous orbits. Weightlessness. Basic idea of global positioning system (GPS).

Oscillations: Simple harmonic motion – simple pendulum: derivation of frequency of oscillation and total energy. Differential equation of SHM and its solutions. Kinetic and potential energy, total energy and their time averages. Damped oscillations.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Elasticity
 

Elasticity: Hooke’s law - Stress-strain diagram - Elastic moduli-Relation between elastic constants - Poisson’s Ratio-Expression for Poisson’s ratio in terms of elastic constants - Work done in stretching and work done in twisting a wire - Twisting couple on a cylinder - Determination of rigidity modulus by static torsion, torsion pendulum - Determination of Rigidity modulus and moment of inertia – Derivation for q, η and σ by Searle’s method.

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Kittel C. (1965). Mechanics Berkeley Physics Course, New Delhi: Tata Mcgraw Hill.
  2. Adler C. G. (1987). Does Mass Really Depend on Velocity? American Journal of Physics, 55(8), 739-743.
  3. Halliday D., Resnick R. and Walker J. (2016). Principles of Physics Extended, International Student Version, New Delhi: Wiley India Pvt. Ltd.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Reese R. L. (2003). University Physics, Brooks Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole Pub. Co.
Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) 50%,   End Semester Examination (ESE) 50%

 

 

Component

Schedule

Duration

Marks

Marks reduced to

CIA I

Assignment/test/group task/presentation

Before Mid

Semester

Exam

(MSE)

 

20

10

CIA II

Mid-Semester Test (MST)

Centralised

2 hours

50

 

25

CIA III

Assignment/test/group task/presentation

After MST

 

20

 

10

Attendance

75 – 79: 1 mark, 80 – 84: 2 marks, 85 – 89: 3 marks, 90 – 94: 4 marks, 95 – 100: 5 marks

 

05

ESE

Centralised

3 hours

100

 

50

 

Total

 

100

PHY111-1 - MECHANICS LAB (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The mechanics-related experiments included in this course enable the students to understand the theory better and develop application skills in a practical situations.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the theory and apply it to different mechanical systems.

CO2: Acquire basic skills in constructing the experimental design effectively.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
List of experiments
 

1. Length or diameter of an object using a vernier calliper, screw gauge and travelling microscope.

2. Moment of inertia of a flywheel.

3. Elastic constants of a wire by Searle’s method.

4. Acceleration due to gravity (g) by bar pendulum.

5. Acceleration due to gravity (g) and velocity of a freely falling body using digital timing technique.

6. Surface and interfacial tension between kerosene and water.

7. Coefficient of viscosity of a given liquid by Stoke’s method.

8. Modulus of rigidity of a wire by dynamic method.

9. Modulus of rigidity of a rod by the static method.

10. Verification of the law of conservation of energy.

11. To study the motion of a spring and calculate the spring constant and value of g.

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Worsnop B. L. and Flint H. T. (2005). Advanced Practical Physics (3rd ed.), New Delhi: Prentice Hall of India.
  2. Nelkon M. and Ogborn J. M. (1985). Advanced Level Physics Practicals (4th ed.), Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann Educational Publishers.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Panigrahi S. and Mallick B. (2015). Engineering Practical Physics, New Delhi: Cengage Learning India Pvt Ltd.
  2. Prakash I. and Krishna R. (2011). A Textbook of Practical Physics, Mumbai: Kitab Mahal Publisher.
Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) 50%,   End Semester Examination (ESE) 50%

 

Component

Duration

Marks

CIA

Class work, Pre-lab assessment, MSE

 

25

ESE

Experiment and viva voce

3 hours

 

25

 

 

Total

50

 

 

 

Each student should complete a minimum of 75 per cent of the allotted experiments to be eligible to attend practical ESE. The fair record of each experiment is to be attested by the lab faculty in charge in the same week.  

PHY161-1 - BASIC ELECTRONICS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This skill enhancement course on basic electronics includes the fundamental concepts in Electronic devices and circuits. This paper also gives an opportunity to the students to  learn the basic procedure in the designing of electronic circuits and also troubleshooting methods. In order to enable students to have an experience of electronics circuit design, the simulator tools are introduced in the course. The course also discusses e-waste and its hazards to sensitize the students as a part of societal engagement.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the basics of electronic devices, functioning of electronic circuits and basic instruments.

CO2: Apply the principles of electronic circuits to describe the applications of electronic systems

CO3: Analyze the circuits and solve numerical problems.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Fundamentals of electronics
 

Introduction, Major sectors of electronics industry and common applications, Electronic components, DC and AC voltage sources, ideal and practical representations and description. Electrical safety measures. Passive Components - Resistors, types, colour code, numerical examples on resistive circuits, Capacitors, principle, types, Inductor, principle, types. Active components - diode, Zener diode, construction, working and characteristics. Transistor, types, construction, operating modes and characteristics. Data sheet reference for the electrical specifications of the transistors. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Applications of semiconductor devices
 

Semiconductor diode as rectifier, halfwave and fullwave circuits, waveforms, applications. Filter circuits, need for filters, types, circuit diagram and description with waveforms. Zener diode as voltage regulator, DC power supply block diagram. Practical applications. Transistor as an electronic switch, circuit diagram, analysis of its working. Transistor as an amplifier, single stage amplifier, description, expressions for voltage gain, basic design procedure for the voltage gain, power amplifiers, types and applications (qualitative). Hands on with simulators (online/offline) to build and test the circuits with passive and active devices.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Electronic measuring instruments
 

Multimeter, need for multimeter, types - analog and digital, measurement options, Cathode Ray Oscilloscope - basic principle, simplified block diagram, working, applications. Digital Oscilloscope (mention only). Signal generator, basic principle, simplified block diagram, working, applications. Electronic waste - brief description, qualitative discussion of hazards of e-waste, the materials responsible, management of e-waste, Indian and global current scenario of e-waste and its management.

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1]. Malvino A. P. (2011). Principles of Electronics (7th ed.), New Delhi: Tata McGraw Hill.

[2]. Mehta V. K. (2014). Principles of Electronics (11th ed.), New Delhi: S. Chand & Co.

[3]. Darr J. and Horn D. T. (2000). How to Test Almost Everything Electronic, New York:McGraw-Hill Inc.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[4]. Frenzel Jr. L. E. (2010). Electronics Explained: The New Systems Approach to Learning Electronics, New York,Newnes.

Evaluation Pattern

No.

Components

Marks

CIA 1

Assignment/Test

10

CIA2

Mid Semester Exam

25

CIA 3

Quiz, online test, presentation, minor project

10

Attendance

 

05

ESE

 

50

Total

100

POL143 - SUBALTERN STUDIES: NARRATIVES OF THE COMMUNITIES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Subaltern Studies emerged as an intellectual project to counter the elitism prevailing in dominant historical narratives. This project aimed at giving voice to the people’s autonomous agency and struggles against the dominant forces. They offered a new outlook to narratives of Peasant, Adivasi and Woman’s movements in history. Over time, subaltern perspective was adopted to understand several issues concerning India and it still holds significant relevance in shedding light on contemporary issues. This course aims to introduce the students to subaltern studies and cultivate a new standpoint to understand and interpret the world.

Course Outcome

CO 1: Demonstrate knowledge about subaltern studies, its foundations, relevance methodology, and critique

CO 2: Analyse various narratives of communities, avenues of their struggles against the dominance

CO 3: Develop a sensibility to view the world from a subaltern perspective

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to Subaltern Studies
 

Foundation of Subaltern Studies Collective, Ranajit Guha, Need of subaltern studies, Resources, Subaltern life narratives

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Communities Countering the Dominance
 

State and subaltern citizens, Dominance without Hegemony, Peasant rebellions, Dalit and Adivasi Assertion, Indian Nationalism, Women’s question and the emergence of counter narratives

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Contemporary Avenues of subaltern struggles
 

Cricket and caste, Environmental movements, political and social mobilization of marginalized classes, public theatre and reclaiming dignity

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Subaltern Narratives in Film, Fiction and Folklore
 

-       Films: Laggan, Karnan, and The Discreet Charm of the Savarnas

-       Fiction: Subaltern in Mahasweta Devi’s stories (Jamunabati’s Mother, and Mother of 1084)

-       Folklore: Folktales from India, “So Many Words, So many sounds”: An Interview

-       People’s Archive of Rural India

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Critiquing the subaltern studies
 

- Exploring the Relevance and Irrelevance of subaltern studies

- Adding new locations? Or After subaltern studies?

Text Books And Reference Books:

 Guha, R. (1982). Preface. In R. Guha (Ed.), Subaltern Studies I (pp. vii–viii). Oxford University Press

Guha, R. (1982). On Some Aspects of the Historiography of Colonial India. In R. Guha (Ed.), Subaltern Studies I (pp. 1–8). Oxford University Press.

Kumar, R. (2021). Police Matters: The Everyday State and Caste Politics in South India, 1900–1975. Cornell University Press.

Guha, R. (2005). ‘The Moral that can be Safely Drawn from the Hindus’ Magnificent Victory’: Cricket, Caste and the Palwankar Brothers. In J. H. Mills (Ed.), Subaltern Sports: Politics and Sport in South Asia (pp. 83–106). Anthem Press.

        Ahuja, A. (2019). Mobilizing the Marginalized. Oxford University Press.

       Chatterjee, P. (2012). After subaltern studies. In Economic and Political Weekly (Vol. 47, Issue 35).

       Ramanujan, A. K. (2009). Folktales From India. Penguin India.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bhadra, G. (1983). Two Frontier Uprisings in Mughal India. In R. Guha (Ed.), SS II (pp. 43–59). Oxford University Press.

Berg, D. E. (2021).Casteism and the Tsundur Atrocity. In Dynamics of Caste and Law (pp. 127–149). Cambridge University Press.

Chemmencheri, S. R. (2015). State, social policy and subaltern citizens in adivasi India. Citizenship Studies, 19(3–4), 436–449.

Das, A. N. (1983). Agrarian Change from Above and Below: Bihar 1947-78. In Ranajit Guha (Ed.), SS II (pp. 180–227). Oxford University Press.

Devi, M. (2005). Jamunabati’s Mother. In In the Name of the Mother. Seagull Books.

Devi, M. (2008). Mother of 1084. Seagull Books.

Guha, R. (1995). Review: Subaltern and Bhadralok Studies. Economic and Political Weekly, 30(33), 2056–2058.

Guha, R. (1996). The Small Voice of History. In  Amin & Chakrabarty (Ed.), SS IX (pp. 1–12). Oxford University Press.

“So Many Words, So many sounds”: An Interview. (2004). In Romtha. Seagull Books.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I-25 Marks

CIA II-25 Marks

CIA III-50 Marks

PSY155 - PSYCHOLOGY OF GENDER (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course has been conceptualized to help learners in delving into the conversation between gender and psychology. Through the lens of socio-historico location of an individual an attempt will be made to locate gender, cognize the spaces of performing, reproducing and perpetuating gender. Looking through psychological and feminist theoretical lenses, the course will analyze the connection of the psychology of gender to the discourse of power and socio-political economical structures. Learners are encouraged to evaluate and envision possible new grounds for a better world, considering the changing cultural diversity in the present Indian society, therefore, reinforcing them to approach gendered issues through cultural, social constructionist and post-structuralist lens to analyze its implications.

Course Outcome

1: Examine the accounts of the production, reproduction and perpetuation of gendered and sexual identities, spaces and subjectivities and related psychological concepts.

2: Discuss gender roles and intersectional nature of identity in everyday life and experience, using psychological, feminist and post-feminist lenses.

3: Demonstrate psychological literacy and problem-solving abilities by suggesting possible counters to the critical gendered issues in personal, interpersonal, social, emotional, cultural, political and professional domains in a multicultural context

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction
 

Describing the spectrum and gender-diverse identities. 

Classical 

psychoanalytic theories on masculinity and 

feminity, analyses 

through feminist, queer and trans readings of psychoanalytic 

theories. 

Feminist theories 

Male gender role stress Gender and space - 

secondarity, 

performativity, 

multiplicity, trans 

community and mental health. 

Body, identity and 

subjectivity - 

psychological and 

philosophical readIngs

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 1
 

Describing the spectrum and gender-diverse identities. Classical psychoanalytic theories on masculinity and feminity, are Analyses through feminist, queer and trans readings of psychoanalytic theories. Feminist theories Male gender role stress Gender and space - secondarity, performativity, multiplicity, trans-community and mental health. Body, identity and subjectivity - psychological and philosophical readings

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Theories
 

Queer and trans theories, Political Economy of Sex Gender and life-space- psychology, feminism, architecture, history & philosophy.

Gender and Bodies; Gender and Violence; Gender and Media

Gender and Work; Gender and Parenthood; Gender and Mental Health

Gender and Indian Law: LGBTQIA+ RightS

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 2
 

Queer and trans theories, Political Economy of Sex; Gender and life-space psychology, feminism, architecture, history & philosophy. Gender and Bodies; Gender and Violence; Gender and Media; Gender and Work; Gender and Parenthood; Gender and Mental Health; Gender and Indian Law: LGBTQIA+ Rights

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Project Work
 

Project-work: 

Examine various sites of the performance and perpetuation of gender and Gendered 

discrimination– 

Through field work, that shows its 

Production in everyday spaces and at the 

Intersections of social, cultural, politcal  Location marked 

Discourses of gender.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 3
 

Project-work: Examine various sites of the performance and perpetuation of gender and Gendered discrimination– Through fieldwork,

that shows its Production in everyday spaces and at the Intersections of social, cultural, political. Location marked. Discourses of gender

Text Books And Reference Books:

RUDMAN, L. A. (2021). Social Psychology of gender: How Power and Intimacy Shape Gender Relations (2nd ed.). GUILFORD.

Matlin, M. (2011). Potential Problems and Biases in Current Research in The Psychology of Women (pp. 20-27). Nelson Education.

Fine, C. (2010). Delusions of gender: How our minds, society, and neurosexism create difference. WW Norton & Company.

Matlin, M. (2011).The Psychology of Women. Nelson Education.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Webb, D. (2023). LGBTQ rights in India. AEA Randomized Controlled Trials. https://doi.org/10.1257/rct.10953-1.0

Irigaray(1995)-The Question of the Other Foucault(1976)-The Will to Knowledge: History of Sexuality (Vol 1)

Kristeva (1980) - Powers of Horror: An Essay on Abjection; Tans. (1992) by L. S. Roudiez.

Gayle (1975). “The Traffic in Women: Notes on a Political Economy of Sex.” In Rayna R. Reiter (ed.), Toward an Anthropology of Women. Monthly Review Press. pp. 157--210

(1975)

Stryker (2004) - Transgender Studies: Queer Theories Evil Twin.

Nagoshi et al. (2010)- Transgender Theories: Embodying Research & Practice Fieldwork and Project-based learning

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Outline: 

 

CIA 1 and CIA 2 is a 20 mark assignment 

CIA 3 is a 50 mark complex assignment

PSY156 - PSYCHOLOGY OF RELATIONSHIPS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: Understanding close relationships is among the central goals of social psychology. Close relationships range from family ties to friendships to romantic and sexual relationships. Our main purpose will be on learning about the life cycle of adult intimate (i.e., romantic) relationships, ranging from stages of initial attraction and relationship initiation to growth and maintenance of the relationship, and in some cases, dissolution. Although other close relationships such as close friendships, family, and work relationships will also be addressed and integrated into the course, they will be of secondary importance. Class meetings will consist mainly of facilitated discussions and student-led presentations on topics such as the biological bases of attraction and love, commitment and interdependence, relationship cognition, attachment, communication, sexuality, relational interaction patterns, relationship satisfaction, and the social context of relationships (e.g., the influence of others) conflict, relationship dissolution, and relationship maintenance.

CO1: Understand the major concepts and models of interpersonal relationships.

CO2: Evaluate the different types of relationships and their impact on one's life.

CO3: Use strategies to enhance everyday life challenges and sustain effective relationships

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the major concepts and models of interpersonal relationships.

CO2: Evaluate the different types of relationships and their impact on one's life.

C03: Use strategies to enhance everyday life challenges and sustain effective relationships

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Understand the major concepts and models of interpersonal relationships.
 

Introduction to key theories and concepts in relationship psychology (attachment theory, social exchange theory, equity theory, interdependence theory, etc.), theories of attraction (evolutionary, social, and cognitive perspectives), historical perspectives on the study of relationships, Ethical considerations in relationships.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Evaluate the different types of relationships and their impact on one's life.
 

Different types of relationship: childhood relationship (parent, teacher, caregiver), adult relationship, friendship and workplace relationships, emerging trends in relationships such as virtual relationship, long distance relationship, cohabitation, post- divorce relationship, friendships and social networks – benefits, types and maintenance. Social media and its influence on relationship formation and maintenance

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Use strategies to enhance everyday life challenges and sustain effective relationships
 

Effective communication strategies,

Active listening skills and empathetic communication,

Conflict resolution techniques and managing relationship disagreements, developing self-awareness, empathy, emotional intelligence, and applying psychological principles to real-life relationship scenarios.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Baron, R.A., Byrne, D. & Bhardwaj, G. (2010). Social Psychology (12th Ed.). New Delhi: Pearson.

Miller, Chapter 1: The Building Blocks of Relationships Reis, H. T. (2012).

A history of relationship research in social psychology. In A.W. Kruglanski & W Stroebe (Eds.), Handbook of the history of social psychology (pp. 213- 232). New York: Psychology Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Graziano, W. G., & Bruce, J. W. (2008). Attraction and the initiation of relationships: A review of the empirical literature. In S. Sprecher, A. Wenzel, & J. Harvey (Eds), Handbook of relationship initiation, pp. 269-295. New York: Psychology Press.

Cameron, J. J., Stinson, D. A., & Wood, J. V. (2013). The bold and the bashful: Selfesteem, gender, and relationship initiation. Social Psychological and Personality Science, 4, 685-692. https://doi.org/10.10 02/9780470939338

Finkel, E.J., Eastwick, P.W., Karney, B.R., Reis, H. T., & Sprecher, S. (2012). Online dating: A critical analysis from the perspective of psychological science. Psychological Science in the Public Interest, 13, 3– 66.

Emery, L. F., Muise, A., Dix, E. L., & Le, B. (2014). Can you tell that I’m in a relationship? Attachment and relationship visibility on Facebook. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 40, 1466–1479.

Vanden Abeele, M., Schouten, A. P., & Antheunis, M. L. (2017). Personal, editable, and always accessible: An affordance approach to the relationship between adolescents’ mobile messaging behavior and their friendship quality. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships.

Sbarra, D. A., & Beck, C. J. A. (2013). Divorce and close relationships: Findings, themes, and future directions. In J. A. Simpson & L. Campbell (Eds.), The Oxford handbook of close relationships (pp. 795-822). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. Lewandowski, G. W., Aron, A., Bassis, S. & Kunak, J. (2006). Losing a selfexpanding relationship: Implications for the selfconcept. Personal Relationships, 13, 317-331

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1:Individual assignment – Video presentations

The students are required to make individual video presentations on the basis of the topics that will be given to them. Submission will be based on one of the different topics through a Video PPT (The feature is available in PPT software) Topics: Example: theories of relationship psychology; theories of attraction Number of Slides: Maximum 9 slides (excluding the Title slide) Duration: 3 minutes

Test details: ● Total Marks: 20 marks ● Date of Submission: 31st August

Evaluation Criteria:  Organization of the content  Quality of the information  Research citations   Creativity   Personal Learnings 

CIA 2: Group Presentation (with viva)

This is a group assignment and the groups will be divided into groups of five. The faculty in charge will be giving each group a movie (based on relationships). Each group will be given one movie/short film to watch and a week long time shall be given for the same. In the following Thursday, 2 hours shall be given to the group to prepare a presentation (5 Slides in 5 Minutes) on the basis of guiding questions and will have to present the same in 5 mins in the next class. Individually group members shall answer facilitator’s questions. Post the presentation each member of the group will write a reflective note on their experience working on the topics and submit the same on moodle. Students can be creative in making their ppts and adding audio-visuals etc but should be able to cover within the specified time limit. PPT submission pre presentation mandatory and individual reflective notes submission post presentation is mandatory. The presentation might primarily include :  Different types of relationships portrayed in the film  Their own perception as to whether the relationships has been portrayed accurately in the film or not.  Conflict resolution strategies in relationships that were used in the film vs what they would have used.

Details: Total marks: 20 ● Date of Allotment of their Movie/Documentary: 12th September ● Date of Group Discussion/Planning: 21st September ● Date of Presentation – 28th September 

Evaluation Criteria:

Pre- Presentation: ● 1. Timely Submission 

Individual contribution: ● a. Organization and Flow of the content ● b. Relevance of the content  ● c. Reference 

Presentation: ● 3. Delivery and presentation of information  ● 4. Organization of the slides  5. Group effort and team spirit  6. Time Management  7. Q & A (one question to per person) 

Post Presentation 8. Depth of Individual Reflections / Learnings

CIA 3: In class written exam

This will be an in class written exam. It will consist of two parts – Part A and Part B. Part-A is for a total of 30 marks. Part A will consist of five 10-mark questions. Out of five, students will answer three questions (each question carries ten marks). Part - B is for 20 marks. It is a compulsory case study that the students need to answer. There is no choice. Total marks: 50 marks Date of examination: 26th October An Assessment scheme will be created for the paper

PSY157 - SCIENCE OF WELLBEING (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This multidisciplinary course will focus on those aspects that help individuals thrive. The course sheds its light on well-being and its components and also clears all the misconceptions revolving around it. The students will be exposed to certain theories, concepts and practice procedures of well-being and its components. This programme will help the students to reflect on their life experiences on these dimensions and to know how to improve them and flourish in their life. 

Course Outcome

CO1: Explain the concept of well-being and its components

CO2: Analyze the role of happiness and emotions in enhancing well-being using relevant theories

CO3: Apply various concepts of well-being on the life experiences of students

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Well-being
 

Well-being - components of well-being: subjective happiness and life satisfaction

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Well-being - components of well-being
 

subjective happiness and life satisfaction

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Happiness & Emotion
 

Happiness - Definition, Significance Misconceptions, types and interventions  Emotion - types, emotion regulation

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Happiness
 

Definition, Significance Misconceptions, types and interventions Emotion - types, emotion regulation

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Mindfulness- components
 

Mindfulness- components: gratitude, forgiveness, kindness-compassion

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:25
Mindfulness components
 

Gratitude, forgiveness, kindness-compassion

Text Books And Reference Books:

·       Carr, A. (2004). Positive Psychology. New York: Routldge.

·       Hupper, F. A., Baylis, N., & Keverne, B. (2005). The science of well-being. Oxford Scholarship.

·       Hupper, F. A., Baylis, N., & Keverne, B. (2005). The science of well-being. Oxford Scholarship.

·       Ivtzan, I. & Lomas, T.(Ed.) (2016) Mindfulness in Positive Psychology. New York: Routldge.

·       Kabat-Zinn, J. (2012). Mindfulness for beginners: reclaiming the present moment—and your life. Boulder, CO, Sounds True.

·       Linley, P. A., & Joseph, S. (Eds.). (2004). Positive psychology in practice. John Wiley & Sons, Inc.. https://doi.org/10.10 02/9780470939338

 

·       Maddux, J. E. (2018). Subjective Wellbeing and Life Satisfaction. New York: Routldge.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

.

Evaluation Pattern

 

 

CIA1

CIA2

CIA3

Class attendance & Participation

20 marks

20 marks

50 marks

10

SOC141 - WOMEN'S ISSUES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course aims at enabling the student to study and understand the problems and issues relating to women in Indian society in the context of wider social forces. This course will sensitize students on the issues of subjugation of and oppression prevalent against women in Indian society and enhance their understanding of the various social problems that women face in the society.

Course objectives :

●        To introduce the students to social issues relating to women

●        To explore gender relations from an interdisciplinary perspective 

Course Outcome

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Unit I: Sociological Understanding of Social Problem with a Gender Perspective
 
  1. Conceptualization of a social problem                                         
  2. Structural and functional perspective, cultural roots, and critical analysis of social issues under power, ideology, and hegemony.
  3.  Understanding Gender and subjugation of gender.
Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Unit I: Sociological Understanding of Social Problem with a Gender Perspective
 
  1. Conceptualization of a social problem                                         
  2. Structural and functional perspective, cultural roots, and critical analysis of social issues under power, ideology, and hegemony.
  3.  Understanding Gender and subjugation of gender.
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Unit II: Problems of Inequality
 
  1. Poverty - Concept of poverty, its multidimensional manifestations, Feminization of Poverty.
  2. Caste Inequality - Concept of caste, nature of inequality and position of women within it.
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Unit II: Problems of Inequality
 
  1. Poverty - Concept of poverty, its multidimensional manifestations, Feminization of Poverty.
  2. Caste Inequality - Concept of caste, nature of inequality and position of women within it.
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit III: Problems of Violence and Discrimination
 
  1. Violence against Women: Cultural setting, Dowry, acid attacks, physical and sexual abuse, Global Sex Market.
  2. Missing Millions- Skewed sex ratio, son preference
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit III: Problems of Violence and Discrimination
 
  1. Violence against Women: Cultural setting, Dowry, acid attacks, physical and sexual abuse, Global Sex Market.
  2. Missing Millions- Skewed sex ratio, son preference
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Unit IV: Problem of Personal Well-being
 
  1. Women and Health : Reproductive health
  2. Aging and women
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Unit IV: Problem of Personal Well-being
 
  1. Women and Health : Reproductive health
  2. Aging and women
Text Books And Reference Books:

Bhasin, K. (1994). What is Patriarchy? New Delhi: Kali for Women.

Beteille, A. (1990). Race, Caste and Gender. Man, 25(3), 489–504. https://doi.org/10.2307/2803715

John, Mary E. (2008). Women’s Studies in India: A Reader. New Delhi:Penguin Books.

Krishnaraj, M. (2007). Understanding Violence against Women. Economic and Political Weekly, 42(44), 90–91. http://www.jstor.org/stable/40276750

Kotiswaran, P. (2008). Born Unto Brothels: Toward a Legal Ethnography of Sex Work in an Indian Red-Light Area. Law & Social Inquiry, 33(3), 579–629. http://www.jstor.org/stable/20108776

KUMAR, A. K. S. (2013). The Neglect of Health, Women and Justice. Economic and Political Weekly, 48(23), 25–27. http://www.jstor.org/stable/23527205

 

Karkal, M. (1999). Ageing and Women in India. Economic and Political Weekly, 34(44), WS54–WS56. http://www.jstor.org/stable/4408566

 

Merton, R and Nisbet. (1966). Contemporary Social Problems, New York: Harcourt, Brace and World.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bhasin, K. (1994). What is Patriarchy? New Delhi: Kali for Women.

Evaluation Pattern

Internal Assessment:

CIA 1  10 marks (conducted out of 20 )- Class Presentations

CIA 2 10 marks (conducted out of 20 )- Article Review

CIA 3 25 marks (conducted out of 50 ) - Prferably an exam

Attendance 5 marks 

 

BLS144 - PRINCIPLES OF AYURVEDA (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is an introduction to Ayurveda, the traditional Indian system of medicine. The course covers topics such as the history and philosophy of Ayurveda, principles of Ayurvedic diagnosis and treatment, and the use of Ayurveda in maintaining health and preventing disease. Students will also learn about the role of Ayurveda in contemporary medicine and the current state of Ayurvedic research.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the history and philosophy of Ayurveda.

CO2: Identify the basic principles of Ayurvedic diagnosis and treatment

CO3: Apply Ayurvedic principles in maintaining health and preventing disease

CO4: Evaluate the role of Ayurveda in contemporary medicine

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Introduction to Ayurveda
 
  • History and philosophy of Ayurveda
  • Basic principles of Ayurveda
  • Doshas and their functions
  • The importance of digestion in Ayurveda
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:11
Ayurvedic Diagnosis and Treatment
 
  • Pulse diagnosis in Ayurveda
  • Ayurvedic herbs and their uses
  • Ayurvedic therapies, including Panchakarma
  • Yoga and Ayurveda
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:11
Ayurveda for Health and Wellness
 
  • Ayurvedic diet and nutrition
  • Ayurvedic lifestyle practices
  • Ayurvedic approaches to mental health
  • Ayurveda and women's health
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:11
Ayurveda in Contemporary Medicine
 
  • The role of Ayurveda in integrative medicine
  • The regulation of Ayurvedic products and practices
  • The current state of Ayurvedic research
  • The future of Ayurveda
Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Lad, V. (1998). The complete book of Ayurvedic home remedies. Harmony.
  2. Frawley, D., & Ranade, S. (2001). Ayurveda, nature's medicine. Lotus Press.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Sharma, H. (2011). Ayurvedic healing: A comprehensive guide. Singing Dragon.
  2. Svoboda, R. (1999). Prakriti: Your Ayurvedic constitution. Lotus Press.
Evaluation Pattern

·        Attendance and Class Participation- 10%

·        Midterm Examination- 30%

·        Review paper/Research Paper- 20%

·        Seminar presentation – 10%

·        Final Examination - 30%

CHE101-2 - INORGANIC CHEMISTRY-I: COORDINATION COMPOUNDS AND ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course deals with the chemistry of transition elements and the fundamentals of coordination chemistry. This course will introduce the students to concepts of environmental pollution.

 

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the properties of transition elements and metal complexes.

CO2: Illustrate the structure, bonding, properties and mechanisms of coordination complexes using appropriate theories.

CO3: Apply the knowledge of environmental chemistry in the sustainable development of human kind.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:4
1. Transition Elements
 

Pre learning: General group trends with special reference to electronic configuration variable valency colour magnetic and catalytic properties ability to form complexes and stability of various oxidation states

Latimer diagrams for Mn, Fe and Cu. 

Lanthanoids: Electronic configurations, oxidation states, colour, magnetic properties, lanthanide contraction, *separation of lanthanides (ion exchange method only).

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
2. Coordination Chemistry-I
 

Prelearning- Werner’s theory, IUPAC system of nomenclature.

Structural and stereoisomerism in complexes with coordination numbers 4 and 6.

Metal- ligand bonding in complexes Valence Bond Theory (VBT): Postulates of VBT, Inner and outer orbital complexes of Cr, Fe, Co, Ni and Cu (coordination numbers 4 and 6). Drawbacks of VBT.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:16
3. Coordination Chemistry-II
 

Crystal field effect, octahedral symmetry. Crystal field stabilization energy (CFSE), Crystal field effects for weak and strong fields. Spectrochemical series, Weak and strong ligand fields magnetic and spectral properties of transition metal complexes, 

Tetrahedral symmetry. Factors affecting the magnitude of Dq. Comparison of CFSE for Oh and Td complexes, Tetragonal distortion of octahedral geometry. Jahn-Teller distortion, Square planar coordination. Limitations of CFT, Evidence for M-L covalent bonding (nephlauxetic effect, NMR and ESR), Introduction to MOT. 

Labile and inert octahedral complexes, chelate effect. Ligand substitution reaction reactions in octahedral and square planar compexes. Trans effect. Electron transfer and ligand transfer reactions.

                                                                                   

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
4. Environmental Chemistry
 

 Air Pollution: Atmosphere turbidity. Chemical and photochemical reactions in atmosphere. Air pollutants: types, sources, particle size and chemical nature; Photochemical smog: its constituents and photochemistry. Environmental effects of ozone, * Pollution by SO2, CO2, CO, NOx, H2S and other foul smelling gases. $Methods of estimation of CO, NOx, SOx and control procedures. Automobile emission. Effects of air pollution on living organisms and vegetation. *Acid rain, Greenhouse effect, Global warming, Ozone depletion by oxides of nitrogen, chlorofluorocarbons and halogens, Control of particulates.

 

 

Water Pollution: Introduction to Aquatic Chemistry: Water Acidity and Carbon Dioxide in Water, Alkalinity, Calcium and Other Metals in Water, Complexation and Chelation, Bonding and Structure of Metal Complexes, Complexation by Deprotonated Ligands, Complexation by Protonated Ligands, Polyphosphates in Water, Complexation and Redox Processes.

 

Sources and nature of water pollutants, Techniques for measuring water pollution. $Water purification and treatment (reverse osmosis, electro dialysis, ion exchange). #Water quality parameters for domestic water.

 

#Effluent treatment plants (primary, secondary and tertiary treatment). #Industrial effluents from the following industries and their treatment: electroplating, petroleum and petrochemicals, agro, fertilizer, food industry. #Industrial waste management, incineration of waste.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

 [1] Cotton, F.A. & Wilkinson, G. Basic Inorganic Chemistry, Wiley, 6th edition, 2007.

[2] A. K. De, Environmental Chemistry: New Age International Pvt., Ltd, New Delhi (2012).

[3] E. Stocchi: Industrial Chemistry, Vol-I, Ellis Horwood Ltd. UK (2008).

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading