CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT

School of Business and Management

Syllabus for
BBA (Strategy and Business Analytics/Honours/Honours with Research)
Academic Year  (2023)

 
1 Semester - 2023 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBA101-1 MANAGEMENT AND BEHAVIOURAL PROCESS Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
BBA102-1 FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
BSBA103-1 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS STRATEGY Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
BSBA161-1 INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION Skill Enhancement Courses 2 2 50
ECO142 ECONOMICS OF CORRUPTION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
ENG185-1 DEVELOPING FLUENCY AND CLARITY IN ENGLISH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses 2 2 50
EST141B READING TECHNOLOGY IN/AND SCIENCE FICTION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
EST142B GLOBAL ETHICS AND CONTEMPORARY SOCIETY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
HIS141 ENCOUNTERING HISTORIES: THE FUTURE OF THE PAST Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
HIS142 THE HISTORY OF URBAN SPACE AND EVOLUTION OF CITY FORMS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
MED142 UNDERSTANDING THE LANGUAGE OF CINEMA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
MED143 DEMOCRACY AND MEDIA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
POL142 GLOBAL POWER POLITICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
POL143 DEMOCRACY AND ETHICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY141 ADVERTISEMENT PSYCHOLOGY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY157 SCIENCE OF WELLBEING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
2 Semester - 2023 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBA101-2 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
BBA102-2 MARKETING MANAGEMENT Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
BBA191-2 SOCIAL CONCERN PROJECT Skill Enhancement Courses 2 1 50
BSBA103-2 FOUNDATION OF BUSINESS ANALYTICS Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
BSBA161-2 QUANTITATIVE TECHNIQUES Skill Enhancement Courses 2 2 50
ECO143 DEMOCRACY AND ECONOMY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
ECO144 DESIGNING POLICIES FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
ENG185-2 THOUGHT AND WRITING Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses 2 2 50
EST141 READING THE CITY: BANGALORE HISTORIES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
EST142 READING THE CYBERSPACE: THE PUBLIC AND THE PRIVATE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
HIS142 RELIGION: PHILOSOPHY AND POLITICS THROUGH AGES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
MED141 INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
POL141 POLITICS IN INDIA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY142 APPRECIATING AESTHETICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY146 HUMAN ENGINEERING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
    

    

Introduction to Program:

Programme Description:  

      The BBA in Strategy and Business Analytics is a single major program at the School of Business and Management. Businesses in today's fast-paced, fiercely competitive environment need leaders who can offer value and drive great performance at all levels of corporate responsibility. Organisations are using analytics and sophisticated strategies to increase efficiency, improve customer service, and identify risks and opportunities across all sectors. This program is for undergraduate students who want to learn how to use data, numbers and strategies to help their companies make decisions. This Program is intended to assist students in creating and putting into practice strategies and data for diverse enterprises and organisations. Strategy and Business analytics will teach students the techniques and methods required to build and manage a successful business, particularly in the modern age of globalisation.

Programme Outcome/Programme Learning Goals/Programme Learning Outcome:

1: Awareness of and sensitivity to social and ethical issues in the world

2: Ability to demonstrate knowledge of business from a holistic and cross-functional perspective

3: Demonstrate the ability to communicate in a professional manner.

4: Evaluate problems and solve them in a scientific manner.

5: Develop Analytical decision-making.

Programme Specific Outcome:

1: Develop and implement effective business strategies based on data-driven analysis.

Programme Educational Objective:

2: Suggest business opportunities for data-driven solutions.
Assesment Pattern

Total Marks: 50

Duration: 2 Hours

 

Section

Number of questions

Total marks

Section A

3 Questions  of either or choices carrying 5 marks

15

Section B

2 Questions of either or choices carrying 10 marks

20

Section C

Compulsory question – Case Study

15

Components of CIA-I       20 marks                                                                                    

 

Components of CIA-II                                                                                               25 Marks

 

Mid Term Exam

Syllabus: Unit I, II, III

   

Components of CIA-III  20 Marks  

                                                                                    

End Sem                            50 Marks  from all unit will be converted into 30

 

Examination And Assesments

Components of CIA-I       20 marks                                                                                    

 

Components of CIA-II                                                                                               25 Marks

 

Mid Term Exam

Syllabus: Unit I, II, III

   

Components of CIA-III  20 Marks  

                                                                                    

End Sem                            50 Marks  from all unit will be converted into 30

BBA101-1 - MANAGEMENT AND BEHAVIOURAL PROCESS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: The course focus on developing an understanding about managing human behaviour at the workplace for achieving organizational effectiveness. The course has been designed to provide valuable insights into the functions of modern-day managers. It involves tracing the historical evolution of management thoughts, exploring the concepts, principles and behavioural processes of management. The course provides an overview of human behaviours at individual, group and organization level.

Course Objectives: 

•To explain the basic concepts, principles and theories of management

•To examine the broad essential functions of a manager

•To identify the challenges posed by of globalization, diversity and ethics on today’s manager

•To analyse the individual’s personality, learning, attitudes and perceptions and its impact on their work behaviour

•To compare and contrast motivation and leadership styles of managers

•To assess the dynamics of group behaviours and its influence on group effectiveness

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Summaries the essential managerial functions for the organizational effectiveness.

CO2: Identify the impact of challenges posed by of globalization, diversity and ethics on managerial effectiveness.

CO3: Analyse the individual differences and its implications in the organisation.

CO4: Assess factors that motivate individuals at the workplace.

CO5: Evaluate various leadership styles that enhance group effectiveness.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT
 

Definition – nature, process and significance of management – Role of managers – Managerial Skills and Roles - Evolution of Management Thought: Classical Management Approaches, Behavioural Management Approaches, Quantitative Management Approach, Modern Management Approaches - Management as a Science or Art - Management as a profession- Administration and Management- Functions of Management – Functional Areas of Management. Challenges for 21st Century Business Managers.

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
PLANNING AND DECISION MAKING
 

Planning - Nature and Importance of Planning- Types of Plans - Levels of Planning - Steps in planning - Making Effective Plans- Objectives and Management By Objective (MBO) –Management By Exception (MBE) - Policy and Strategy-.Organizing - Nature and purpose -Principles of Organization - Types of Organization - Organizational Structure and Design – Line, Staff and functional authority – responsibility and Accountability - Principles of Delegation - Steps - Centralization Vs Decentralization – Factors determining the degree of Decentralization of authority.

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
CONTROLLING
 

Controlling - Concept, Nature and Importance - Essentials of Control - Requirements of an Effective Control System – Behavioural Implications of Control – Techniques of Managerial control.

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISATIONAL BEHAVIOUR
 

Definition of Organizational Behaviour, OB as systematic study, Contribution from other disciplines, OB Model/Framework- Individual, Group and Organisational Level.

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
UNDERSTANDING INDIVIDUAL BEHAVIOUR
 

Personality - Defining and Measuring Personality, Determinants of Personality, The Big Five Personality Model, Learning: Meaning of Learning; Theories of Learning- Classical Conditioning, Operant Conditioning, Cognitive Theory, Social Learning Theory, Principles of Learning; Attitude-Components of Attitude- ABC model, Work Attitudes- Job Satisfaction and Organisational Commitment. Perception: Meaning, Perceptual Process; Common Shortcuts in Judging Others.

 

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
MOTIVATION AND LEADERSHIP
 

Motivation- Basic Motivational Process, Content Model of Motivation- Maslow’s Need Hierarchy, Dual Factor Theory, Achievement Motivation Model, Process Model - Victor Vroom’s Expectancy Model. Leadership and Management, Trait Perspective of Leadership, behavioural Perspective- Ohio State Studies, Managerial Grid; Contemporary Perspective- Transformational, Transactional, Charismatic Leadership, Ethical Leadership, Shared Leadership.

 

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:6
GROUP DYNAMICS
 

Define Group, Types Groups, Functions of Group, Tuckman’s Model of Group Development, Group Cohesiveness, Sources of Group Cohesiveness, Common Threat to Group Effectiveness- Groupthink, Group Shift, Social Loafing.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

● Stephen P. Robbins, Timothy A. Judge and Neharika Vohra (2018), 18th Ed. Organizational Behaviour. Pearson Education Asia.

● Stoner, Freeman, Gilbert Jr. (2014). Management (6th edition), New Delhi: Prentice Hall India.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

● Aswathappa, K. (2016). Organizational Behaviour (Text, Cases and Games), 12th Ed. Bangalore: Himalaya Publication.

● Fred Luthans (2017). Organizational Behaviour: An Evidence - Based Approach, 12th Ed. McGraw Hill Education.

● Gupta, C. B. (2014). A textbook of organizational behaviour: With text and cases. NewDelhi: S Chand & Company.

● Daft, R. L. (2009). Principles of Management (1st edition), Cengage Learning.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1          20 Marks

CIA2          25 Marks

CIA3          20 Marks

ESE           30 Marks

Attendance  5 Marks

BBA102-1 - FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course intends to introduce basic accounting principles and practices. It also deals with subsidiary books maintained in business organizations. The students will have knowledge about the fundamental accounting processes such as journalizing, ledger posting, preparation of trial balance and final accounts in sole trading business. It also deals with providing an overview of accounting standards and IFRS. This course will be useful for all those who are desirous of having an understanding and application of financial dynamics of the business and become successful financial managers/entrepreneurs.

Course Objective:

      To provide an understanding of application of various principles and practice of Accounting.

      To demonstrate the knowledge on the process of accounting cycle and basic steps involved in Accounting.

      To extend the knowledge of systematic maintenance of books of accounts to real life business.

      To interpret Annual Financial statements of Sole proprietorship form of business.

  • To outline the need for Accounting standards and IFRS.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Identifies the application of various principles and practice of Accounting in preparation of accounting statements.

CO2: Demonstrate the knowledge on the process of accounting cycle.

CO3: Extend the knowledge of systematic maintenance of books of accounts to real life business.

CO4: Interpret Annual Financial statements of Sole proprietorship form of business.

CO5: Outline the need for Accounting standards and IFRS

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to Accounting
 

Level of Knowledge: Conceptual

 

Meaning, Need for accounting, Internal and External users of accounting information, limitations of accounting, accounting Concepts and Conventions, Accounting Practices, Generally Accepted Accounting Principles.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Accounting systems & process
 

Level of Knowledge: Analytical

 

Nature of Accounting, Accounting equation - Systems of Accounting, Process of Accounting transactions- types of Accounts, Rules of Accounting. Journal - Meaning, features, simple and compound entries, Including recording of GST transactions, Capital and revenue expenditures, Capital and revenue receipts, Contingent assets and contingent liabilities, Preparation of ledgers and Trial balance.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Subsidiary books
 

Level of Knowledge: Analytical

 

Conceptual introduction to subsidiary books - Sales book, Sales return book, Purchases book, Purchase returns book, receivable book, payable book. Practical problems in Cash Book- Single column, double column, and three columnar cash book.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Bank reconciliation statement
 

Level of KnowledgeAnalytical

 

Need for reconciliation and preparation of bank reconciliation statements.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
Rectification of Errors
 

Level of Knowledge:  Analytical

 

Need for rectification of errors, types of errors, process of rectification and accounting entries of rectification.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:12
Final Accounts
 

Level of Knowledge: Analytical

 

Preparation of Trading and Profit and Loss account and Balance Sheet of sole trading concerns.

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:4
Accounting standards and IFRS
 

Level of Knowledge: Conceptual

 

Types of Accounting standards Need for IFRS, Ind AS and IFRS.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Jain S.P., & Narang K L. (2020). Basic Financial Accounting I, New Delhi, Kalyani publishers.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Maheshwari, S.N., Maheshwari, S.K. (2020). Advanced Accountancy1, New Delhi: Jain Book Agency.
  2. Shukla, M. (2020). Advanced Accounts, New Delhi, S Chand Group
  3. Radhaswamy, M & Gupta, R.L. (2020). Advanced Accountancy 2, New Delhi, Sultan Chand & Sons.
  4. Reddy, A. (2020). Fundamentals of Accounting, New Delhi, Himalaya Publishing House
  5. Gupta, A. (2020). Financial Accounting for Management: An Analytical Perspective, Noida, Pearson Education.
  6. Raman, B. S. (2014). Financial Accounting (1stedi). I& II, New Delhi: United Publishers.
  7. Porter, G.A., & Norton, C.L. (2013). Financial Accounting (IFRS update) (6th edi), Cengage Learning.
  8. Jawahar Lal & Seema Srivastava (2013). Financial Accounting New Delhi: Himalaya Publishing House.
Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1: 20 Marks

CIA 2: 25 Marks

CIA 3: 20 Marks

Attendance: 5 Marks

ESE: 30 Marks

Total: 100 marks

BSBA103-1 - INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS STRATEGY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

An ever-changing Political, Economic, Social, Technological, Ecological and Legal (PESTEL) environment, coupled with the Volatility, Uncertainty, and Complexity Ambiguity (VUCA) world in that businesses operate, demands companies to be agile. This course gives an insight into corporate strategy enabling firms to survive the dynamism. The course dwells on the art and science behind crafting strategies. It allows for reflecting on the ethical and social sensitivity perspectives that drive businesses to pursue specific strategies.

Objectives:

·      To explain the concepts of Strategic Management in the given context 

·      To Identify and assess the internal and external environment to understand the problems businesses face.

·      To infer an appropriate strategy to solve a business problem.

·      To espouse a sense of social responsibility while strategizing

·      To instil a sense of ethical sensitivity while strategizing

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Explain the concepts of Strategic Management in the given context.

CO2: Analyze the business environment to find problems that need attention.

C03: Formulate strategies to solve business problems.

CO4: Examine business strategies from a social responsibility perspective.

C05: Evaluate business strategies from an ethical sensitivity perspective.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Strategic Management
 

Introduction, what is Strategic Management? Intended, Emergent, and Realized Strategies, The History of Strategic Management, Contemporary Critique of Strategic Management, Understanding the Strategic Management Process                                                                                                                         

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Elements of Strategy
 

Vision, Mission, and Goals, SMART Goals, Balanced Scorecard, Assessing Organizational Performance, Competitive Advantage

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Evaluating the External Environment
 

The Relationship between an Organization and its Environment, Evaluating the General Environment, PESTEL Analysis, Evaluating the Industry, Porter’s five forces model, Mapping Strategic Groups

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Evaluating the Internal Environment
 

Managing Firm Resources, Resource-Based View, VRIO framework, Value Chain

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Selecting Business-Level Strategies
 

 

Understanding Business-Level Strategy through “Generic Strategies”, Cost Leadership, Differentiation, Focused Cost Leadership and Focused Differentiation Best-Cost Strategy.                                                                                                                         

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:9
Selecting Corporate-Level Strategies
 

Corporate-Level Strategy Defined, Diversification, Implementing Corporate Strategy, BCG Matrix, Strategies for Getting Smaller, Portfolio Planning and Corporate-Level Strategy                                                                                                                                                                                                               

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:8
Leading an Ethical Organization: Corporate Governance, Corporate Ethics, and Social Responsibility
 

Doing Well by Doing Good, Corporate Governance, Corporate Ethics and Social Responsibility Contemporary Questions of Corporate Ethics

Text Books And Reference Books:

Kennedy, Reed. (2020) Strategic Management. Blacksburg, VA: Virginia Tech Publishing. https://doi.org/10.21061/strategicmanagement CC BY NC-SA 3.0

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

David, F. R., David, F. R., & David, M. E. (2022). Strategic Management Concepts and Cases: A competitive advantage approach. Pearson.

Jauch, L. R., & Glueck, W. F. (1988). Business policy and strategic management. McGraw-Hill.

L., H. C. W., Schilling, M. A., & Jones, G. R. (2020). Strategic management: An integrated approach: Theory & cases. Cengage.

Miller, A. (1998). Strategic management. Irvin McGraw-Hill.

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

CIA - Evaluation Pattern

Assignment

Case Study

Presentation

Test

Mid Semester

20

10

10

10

25

 

Mid Semester Examination

Section A

Section B

Section C

Total

3X5=15

2X10=20

1X15=15

50

 

End Semester Examination

Section A

Section B

Section C

Total

3X5=15

2X10=20

1X15=15

50

BSBA161-1 - INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course on interpersonal communication attempts to expose students to the intricacies of interpersonal communication such as self, self-esteem, listening, perception, culture and intercultural, verbal and nonverbal, interpersonal relationship, conflict management and team skills.The course further describesthe applications of interpersonal communication in the work place and in an individual’s personal life. 

Course Outcome

CO 1: Demonstrate the understanding of self and intercultural competencies

CO 2: Examine the role of verbal and nonverbal communication in business

CO 3: Discuss the interpersonal relationship issues in interpersonal communication

CO 4: Identify the alternative conflict management strategies for effective interpersonal communication

CO 5: Develop teams skills for creating a performing organization

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Foundations of Interpersonal Communication
 

Nature and elements of interpersonal communication, Principles of interpersonal communication, Johari window, listening and role of interpersonal communication in management.                                                                                                                                            

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Culture and Perception in Interpersonal Communication
 

Culture, enculture, ethnic identity and acculturation, relevance of culture, aim of a culture Steve Hofstede’s Cultural model and dimensions, intercultural competency and perceptual errors, relationship between culture, society and business.                                                                                                                    

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Verbal and Nonverbal Communication
 

Principles of verbal messages, guidelines for using verbal messages effectively, principles of nonverbal communication, channels of nonverbal communications, nonverbal communication competence.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Interpersonal Relationship, Interpersonal Conflict Management
 

Interpersonal relationship states, movement among the states, relationship theories, relationship communication, principles of interpersonal conflict, conflict management stages, conflict management strategies

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Interpersonal Communication and Team Building
 

Meaning, need and types of teams, states of team development, characteristics of team, roles of team members, team problem solving, creating a performing team, interpersonal communication and team.

Text Books And Reference Books:

DeVito, J. A. (2022). The Interpersonal Communication Book. Pearson. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

        Beebe, S. A., Beebe, S. J., & Redmond, M. V. (2020). Interpersonal communication: Relating to others. Pearson.

 

        Vandemark, J. A. F., & Leth, P. C. (1977). Interpersonal Communication. Cummings Publ. Co.

 

        Hamilton, V. (2017). Interpersonal Communication. Cognella Academic Publishing.

Floyd, K. (2021). Interpersonal Communication. McGraw-Hill Education

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-I 10 Marks             - Simulation Exercise

CIA 2 10 Marks             - Collage

CIA 3 20 Marks             - Role Play (Movie Making)

CIA 4 10 Marks             - Case Study

CIA 5 20 Marks             - Management Games

CIA 6 10 Marks             - Class Participation

CIA 7 20 Marks                            - Written Exam

ECO142 - ECONOMICS OF CORRUPTION (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

This course is aimed at undergraduate students to introduce to them the prominent debates in the economics of corruption. The course discusses how corruption acts as a constraint on economic growth using the theoretical constructs in Political Economy. It allows students to delve into the causes and consequences of corruption. In particular, the course will examine how corruption affects the emerging economies. The course will consider some of the seminal papers on the economics of corruption.

Course Objectives

 1. to create an understanding of the economic issues associated with corruption

 2. to enhance the student's understanding of the effect of corruption on growth and development

 3. to provide insights into the effect of corruption on emerging countries 

Course Outcome

CO1: identify the nuances in the way corruption is defined and interpreted in different economies

CO2: investigate some impacts of corruption on emerging economies

CO3: analyse the cause and consequences of corruption and examine some of the policy reforms aimed at tackling corruption

CO4: present complex ideas through written and oral presentation

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit I: Corruption, Poor Governance and Institutional Structure
 

Causes and Consequences of Corruption: What do we know from a cross-section of countries? Democratic Institutions and Corruption: Incentives and Constraints in Politics, Bargaining for Bribes: The Role of Institutions.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit II: Corruption and the Private Sector
 

The Privatization of Rent-Generating Industries and Corruption; Corruption in Private Sector, Why the private sector is likely to lead the next stage in the global fight against corruption.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit III: Tackling Corruption
 

Corruption and Policy Reform; Anti-Corruption Authorities: An Effective Tool to Curb Corruption?  Corruption and Competition: Fair Markets as an Anti-Corruption Device.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Auriol, E., & Straub, S. (2011). Privatization of Rent-generating Industries and Corruption. In S. Rose-Ackerman & T. Søreide, (Eds.). International Handbook on the Economics of Corruption, (Vol. 2). Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Pub.

Burger, E. S., & Holland, M. S. (2006). Why the private sector is likely to lead the next stage in the global fight against corruption. Fordham International Law Journal, 30, 45.

Meschi, P. X. (2009). Government Corruption and Foreign Stakes in International Joint Ventures in Emerging Economies. Asia Pacific Journal of Management, 26(2), 241-261.

Meyer, K. E., Estrin, S., Bhaumik, S. K., & Peng, M. W. (2009). Institutions, Resources, and Entry Strategies in Emerging Economies. Strategic Management Journal, 30(1), 61-80.

Nowakowski, K. (2010). Corruption in the Private Sector. Economics and Law, 6(1), 345-360.

Uhlenbruck, K., Rodriguez, P., Doh, J., & Eden, L. (2006). The Impact of Corruption on Entry Strategy: Evidence from Telecommunication Projects in Emerging Economies. Organization Science, 17(3), 402-414.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Cartier-Bresson, J. (2000). Economics of corruption. Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. The OECD Observer, (220), 25.

Jain, A. K. (2001). Corruption: A Review. Journal of Economic Surveys, 15(1), 71-121.

Jain, A. K. (Ed.). (2012). Economics of Corruption (Vol. 65). Springer Science & Business Media.

Rose-Ackerman, S. (1975). The Economics of Corruption. Journal of Public Economics, 4(2), 187-203.

Evaluation Pattern

 

            MSE/ CIA2

 

ESE

 

Attendance

45 Marks

50 Marks

5 Marks

ENG185-1 - DEVELOPING FLUENCY AND CLARITY IN ENGLISH (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

English is a global language for business. Fluency and clarity are critical skills for business communication. This course is designed for students of Business Studies to build business contexts using the English language. The course introduces students to reading and understanding the significance of Business English. It also teaches the basics of written and oral communication along with the knowledge of English grammar and syntax and their application in day-to-day communicative needs

The course aims to:

Familiarise the students with the importance of intercultural communication to meet global needs.

Develop linguistic and communicative skills for academic advancement and employment opportunities in national and global markets.

Enhance students' skills to be effective communicators in the digitally interconnected world.

Make students understand the significance of professional ethics in business correspondence.

 

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Develop basic language skills to deal with people in business contexts through case-based activities and tasks

CO2: Display advanced business writing skills through the deployment of critical tools in writing i.e., identify objects of study, construct arguments after evaluating the object, and provide a point of view to support the claims made.

CO3: Attain proficiency in business correspondence through formal and business letters

CO4: Engage in active problem-solving activities through the analysis of cases and reflect it through the creation of cases in the domain of business

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
English Language for Business
 

This unit discusses the importance of the English language in the business context. The unit introduces the students to the basics of the language and its communicative function to achieve national and global business goals. Respect for others (human value) in the communicative scenario is one of the concerns of this unit.

1. Language as a means of communication

2. Features of Professional Communication: Accuracy (Vocabulary), Fluency (Speed) and Effectiveness (Non-verbal Communication)

3. Levels of communication: Intrapersonal, Interpersonal, organizational and mass communication

4. Barriers to communication: i) Lisa Davis (1990). Where do We Stand? ii) Robert Levine (1997), Time Talks, with an Accent

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Essentials of Writing Skills
 

This unit will introduce students to the structures of academic writing that will enhance their employability skills in global business scenarios. The unit will enable students to create essays through reading and writing. Students would be specifically trained about the structure of an essay, its components, locating the argument, constructing one, and using sources to substantiate claims and evidence. This unit focuses on written communication to ensure professional ethics in the business context.

A. The Writing Process

1. Assessing the writing situation

2. Exploring and planning

3. Drafting

4. Revising

5. Editing and proofreading

B. Structure of an essay: introduction, body, and conclusion

1. Introduction: Thesis Statement, Argument

2. Body: Claims, Evidence

3. Conclusion: Summary, major deduction, and final statement

4. Referencing in an essay

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Communication Skills in Business
 

This unit will introduce students to business communication skills as a form of writing. Writing for business purposes is one of the required employability skills needed in a global professional setting. Students will learn the importance of inclusive communication to understand the human values of interlocutors in communication.

1. Mechanics of Note-Making: Topicalisation, Schematising, Reduction Devices, Methods of Sequencing

2. Written Documentation: Letter Writing, Memo, Report, Proposal

3. E-mail Communication: Characteristics of the successful E-mail message; Formatting E-mail message; Standard E-mail Practices, E-mail Writing Strategies

4. Case Studies on communication barriers

Text Books And Reference Books:

Anderson, Marilyn, et al. Critical Reasoning, Academic Writing and Presentation Skills. Delhi: Pearson, 2010.

Gardener, Peter. S. New Direction: Reading, Writing and Critical Thinking. Cambridge University Press, 2009.

Mukhopadhyay, Lina et al. Polyskills: A Course in Communication Skills and Life Skills. Foundation, 2012.

Raman, M. and Sangeeta Sharma. Professional Communication. Oxford University Press, 2017.

Rizvi, M. Ashraf. Effective Technical Communication. McGraw Hill Education, 2015.

Sen, Sanghita, et al. Communicative English 1. Cambridge University Press India Pvt Ltd, 2015.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Brieger. N. Teaching Business English Handbook. York Associates Publications, 1997.

McCarter, Sam, Norman Whitby. Writing Skills. Macmillan India, 2009.

Reinders, H, Marilyn L., and Linh Phung. Studying in English: Strategies for Success in Higher Education. Macmillan Education, 2017.

Robert, Barraas. Students Must Write. London: Routledge, 2006.

Evaluation Pattern

Components

CIA I

CIA II: MSE

CIA III

ESE

Attendance

Marks/Percentage

5 Marks

(10%)

10 Marks

(20%)

5 Marks

(10%)

25 Marks

(50%)

5 Marks

(10%)

EST141B - READING TECHNOLOGY IN/AND SCIENCE FICTION (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course aims to provide a basic introduction to understanding discourses of science and technology as represented in select science fiction narratives. The course will help students understand some of the basic questions about the human condition that are raised, debated, and negotiated in and through representative fiction that addresses global and national concerns. Keeping the contemporaneity of issues today, the course will also emphasize how there is a crucial intersection of various ideas that cut across several disciplines with regard to technology and life, thereby making it crucially relevant to engage with it in the contemporary context. Anyone interested in questions of science, fiction, and the human condition and the cross-cutting issues of gender, environment, technology, ethics, sustainability, etc may choose this course. The course will help develop theoretical knowledge about the genre, critical reading skills, and creative writing skills through class engagements and assignments.

 

Objectives:

• To introduce students to the field of science fiction

• Help students identify and raise questions through these works of fiction some relevant questions in the contemporary context

• To direct students towards realising the intersection of various issues raised across different disciplines.

Course Outcome

CO1: Recognize the concepts and debates raised in the genre and engage with the form critically.

CO2: Reflect on the implications of science fiction in contemporary times and illustrate it in their writings. CO3. Appraise the many representations of the human and nonhuman in science fiction and the concerns it makes evident.

CO3: Develop an interdisciplinary perspective towards analyzing science fiction.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Science Fiction Narratives
 

This unit will provide students with a basic overview of science fiction through some critical and conceptual lenses that are commonly identified across SF narratives globally. The New Critical Idiom Series: Science Fiction, would be used here to introduce aspects of SF that touch upon human values and concerns such as gender, environment, ethics, technology, etc. Locating the interdisciplinarity of the domain would be central to this module and will build theoretical knowledge and critical reading skills.

1. History of Science Fiction

2. Common Terminologies

3. Critical Concerns about Technology for Humanity

 

Essential readings:

1. Hollinger, Veronica. “Contemporary Trends in Science Fiction.” Science Fiction Studies. No. 78, Vol. 26, 1999.

2. Mendlesohn, Farah, and Edward James. The Cambridge companion to science fiction. Cambridge University Press, 2003.

3. Nicholls, Peter, and John Clute. "New Encyclopaedia of Science Fiction." (1999).

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
SF and technology
 

This unit will engage with how technology becomes a crucial part of negotiating contemporary existence as represented through SF. What are the fundamental concerns that Sf raises regarding technology and the human condition? How does technology come to be framed within SF? How are gender and sexuality framed within the discourses of SF? How SF addresses the anxieties of technology and the future would be some of the questions engaged with here. Critical reading skills and creative writing exercises will enable students to develop creative and critical skills.

1. The Matrix

2. Select Episodes of the series Stranger Things

3. Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid’s Tale

4. Any episode of Black Mirror

 

Essential readings:

● Ryder, W., Harbour, D. and Modine, M., 2016. Stranger Things | Netflix. [online] Netflix.com. Available at: <https://www.netflix.com/watch/80077368?trackId=200257859> [Accessed 8 November 2016].

● Wachowski, Andy, et al. Matrix. Burbank, CA: Warner Home Video, 1999.

● Atwood, Margaret. The Handmaid's Tale. New York: Everyday Library, 2006.

● “Hated in the Nation.” Black Mirror, season 3, episode 6, 21 Oct. 2016. Netflix.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Indian Science Fiction
 

This unit will engage with science fiction in the Indian context. One of the main points of

discussion would be to understand how SF writers from India have engaged with tropes of SF that we are

familiar with and what kind of an ‘India’ is imagined thereof which has implications socially, politically,

 

21

 and culturally. The unit enables critical insights into the concerns around human and non-human and the intersectionalities of it in the Indian context.

1. Vandana Singh “Delhi”

2. Manjula Padmanabhan, “Harvest”

3. Cargo

 

Essential readings:

1. Padmanabhan, Manjula. Harvest. Hachette UK, 2017.

2. Singh, Vandana. “Delhi.” Lightspeed, June, 2016, Delhi - Lightspeed Magazine. Accessed on 4 March 2023.

3. Kadav, Arati. Cargo. Mumbai: Fundamental Pictures, 2019. Netflix

Text Books And Reference Books:

Hollinger, Veronica. “Contemporary Trends in Science Fiction.” Science Fiction Studies. No. 78, Vol. 26, 1999.

2. Mendlesohn, Farah, and Edward James. The Cambridge companion to science fiction. Cambridge University Press, 2003.

3. Nicholls, Peter, and John Clute. "New Encyclopaedia of Science Fiction." (1999).

4. Ryder, W., Harbour, D. and Modine, M., 2016. Stranger Things | Netflix. [online] Netflix.com. Available at: <https://www.netflix.com/watch/80077368?trackId=200257859> [Accessed 8 November 2016].

5 Wachowski, Andy, et al. Matrix. Burbank, CA: Warner Home Video, 1999.

6 Atwood, Margaret. The Handmaid's Tale. New York: Everyday Library, 2006.

7 “Hated in the Nation.” Black Mirror, season 3, episode 6, 21 Oct. 2016. Netflix.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Malak, Amin. "Margaret Atwood’s “The Handmaid Tale” and the Dystopian Tradition." Canadian Literature 112 (1987): 9-16.

Howell, Amanda. "Breaking silence, bearing witness, and voicing defiance: the resistant female voice in the transmedia storyworld of The Handmaid’s Tale." Continuum 33.2 (2019): 216-229.

Barnett, P. Chad. "Reviving cyberpunk:(Re) constructing the subject and mapping cyberspace in the Wachowski Brother's film The Matrix." Extrapolation (pre-2012) 41.4 (2000): 359.

Wetmore Jr, Kevin J., ed. Uncovering Stranger Things: Essays on eighties nostalgia, cynicism and innocence in the series. McFarland, 2018.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 30 marks 

MSE 30 MARKS 

ESE 35 MARKS 

ATTENDANCE 5 MARKS 

EST142B - GLOBAL ETHICS AND CONTEMPORARY SOCIETY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course will introduce students to the major theoretical and applied debates

as well as major moral puzzles and challenges in the field of global ethics.

Ethics is gaining ground as an important humanities intervention in a

fast-changing world. A course on ethics is often an added advantage for students

as it helps them shape a socially-aware perspective of the social reality and

develop ethical skills and foster employability.. Drawing on interdisciplinary

perspectives and thematic issues in the fields of international politics, business,

communications and law, the course will challenge students to reflect on major

ethical theories and traditions as well as core problems such as corporate

governance, global distributive

justice, the ethics of making and sustaining peace, media ethics and legal

dimensions of ethics. By combining the works of both classic and contemporary

philosophers with contemporary applied global issues, students will be able to

critically reflect on fundamental normative questions from an interdisciplinary

perspective and reflect on the rights, responsibilities and challenges of ‘good

global citizenship’. Through this, student reflect on cross cutting issues of

human values, gender, sustainability and professional development.

Course Outcome

CO1: The general ability to critically compare, contrast and synthesise major theories and concepts and to apply them in a creative manner to conceptual debates and real-life ethical challenges; critically reflect on fundamental normative questions from an interdisciplinary perspective and reflect on the rights, responsibilities and challenges of ?good global citizenship?.

CO2: Analyse various ethical dilemmas present in the society and efficiently present it in the form of classroom debates and discussions.

CO3: Demonstrate a clear understanding of various schools of thoughts in the domain of ethics through their assignments.

CO4: Appraise their views on various aspects of ethics and present it with clarity through multiple engagements in the classroom.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction
 

This unit introduces students to the conceptual frameworks of integrity and ethics in local and

global contexts. IT exposes students to ethical dilemmas and provides conceptual clarity on nuances of

integrity, human values and ethical decision making. It develops ethical skills in order to enable better

professional behaviour and employability.

1. Global Ethics: Conceptual Definitions,

2. Historical Origins & Present Challenges

3. Introduction to the Ethics, Morals and Values

4. Cultural Relativism vs Universalism (case study)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Ethical Theories
 

This unit introduces students to various ethical theories, under the two categories of rationalist

ethical theories and the more recent alternatives. It enables students to apply these global and national

theoretical concepts to local and personal situations. By this application process, students reflect on cross

cutting issues of human values, gender, sustainability and professionalism and develop ethical thinking

skills that fosters employability. (Include LRNG, Employability, and Cross-cutting issues):

1. Rationalist Ethical Theories

2. Contractualist ethics

3. Deontological Ethics

4. Utilitarian Ethics

5. Discourse ethics,

6. Alternatives to Ethical Rationalism

7. Virtue Ethics

8. Feminist & Care Ethics

9. Postmodernist Ethics

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Applying Ethical Theories
 

This unit is based on some relevant contemporary applications of ethical theories learnt in the

previous unit. The unit sees the practical application of ethics in local, regional, national and global fields of

business, journalism, digital media and technology. It develops ethical skills in order to enable better

professional behaviour and employability.

1. Global Business Ethics and Arms Trade: The Ethics of Capitalism (Film Inside Job)

2. Global Journalism Ethics, Citizen Journalism

3. Digital Media Ethics and Whistleblowing Practices: Snowden and Whistleblowing

4. Ethical Implications of Emerging Technologies (Film The Social Network)

5. Genetics, stem cell and embryo research: Embryo research and women’s rights

Text Books And Reference Books:

Hutchings, K. (2010) Global Ethics. An Introduction, Polity: Cambridge

Ferguson, C. (2010). Inside Job. Sony Pictures Classics

Fincher, David. (2010) The Social Network. Columbia Pictures

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Copp, D. (ed.) The Oxford Handbook of Ethical Theory, Oxford: OUP.

Graham, G. (2008) Ethics and International Relations, 2nd Edition. Malden, MA: Blackwell.

LaFollette, H. (ed.) (2003) The Oxford Handbook of Ethical Practice, Oxford: OUP

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 30 MARKS

MSE 30 MARKS

ESE 35 MARKS

ATTENDANCE 5 MARKS 

HIS141 - ENCOUNTERING HISTORIES: THE FUTURE OF THE PAST (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The influence and presence of the past is felt everywhere and every day in our lives. Movies, newspapers or the internet

bombard us and expose us to the past – both familiar and unfamiliar. However, the barrage of information and the forces

of globalisation have led to increasing questions on the relevance and the value of the past – indeed a denial even. This

course will engage the students with the myriad ways in which the past, though no longer present – is a presence in our

lives today. It will introduce the students to think historically, relate to their memories of their own past and make them

aware of the multiple perspectives which will enable them to read, write and reflect on the past; or in other words, make

history.

This course will introduce students to the methodological and theoretical questions that animate and inform the practice

of history. How do professional historians work? What is their goal? How do they locate and analyze source materials?

What kinds of arguments do historians try to make? How, ultimately, is history produced? This course will ask how (or

whether) historians’ particular sources – and their location in the archives – can give voice to the ordinary and of things

‘past’. Moreover, the course will address how the advent of the information age impact upon the historians’ profession by

exploring how modern technology – whether film, photography, or the internet – changed the way historians work and

address their audience.

Course Outcome

CO1: Discover how and why historians debate issues of evidence and interpretation and learn to distinguish between various schools or styles of academic history.

CO2: Critically engage with representations of the past in the present to enable them to analyze and use evidence in interrogating historical accounts.

CO3: Critically reflect and engage with the interface between the past and the present, fostering a healthy appreciation for history and its imprint on our world.

CO4: Apply how historical narratives are shaped by states, organizations, and individuals.

CO5: Analyze the interaction between history and politics when following the news and in examining historical cases.

CO6: Apply how issues of identity and memory factor into our historical understandings and how this can condition present day policies and decision-making.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
The Many Pasts (Global, National, Regional, local)
 

Level of Learning: Theory/Basic

a) Doing History - The Place of the Past.

b) Facts, Fiction and Lies: Interrogating evidence - paintings, films, novels.

Level of Learning: Practical/Application

c) Facts, Fiction and Lies: Interrogating evidence - paintings, films, novels-Students will take any work of Historical

fiction, Historical Films as case studies and analyse the element of fact and fiction

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
The Use and Abuse of History (Global, National)
 

Level of Learning: Theory/Conceptual/Interpretative

a) Voice and the Subject: Narratives and Counter-narratives – Winston Churchill, Velupillai Prabhakaran, Pirates of the

Caribbean, Tom and Jerry

b) Locating the Popular: Historical Fiction or Fictionalised History – Exploring the Fantasy Worlds of Ice Age, Hogwarts,

Narnia, Westeros and Middle-earth.

c) The Past Today: The Ayodhya Debate and the Ram Janmabhoomi issue, Dwarka, Kapilavastu.

d) Historical Monuments and their Authorship/Ownership: The Temple Mount and Taj Mahal.

Level of Learning: Practical/Application

e) Voice and the Subject: Narratives and Counter-narratives – Winston Churchill, Velupillai Prabhakaran, Pirates of

the Caribbean, Tom and Jerry

f) Locating the Popular: Historical Fiction or Fictionalised History – Exploring the Fantasy Worlds of Ice Age,

Hogwarts, Narnia, Westeros and Middle-earth.

Screening of Documentaries, Speeches and Films followed by Student led panel discussion

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Locating Sources: The Historian?s Voice (Global, National)
 

Level of Learning: Analytical

a) History and the Visual: Photography, Film and the Image – Gladiator, Schindler’s List, 300, Gone with the Wind,

Jodha Akbar and Mohenjo Daro

b) Historical Re-enactments? Light and Sound Shows at Golconda, Red Fort and Khajuraho.

c) Alternate Histories: Oral Histories, Sports Histories, Graphic Novels, Caricatures and Political Cartoons.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Memory, Commemoration, and Silence (Global, National)
 

Level of Learning: Theory/Conceptual/Interpretative

a) Memory and History: Power and the Production of History – Museums and Memorials.

b) ‘Truth’ and ‘myth’: History as Conspiracy – Insider and Outsider Perspectives – the Aryan Debate, Hindutva

Ideology and Neo-Nazis.

c) Private Lives and Public Affairs: The British Monarchy, the Nehru-Edwina Affair.

d) Suppressing the Text: State Secrets and Declassification – Wikileaks and the Netaji Files.

Level of Learning: Practical/Application

e) Private Lives and Public Affairs: The British Monarchy, the Nehru-Edwina Affair.

f) Suppressing the Text: State Secrets and Declassification – Wikileaks and the Netaji Files

g) Case study of various Print mediums which have discussed these issues to analyse how media is responsible for

creating various memory narratives.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Davis, Natalie Z. 1981. The Possibilities of the Past, Journal of Interdisciplinary History, Vol. 12, No.2, The New History:

The 1980s and beyond II, pp. 267-275.

● Gaddis, John Lewis. 2002. The Landscape of History: How Historians Map the Past, New York: Oxford Univ Press.

● Gathercole, Peter and David Lowenthal (eds.) 1994. The Politics of the Past, New York: Routledge.

● Hodder, Ian and Scott Hutson. 2003 (Third Edition). Reading the Past, New York: Cambridge Univ. Press.

● Kumar, Ravinder 1989. The Past and the Present: An Indian Dialogue, Daedalus, Vol. 118, No.4, pp. 27-49.

● Thompson, Paul. 2000. The Voice of the Past: Oral History, New York: Oxford Univ Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Banerjee, Sumanta, 2003. Ayodhya: A future bound by the past, Economic and Political Weekly, Vol. 38, No. 27, pp.

2795-2796.

● Buchli, Victor and Gavin Lucas 2001. Archaeologies of the Contemporary Past, Routledge.

● Carr, E.H. 1967. What is History, Vintage.

● Chalcraft, David et.al. 2008. Max Weber Matters: Interweaving Past and Present, Ashgate.

● Chapman, James 2005. Past and Present: National Identity and the British Historical Film, I.B.Tauris.

● Clarke, Katherine 2008. Making Time for the Past: Local History and the Polis, Oxford Univ Press.

● Damm, Charlotte 2005. Archaeology Ethno-History and Oral Traditions: approaches to the indigenous past,

Norwegian Archaeological Review, Vol. 38, No. 2, pp. 73-87.

● Fowler, Don D. 1987. Uses of the past: Archaeology in the service of the state, American Antiquity, Vol. 52, No. 2, pp.

229-248.

● Greene, Naomi 1999. Landscapes of Loss: The Nationalist Past in Postwar French Cinema, Princeton Univ Press.

● Hamilakis et. al. 2001. Art and the Re-presentation of the Past, The Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, Vol. 7,

No. 1, pp. 153-156.

● Muller, Jan-Werner 2004. Memory and Power in Post-War Europe: Studies in the presence of the past, Cambridge Univ.

Press.

● Murray, Williamson and Richard Hart Sinnreich (eds.) 2006. The Past as Prologue: The Importance of History to the

Military Profession, Cambridge Univ Press.

● Piercey, Robert 2009. The Uses of the Past from Heidegger to Rorty: Doing Philosophy Historically, Cambridge Univ. Press.

● Shrimali, K.M. 1998. A Future for the Past? Social Scientist, Vol. 26, No. 9, pp. 26-51.

● Stone, Peter G. and Philippe G. Planel 1999. the Constructed Past, Routledge.

● Walsh, Kevin 1992. The Representation of the Past: Museums and heritage in the post-modern world, Routledge

Evaluation Pattern

 Course Code  HIS141

Course Title Assessment Details :  Encountering Histories: The Place of the Past

 

CIA1 - 20 Marks  Group assignment - Submission paper

MSE CIAII - 25 Marks - Submission paper

 

ESE - 50 Marks - Individual Assignment - Submission paper

 

 

MED142 - UNDERSTANDING THE LANGUAGE OF CINEMA (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course would provide students with a thorough knowledge of the conceptual and practical aspects of digital cinematography through engagement with the works of eminent cinematographers from around the world and the equipment.

The course aims to help students to:

  • Appreciate cinematography as a combination of artistic and technological endeavors
  • Understand the basics concepts of cinematography and shot design
  • Harness the power of natural and artificial lighting to compose powerful shots
  • Explore the creative possibilities of cinematography and understand its importance in effective storytelling.

Course Outcome

CO1: Identify and describe the visual elements in cinematography.

CO2: Demonstrate understanding of different tools of cinematography.

CO3: Apply knowledge of cinematography techniques to create films.

CO4: Use cinematography skills to make films on social issues.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to the language of cinema
 

Cinematography as an art; Art of visual storytelling; Evolution of cinematography; Eminent cinematographer’s from world cinema; Cinematography and effective storytelling.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
The Cinematographer?s medium and Tools
 

Light, Camera, Lenses, Basics of Lighting; Various types of light sources and their practical application;Color temperature, Lens Choice, Lens filters, Exposure/F‐Stop/Shutter/ISO; Depth of field Camera operating; Hands-on introduction to camera equipment

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Visualising and Shot Design
 

Composition & Framing; Types of Shots; Shot design for single camera and multi camera productions

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Camera Placement and Movement
 

Camera Placement -how does it affect the meaning; Motivated Camera Movement.

Text Books And Reference Books:

  • Pro, A. P. (2010). Adobe Premiere Pro.
  • Team, A. C. (2012). Adobe Premiere Pro CS6 Classroom in a Book: Adobe Perm Pro CS6 Classro_p1. Adobe Press.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

  • Block, B. (2013). The visual story: Creating the visual structure of film, TV and digital media. CRC Press.
  • Alton, J. (2013). Painting with light. Univ of California Press.
Evaluation Pattern
  • CIA 1: Submissions for 20 marks
  • Mid-Semester Submission: 30 marks
  • CIA 3: Submissions 20 marks
  • End Semester Submission: Submission for 30 marks

MED143 - DEMOCRACY AND MEDIA (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
The course provides an overview of the complex interrelation and interdependence between media and democracy. The normative objective of this course is to
understand and critically evaluate whether the existing forms and structures of media, enable, support and promote a democratic society. It also tries to explore whether new forms of media can empower media's role within democratic societies. The course also provides a deep understanding of complexities that arise in neoliberal democracies and contemporary media systems.
Course Objectives :
  • To equip students with tools for critical consumption of media.
  • To analyze the structural deficiencies preventing the media from performing its democratic functions.
  • To understand media as an Ideological State Apparatus' to 'manufacture consent'.

Course Outcome

CO1: Discuss the significance of the fourth estate in a constitutional democracy.

CO2: Recognize media's critical function of speaking truth to power.

CO3: Identify the threats of increasing corporatization, concentration of ownership, and evolving funding models in the digital economy.

CO4: Critique the undemocratic overrepresentation of social elites in Indian newsrooms.

CO5: Discern the role of mass and social media in manufacturing public opinion and reality.

CO6: Critique various forms of censorship and curbs on press freedom in India.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Theory, Concept, and Definitions
 
  • Definition of Democracy and Democratic theory.
  • Media as the fourth estate.
  • Democratic responsibilities of media.
  • Fundamental rights and the media's role in protecting them. 
  • Media as the voice of the voiceless.
  • Media as the watchdog of democracy.
  • Media as the platform for deliberation (Media as Public Sphere).
  • Media worker as the democratic warrior.
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Media, Democracy and Capitalism
 
  • Contemporary structure of media within capitalism:
  • Advertising funding and its implications on media's democratic functions.
  • Big business and government
  • Media as Big Business.
  • Use of SLAPP on media houses and self-censorship.
  • Media concentration, conglomeration, commercialization and its effect on democracy.

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Democratic Media
 
  • Media reform and democratic media.
  • Media policy and democratic reform.
  • Alternatives to commercial media models: Case studies of BBC, NPR, and Aljazeera.
  • Critical analysis of Doordarshan and Rajya Sabha TV as possible democratic media.
  • Emergence of digital news platforms and their role in democratic communication [The Wire, Quint News Laundry, The News Minute, Scroll].
  • Representation of Caste and minorities in the media.
  • Media trials and the creation of the common enemy.

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Social Media, Alternative Media and Democracy
 
  • Social media as the new public sphere.
  • Social media democratic elections in the current era (Case studies of 2016 US elections and 2019 Indian elections).
  • Alternative media spaces: Exploring community radio, Video Volunteers and Alt News.
  • Critical examination of alternative models of media

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:2
Video Voice for Social Change Manyam Praja Video : A Community Empowerment Initiative
 
  • Participatory Video (PV).
  • Manyam Praja Video.
  • Elements of Participatory Process.
  • Teaching Process. Community Video Producer (CVP). Community Video Unit (CVU).

 

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:2
Media Trial and at the time of Trialling Media: An Indian Perspective
 
  • Media trial. Sensationalism. Some instances of media trial in India.
  • Celebrity power and PR teams. Me Too. Cancel Culture. Ethical Consideration.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:
  • Curran, J. (2011). Media and democracy. Routledge.
  • Chattarji, S., & Ninan, S. (Eds.). (2013). The hoot reader: media practice in twenty-first century India. New Delhi: Oxford
  • Ghosh, S., & Thakurta, P. G. (2016). Sue the Messenger: How Legal Harassment by Corporates is Shackling Reportage and Undermining Democracy in India. Paranjoy Guha Thakurta.
  • Hardy, J. (2014). Critical political economy of the media: An introduction. Routledge.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Herman, E. S., & Chomsky,N. (2010). Manufacturing consent: 1he political economy of the mass media, Random House.
  • McChesney, R. W. (2016). Rich media, poor democracy: Communication politics in dubious times. New Press.
  • Thomas, P. N. (2010). Political Economy of Communications in India: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1st ed.). New Delhi, India: Sage Publication.

Research Articles:

  • Biswal, S. K. (2019). Exploring the role of citizen journalism in rural India. Media Watch, 10, 43-54.
  • Curran, J. (1991). Rethinking the media as a public sphere. Communication and citizenship, 27-57.
  • Khan, U. (2015). Indian media: Crisis in the fourth estate. Kennedy School Review, 15, 70
  • Rao, S., Mudgal, V. (2015). Introduction: Democracy, Journalism and Civic Society in India. Journalism Studies. 16(5), 615-623.
  • Saeed, S. (2015). Phantom journalism governing India's proxy media owners. Journalism Studies, 16(5), 663-679,
  • Thussu, D. K. (2007). TheMurdochization'of news? The case of Star TV in India. Media, Culture & Society, 29(4), 593-611.
Evaluation Pattern

Assessment outline

  • Overall end semester  evaluation for 95 marks
  • Project I: 20 Marks 
  • Project II: 25 Marks
  • Project III: 20 Marks
  • End semester Submission Project IV: 30 Marks. Attendance 5 Marks

 

POL142 - GLOBAL POWER POLITICS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The global balance of power is changing dramatically. As the world seems to be moving away from American Hegemony, the question of where power lies in global politics is becoming ever more significant. Great powers remain as the critical actors in the international system and the nature of the international order is determined by their interactions in war and peace. This course focuses on the transformation of global power politics particularly focusing on the power shifts in the post-cold war international system. The course will also introduce students to the emergence of new powers such as China, India, Brazil and South Africa and the changing dynamics of the international system. The course will examine whether great powers can cooperate in addressing the consequential challenges in the new century; climate change, nuclear proliferation, refugee crisis, international terrorism and other issues. The course will also examine the competition among the great powers in the South and East China Sea, and the West Asian region.

 

Course Objectives

The course aims to help students to:

  •   understand the key concepts and theories of international relations.
  •  examine the key issues pertaining to great power politics in the twenty-first century.
  • outline the dynamics of strategic interaction between great powers and focus on great power competition during World Wars, Cold War period and the post-Cold War period.
  • develop an understanding of the great power dynamics, the use of power by great powers in international relations.

Course Outcome

CO1: analyse global power politics in the twenty-first century.

CO2: demonstrate the major contemporary challenges and issues in global politics.

CO3: evaluate the changing power dynamics and power shifts in international relations.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to International Relations
 

International Relations: Meaning, nature and scope of international relations; concepts and theories of International Relations.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Great Power Politics in the Cold War era
 

First World War, Second World War: causes and consequences, inter war period (multipolarity), the Cold War (bipolarity) and the post-Cold War period (unipolarity).

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Power shifts in the Post-Cold War
 

Power shifts in the post-Cold War international system, Great Powers: traditional and non-traditional security threats, emergence of new powers(rise of China as a challenge to the West)

Text Books And Reference Books:

Baylis, J. and Smith, S. (eds.) (2011), The Globalization of World Politics. An Introduction to International Relations, London: OUP.

Heywood, A (2014), Global Politics, Palgrave Foundation.

Griffiths, M and Terry O Callaghan (2002), International Relations: The Key Concepts’. Routledge London and New York.

Griffiths, M. (1999) ‘Fifty Key Thinkers in International Relations, Routledge London and New York.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Barry Buzan and Ole Weaver (2003), ‘Regions and Powers: The structure of International Security’ Cambridge.

Ikenberry, G. John, Ed. 2002. America Unrivaled: The Future of the Balance of Power, Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press. 

John J. Mearsheimer, The Tragedy of Great Power Politics, updated ed. (New York: Norton, 2014).

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Outline:

Course Code

Course Title

Assessment Details

POL142

Global Power and Politics

CIA 1

MSE

(CIA 2)

CIA 3

ESE

Attendance

20

Marks

25

Marks

20

Marks

30

Marks

05

Marks

Individual Assignment

Written Exam

Group Assignment

Written Exam

 

 

 

 

Section A:

3 x 25= 15 Marks

Section B:

2 x 10= 20 Marks

Section C:

1 x 15 = 15 Marks

 

Section A:

3 x 5 = 15 Marks

Section B:

2x 10 = 20 Marks

Section C:

1 x 15 = 15 Marks

 

 

POL143 - DEMOCRACY AND ETHICS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 The course  is designed to provide a sound working knowledge of policy-making actors and processes within the public sector at national and sub-national levels of government. In addition, the module provides an understanding of the principles of good governance in the public and corporate sectors, and knowledge and skills in the areas of professional values and ethics.

There are a large number of different forms of government, so this module focuses primarily on the actors and structures typically found in democratic states, but reference is made to other approaches where relevant. Even within democracies there is a large amount of variation, with differences such as federal or unitary arrangements, monarchies or republics, prime-ministerial or presidential systems, etc. As far as possible, this variety is reflected in the syllabus and learning materials, but inevitably there a limit to the extent to which all variations can be addressed. Where, for example, the materials focus on approaches applied in the UK, USA or EU in order to provide concrete cases that can be analysed alongside general or theoretical concepts, this is not intended to suggest that these approaches are in any way the ‘norm’. This course is designed to develop student’s capacity to critically analyze the terrain where politics and ethics intersect. It also examines some arguments for and against keeping the practice of politics separate from the sphere of ethics. It explores the problems of “dirty hands” and “many hands” in government, public organizations and public life. It discusses some of the ethical dilemmas confronting public officials and powerful institutions and organizations which have major impact on the life of ordinary citizens in a democratic polity. It offers a reflective and methodological approach to develop moral reasoning and analytical skills to evaluate ethical issues and to guide decision-making in government and public life. The rationale of the study is to make the pupils aware of the importance of democracy. What constitute democracy, what is its

importance from the point of view of the role of individual and what exactly can an individual get if he performs his role well in the society. This module also aims to make the individual understand the different aspects of democracy and its implications in the overall development of the state. The course on “Democracy and Ethics” is to introduce and discuss the moral foundations of democracy in principle, and democratic institutions, in particular. The students are initiated to various types of moral discourses in political philosophy. Further, this course looks at the development of democracy, in the global and national realm. Democracy as an ideal gets fructified in the form of a government, which in turn is based on the principles of justice, freedom, equality, and fraternity. Ethics acts as the premise on which a successful democracy rests. syllabus is introduced from the point of view that all students upon entering into the college, enroll themselves as voters and encourage and enthuse other members of the society to participate not only in election process but also electoral and political process in general.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Discover and analyse the terrain where politics and ethics intersect, based on different theoretical perspectives

CO2: Critically assess the problems of ?dirty hands? and ?many hands? in government and public organizations and evaluate by reflecting on and applying various ethical and political theories of responsibility.

CO3: Discover and critically investigate the ethical dilemmas confronting public officials in discharging their public duties, based on different ethical perspectives

CO4: Acquire and enhance skills in moral reasoning and ethical analysis to guide their personal and professional lives

CO5: Discuss and apply principles and concepts of ethical behaviour

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Foundations of Principle of Moral Philosophy - Justice between Peoples
 

 

 

1.      Nature of ethics and its relevance

2.      How ethics reinforces democratic principles

3.      Common unethical means adopted in democracy: identify and rectify

4.      Difference between Ethics, Morals and Values

 

5.      Human Rights,

 

6.       Distributive Justice,

 

7.      Decision-theoretic Consequentialism, Deontology

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:11
Political Responsibility: The Problem of Dirty Hands and Many Hands
 

                                    

1.      Platonic Concept of Virtue


2.      Aristotle’s Account of Rational Agents, Choice, Deliberation and Action


3.      Practice of Virtue and Attainment of Happiness


4.      Kant: Good Will as source of moral action


5.      Duty Ethics


6.      Sources of Utilitarianism in John Stuart Mill and Jeremy Bentham


7.      Utility as the Moral criterion

8.       Liberalism, ‘“Precommitment” and “Post commitment”

9.      Hindu Tradition: Dharma and Karma, Purusharthas

10.  Buddhist Tradition: Four Noble Truths and Eight- fold Path

11.   Indian Principles in Ethical Context: Saravana, Manana and Nidhidhyasana

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Democracy
 

1.      Principles of Democracy: Freedom, Equality and Fraternity,

2.      Government by Consent


3.      Constitutional Government and Rule of Law

4.      Democracy and Human Rights society

 

5.      Instrumentalist Conceptions of Democratic Authority

 

6.      Democratic Consent Theories of Authority

 

7.      Limits to the Authority of Democracy

 

8.      Leadership: Servant, Participative, Consensus, leaderships in Democracy

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Indian Democracy and Path to Enlightened Democracy
 

1.      History and Democratic Heritage, Freedom Struggle,


2.      The Indian Constitution: Preamble and other constitutional values


3.      Ethical Code of Conduct for Politicians


4.      Citizenship, Fundamental Rights and Fundamental Duties of Indian Citizens

 

5.      Character record of members of legislature

 

6.      Ethical use of majority in parliament

 

7.      Avoidance of ‘floor crossing’ and defection

 

8.      Respecting independence of judiciary and media

 

9.      Safeguarding national history and avoiding distortion

 

10.  Ensuring political neutrality of Universities and their syllabi

 

Judicious allocation of central funds to states Free and fair elections

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      Aristotle, (1955). Nichomachean Ethics, trans. J. A. K. Thomson, Baltimore, Maryland: Penguin Books.


2.      Christiano, T. (Ed.). (2002). Philosophy and Democracy, Oxford: Oxford University Press.


3.      Cortella, L. (2015). The Ethics of Democracy: A Contemporary Reading of Hegel's Philosophy of Right, Giacomo Donis (tr.), New York: SUNY Press.


4.      Dewey, J. (1993). Philosophy and Democracy [1919] and The Ethics of Democracy [1888] in The Political Writings, ed. D. Morris, I. Shapiro, Indianapolis: Hackett, 1993.


5.      Finnis, J. (1983). Fundamentals of Ethics. Oxford: Clarendon Press.


6.      Gandhi, M. K. (1927). An Autobiography or The Story of My Experiments with Truth. Ahemadabad: Navajivan Mudranalaya.


Granville, A. (2000). The Indian Constitution: Cornerstone of a Nation. New Delhi: Oxford University Press

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.      Jain, S. (2000). The Constitution of India: Select Issues and Perceptions. New Delhi: Taxmann.


2.      Locke, J. (Ed.). (1980). Second Treatise on Civil Government, (1690), C. B. MacPherson, Indianapolis, IN: Hackett.


3.      Kant, I. (1959). Foundations of the Metaphysics of Morals. trans. Lewis White Beck, Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merril.


4.      KANT, Immanuel, Critique of Practical Reason, translated by Lewis White Beck, Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merril, 1956.


5.      MACHIAVELLI, The Prince [1513], ed. Q. Skinner, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1988.


6.      PLATO, The Republic, revised/trans. by Desmond Lee, Harmondsworth, UK: Penguin Books, 1974.


7.      RAWLS, John, Political Liberalism, New York: Columbia University Press, 1996.


8.      SANDEL, Michael (ed.), Justice-A Reader, Oxford University Press, 2007.


9.      SINGER, Peter, Democracy and Disobedience, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1973.


10.  WALZER, Michael, "Philosophy and Democracy", Political Theory, Vol.9, No.3, 1981, 379-399.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1   25

CIA 2   25

CIA 3   45

PSY141 - ADVERTISEMENT PSYCHOLOGY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course will develop an understanding of how advertising affects the human mind by giving unique and valuable insight from the industry. The course will help in studying the relationship between advertising and human mind and also apply this learning to advertising strategy, positioning, brand, and marketing communications that prepare students for the competitive world of advertising and marketing.

Course objectives

This course aims to

  • Introduce psychological perspectives of advertisements in real life situations. 
  • Orient students towards the various functions and roles of cognitive, affective and behavioral responses in the field of advertisement.
  • Help students to identify and apply the various theories and principles of advertisement psychology in the field of marketing.

Course Outcome

CO1: Apply the psychological perspectives of advertisements in the real-life setting.

CO2: Integrate different domains such as cognitive, affective and behavioral responses in the field of advertisement.

CO3: Develop the ability to make applications based on understanding of marketing strategies.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit I: Introduction to advertisement psychology
 

 

Introduction to advertisements; Its objectives and importance; Types and forms of advertising; Effects of advertisements a psychological perspective; Classic and contemporary approaches of classifying advertisement effectiveness.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Unit II: Cognitive processing of advertisements
 

Influence of advertisements on buying behaviors; Dynamics of Attention,Comprehension,Reasoning for advertisements; Attitudes and attitude changes with the influence of advertisements;Principles of persuasion and attitude change; Achieving advertisement compliance without changing attitude.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Unit III: International Advertising and Creating Brand
 

Emergence of International Advertising; Advertising in Multicultural Environment; Ethics in Advertising; Integrated marketing communication and marketing mix.

Text Books And Reference Books:

 Fennis,B.M.,&Stroebe,W.(2015).ThePsychologyofAdvertising.NewYork:PsychologyPress.

Andrew,A.Mitchell.(1993).AdvertisingExposure,MemoryandChoice.LawrenceErlbaumAssociates.Hillsdale,NJ.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

Linda,F.Alwitt & Andrew,A.Mitchell (1985).PsychologicalProcessesandAdvertising Effects:Theory,Research,andApplications. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Hillsdale, NJ. London.

Rolloph,M.E.&Miller,G.R.(Eds)(1980).Persuasion:NewDirectionsinTheoryandResearch.Sage.N.Y.

Eddie.M.Clark,Timothy.C.Brock,&DavidW.Stewart.(1994).Attention,AttitudeandAffectinResponsetoAdvertising.LawrenceErlbaumAssociates.Hillsdale,NJ.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I

CIA II

CIA III

25

35

35

PSY157 - SCIENCE OF WELLBEING (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This multidisciplinary course will focus on those aspects that help individuals thrive. The course sheds its light on well-being and its components and also clears all the misconceptions revolving around it. The students will be exposed to certain theories, concepts and practice procedures of well-being and its components. This programme will help the students to reflect on their life experiences on these dimensions and to know how to improve them and flourish in their life. 

Course Outcome

CO1: Explain the concept of well-being and its components

CO2: Analyze the role of happiness and emotions in enhancing well-being using relevant theories

CO3: Apply various concepts of well-being on the life experiences of students

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Well-being
 

Well-being - components of well-being: subjective happiness and life satisfaction

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Well-being - components of well-being
 

subjective happiness and life satisfaction

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Happiness & Emotion
 

Happiness - Definition, Significance Misconceptions, types and interventions  Emotion - types, emotion regulation

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Happiness
 

Definition, Significance Misconceptions, types and interventions Emotion - types, emotion regulation

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Mindfulness- components
 

Mindfulness- components: gratitude, forgiveness, kindness-compassion

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:25
Mindfulness components
 

Gratitude, forgiveness, kindness-compassion

Text Books And Reference Books:

·       Carr, A. (2004). Positive Psychology. New York: Routldge.

·       Hupper, F. A., Baylis, N., & Keverne, B. (2005). The science of well-being. Oxford Scholarship.

·       Hupper, F. A., Baylis, N., & Keverne, B. (2005). The science of well-being. Oxford Scholarship.

·       Ivtzan, I. & Lomas, T.(Ed.) (2016) Mindfulness in Positive Psychology. New York: Routldge.

·       Kabat-Zinn, J. (2012). Mindfulness for beginners: reclaiming the present moment—and your life. Boulder, CO, Sounds True.

·       Linley, P. A., & Joseph, S. (Eds.). (2004). Positive psychology in practice. John Wiley & Sons, Inc.. https://doi.org/10.10 02/9780470939338

 

·       Maddux, J. E. (2018). Subjective Wellbeing and Life Satisfaction. New York: Routldge.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

.

Evaluation Pattern

 

 

CIA1

CIA2

CIA3

Class attendance & Participation

20 marks

20 marks

50 marks

10

BBA101-2 - FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Financial Management is an introductory core course that is offered with intent to equip the students with the basic knowledge of finance theory and its application to develop relevant financial strategies pertinent to profit-seeking organizations. The theme of financial management is structured around three decision making financial areas: Investment- long term as well as working capital, Financing and Dividend policy. This imbibes students with analytical and decision-making skills in managing finance through application of theoretical questions and practical problems.

 

Course Objectives: 

      To understand the basics of finance function and the concepts of financial management

      To apply the knowledge in taking finance decisions

      To develop analytical skills to identify financial management problems and solve them.

      To analyse the relationship among capital structure, cost of capital, dividend decisions, and value of the business.

To assess a firm’s requirement for long-term assets by applying capital budgeting techniques

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate understanding of the principles and concepts of financial management

CO2: Summarize the motives behind financial decision making

CO3: Interpret the relevant theories and concepts of various practices of financial management and ethics in Finance.

CO4: Analyze the relationship among capital structure, cost of capital, dividend decisions, and value of the business.

CO5: Evaluate projects for profitability

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to Financial Management
 

Meaning of finance and financial management, Types of finance, Scope of financial management, Approaches to finance function relationship of finance with other business functions, Objectives of financial management – profit maximization and wealth maximization - merits and criticisms Financial decisions, Internal relation of financial decisions, Factors influencing financial decisions, Functional areas of financial management, Functions of a finance manager, Agency Cost, Definition of ethics and the importance of ethics in Finance.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Sources of Finance
 

Ownership securities – Equity shares, Preference shares, Deferred shares, No par stock/shares, Shares with differential rights, Sweat Equity Creditorship securities – Debentures – Zero coupon bonds, Zero interest bonds, Callable bonds, Deep discount bonds Internal financing or ploughing back of profit – factors affecting ploughing back of profits – merits and demerits Loan financing – short term and long term sources. Startup finance-Bootstrapping, Series Funding

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Capital Structure & Capitalization
 

Meaning of capitalization – Theories of capitalization – cost theory and earnings theory. Over capitalization and under capitalization (Theory) – causes – effects and remedies, Watered stock, Over trading and under trading. Meaning of capital structure and financial structure, principles of capital structure, Optimum Capital Structure, Determinants of capital structure, capital gearing-Theories of Capital structure, Effect of capital structure on EPS, EBIT-EPS Analysis, Point of indifference-Practical Problems

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Cost of Capital and Leverages
 

Meaning of cost of capital, significance of cost of capital, components of cost of capital – Computation of Cost of capital and Weighted Average Cost of Capital, CAPM-Practical Problems. Meaning of Leverage, Types of Leverages – operating, financial and combined leverage, risk and leverage – practical problems

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
Capital Budgeting
 

Meaning of Capital Budgeting, Importance, Need, Time value of money-Present and Future Value (Simple Problems), Capital budgeting process, project appraisal by using traditional methods and modern methods, Practical problems on Payback Period, Net Present Value, Profitability Index, IRR and MIRR methods

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
Dividend Policy decisions
 

Meaning, Kinds, Bonus shares – Merits and Demerits, Theories of dividend decisions, determinants of dividend policy decisions, Companies Act, 2013 and SEBI Guidelines on Dividend Distribution (Theory only)

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:7
Management of Working Capital
 

Meaning of working capital, types of working capital, working capital cycle, adequate working capital, determinants of working capital, estimation of working capital-Practice problems. Management of cash. Management of inventory and debtors – Theory only

Text Books And Reference Books:

Khan, M, Y, & Jain, P, K (2018). Financial Management. Tata Mc Graw Hill. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Chandra, P. (2019).Financial Management. New Delhi, India. Tata McGraw Hill Book Co.
  2. Pandey,I.M.(2015). Financial Management. New Delhi, India. Vikas Publishing House.
  3. Gupta, S, K., Sharma, R.K. & Gupta, N (2013). Financial Management. Kalyani Publishers.
  4. Khan, M, Y, & Jain, P, K (2018). Financial Management. Tata Mc Graw Hill. 

Brigham and Houston (2021), Fundamentals of Financial Management, Cengage Learning, 14 edition

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I- 20 Marks

CIA II- 50 Marks

CIA II- 20 Marks

ESE- 50 Marks

Attendance : 5 Marks

BBA102-2 - MARKETING MANAGEMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Marketing a particularly stimulating subject for learners, since its practical application is visible every day. Old rules of marketing are no longer useful to those who want to influence these new consumer’s choices. This course will lead the exploration of the leading edge of this paradigm shift that is now underway. This course introduces students to the concepts and processes of marketing and takes them deeper into the world of marketing.

Course Objectives: This course intends

  • To explain fundamental concepts of marketing and their application to different markets.
  • To give an understanding about marketing mix elements and strategies.
  • To explain about consumers buying behavior.
  • To critically examine and evaluate existing marketing strategies and tactics.
  • To study the social responsibility and ethics of marketing.

Course Outcome

CO1: Explain fundamental concepts of marketing and their application to different markets.

CO2: Understand elements and strategies about marketing mix.

CO3: Explain about consumers buying behavior.

CO4: Critically examine and evaluate existing marketing strategies and tactics.

CO5: Study the social responsibility and ethics of marketing.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Introduction to Marketing Fundamentals
 

Meaning and Definition of Marketing; Scope of marketing - What Is Marketing? What Is Marketed? Who Markets, Evolution of marketing - The Production Concept, The Product Concept, The Selling Concept, The Marketing Concept, The Holistic Marketing Concept; Core marketing concepts - Needs, Wants, and Demands, Target Markets, Positioning, and Segmentation, Offerings and Brands, Value and Satisfaction, Marketing Channels, Supply Chain, Competition Marketing Environment

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Connecting with Customers
 

Consumer behavior model (Black box) Factors affecting consumer Behavior, Types of Buying Decision Behavior, The Buyer Decision Process, The Business Buyer Decision Process, Institutional and Government Market. Segmentation, targeting and positioning for competitive advantage.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Product Decision
 

Setting Product Strategy: Product Classification, Product Levels, Product and Services Differentiation, New product development stages, categories of new product, reasons for launching new products and its failure. Product life cycle strategies and its extension, Ansoff’s Matrix, meaning of services, unique characteristics of services, 7Ps of service marketing, Service delivery process.

Competitive Dynamics: Competitive Strategies for Market, Other Competitive Strategies – Market Challenger Strategies Market Follower Strategies, Market Nicher Strategies.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Pricing
 

Types of pricing, Pricing strategies: New product pricing strategies, Product mix pricing strategies, Price adjustment strategies, Price changes, Public policy and pricing.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
Distribution Channels
 

Marketing channels, structure, types and criteria of selecting a channel, wholesaling, retailing, and physical distribution, Channel Management (Channel design and Channel Conflict)

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Promotion
 

Significance of Integrated Marketing communication, Advertising, sales promotion, personal selling and sales management.  Public and customer relations, direct and online marketing, multi-level marketing-the new marketing model. Other promotional strategies (Buzz Marketing, Stealth Marketing and Guerilla Marketing)

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:6
Competitive Dynamics and Socially Responsible Marketing
 

Sustainable Marketing, Social Criticisms of Marketing, Marketing’s Impact on Individual, Marketing’s Impact on Society as a Whole, Marketing’s Impact on Other Businesses, Actions to Promote Sustainable Marketing, Business Actions Toward Sustainable Marketing, Principles and Marketing Ethics.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Kotler.P, &Keller.K.L., Koshy & Jha  (2020). Marketing Management, 20th edition, Pearson.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Marshall & Johnston, Marketing Management, McGraw Hill
  2. Kotler & Armstrong, 15th ed., Principles of Marketing Management, Pearson publication
  3. Chernev & Kotler, 5th ed., Strategic Marketing Management, Brightstar Media
  4. Stanton, Etzel, Walker, Fundamentals of Marketing, Tata-McGraw Hill, New Delhi.
  5. Saxena, Rajan, Marketing Management, Tata-McGraw Hill, New Delhi.
  6. McCarthy, E.J., (2016). Basic Marketing: A managerial approach. Irwin, New York.
Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1- for 20 marks. Report submission either individual or in group

CIA 2 - For 25 marks- Written exam for 50 marks, converted to 25 marks.

CIA 3 - For 20 Marks- Report Submission either individual of in group.

ESE- For 30 Marks- Written Exam conducted for 2 hours for 50 Marks converted to 30

Attendance percentage - carry a maximum of 5 Marks.

BBA191-2 - SOCIAL CONCERN PROJECT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:1

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This project is an opportunity to students understand social issues and challenges around their society. A short term association of students with NGO’s help them to learn other side reality of society which enable them to consider social issues in their future corporate decision makings. This project facilitate the students to effectively  utilizing their skills and competences to contribute the people, community and society

Course Outcome

CO1: Identify the social problems and issues

CO2: Students able to analyze the opportunities to be agents of social change

CO3: Develop the students to become socially responsible citizens

CO4: Motivate to help them to realize what they learn and do can resolve social problems and issues by their contributions towards people, community, or society

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
Social Responsibility Project
 

Social Responsibility Project

Text Books And Reference Books:

       An external guide(from NGO) must be identified and informed to the teacher teaching Business ethics and sustainability.

       A mail confirming the details-Name of the external guide, designation, email id, phone number, address to be sent to teacher.

       A mail from the external guide must be sent to the teacher accepting your proposal to work with them and clearly mention your work, roles and responsibilities.

       Team leaders to coordinate which teams go when and complete what task and inform the teacher about the same

       A flow chart must be prepared by cluster coordinator showing each teams work to be completed and time line.

       A log book must be maintained by each group mentioning the individual contribution and work completion on a daily basis

       No more than 1 group from each cluster can go for project on any given day

       Each student is expected to put in a 25 hrs work towards project they undertake. The burden of proof lies with each student.

       Failure to report the day to day activities and update log book will lead to cancellation of project.

       Sufficient documents shall be made available both to the faculty guide and mentor at the NGO, for the work completed.

       It may consider  working with corporate foundations and in house CSA

       It is the group’s responsibility to ensure that the mentor at the NGO is aware about these guidelines. 

       Attendance shall be granted subject to confirmed participation by each student on a daily basis. NO attendance shall be given during class hours.

        At the end of each day's work it is the responsibility of the team leader to coordinate with the faculty mentor and get attendance sorted for their team.  No white forms or note is issued by anybody for this purpose.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Approved NGO by Department

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

VIVA-VOCE (50 Marks): -Implementation

• Demonstrate awareness of social issues -20 marks

• Propose initiatives for future commitment -20 marks

• Summarise key facts with clarity- 10 marks

REPORT VALUATION (25 Marks) &amp; RELECTIVE/FEEDBACK SESSIONS (25

Marks)

• Analyze stakeholder impact on social issues 10 marks

• Demonstrate clarity and coherence in writing – 10 marks

• Develop documents with appropriate structure and style- 5 marks

BSBA103-2 - FOUNDATION OF BUSINESS ANALYTICS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course aims to deliver theoretical and practical exposure to Business Analytics and how it can be used to solve Analytical problems in Business. The course aims to provide the foundational concepts of Business Analytics and enable students to use those learnings and analytical models to analyse business decisions.

      To relate the theoretical knowledge of business analytics with real-world data systems. 

      To understand data management techniques to handle data for the decision-making process.

      To analyse problems with the different tools and techniques for data-driven decisions

      To appraise the different business analytics models to solve management problems

●   To design data-based solutions for different functional domains of business

Course Outcome

CO1: Summarize the theoretical perspectives of data analytics.

CO2: Identify the practical applications of database systems for improving business decisions.

CO3: Apply analytical tools and practices in order to develop data-based managerial ability.

CO4: Evaluate the pattern of data for analytical models and make viable business decisions.

C05: Process the data and recommend solutions to the business problem across functional domains.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
FOUNDATION OF BUSINESS ANALYTICS
 

Definition of Business Analytics-Impacts and Challenges-Evolution of Business Analytics-Types of Business Analytics-Data for Business Analytics-Problem solving with Business Analytics

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
ANALYTICS PROCESS and OVERVIEW OF USING DATA
 

Data Selection, classification, Reduction, Exploration, Preparation, Partition, Types of data, modifying data using Excel, Datasets and Databases – Using range names in Databases – Sorting, Pareto analysis, Filtering data, creating distribution from data, measures of location, variability, association, analyzing the distribution

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
DESCRIPTIVE ANALYTICS
 

Population and samples - Frequency distribution and Histogram – Percentiles and Quartiles – Cross tabulation – Descriptive statistical measures – Cluster analysis

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
PREDICTIVE MODELLING
 

Trendlines and Regression analysis, Simple Linear Regression, Least Square Method, Multiple Regression Model, Model fitting

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
TIME SERIES AND FORECASTING
 

Time Series Pattern, forecast, accuracy, moving averages, seasonality.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
DECISION ANALYSIS
 

Problem formulation - payoff tables, decision trees; Decision analysis without probabilities: optimistic approach, conservative approach and mini-max regret approach; Decision analysis with probabilities: expected value approach, risk analysis and sensitivity analysis; Decision analysis with sample information - expected value of sample information and expected value of perfect information

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:8
APPLICATIONS OF BUSINESS ANALYTICS
 

Marketing – HR – Finance – Operations – Supply chain – Latest trends in analytics

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. James R Evans. (2021). Business Analytics (3rd ed.). Pearson Education.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Jeffrey D. Camm, James J. Cochran, Michael J. Fry,Jeffrey W. Ohlmann,David R. Anderson,Dennis J. Sweeney,Thomas A. Williams. (2018). Business Analytics (3rd ed.). Cengage Publishers.

2. Tanushri Banerjee and Arndam Banerjee (2019). Business Analytics: Text and Cases (1st ed.). Sage Publications.

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Outline:

 

Sl.No

Particulars

Weightage

1

CIA- I

20

2

CIA-II

25

3

CIA-III

20

4

Submission Paper

30

5

Attendance*

05

BSBA161-2 - QUANTITATIVE TECHNIQUES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

Quantitative aptitude is the basis for major decision-making process in business. The course is introduced as to give foundational knowledge of Mathematical concepts and to take the students through simple applications in business. Understanding of mathematical models is essential in numerous decision-making situations under uncertainty. A proper understanding of the course will help in building knowledge about optimization techniques, commercial arithmetic and applications of calculus. The decision-making environment is so complex that an appropriate decision can only be made with good analytical skills. The course is introduced to create quantitative aptitude among students at an early stage in higher education.

Course Objectives

 

 

 Course Objectives are:

     To impart basic knowledge of quantitative techniques and their applications in business.

     To learn construction and analysis of mathematical models for better decision making.

     To analyse simple business problems and suggest solutions.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the importance of basic Mathematical concepts

CO2: Demonstrate knowledge of quantitative techniques and apply in simple business situations.

CO3: Analyse business environment to make decisions using quantitative approach.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Unit I ? Linear Models (8 hours)
 

Linear Equations and Straight Lines - Coordinate systems and Graphs, standard form, slope of a straight line, Linear Inequalities, Feasible set, Method of least squares.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:7
Unit II ? Systems of linear equations and matrices
 

Addition of matrices, System of linear equations, addition and multiplication of Matrices, Determinants, Inverse of a matrix by Gauss Jordan method.  Applications of matrices – Solution of a system of linear equations- Gauss elimination method.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Unit III: Probability and Probability Distributions
 

Probability: sample space, classical definition, Addition and multiplication rules of probability. Independence of events, Discrete probability distributions – binomial and poisson distributions (theory only). Continuous probability distributions - Normal Distribution – properties, problems.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:7
Unit IV Basic Calculus and applications in business
 

Limits, Differentiation, Second order derivatives,  Maxima and Minima, Revenue Function, Cost function,  Profit function.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Goldstein, L. J., Schneider, D. I., Siegel, M. J., & Hair, S. M. (1991). Finite mathematics and its applications. Prentice Hall

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading