CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT

School of Business and Management

Syllabus for
Bachelor of Business Administration
Academic Year  (2022)

 
1 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN121 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
BBA111 FOUNDATIONS OF MANAGERIAL EFFECTIVENESS Skill Enhancement Course 2 0 100
BBA131 PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT Core Courses 4 4 100
BBA132 FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING Core Courses 4 4 100
BBA133 MICROECONOMICS Core Courses 4 4 100
BBA134 BUSINESS MATHEMATICS Core Courses 4 4 100
BBA161A BASIC PSYCHOLOGICAL PROCESS Generic Elective 2 2 50
BBA161B THE DYNAMICS OF INDIAN SOCIETY Generic Elective 2 2 100
BBA161C INTRODUCTION TO MEDIA PRODUCTION Generic Elective 2 2 100
BBA161D HUMAN RIGHTS LAW Generic Elective 2 2 100
BBA161E GRAPHIC DESIGNING Generic Elective 2 2 100
BBA161F ECLECTIC THOUGHTS Generic Elective 2 2 100
BBS161A COURTESY AND ETIQUETTES Generic Elective 3 3 100
BBS161B A LIFE WORTH LIVING-FROM HEALTH TO WELL BEING Generic Elective 3 3 100
BBS161C MAHABHARATHA AND MODERN MANAGEMENT Generic Elective 3 3 100
BECH131 MICROECONOMICS - I Core Courses 5 5 100
BECH132 MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS-I Core Courses 5 5 100
BECH133 ECONOMIC HISTORY OF INDIA FROM 1750 TO 1947 Core Courses 5 5 100
BECH141 INTRODUCTION TO THE PHILOSOPHY OF ECONOMICS Discipline Specific Elective 3 3 100
BECO161A INSTITUTIONS AND INFORMAL ECONOMY Generic Elective 3 3 100
BECO161B ECONOMICS OF CORRUPTION Generic Elective 3 3 100
BENG121 ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION I Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
BENG161A READING TECHNOLOGY IN/AND SCIENCE FICTION Generic Elective 3 3 100
BENG161B GLOBAL ETHICS FOR CONTEMPORARY SOCIETIES Generic Elective 3 3 100
BHIS161A ENCOUNTERING HISTORIES: THE FUTURE OF THE PAST Generic Elective 3 3 100
BHIS161B THE HISTORY OF URBAN SPACE AND EVOLUTION OF CITY FORMS Generic Elective 3 3 100
BMED151B UNDERSTANDING THE VISUAL LANGUAGE OF CINEMA Generic Elective 3 3 100
BMED161A MEDIA LITERACY Generic Elective 3 3 100
BPOL161A PEACE AND CONFLICT MANAGEMENT Generic Elective 3 3 100
BPOL161B GLOBAL POWER POLITICS Generic Elective 3 3 100
BPSY161A SCIENCE OF WELLNESS Generic Elective 3 3 100
BPSY161B ADVERTISEMENT PSYCHOLOGY Generic Elective 3 3 100
ENG121 ENGLISH - I Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 2 100
FRN121 FRENCH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
HIN122 HINDI Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
KAN121Y FOUNDATIONAL KANNADA Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 2 0 100
KAN122 KANNADA Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 03 100
SAN122 SANSKRIT Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
SDEH111 SOCIAL SENSITIVITY SKILLS Skill Enhancement Course 2 2 100
TAM121 TAMIL Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
2 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN221 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH - 3 3 100
BBA231 ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOUR - 4 4 100
BBA232 BUSINESS STATISTICS - 4 4 100
BBA233 MACROECONOMICS - 4 4 100
BBA234 CORPORATE ACCOUNTING - 4 4 100
BBA251 COMPUTERIZED ACCOUNTING - 4 4 100
BBA261A BASIC SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY - 2 2 100
BBA261B SOCIOLOGY OF CHANGE AND DEVELOPMENT - 2 2 100
BBA261C TECHNIQUES OF DIGITAL DESIGN - 2 2 100
BBA261D INDIAN SOCIETY AND LAW - 2 2 100
BBA261E WEB PAGE DESIGNING AND MULTIMEDIA - 2 2 100
BBA261F LITERATURE, HISTORY AND SOCIETY - 2 2 100
BBA281 SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY PROJECT - 1 1 100
BBA282 INTERNSHIP - 2 6 100
BBS261A CONSUMPTION AND CULTURE IN INDIA - 3 3 100
BBS261B GLOBAL LEADERSHIP AND CULTURE - 3 3 100
BBS261C TOURISM, CULTURE AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT - 3 3 100
BECH231 MACROECONOMICS-I - 5 5 100
BECH232 MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS-II - 5 5 100
BECH233 BASIC STATISTICAL METHODS USING MS-EXCEL - 5 5 100
BECH241 GENDER ECONOMICS - 3 3 100
BECO261A ECONOMICS AND LITERATURE - 3 3 100
BECO261B DESIGNING POLICIES FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT - 3 3 100
BENG221 ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION-II - 3 3 100
BENG261A READING CITYSCAPES: BANGALORE HISTORIES - 3 3 100
BENG261B READING THE CYBERSPACE: PUBLIC AND THE PRIVATE - 3 3 100
BHIS261A THE POLITICS OF MEMORY: THE MAKINGS OF GENOCIDE - 3 3 100
BHIS261B RELIGION: PHILOSOPHY AND POLITICS THROUGH AGES - 3 3 100
BMED251B AUDIO CONSUMPTION IN EVERYDAY LIFE - 3 3 100
BMED261A INTER-CULTURAL COMMUNICATION - 3 3 100
BPSY261A APPRECIATING AESTHETICS - 3 3 100
BPSY261B HUMAN ENGINEERING AND ERGONOMICS - 3 3 100
ENG221 ENGLISH - II - 3 2 100
FRN221 FRENCH - 3 3 100
HIN222 HINDI - 3 3 100
KAN222 KANNADA - 3 03 100
SAN222 SANSKRIT - 3 3 100
SDEH211 SKILL DEVELOPMENT - 2 2 100
TAM221 TAMIL - 3 3 100
3 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBA311 WORKING WITH SPREADSHEETS-I Skill Enhancement Course 2 0 100
BBA331 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT Core Courses 4 4 100
BBA332 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT Core Courses 4 4 100
BBA333 MARKETING MANAGEMENT Core Courses 4 4 100
BBA334 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND E-BUSINESS Core Courses 4 4 100
BBA335 INDIAN FINANCIAL SYSTEM Core Courses 4 4 100
BBA381 INDUSTRY REVIEW PROJECT Skill Enhancement Course 0 1 100
4 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBA431 COST AND MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING - 4 4 100
BBA432 ENTREPRENEURSHIP DEVELOPMENT - 4 4 100
BBA433 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY - 4 4 100
BBA434 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS ANALYTICS - 4 4 100
BBA435 CORPORATE LAW AND GOVERNANCE - 4 4 100
BBA461 INSURANCE AND RISK MANAGEMENT - 3 3 100
BBA462 SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT - 3 3 100
BBA463 GLOBAL BUSINESS - 3 3 100
BBA464 SERVICE MANAGEMENT - 3 3 100
BBA465 INNOVATION AND CREATIVITY IN BUSINESS - 3 3 100
BBA466 EVENT MANAGEMENT - 3 3 100
BBA467 CROSS CULTURAL MANAGEMENT - 3 3 100
BBA468 BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT - 3 3 100
BBA481 ENTREPRENEURSHIP DEVELOPMENT PROJECT - 0 1 100
5 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBA511A DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION Discipline Specific Elective 2 1 100
BBA511E ENTREPRENEURIAL ENHANCEMENT AND DECISION TOOLS Discipline Specific Elective 2 1 100
BBA511F TIME SERIES ANALYSIS Discipline Specific Elective 2 2 100
BBA511H TALENT ACQUISITION SKILLS-I Discipline Specific Elective 2 1 100
BBA511M MARKET FORECASTING AND CONSUMER ANALYSIS Discipline Specific Elective 2 1 100
BBA531 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT Core Courses 4 4 100
BBA532 TAXATION LAWS Core Courses 4 4 100
BBA541E MANAGEMENT OF BUSINESS SUSTAINABILITY Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
BBA541F SECURITY ANALYSIS AND PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
BBA541H INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS LAW Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
BBA541M CONSUMER BEHAVIOR Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
BBA542E SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
BBA542F GLOBAL BUSINESS FINANCE Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
BBA542H COMPENSATION MANAGEMENT Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
BBA542M BRAND MANAGEMENT Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
BBA543E FAMILY BUSINESS MANAGEMENT Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
BBA543F STRATEGIC FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
BBA543H INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
BBA543M RETAIL MANAGEMENT Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
BBA544E WORKING CAPITAL MANAGEMENT Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
BBA544F MANAGEMENT CONTROL SYSTEM Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
BBA544H HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
BBA544M CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIP MANAGEMENT Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
BBA545E PRODUCT DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
BBA545F DERIVATIVES Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
BBA545H ORGANIZATION THEORY AND DESIGN Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
BBA545M INTERNATIONAL MARKETING Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
BBA551A DATA MANAGEMENT FOR BUSINESS ANALYTICS Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
BBA552A DATA VISUALIZATION Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
BBA553A PYTHON PROGRAMMING FOR BUSINESS ANALYTICS Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
BBA581 INTERNSHIP PROJECT Skill Enhancement Course 2 2 100
6 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBA631 PRODUCTION AND OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT - 4 4 100
BBA632 BUSINESS LAWS - 4 4 100
BBA641E INDUSTRIAL MARKETING - 4 4 100
BBA641F TAXATION MANAGEMENT - 4 4 100
BBA641H KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT - 4 4 100
BBA641M INTEGRATED MARKETING COMMUNICATION - 4 4 100
BBA642E MANAGING INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS - 4 4 100
BBA642F CORPORATE RESTRUCTURING - 4 4 100
BBA642H ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE AND DEVELOPMENT - 4 4 100
BBA642M SALES AND DISTRIBUTION MANAGEMENT - 4 4 100
BBA643E TECHNOLOGY AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP - 4 4 100
BBA643F PROJECT AND INFRASTRUCTURE FINANCE - 4 4 100
BBA643H STRATEGIC HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT - 4 4 100
BBA643M RURAL MARKETING - 4 4 100
BBA644E QUALITY MANAGEMENT - 4 4 100
BBA644H PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - 4 4 100
BBA644M DIGITAL MARKETING - 4 4 100
BBA645E ENTREPRENEURIAL FINANCE - 4 4 100
BBA645F DEBT MARKETS AND MUTUAL FUNDS - 4 4 100
BBA645H HUMAN RESOURCE ANALYTICS - 4 4 100
BBA645M NEURO MARKETING - 4 4 100
BBA651A ADVANCED DATA ANALYTICS FOR BUSINESS APPLICATIONS - 4 4 100
BBA652A DATA WAREHOUSING AND DATA MINING - 4 4 100
BBA653A ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE FOR BUSINESS AND SOCIETY - 4 4 100
BBA654F FINANCIAL MODELING - 4 4 100
BBA681 PROJECT - 4 3 100
    

    

Introduction to Program:

The undergraduate programme in Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) is offered by the School of Business and Management since 1991as a platform to prepare young minds with a positive attitude for excellent performance and committed service. It provides the right nurturing ground to enable students to pursue their entrepreneurial ambitions. The curriculum for the three-year programme (6 Semesters), has been designed to enable the students to get an overview of the various aspects related to launching and managing a business effectively; as well as giving them an opportunity to specialize in a functional area of management that they would like to pursue in their careers. The BBA programme provides students with the opportunity for interdisciplinary learning through various generic electives from the streams of Economics, Psychology, Sociology, Social Work, Law, Media Studies, Hotel Management and Computer Applications. The programme focuses on developing the students and equipping them to meet the managerial challenges of the 21st century. The ability to work in teams are also focused upon as a key skill to be developed for success in the work-place.

Programme Outcome/Programme Learning Goals/Programme Learning Outcome:

PLG1/PO1: Social Responsibility and Ethical Sensitivity.

PLG2/PO2: Functional Knowledge and Application

PLG3/PO3: Communication

PLG4/PO4: Problem Solving

PLG5/PSO: Entrepreneurial Mind-set

Programme Educational Objective:

PEO1: Graduates possessing subject knowledge, analytical ability and skills to manage business.

PEO2: Graduates exhibiting spirit of inquiry, innovation and ability to solve problems in dynamic business environment.

PEO3: Graduates with value based leadership skills, entrepreneurial capabilities and global awareness serving enterprises and society.

Assesment Pattern

QUESTION PAPER PATTERNS

Mid Semester Examination (MSE) Question Paper Pattern

SECTION – A

SECTION – B

SECTION – C

SECTION – D

5 x 2 = 10 (out of 7 questions)

3 x 5 = 15 (out of 5 questions)

1 x 10 = 10 (out of 2 questions)

15 Marks (Case Study-Compulsory Question)

 End Semester Examination (ESE) Question Paper Pattern

SECTION – A

SECTION – B

SECTION – C

SECTION – D

10 x 2 = 20 (out of 12 questions)

6 x 5 = 30 (out of 8 questions)

3 x 10 = 30 (out of 5 questions)

20 Marks (Case Study-Compulsory Question)

Examination And Assesments

Examination and Assessments

 

CIA – 1 (20)*

CIA – 2 (25)*

CIA – 3 (20)*

Attendance (5)*

ESE  (30)*

Total (100)*

Component

1

2

MSE

1

2

 

ESE

 

Marks

20

50

20

5

50

145

Nature

Individual  Assignment

Written Examination

Group Presentation

 

 Written Examination

 

                 

 

 CIA: Continuous Internal Assessment

*Percentage of weight

MSE: Mid Semester Examination

ESE: End Semester Examination

 

ASSESSMENT PATTERN FOR SKILL ENHANCEMENT COURSES (SEC):

Semester 1 & 2:

·         6 Modules of 10 marks weight for each.

·         Total marks (60) to be converted to 100.

 Semester 3, 4, 5, & 6:

 

Component

CIA 1

CIA 2

CIA 3

Class Participation

Marks

30

30

30

10

Total

 

 

AEN121 - ADDITIONAL ENGLISH (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The Additional English course is offered as a second language course and seeks to introduce the students to the nuances of English literature in its varied forms and genres. The students who choose Additional English are generally proficient in the English language. Hence, instead of focusing on introducing them to language, challenging texts in terms of ideas, form, and technique are chosen. Additional English as a course is designed for students in place of a regional language. Non-Resident Indians (NRIs), foreign nationals and students who have not taken Hindi, Kannada, Tamil or French at the Plus 2 or Class XII levels are eligible to choose Additional English. The course is taught for students from different streams, namely, BA, BSc, BCom, and BBA in the first year and for BA, BSc and BCom (Regular) in the second year.

The first year syllabus is an attempt by the Department of English, Christ University to recognize and bring together the polyphonic Indian and Indian sub-continental voices in English in English translation for the Additional English students of the first year. This effort aims to familiarize the students with regional literatures in translation, Indian Writing in English (IWE) and literatures from Pakistan, Nepal and Srilanka, thereby, enabling the students to learn more about Indian culture and ethos through writings from different regions of the country. We have tried to represent in some way or the other the corners of India and the Indian sub-continent in this microcosmic world of short stories, poems and essays

 

There is a prescribed text bookfor the first year students, compiled by the Department of English, Christ University and intended for private circulation.

The first semester has a variety of writing from India, Pakistan and Nepal. The various essays, short stories and poems deal with various socio-economic, cultural and political issues that are relevant to modern day India and the Indian sub-continent and will enable students to comprehend issues of identity-politics, caste, religion, class, and gender. All of the selections either in the manner of their writing, the themes they deal with or the ideologies that govern them are contemporary in relevance and sensibility, whether written by contemporary writers or earlier writers. An important addition to this syllabus is the preponderance of North-Eastern writing which was hitherto not well represented. Excerpts from interviews, autobiographical writings, sports and city narratives are added to this section to introduce students to the varied genres of literature.

The objectives of this course are

to expose students to the rich literary and cultural diversity of  Indian literatures

to sensitise students on the social, political, historical and cultural ethos that has shaped the nation- INDIA

to enable to grasp and appreciate the variety and abundance of Indian writing, of which this compilation is just a passing glance

to learn and appreciate India through association of ideas in the texts and the external contexts (BhashaUtsav will be an intrinsic help in this endeavour)

  

 

Course Outcome

CO1 CO 2: iv) Understand the cultural, social, religious and ethnic diversities of India v) it will be able to be analytical and critical of the pluralistic society they live in through the activities and assignments conducted vi) be aware of the dynamics of gender, identity, communalism and politics of this vast nation through its literature.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Poetry
 

1.      Keki N Daruwala     “Migrations”

 

2.      Kamala Das            “Forest Fire”

 

3.      Agha Shahid Ali      “Snow on the Desert”

 

4.      Eunice D Souza       “Marriages are Made”

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Short Stories
 

1.      Rabindranath Tagore    “Babus of Nayanjore”

 

2.      Ruskin Bond  “He said it with Arsenic”

 

3.      Bhisham Sahni       “The Boss Came to Dinner”

 

4.      N. Kunjamohan Singh    “The Taste of Hilsa”

 

5.      Mohan Thakuri                “Post Script”

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Essays
 

1.      Mahatma Gandhi       “What is True Civilization?” (Excerpts from Hind Swaraj)

 

2.      Ela Bhatt                    “Organising for Change”

 

3.      Sitakant Mahapatra     “Beyond the Ego: New Values for a Global Neighborhood

 

4.      B R Ambedkar             “Waiting for A Visa”

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Contemporary knowledge of the soci-political situation in the sub-continent

The text book copy "Reading Diversity"

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

On-line resources to appreciate the text through the Comprehension Questions

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1:  Classroom assignment for 20 marks keeping in mind the objectives and learning outcomes of the course.

CIA 2: Mid-semester written exam for 50 marks

CIA 3: Collage, tableaus, skits, talk shows, documentaries, Quizzes or any proactive            creative assignments that might help students engage with India as a cultural space. This is to be done keeping in mind the objectives and learning outcomes of the course.

Question Paper Pattern

Mid Semester Exam: 2 hrs

Section A: 4x5= 20

Section B: 2x15=30

Total                  50

 

End Semester Exam: 2 hrs

Section A: 4 x 5 = 20

Section B: 2 x 15= 30

Total                   50

BBA111 - FOUNDATIONS OF MANAGERIAL EFFECTIVENESS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:0

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

This course intended to provide a cohort experience and to help students acquire a range of useful strategies and skills for enhancing their managerial effectiveness, as well as for engaging productively with the undergraduate course concepts throughout their program. The three themes addressed are managing your learning, learning together, and managerial skill development.

 

Course Objectives:

·       To explain and illustrate different barriers of professionalism and ethics as an attribute.

·       To develop understanding between individuals within a team or in a group setting.

·       To discover the importance of Team Building & Being a Team Member.

·       To analyze and interpret the techniques and tools that will promote efficient utilization of time.

To evaluate different reading strategies to improve effective reading.

 

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Identify the importance of professionalism and ethics.

CO2: Apply the concept of self awareness and its importance to improve relationship within a team or a group

CO3: Discover the importance of Team Building & Being a Team Member.

CO4: Analyze and interpret the techniques and tools that will promote efficient utilization of time.

CO5: Develop different reading strategies to improve effective reading

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
PROFESSIONALISM AND ETHICS
 

Professionalism in workplace, Ethics, Professionalism in sports, society, etc. Grooming

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
JOHARI WINDOW & TRANSACTIONAL ANALYSIS
 

JOHARI WINDOW - The four quadrants of JW, Advantages and disadvantages, Applications, TRANSACTIONAL ANALYSIS - Ego states, Type of transactions, Implications of TA

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
SELF AWARENESS
 

Introduction, importance, benefits, types and how to create a self-awareness, Understand yourself, Realize your strengths and weakness, Applicability of self-awareness in our lives.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
TEAM BUILDING
 

Introduction to meaning and concept of Teams, importance of Team in formal Set up. Importance of being a Team Member and Team Leader. Meaning, importance   and Challenges of Team Building, Introduction as to how to build Teams.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:4
TIME MANAGEMENT
 

Introduction to Time management, Benefits of time management, Prioritization of events, preparing schedules, Procrastination, Problems in time management and strategies for effective time management

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:2
Reading & Comprehension Skills Usage of Library Resources
 

Importance of Reading Skills, Ways to improve reading skills, Building vocabulary, Techniques for Smart Reading: Surveying, Questioning, Reading, Skimming, Recalling and Reviewing.

Usage of Library Resources in University Campus.

Evaluation Pattern

SKILL ENHANCEMENT COURSE

FINAL SUBMISSION OUT OF 100 (6 CIA * 10 marks, which will be rounded out of 100 marks)

BBA131 - PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

The dynamic business environment, compels managers to perform a challenging role in steering the organisations' success to new heights. This comprehensive introductory course has been designed to provide valuable insights into the functions of modern day managers. By tracing the historical evolution of management thought, it explores the basic concepts, principles and theories of management. It orients the learners towards basic understanding of managerial functions like planning, organising, staffing, motivation, communication, controlling and supervision. By focusing on the contemporary challenges faced by organizations in recent years, it enables the proponents to cater to global needs and gather skills that ensures employability and sustainability in the corporate world. 

 

 

  • To outline the fundamental activities of managers

  • To explain the basic concepts, principles and theories of management 

  • To examine the broad functions of management

  • To propose initiatives to address the contemporary social issues and challenges in the field of management 

  • To determine ethical workplace practices

Course Outcome

C01: Demonstrate understanding the role of managers in an organisation

CO2: Summarise the elementary concepts, principles and theories of management

CO3: Examine the managerial functions having an impact on the organisational effectiveness

CO4: Identify the contemporary issues and challenges in management

CO5: Develop ethical workplace practices

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT
 

Definition – nature, process and significance of management –Role of managers – Managerial Skills and Roles - Evolution of Management Thought : Classical Management Approaches, Behavioural Management Approaches, Quantitative Management Approaches, Modern Management Approaches -  Management as a Science or Art - Management as a profession- Administration and Management- Functions of Management – Functional Areas of Management. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
PLANNING AND DECISION MAKING
 

Planning - Nature and Importance of Planning- Types of Plans - Levels of Planning - Steps in planning - Making Effective Plans- Objectives and Management By Objective (MBO) –Management By Exception (MBE) -  Policy and Strategy- Forecasting and Decision Making - Nature of decision making - Types of decisions – Decision Making Process – Rational Perspectives and Behavioural Aspects of decision making.         

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
ORGANIZING
 

Organizing - Nature and purpose - Principles of Organization - Types of Organization - Organisational Structure and Design – Line, Staff and functional authority – Conflict between Line and Staff – Overcoming the Line-Staff Conflict. Committees, Departmentation - Span of control – Authority, Responsibility and Accountability - Principles of Delegation - Steps - Centralization Vs Decentralization – Factors determining the degree of Decentralization of authority.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
STAFFING
 

Staffing - Nature and Purpose of staffing – Importance of staffing – Components of Staffing - Manpower planning - Recruitment and Selection - Training and Development - Performance Appraisal.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
DIRECTING
 

Directing – Nature of Directing function - Principles – Importance of Effective Direction – Motivating people at work – Motivation theories: Early theories, Contemporary theories – Morale Building – Job Satisfaction - Effective Communication skills for directing – Barriers of communication.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:7
CONTROLLING AND SUPERVISION
 

Controlling - Concept, Nature and Importance - Essentials of Control - Requirements of an Effective Control System – Behavioural Implications of Control – Techniques of Managerial control - Co-ordination – Need for co-ordination – Types of Co-ordination - Techniques of Coordination - Cooperation. Supervision – Position of a supervisor – Qualities of a good supervisor – Key Man – Man in the middle – Middle marginal man – Human relations specialist – Essential requirements of effective supervision.

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:4
CONTEMPORARY ISSUES AND CHALLENGES IN MANAGEMENT OF 21st CENTURY
 

Leadership and change, Total quality management, Work force diversity, Globalization and innovation, Enterprise mobility, How to manage and control virtual teams, creating an ethical workplace.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Stoner, Freeman, Gilbert Jr. (2014). Management (6th edition), New Delhi: Prentice Hall India.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Daft, R. L. (2009). Principles of Management (1st edition), Cengage Learning.
  2. Gupta, R.S., Sharma, B.D., & Bhalla. N.S. (2011). Principles & Practices of Management (11th edition). New Delhi: Kalyani Publishers.
  3. Williams. Management, (International edition) South-western Cengage Learning.
  4. John R. Schermerhorn. Management, Wiley-India
  5. Koontz, H., & Weihrich, H.  Essentials of Management, McGraw Hill Publishers.
  6. L M Prasad, (2007). Principles and Practices of Management, Himalaya Publishing House
  7. Rao, P.S. (2009). Principles of Management, Himalaya Publishing House.
  8. Moshal, B.S. Principles of Management, Ane Books.
Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 - 20 M

CIA 2 - 50 M

CIA 3 - 20 M

End Semester - 50 M

BBA132 - FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course intends to introduce basic accounting principles and practices. It also deals with subsidiary books maintained in business organizations. The students will have knowledge about the fundamental accounting processes such as journalizing, ledger posting, preparation of trial balance and final accounts in sole trading business. It also deals with providing an overview of accounting standards and IFRS. This course will be useful for all those who are desirous of having an understanding and application of financial dynamics of the business and become successful financial managers/entrepreneurs. 

 

Course Objectives:

  • To provide an understanding of application of various principles and practice of Accounting.
  • To demonstrate the knowledge on the process of accounting cycle and basic steps involved in Accounting.
  • To extend the knowledge of systematic maintenance of books of accounts to real life business.
  • To estimate Annual Financial statements of Sole proprietorship form of business.
  • To outline the need for Accounting standards and IFRS.

 

 

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Identify the application of various principles and practice of Accounting in preparation of accounting statements.

CO2: Demonstrate the knowledge on the process of accounting cycle.

CO3: Extend the knowledge of systematic maintenance of books of accounts to real life business.

CO4: Estimate Annual Financial statements of Sole proprietorship form of business

CO5: Outline the need for Accounting standards and IFRS

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to Accounting
 

Meaning, Need for accounting, Internal and External users of accounting information, limitations of accounting, accounting Concepts and Conventions, Accounting Practices, Generally Accepted Accounting Principles.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Accounting systems & process
 

Nature of Accounting, Accounting equation - Systems of Accounting, Process of Accounting transactions- types of Accounts, Rules of Accounting. Journal - Meaning, features, simple and compound entries, Including recording of GST transactions, Capital and revenue expenditures, Capital and revenue receipts, Contingent assets and contingent liabilities, Preparation of ledgers and Trial balance.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Subsidiary books
 

Conceptual introduction to subsidiary books - Sales book, Sales return book, Purchases book, Purchase returns book, receivable book, payable book. Practical problems in Cash Book- Single column, double column, and three columnar cash book.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Bank reconciliation statement
 

Need for reconciliation and preparation of bank reconciliation statement.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
Rectification of Errors
 

Need for rectification of errors, types of errors, process of rectification and accounting entries of rectification.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:12
Final Accounts
 

Preparation of Trading and Profit and Loss account and Balance Sheet of sole trading concerns.

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:4
Accounting standards and IFRS
 

Types of Accounting standards, Need for IFRS, Ind AS and IFRS.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Jain S.P.,& Narang K L. (2020). Basic Financial Accounting I, New Dehli, Kalyani publishers.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Maheshwari, S.N., &Maheshwari, S.K. (2020). Advanced Accountancy1, New Delhi: Jain Book Agency.
  2. Shukla, M. (2020). Advanced Accounts, New Delhi, S Chand Group
  3. Radhaswamy, M & Gupta, R.L. (2020).Advanced Accountancy 2, New Delhi, Sultan Chand & Sons.
  4. Reddy, A. (2020). Fundamentals of Accounting, New Delhi, Himalaya Publishing House
  5. Gupta, A. (2020). Financial Accounting for Management: An Analytical Perspective, Noida, Pearson Education.
  6. Raman, B. S. (2014). Financial Accounting (1stedi).I & II, New Dehli:United Publishers.
  7. Porter, G.A., & Norton, C.L. (2013). Financial Accounting (IFRS update)( 6thedi), Cengage Learning.
  8. Jawahar Lal & Seema Srivastava (2013). Financial Accounting  New Delhi:Himalaya Publishing House.
  9. Arora M. N. (2013). Accounting For Management. New Delhi: Himalaya Publishing House.
  10. Bhattacharya .(2013). Essentials of Financial Accounting (Based on IFRS) (2ndedi), Prentice Hall India.
Evaluation Pattern

Component of Final Grade

Max Marks per Component

Weightage towards Final Grade

Total Marks per Component in Final Grade

CIA-I

20

20 %

20

CIA-II

50

25 %

25

CIA-III

20

20 %

20

End – Term

50

30 %

30

Attendance

5

5 %

5

Total

   

100

BBA133 - MICROECONOMICS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

This common core course helps students to think in the economic way of establishing a connection between unlimited wants and limited resources available to an individual, firm and the society.  It deals with the application of economic analysis in formulation of business decisions.  In this context, the course deals with demand, supply, pricing, theory of consumer choice, theories of production and market structures.

Course Objectives: This course aims to help students to:

● Describe how economic trade-offs and social values impact business decisions.

● Understand the causes and consequences of different market conditions.

●  Explain the theory of consumer choice using the utility concepts.

● Make use of the concept of market equilibrium in business decisions.

● Analyse cost of production and revenue of business operations.

 

● Evaluate the market outcome(s) under different market structure.

Course Outcome

CO1: Describe how economic trade-offs and social values impact business decisions.

CO2: Understand the causes and consequences of different market conditions

CO3: Explain the theory of consumer choice using the utility concepts.

CO4: Make use of the concept of market equilibrium in business decisions.

CO5: Analyse cost of production and revenue of business operations

CO6: Evaluate the market outcome(s) under different market structure

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Unit I Basic Concepts
 

 

Ten Principles of Economics: How People Make Decisions - How people Interact - How the Economy as a Whole Works; Thinking Like an Economist - Role of Observations, Theory and Assumptions in Economics; Role of Economic models - The Circular Flow Diagram - Production Possibility Frontier - Opportunity Cost; Central Problems of an Economy; Microeconomics and Macroeconomics.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Unit II The Basics of Supply and Demand
 

Markets and Competition; Demand - Law of Demand, Exceptions to the Law - Market Demand - Changes in Demand; Supply - Law of Supply, Exceptions to the Law - Market Supply - Changes in Supply; Equilibrium – Steps - Changes in Equilibrium.    

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:7
Unit III Elasticity and its Application
 

Elasticity of Demand - Price Elasticity and Its Determinants - Methods of Measurement - Degrees of Price Elasticity - Total Revenue and Price elasticity; Income Elasticity Demand; Cross Elasticity Demand; Elasticity of Supply-Determinants - Measurement and Degrees.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Unit IV Theory of Consumer Behaviour
 

Utility - Characteristics and Types - Cardinal and ordinal Utility analysis – Law of Diminishing Marginal utility; Budget Constraint; Indifference curves - Properties, Consumer’s equilibrium - Price Effect - Income Effect and Substitution Effect.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Unit V Market Efficiency and Externalities
 

Consumers, Producers and the Efficiency of the Markets: Consumers surplus (Marshall) - Producer surplus and Market efficiency; Externalities and Market Inefficiency - Negative and Positive.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Unit VI Theory of Production and Cost
 

Production Function; Law of Variable Proportions; Law of returns, Economies of Scale; Iso-quants and Iso-cost lines. Cost Function - Important Cost Concepts; Short Run and Long Run Cost Analysis (traditional theory) - Modern theory of cost; Long Run and short Run Revenue analysis.

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:12
Unit VII Market Structure and Competitive Strategy
 

Market structure - Perfect Competition - Price and Output Determination - Role of Time Element in Market Price Determination; Monopoly - Price and output determination, Price Discrimination; Monopolistic Competition - Price and Output Determination-Selling Costs - Product Differentiation – Oligopoly - Duopoly Example - Price Determination (Collusive Pricing, Price Leadership).                                      

Text Books And Reference Books:

Essential Reading:

 

Gregory Mankiw, N. (2019), Principles of Economics, 8th Edition, Cengage Learning India.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Recommended Reading

1. Robert S Pindyck and Daniel L Rubinfeld (2013), Microeconomics, 8th Edition, New York: Pearson.

2. Salvatore, D. (2011). Managerial Economics in a Global Economy (7thed.). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

3. Sen, Anindy (2006). Microeconomics: Theory and application (2nded.). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

4. Salvatore, D. (2019). Microeconomics Theory and Applications (5thed.). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

5. Lipsey, R. G., & Chrystal, K. A. (1999). Principles of Economics (9thed.). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

 

6. Samuelson, P. A., & Nordhaus, W.D. (2010). Economics (19thed.). New Delhi:  McGraw-Hill Companies.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-I – 20 Marks

            CIA 1 A-Assignment - Marks: 20 (Will be brought down to 10 Marks)

            CIA 1 B- Quiz- Marks: 20 (Will be brought down to 10 Marks)

CIA II- Mid Semester Examination- 25 Marks

(MSE 50 Marks, will be brought down to 25 Marks)

CIA III-20 Marks

CIA III-Assignment - Marks: 20

End Semester Exam 30 Marks

(MSE 50 Marks, will be brought down to 25 Marks)

Attendance 5 Marks

 

Total 100 Marks

BBA134 - BUSINESS MATHEMATICS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

This course aims at aiding the students in reaching a level of increased competence in business mathematics and expands understanding of the importance of mathematical concepts in business applications. Emphasis is placed upon learning mathematical concepts by examining some basic business problems.

 

Course objectives:

This course will help the learner to

● Understand the theory of matrices and determinants and apply in business.

● Solve problems on simple interest, compound interest, annuities, sinking funds, etc.,

● Formulate a linear programming problem and solve it graphically and using simplex method.

● Solve problems based on transportation and assignment problems using different methods.

● Inspect concepts of limits and differentiation and apply them to solve problems in business.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the theory of matrices and determinants and its application in business scenario.

CO2: Solve problems on simple interest, compound interest, annuities and sinking funds.

CO3: Formulate a linear programming problem and solve it graphically and using simplex method.

CO4: Solve problems based on transportation and assignment problems using different methods

CO5: Evaluate the business problem with the application of concepts of Limits and Differentiation.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Matrices and Determinants:
 

Matrices and Determinants - Addition of matrices – Multiplication of Matrices by a scalar – some special types of matrices – Multiplication of two matrices – Properties of Matrix Multiplication – determinants –Properties of determinants (statement only) - Minors and co-factors – Inverse of a matrix (Simple Problems only).

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Applications of Matrices and Determinant
 

Applications of Matrices and Determinants – Matrix representation of data – Applications of matrices based on basic operations – Solving system of linear equations – Matrix inverse method – Cramer’s Rule

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Commercial Arithmetic
 

Simple interest – Compound interest – Equivalent rate – Effective rate - Depreciation – Accumulated value - Present value – Annuity – Types of Annuities - Sinking Fund.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Linear Programming
 

Definition – Linear Programming Problem – Formulation – Solution by Graphical method – simplex method – minimization and maximization problems.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Transportation Problem
 

Nature and scope of transportation and allocation models, different methods for finding initial solution - N-W Corner Rule, Least Cost Method and VAM.  Unbalanced TP, Test for optimality – MODI method

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
Assignment Problem
 

Assignment Problem a variant of Transportation model, Hungarian method, Restricted Assignment problems.

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:10
Differentiation and its Applications
 

Limits – Differentiation – Differentiation rules - Methods of differentiation – Differentiation of composite functions – Differentiation of parametric functions - Second order derivative. Maxima and Minima – Application to commerce and Economics – Revenue Function – Cost function – profit function

Text Books And Reference Books:

  1. D.C. Sancheti and V.K.Kapoor, Business Mathematics, 11th ed., Sultan Chand and Sons, 2012.
  2. U.K. Srivatsava, G.V.Shenoy and S.C.Sharma, Quantitative Techniques for Managerial Decisions, 3rd ed., New Age International Publishers, 2012.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. E. Don and J. J. Lerner, Schaum’s outlines of Basic Business Mathematics, 2nd ed., McGraw-Hill, 2010.

2. J D Gupta, P K Gupta and M. Mohan, Mathematics for Business and Economics, Tata Mc Graw Hill Publishing Company Limited, 1987.

3. A.H. Mouhammed, Quantitative methods for Business and Economics, 3 rd ed., Routledge, 2015.

4. D. R. Anderson, D. J. Sweeney, T. A. Williams, J. D. Camm, J. J. Cochran, M. J. Fry and J. W. Ohlmann, Quantitative Methods for Business, 12 th ed., South-Western Cengage Learning, 2013.

5. Margaret L.Lial, Thomas W. Hungerford, John P. Holcomb, Jr, Bernadette Mullins, Mathematics with Applications, seventh edition, Pearson Education, 2015.

Evaluation Pattern

 

CIA – 1 (20)*

CIA – 2 (25)*

CIA – 3 (20)*

Attendance (5)*

ESE  (30)*

Total (100)*

Component

1

2

MSE

1

2

 

ESE

 

Marks

20

50

20

5

50

145

Nature

Individual  Assignment

Written Examination

Group Presentation

 

 Written Examination

 

BBA161A - BASIC PSYCHOLOGICAL PROCESS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To introduce and initiate the student into the world of Psychology. It will provide a brief historical sketch of the science of psychology and a glimpse into the methods used in the study of human behavior.  

Course Outcome

CO1 : Provide sufficient knowledge and information about the nature and history of psychology, different fields of psychology, approaches in psychology and multiple perspectives and recent trends in the field.

CO2: Understand the basic principles of psychology and methods of psychology

CO3: Design fundamental processes underlying human behaviour such as learning, motivation, emotion, personality

CO4: Provide understanding in biological basis of behaviour.

CO5: Explain psychological processes of attention, perception, and forgetting

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction
 

Definition and goals of Psychology, Role of a psychologist in society, Modern perspectives-Biological, Psychodynamic, Behaviouristic, Gestalt, Cognitive, Cross cultural, Humanistic and Evolutionary perspective. Methods: Experimental, Observation, Survey Method, Archival method, Interview and case study. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Sensory and Perceptual Processes
 

Sensation: Basic concepts. Sensory adaptation-advantages and disadvantages, Integration of senses. Perception: Understanding perception, Gestalt laws of organization. Illusion, Subliminal perception, Extrasensory perception

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Memory and Forgetting
 

Basic processes- Encoding, Storage, Retrieval. Sensory storage -Iconic memory and Echoic memory. STM-Working memory, Serial position curve, Rehearsal, Chunking; LTM-Units of  Memory-Declarative, Procedural, Semantic, Episodic memory. Associative models-Explicit and Implicit memory, Retrieval cues, State dependent and Context dependent memory. Forgetting- Decay, Interference, Amnesia Retrieval problems, Motivated forgetting.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Personality
 

Definition, Approaches – Psychodynamic, Humanistic, Dispositional (Type and Trait) and Social-Cognitive approach, Assessment of Personality – Questionnaire, Rating Scales and Projective tests – Characteristics, Advantages and disadvantages. Body language   

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Cognitive Process
 

Cognition-definition. Attention: definition, Characteristics, Selective attention, Divided attention. Thinking- Process of thinking, Image and thinking, Language and thought. Types of Thinking- Concept formation, Reasoning, Problem solving, Decision Making, Creative thinking, Meditation: Meaning, Short term and long-term effects of meditation

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Feldman R.S (2011 ).Understanding Psychology, 10th edition. Delhi : Tata- McGraw Hill.
  2. Morgan, C.T, King, R.A., Weisz, J.R., and Schopler, J. (2004). Introduction to Psychology, 7th ed, 24th reprint. New Delhi: Tata McGraw-Hill.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Baron, R.A. Psychology.(1995). 3rd edition. Delhi: Prentice Hall. 
  2. Munn, N.L., Fernald, L.D., & Fernald, P.S.( 1997 ) Introduction to Psychology. Delhi: Houghton Mifflin.
  3. Munn, N.L., Fernald, L.D., & Fernald, P.S.( 1997 ) Introduction to Psychology. Delhi: Houghton Mifflin.
  4. Smith, E.E., Hoeksman, S.N., Fredrickson, B., Loftus, G.R. (2003) .Atkinson’s & Hilgard’s Introduction to Psychology. First Reprint. Delhi Thomson Wadsworth.
  5. Weiten, W. (2010). Psychology: Themes and variations.4th edition. Delhi: Brooks/ Cole Publishing Co.
Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1: 25 Marks

CIA 2: 25 Marks

CIA 3: 25 Marks

CIA 4: 25 Marks

BBA161B - THE DYNAMICS OF INDIAN SOCIETY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course provides an introduction to Indian society with special emphasis on its diversity and pluralistic composition. It studies the social structure and social institutions like family, caste system, and tribes. It also provides an overview of the contemporary social issues in Indian society.

Course Objectives: This course intends to

·         Introduce the students to the pluralistic composition of Indian society

·         Provide an understanding of the social institutions

Address contemporary social issues in Indian society

Course Outcome

CO1 : Explain aspects of Indian society and examine its pluralistic composition

CO2: Analyse the significance of social institutions and how they shape our lives in the context of Indian society

CO3: Explain the emergence of contemporary social issues relating to demography, rights, and development and evaluate their significance

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:4
Introduction to Indian Society
 

Understanding Indian society, Unity in Diversity, Pluralism – Language, religion and ethnicity

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:4
Family in Indian Society
 

Marriage and Kinship in India, Functions of Family, Types of Family, Changes in Indian Family System

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Caste system in India
 

Concept, Origin & Structure,   Characteristics of Caste System in India, Socio-cultural, economic  dimensions of caste system in India: Jajmani system, Caste and Politics, Changes in Caste system  in India : Caste Vs. Class

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:4
Tribes in India
 

Definitions, and features, Categorization, Problems faced by the tribes

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Contemporary Social Issues in Indian Society
 

Demographic Transition – Aging, Declining Sex Ratio, Human Rights Issues – Violence against Women and Children,             Communal Disharmony, Government policies and interventions for development in various sectors and issues arising out of their design and implementation.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.                  Ahuja, R.2005. Indian Social System. Rawat Publications, New Delhi:

2.                  Shah, A.M. 1982. Essays on Family in India. Orient Longman,  New Delhi:.

3.                  Dube S C, 1995. Indian Society. NBT,  New Delhi

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.                  Das, Veena Ed. 2003.The Oxforxd India Companion to Sociology and Social Anthropology, Oxford University Press, New Delhi.   (Selected Essays)

2.                  M.N.Srinivas (Ed.). 1997. Caste: Its Twentieth Century Avtar, Penguin Books India (P) Ltd.

3.                  Verma R.C. 1995.  Indian Tribes through the Ages, Government of India Publication.

4.                  Uberoi, Patricia.2005. Family, Kinship and Marriage in India, OUP. 

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern for Optional Electives

CIA – 1 (15 Marks)

CIA – 2 (30 Marks)

CIA – 3 (15 Marks)

CIA – 3 (30 Marks)

Written Assessment/ MCQ based Quiz

(30 Marks) 

Minor Project/Skill Based Activity/Case Study /viva/ Exam

(40 Marks)

Case Study/Role Play/Class Participation/GD

(30 Marks)

Viva /written  Exam/ submission assignment / project           (50 Marks)

BBA161C - INTRODUCTION TO MEDIA PRODUCTION (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: An interdisciplinary course aimed at introducing the students of management with media skills.  This course introduces the technical skills which is necessary for radio broadcasting and television production. The students can work extensively with video footage, still images and audio assets to create advertisements promos and general video contents.

Course Objectives: This course intends

·         To understanding technical aspects of Audio production and Video Production Techniques

·         To examine theory and practice of audio production and its relationship to other aspects of media production

To demonstrate the industry standard, Audio and Video Editing software. 

Course Outcome

CO1 : Understanding technical aspects of Audio production and Video Production Techniques

CO2: Examining theory and practice of audio production and its relationship to other aspects of media production

CO3: Demonstrate the industry standard, Audio and Video Editing Software.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Understanding Audio Media
 

Radio programmes- scripting the content, recording it and editing.

Introduction to Radio Broadcasting, Principles of Script Writing, Types of programmes: Production, Talks, Interviews, Discussions, Drama, Features, News, Special Audience Programmes, Sports, Handling of simple equipment for recording sound, Usage and awareness of softwares for audio editing, Techniques in audio editing. 
Practical: Write script for - Talk show, TV News, News feature, Drama

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Over view of Video Production
 

Television production- writing the script, shooting the programmes and editing it.

 

Introduction to TV as a mass medium, Advantages And Disadvantages of Television, Various Types of Television Programmes, Scripting for TV News, Order of news presentation, sources of news gathering. Usage of simple equipment for video recording, Editing techniques
Practical: News production, Documentary making, Ad making 

 

Text Books And Reference Books:
  •  Musburger, R. B., & Kindem, G. A. (2009). Introduction to media production: The path to digital media production (4th ed.). Amsterdam ; Boston: Focal Press/Elsevier.
  • Dwyer, P. (2019). Understanding media production. New York: Routledge.
  • Compesi, R. J. (2018). Introduction to video production: Studio, field, and beyond (Second edition.). New york: Routledge.
  • Pierson, J., & Bauwens, J. (2015). Digital broadcasting: An introduction to new media. New York: Bloomsbury. 
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Nil

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern for Optional Electives

 

CIA – 1 (15 Marks)

CIA – 2 (30 Marks)

CIA – 3 (15 Marks)

CIA – 3 (30 Marks)

Written Assessment/ MCQ based Quiz

(30 Marks) 

Minor Project/Skill Based Activity/Case Study /viva/ Exam

(40 Marks)

Case Study/Role Play/Class Participation/GD

(30 Marks)

Viva /written  Exam/ submission assignment / project           (50 Marks)

BBA161D - HUMAN RIGHTS LAW (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course provides overview of human rights law and practice from the micro level to global level. The various nuances of human rights law is discussed and students are given an orientation on the importance of adhering to the fundamental principles while engaging in meaningful business practices.

Course Objectives: This course intends

 

  • To understand the Conceptual, constitutional aspects and the provisions about the National and State Human Rights Commissions.
  •  To analyze societal expectations in terms of human rights.
  •  To provide an analysis of criminal infractions and resultant rights abuse.
  •   To evaluate state action in juxtaposition with human rights.
  • To study various international instruments in the field of human rights

Course Outcome

CO1 : Identify the fundamental philosophy and policies concerning human rights.

CO2: Summarize the legal effects of international treaties and conventions on the national human rights jurisprudence

CO3: Relate to the on-going debates and current or future challenges concerning human rights.

CO4: Critically Analyze the Human rights protection mechanism, nationally and internationally, concerning human rights.

CO5: Formulate the role of State Actors in the protection of human rights.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction
 

Concept of Human Rights, Historical Background, Meaning of human rights, International Human Rights Framework, Indian Constitution and Human Rights, Protection of Human Rights Act – Objectives and framework, National Human Rights commission, State Human Rights Commission

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Human rights and Community
 

Freedom of speech and expression, Religion, Marriage, Caste System, Environmental Degradation

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Human rights and State
 

Crime against women and children, Juvenile reformatory institutions, Terrorized areas, Communal riots, Role of State, Police Atrocity, Role of Judiciary

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      Awasthi, S.K., & Kataria, R.P. (2006). Law relating to Protection of Human Rights (2nd edi).Orient Publishing Company.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.      Sircar, V. K. (2004). Protection of Human Rights in India (1st edition). Asia Law House.

 

2.      Schutter, O.D. (2010). International Human Rights Law, Cases, Materials, Commentary (1st edi).Cambridge University Press

 

3.      Subramanian, S. ( 1997). Human Rights: International Challenges. 2, Manas Publications

 

4.      Symonides, J. (2000). Human Rights – Concept & Standards. Ashgate

 

5.      Patel, B.N. (2007). Comprehensive Guide of Law of Human Rights in Common Wealth Countries (1st edi).

 

6.      Naikar,L.D.(2003).The Law Relating to Human Rights: Global, Regional, and National. Puliani and Puliani.

 

7.      Agarwal, H.O. (2011). International Law & Human Rights (18th edi).

 

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern for Optional Electives

CIA – 1 (15 Marks)

CIA – 2 (30 Marks)

CIA – 3 (15 Marks)

CIA – 3 (30 Marks)

Written Assessment/ MCQ based Quiz

(30 Marks) 

Minor Project/Skill Based Activity/Case Study /viva/ Exam

(40 Marks)

Case Study/Role Play/Class Participation/GD

(30 Marks)

Viva /written  Exam/ submission assignment / project           (50 Marks)

BBA161E - GRAPHIC DESIGNING (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: Graphic Designing course will help the students to develop digital entities using graphic design tools. It facilitates in creating designs for digital branding and marketing of services and products. The course will enable students to make a career in the field of Graphics and Animation designing.

Course Objectives: This course intends

  •  To equip with practical knowledge and experience of Digital designing for both Print and Web and also to create attractive design entities.
  •  To acquiring skillset in Graphic Designing concepts.
  • To provide an understanding on the benefits of digital branding and marketing of services and products.

Course Outcome

CO1 : Design appropriate graphics for real time requirements of digital branding and marketing.

CO2: Apply Graphic Designing tools to develop rich and professional design entities.

CO3: Create attractive design elements for print and web media.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Basic Concepts
 

Basic Concepts

Basic Concepts of Designing, Design principles, Basics of design elements, Introduction to Graphics.

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Practical Implementation
 

Exercise- Design a Business card and Letter head for a given company using Photoshop.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to Photoshop
 

Introduction to Tools, Environment, layout of Photoshop, Design layout setup, color, resolution setting, using basic marquee.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Tools
 

Selection tools Usage of lasso tools, Using brushes, using and filling colors, layers Using text tool, free transform tool.                        

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Practical Implementation
 

Exercise- Design a Poster for an event using Photoshop.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Image size, Selection, Grid and Guides
 

Modifying Image Size, Resolution, Marquee, Lasso, Magic Wand, Selection Tools, Selecting, Saving, Crop tool, Coping Selection and Image, Grid and Guide Options.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Masks, Painting and Editing
 

Working with quick masks, Painting (Brush and its effects), Blending Modes, Color palettes, Editing

(Background, Color, Touchup, Cleanup), Gradient tools, layer blending modes, all types of text tools, shape tools.

  

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Practical Implementation
 

Exercise- Design a Brochure for a new product using Photoshop.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Layers
 

The layer Palette, Changing and controlling layer order, Editing layers, Adjustment layers, Layer Effects Filters,Actions,Automation, Extract, Filter Gallery,Liquefy, Pattern making, Vanishing point, Built in Bitmap Filters.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Practical Implementation
 

Exercise- Design Logo for a Company using Photoshop.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Animation & Panoramic Picture creation
 

Creating product Packaging designs, CD cover, Book and magazine front cover,Envelope, Visiting card

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Practical Implementation
 

Exercise- Design a CD Label / cover for a Music company using Photoshop.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Preparing Image for Print and Web
 

Calculating Image size and Resolution, Changing Image Dimensions, Layout Preview, Color Separation, Optimizing Images for Web, File Formats.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Adobe system incorporation, Adobe Photoshop – Classroom in a Book, Adobe Press, 2017.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.      Mike Wooldridge (2012). Teach Yourself Visually Adobe Photoshop CS 6, Wiley Publishing.

Lesa Snider (2013). Photoshop the missing Manual, O’Reilly Media, Inc, 

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern for Optional Electives

CIA – 1 (15 Marks)

CIA – 2 (30 Marks)

CIA – 3 (15 Marks)

CIA – 3 (30 Marks)

Written Assessment/ MCQ based Quiz

(30 Marks) 

Minor Project/Skill Based Activity/Case Study /viva/ Exam

(40 Marks)

Case Study/Role Play/Class Participation/GD

(30 Marks)

Viva /written  Exam/ submission assignment / project           (50 Marks)

BBA161F - ECLECTIC THOUGHTS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course is designed with the intention of introducing the students to literature and its influence on their past, present and future life spaces. The modules are designed to cover a wide array of topics ranging from history, politics, social issues, current affairs and so on, with India as the most frequent focal point (across the modules). Consequently, the course helps the students to widen their perspectives and formulate an eclectic approach to understanding the nuances of being in India in the 21st century.

Course Objectives:

  • To introduce the relevance of examining socio-political events of India’s past in comprehendingcontemporary Indian society
  • To appreciate the literary value of texts especially in understanding history
  • To introduce issues concerning social justice (caste/class/gender) in India

 

Course Outcome

CO1 : Appreciate socio-cultural/religious diversity in contemporary India

CO2: Perceive the world through more than one frame of reference (the ?other story?)

CO3: Analyse literary texts within a social setting (Caste/class/gender)

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
The Partition
 

Introduction to the course; Progressive Writers Association and its influence in envisioning India; Role of literature (written as well as Cinema) in Partition - Partition Studies; early writers of modern India; Oral History and Partition; Importance of Oral History in contemporary times.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Nationalism and New India
 

Understanding nationalism from various standpoints; Brief introduction to Bengali literature (Bankim - Tagore); Brief introduction to Gandhi and Ambedkar; pluralistic nationalism and Akhand Bharat; Brief introduction to discussions and debates on ideas of nationhood - nation, state, nation-state; introduction to bio-pics (films).

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
War, Women & Children
 

From Partition to present - woman’s body always a site for violence; rape as weapon; gender and nationalism; women and children - first casualties of warfare; nuclear war policies in India; understanding politics of warfare in brief; introduction to documentaries.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Terrorism and Society
 

Post 9/11 world scenario; religion and terrorism; war and terrorism; Brief introduction to India’s responses to terrorism - government and military action to curb terrorism and unrest in conflicted areas within India; war-profiteering and terrorism; introduction to protest literature.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Social Discrimination
 

Introduction to history of casteism in India; forms of casteism; government response to casteism and law; reservation and exclusion/inclusion policies in India; caste and commerce; introduction to other marginalised and minority communities in India and their literature.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Short Story:

1.                  Saadat Hasan Manto(1948) Khol Do, The best of Manto: a collection of his short stories. New York, NY: Sterling Publishers.

2.                  Saadat Hasan Manto (1955)Toba Tek Singh, The best of Manto: a collection of his short stories. New York, NY: Sterling Publishers.

3.                  R K Narayan (1956)Another Community, Lawley Road  and Other    Stories. New   Delhi:    Orient    Paperbacks

4.                  Devi, Mahasweta. „Anthology of Five Plays, Mother of 1084‟, Seagull Books Pvt Ltd, Calcutta, 1997.

Book:

5.                  Urvashi Butalia (1998)The Other Side of Silence, Mushiral Hasan (ed.), Inventing Boundaries: Gender, Politics and the Partition of India (Delhi, Oxford, 2000);

6.                  Arundhati Roy(1998) End of Imagination, Haymarket Books, ISBN 9781608466191

7.                  Bama(2012) Karruku, Oxford University Press

Poem:

8.                  Thangjam Ibopishak Singh. (n.d.). I WANT TO BE KILLED BY AN INDIAN BULLET (poem). Retrieved March 3, 2021, from Poetry International website: https://www.poetryinternational.org/pi/poem/6316/auto/0/0/Thangjam-Ibopishak-Singh/I-WANT-TO-BE-KILLED-BY-AN-INDIAN-BULLET/en/tile

Novel:

9.                  Bankim Chattopadhyay (1882)Anadamath, Ramanujan University Press, India

Film:

10.              J Patel (2000) Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar

Documentary:

11.              C Macrae (Channel 4) (2011) Sri Lanka’s Killing Fields

Open-Letter:

12.              Naomi Shihab Nye (Not dated) To Any Would-be Terrorist

Acts of Parliament:

Scheduled Caste and Scheduled Tribe (Prevention of Atrocities) Act 1989, Parliament of India

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

nil

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern for Optional Electives

CIA – 1 (15 Marks)

CIA – 2 (30 Marks)

CIA – 3 (15 Marks)

CIA – 3 (30 Marks)

Written Assessment/ MCQ based Quiz

(30 Marks) 

Minor Project/Skill Based Activity/Case Study /viva/ Exam

(40 Marks)

Case Study/Role Play/Class Participation/GD

(30 Marks)

Viva /written  Exam/ submission assignment / project           (50 Marks)

BBS161A - COURTESY AND ETIQUETTES (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course examines the relationship between language use, enormous variety of language experiences, belief systems, and behavioral patterns. On the other hand Etiquette helps smooth the path of our daily activities, whether it's meeting others in our daily interactions talking to someone on the phone, offering condolences properly or understanding how to talk to colleagues at a business conference. Being aware of the beliefs attitudes and etiquettes of individuals will help one to become more tolerant from one individual to the next and from one group to the next.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Able to practice critical thoughts in comprehending the notion of culture, its relationship with language, Etiquettes and the key concepts of cross ?cultural Communication.

CO2: Describes ways to apply proper courtesy in different situations

CO3: Understand the change that constantly undergoes in personal and social use.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction: Greetings and Courtesy
 

Greeting a person, - the different ways of greeting, saying goodbye to another person, Thank You, Excuse me, Introduction to oneself, Yawning, Coughing, Interrupting, Offering assistance/ help, refusing help, requesting privacy, speaking in a low voice,(speaking etiquette) waiting for help, accepting or declining an invitation, expressing admiration, The key principles of common courtesy, professional manners and the Golden Rule as they are practiced in the workplace environmentClassroom Etiquette and Student Behavior Guidelines, The guidelines for maintaining a civil classroom environment

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Manners and civility
 

Introduction to adjusting to a new culture, Theories on second language and culture acquisition, communication, National Standards, Culture acquisition through family and Homestays, Distinguish among the three main forms of communication in the workplace: verbal, nonverbal, and virtual. Proper and improper uses of workplace communication, the potential repercussions of poor listening in the workplace, the proper and improper use of technology in the workplace

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Etiquette
 

Why Etiquette Matters, Identify common cultural differences, taboos, and customs that may be practiced in the workplace, Discuss ways to navigate and honor cultural differences in the workplace, Describe how to express an appropriate awareness of international and other customs. The Common Courtesies of Life, Polite Conversation, Telephone Etiquette, Correspondence, Basic Table Manners, Overnight Guests, Wedding Etiquette, Moments of Sorrow, Appropriate Behavior for Children, Gift Giving Guidelines.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Business Etiquette
 

Introduction to Modern Etiquette, The Rules of the Workplace, Meetings and Introductions, Conversation and Listening Skills, Telephone/Cell Phone, Texting, Emailing and Internet Etiquette, Etiquette in Public Places, Employment/Volunteer Etiquette, Dining Etiquette, Social Gathering Etiquette (Guest and Host/Hostess), School Etiquette, Confidence Without Arrogance

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:7
Personal and professional Presentation
 

Restaurant Etiquette, Cellphone Etiquette, Voice Mail Etiquette, Air Travel Etiquette, Cocktail Party Etiquette, Office Gossip Etiquette, Business Dress Etiquette, Email Etiquette, Social Media Etiquette, Job Interview Etiquette, International Etiquette

Text Books And Reference Books:

Books on Common etiquettes

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Etiquette books

Evaluation Pattern

Students are evaluated on the basis of class performance and they have to do CIAs and exclusive Class presentations and workshops to create awarness on the etiquettes they have learned in the class

BBS161B - A LIFE WORTH LIVING-FROM HEALTH TO WELL BEING (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course focuses on the knowledge and skills that students require to lead a healthy, productive and balanced life.

To examine health in its truest sense, one must explore beyond the limits of medicine to engage a much wider set of questions embracing social, cultural, political, economic, moral and spiritual aspects of human experience. 

Course Outcome

CLO1: Explain health as a multi-dimensional and dynamic concept, which necessarily integrates individual, societal, biomedical, spiritual, cultural and historical influences, and how this relates to health issues encountered in everyday life.

CLO2: Assess the inter-relatedness of health perceptions and practices across cultures.

CLO3: Discuss personal responsibilities towards achieving well being in a rational way and how this contributes to the individual, community and global good

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to health
 

Health of individuals and communities – The significance of determinants of health and how these raise or lower the health of individuals and communities - Health promotion to improve health - Personal and popular attitudes and beliefs and their impact on decision making - self-management - interpersonal and key consumer health skills - Factors influencing health, and actions and strategies to protect and promote health, through investigation and inquiry processes.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Food and Values
 

Philosophy of food, Values – Three different types of values, Meat – Is it wrong to eat animals?Hunger – Do we have a duty to help starving people? - Drugs – Why is it wrong to take drugs? - GM food – How should food technology be regulated? - Capitalism – Food, globalization, and equality - Art – Can food be art? What is art? - Taste – Is taste entirely subjective? - Science – Can science explain conscious taste experiences? -Eating – Eat to live, or live to eat

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Nutrition
 

Balanced diet & Nutrition, Macro and micro nutrients – Nutritive and non nutritive components of diet – Eating for weight control – healthy weight – The pitfalls of dieting – food intolerance and food myths – Food supplements for adolescents. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Physical Education
 

Concept of physical education – Meaning – definition – aims – objectives of physical education and fitness – Need & importance of fitness – Types of fitness – Health related physical fitness – performance related physical fitness – physical activities and health benefits - Activities for developing physical fitness

What is sleep? – The phylogeny of sleep – Developmental course of sleep – Dreams- Functions of sleep – Daytime sleepiness and alertness – Sleep disorders.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Spirituality, Religion and Social Change
 

Meaning of life - Meaning of death- Indian Rituals, symbols, and myths - Spirituality, altruism and moral justice - Resources to deal with stress, temptations, disappointments and failures, social oppression, the loss of possessions and of loved ones, and with one’s own death. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Indian Journals of health and well being

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Indian Journals of health and well being

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1: 20 marks

Midterm exam: 25

CIA 3: 20

Endterm exam: 30

Attendance: 5

 

BBS161C - MAHABHARATHA AND MODERN MANAGEMENT (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

The Mahabharata of the great Maharishi Veda Vyasa is a treasure trove of knowledge, principles and paradigms. It is written that what is not in the Mahabharata will not be found elsewhere. Written nearly thousands of years ago, the Mahabharata is as yet a source of knowledge, especially modern management principles.In essence it highlights the victory of Dharma in times of Adharma.This subject is a comprehensive learning on management lessons which can be inferred from the great epic. It gives a clear understanding and comparison of management Principles, practices and the various functions of management with the epic. The syllabus is structured to provide basic conceptual knowledge on the principles of management. It also deals with behavioral issues in the individual processes, group and interpersonal processes.

Course Objectives:

  •  Discuss the epic by summarizing the various parvas/units in class in accordance with the management concept
  •  Review and make a critical estimate of the epic with a focus on morals, ethics, legal and management concepts
  • To develop competencies and knowledge of students to become effective professionals

Course Outcome

CO1: Explain the fundamentals of management, its functions and the utilization of critical thinking skills in relation to principles, and theories.

CO2: Explain the structure and the operations of management by citing relevant situation/instances from the epic

CO3: Develop an understanding of moral, ethical & legal dimension before any decision by citing relevant situation/instances from the epic

CO4: Express the literary beauty and cultural significance of Mahabharata and to reflect the relevant content to the issues of our own times

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to Mahabharatha
 

The older generations-The Pandava and Kaurava princes- Lakshagraha (the house of lac)

Establishment of the kingdom-Administration and Management principles

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Marriage and Building of New city
 

Marriage to Draupadi- An event study approach.

Indraprastha-A new beginning- Pressure for change – Change process, Types of change, Factors influencing change, Resistance to change

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
The Big Game
 

The dice game- Cooperative strategies & Reasons for strategic alliances-

Exile and return- Risks and costs of strategic alliances

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
The battle at Kurukshetra
 

The battle at Kurukshetra - Strategic Planning and Management- levels at which strategy operates- Event approaches to strategic decision making,

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Post Kurukshetra
 

The end of the Pandavas- Succession Planning,Authority and Responsibility

The reunion Organizing- Choosing the organizational structure

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Stoner, Freeman, Gilbert Jr. (2014). Management (6th edition), New Delhi: Prentice Hall India.

Rao, V.S.P., & Krishna, V.H., (2011). Strategic Management: Text and Cases. New Delhi: Excel Books.

Pratap Chandra Roy ,The complete Mahabharata translated into English prose directly from the original sanskrit text.(1st Edition) oriental publishing co.

Source: Jaya - An Illustrated Retelling of the Mahabharata

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

C Rajagopalachari (2017). Mahabharata (63rdedition), Mumbai: Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 10 Marks

MSE   30 Marks

CIA 3 10 Marks

End Assesment 50 Marks

BECH131 - MICROECONOMICS - I (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

This course is designed to expose the students to the basic principles of microeconomic theory. The emphasis will be on thinking like an economist and the course will illustrate how microeconomic concepts can be applied to analyse real-life situations.

Course Objectives

The course has been conceptualised in order to help students:

  • to understand how decisions related to allocation of scarce resources and trade-offs are made.
  • to analyse the market for goods & services and output-price determination.
  • to understand the role of government policies regulating market outcome.
  • to demonstrate understanding of how rational consumers make their choice to optimize utility.
  • to analyse the dynamics of factors of the production market.

Course Outcome

CO1: summarize how decisions related to allocation of scarce resources and trade-offs are made.

CO2: examine the role of demand and supply in allocating economic welfare

CO3: explain the role of government policies in regulating the market outcomes

CO4: illustrate how consumers optimize the utility given the limited resources

CO5: illustrate and explain the market dynamics of factors of production and impact of policy regulation on allocation of such inputs in the market.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Exploring the Subject Matter of Economics
 

Why study economics? Scope and method of economics; the economic problem: scarcity and choice; the question of what to produce, how to produce and how to distribute output; science of economics; the basic competitive model; prices, property rights and profits; incentives and information; rationing; opportunity sets; economic systems; reading and working with graphs. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Supply and Demand: How Markets Work, Markets and Welfare
 

Markets and competition; determinants of individual demand/supply; demand/supply schedule and demand/supply curve; market versus individual demand/supply; shifts in the demand/supply curve, demand and supply together; how prices allocate resources; elasticity and its application; controls on prices; taxes and the costs of taxation; consumer surplus, producer surplus and the efficiency of the markets.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
The Households
 

The consumption decision - budget constraint, consumption and income/price changes, demand for all other goods and price changes; description of preferences (representing preferences with indifference curves); properties of indifference curves; consumer‘s optimum choice; income and substitution effects; labour supply and savings decision - choice between leisure and consumption.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
The Firm and Perfect Market Structure
 

Behaviour of profit maximizing firms and the production process; short run costs and output decisions; costs and output in the long run.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Imperfect Market Structure
 

Monopoly and antitrust policy; government policies towards competition; imperfect competition.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:12
Input Markets
 

Labour and land markets - basic concepts (derived demand, productivity of an input, marginal productivity of labour, marginal revenue product); demand for labour; input demand curves; shifts in input demand curves; competitive labour markets; and labour markets and public policy; New Frontiers in Microeconomics.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Case, K. E., Fair, R. C., & Oster, S. M. (2013). Principles of Microeconomics (11th ed.). London: Pearson Education Inc.
Mankiw, N. G. (2017). Principles of Microeconomics (8th ed.). MA: Cengage Learning.
Stiglitz, J. E., & Walsh, C. E. (2006). Principles of Microeconomics (4th ed.). New York: W.W. Norton & Company Inc., International Student Edition.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Lipsey, R. G., & Chrystal, K. A. (1999). Principles of Economics (9th ed.). Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Mankiw, N. G. (2011). Economics: Principles and Applications (10th ed.). MA: Cengage Learning.
Pindyck, R. S., & Rubinfeld, D. L. (2013). Microeconomics (8th ed.). New York: Pearson Education.
Ray, N.C. (1975). An Introduction to Microeconomics. New Delhi: Macmillan Company of India Ltd.
Salvatore, D. (2011). Managerial Economics in a Global Economy (7th ed.). Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Samuelson, P. A., & Nordhaus, W.D. (2010). Economics (19th ed.). New Delhi: McGraw-Hill Companies.

Evaluation Pattern

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1

MSE* (CIA2)

CIA3

ESE**

Attendance

Weightage

20

25

20

30

05

* Mid Semester Exam      ** End Semester Exam

BECH132 - MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS-I (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

This is the first of a compulsory two-course sequence. The objective of this sequence is to transmit the body of basic mathematics that enables the study of economic theory at the undergraduate level, specifically the courses on microeconomic theory, macroeconomic theory, statistics and econometrics set out in this syllabus. In this course, particular economic models are not the ends, but the means for illustrating the method of applying mathematical techniques to economic theory in general. The level of sophistication at which the material is to be taught is indicated by the contents of the prescribed textbook.

Course Objectives

The course aims to help students to:

● understand the basic concepts, procedures and techniques of mathematical economics
● apply mathematical techniques to economic theory in general.

Course Outcome

CO1: apply mathematical techniques and models for a deeper understanding of economics, especially the branches of microeconomics, macroeconomics and econometrics.

CO2: build economic problems in a multivariable model and yield valuable insight about optimizing human behaviour

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Preliminaries
 

Elements of logic and proof; Sets and Set operations; Relations; Equations: Linear and Quadratic; Simultaneous Equations; Functions: quadratic, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic; Graphs, Slopes and Intercept; Economic Application of Graphs and Equations: Iso-cost Lines, Supply and Demand Analysis, Income determination models.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Differential Calculus: Single Independent Variable Functions
 

Limits; Continuity; Curvilinear Functions; the Derivative; Rules of Differentiation; Higher-order Derivatives; Optimisation; Uses of the Derivatives in Economics: Increasing and Decreasing Functions, Concavity and Convexity, Inflection points, Optimisation of Economic Functions, Relationship among Total, Marginal and Average Concepts.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Differential Calculus: Multivariable Functions
 

Multivariable Functions and Partial Derivatives; Rules of Partial Differentiation; Second and Higher-order differentials; Optimisation; Constrained optimisation with Lagrange Multipliers; Implicit functions; Application of Partial Derivatives in Economics: Utility Maximisation, Marginal Productivity, Elasticity, Producers Equilibrium, Optimisation of Cobb Douglas and CES Production Function.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:20
Differential Calculus: Exponential and Logarithmic Functions
 

Exponential and Logarithmic Functions; Solving Natural Exponential and Logarithmic Functions; Logarithmic transformation of Nonlinear Functions; Rules of Differentiation; Higher-order Derivatives, Partial Derivatives; Optimisation of Exponential and Logarithmic Functions; Logarithmic differentiation; Application in Economics: Elasticity, Alternative measures of growth, Optimal Timing, Derivation of Cobb Douglas Production Function.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Chiang, A.C. & Wainwright, K.  (2013). Fundamental Methods of Mathematical Economics. (4th ed.). McGraw Hill Education (India) Private Limited.
Sydsaeter, K. &   Hammond, P. (2016). Mathematics for Economic Analysis. New Delhi: Pearson Education Inc.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bradley, T.  (2013). Essential Mathematics for Economics and Business. London: John Wiley & Sons.
Dowling, E.  T. (2012). Schaum’s Outlines-Introduction to Mathematical Economics. (3rd ed.).  New York: McGraw Hill.
Renshaw, G. (2011). Maths for Economics. (4th ed.).  Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Roser, M. (2003). Basic Mathematics for Economists. (2nd ed.). New York: Routledge.

Evaluation Pattern

EvaluationPattern

CIA1

MSE* (CIA2)

CIA3

ESE**

Attendance

Weightage

20

25

20

30

05

* Mid Semester Exam      ** End Semester Exam

BECH133 - ECONOMIC HISTORY OF INDIA FROM 1750 TO 1947 (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

This course traces the evolution of the modern Indian Economy. It places the phenomenon of India’s economic development within the compulsions of colonial rule.  Therefore, it serves as a background course for the study of Indian Economic issues and the Political Economy of India.

Course Objectives

To train students to:

  • Understand the importance of contextualising the discipline in historical terms.
  • Analyse the economic conditions of India, before and during the British rule and how it might have contributed to changing the patterns of production and consumption in the region.
  • Emphasise the role of historical factors that led to the changing distribution of the gains and losses associated with economic growth.

Course Outcome

CO1: explain the importance of studying Economic History to gain a deeper understanding of the interplay between institutional change and economic growth.

CO2: examine and argue how certain historical events from before and during the British colonial rule in India may have given rise to the patterns of economic choices that followed in the long run.

CO3: evaluate and explain if the explanation for increasing economic inequality can be found in the specific manner in which these forces of imperialism and globalisation acted in South Asia or if the explanation lies in how other factors (geographical constraints or social institutions) interacted with these forces.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Economic History: An Introductory Perspective
 

Globalisation and colonialism; Theories of Economic History; Market Formation, Institutions, Class, Political Power and Resource Endowments; Colonial Narratives of India and beyond.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
India in 1750
 

Empires; Economic Conditions: Property, Village Community, Industry and Foreign Trade; Institutional Changes in Property Rights and its consequences; Patterns of Ownership, Tax, Tenancy and Land Markets.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Stability and Change in the Cities (1770-1810)
 

Ruling groups on the move; Religious and social organisation outside the village; Sects, towns and traders; Artisans, traders and urban stability; Two case studies of adaptation – grain and salt; The re-orientation of trade routes and merchant communities.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Agriculture
 

The Agricultural Production Function; Trends in output and income, Factor, Credit and Product Market; Effects of Market Expansion and Stagnation.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Industry
 

Types and patterns of Industrialization; Conditions of Small Scale Industry; Textiles and Handicrafts; Large Scale Industry; Pre-war to World War II; Two major Industries; Cotton Textile and Jute; Industrial Organization: Structure, Labour and Finance.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:12
Infrastructure and Economic Management
 

Drivers of Infrastructure Investments; Irrigation; Railways; Roads and Inland Waterways; Post and Telegraph; Education and Health Care; Fiscal and Monetary System.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Bayly, C. A. (2012). Rulers, Townsmen, and Bazaars: North Indian Society in the Age of British Expansion. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Roy, T. (2011). The Economic History of India. (3rd ed.).New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bandyopadhyay, S. (2004). From Plassey to Partition: A History of Modern India. New Delhi: Orient Longman Private Limited.

Habib, I. (2006). Indian Economy: 1858 – 1914. New Delhi: Tulika Books.

Stein, B. (1998). A History of India (2nd ed.). London: Wiley-Blackwell.

Tomlinson, B. R. (1993).  The Economy of Modern India: 1860 – 1970. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1

MSE* (CIA2)

CIA3

ESE**

Attendance

Weightage

20

25

20

30

05

* Mid Semester Exam      ** End Semester Exam

 Question Paper Pattern: MSE and ESE (Max. Marks = 50)

Section A

Section B

Section C

5 x 2 = 10 Marks

6 x 5 = 30 Marks

1 x 10 = 10 Marks

BECH141 - INTRODUCTION TO THE PHILOSOPHY OF ECONOMICS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

Economics and philosophy overlap in three major areas. These are the ontology and epistemology of Economics, rationality, and welfare and justice. The course first touches upon the fundamental ontological questions such as, what is Economics, what is utility, and how do economists measure it.  Does evidence of widespread `irrationality’ from behavioural economics undermine standard microeconomic theory?  It then discusses the epistemological problems such as if economic models are literally false representations of reality, how can they aid understanding or action.  Finally the course also introduces students to the questions about welfare, justice, liberty and rights, at least insofar as these are connected to features of economic institutions, processes, or outcomes.

Course Objectives

The objectives of offering this course are:

  • to demonstrate students a philosophical platform for carrying out discussions on economic theories and models.
  • to introduce students to the rational-choice theory.
  • to develop the philosophical nature of the fundamental debates in economic methodology.
  • to outline the fundamental questions concerning ethics of economic policy decisions and to develop the students’ abilities to present and to criticize arguments both in discussion and in writing.

Course Outcome

CO1: To provide students a philosophical platform for carrying out discussions on economic theories and models.

CO2: To introduce students to the rational-choice theory.

CO3: To create a firm grounding in the philosophical nature of the fundamental debates in economic methodology.

CO4: To outline the fundamental questions concerning ethics of economic policy decisions and to develop the students? abilities to present and to criticize arguments both in discussion and in writing.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction
 

Ontology of Economics: Individual and Collective Rationality, Bounded Rationality; The assumption of Ceteris Paribus, Friedman and defence of unrealistic assumption.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Six central methodological problems
 

Positivism vs Normativism; Reasons vs Causes; Social Scientific Naturalism; Abstraction and Idealisation in Economics; Economic Causation; Structure and Strategy of Economics: Paradigms.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:18
Influential Approaches to Economic Methodology
 

Scientific Realism; Thomas Kuhn’s scientific revolutions and paradigm shift; Karl Popper’s falsificationism; Putnam’s critique of Positivism; Fraassen’s Constructive empiricism.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Economics and Ethics
 

Welfare; efficiency; individualism; utilitarianism; libertarianism; Egalitarianism and economic justice.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Blaug, M. (1992). The Methodology of Economics: Or, How Economists Explain, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press,
Hausman, D. M. (ed.) (2008).The Philosophy of Economics: An Anthology, 3rd ed. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Reiss, J., (2013).The Philosophy of Economics: A Contemporary Introduction, London: Routledge.
Ross, D. (2016). Philosophy of Economics, London: Palgrave Macmillan.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Friedman, M., (1953). The Methodology of Positive Economics, Essays in Positive Economics, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, pp. 3–43.
Friedman, M. (1999). Reconsidering Logical Positivism. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Hausman, D M., Philosophy of Economics, The Stanford Encyclopaedia of Philosophy retrieved from<https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/economics/#RealEconMeth>
Kuhn, T. S. (1962). The Structure of Scientific Revolutions. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
Popper, K. (1963). Science: Conjectures and Refutations, in Conjectures and Refutations. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, pp. 33-58.
Sen, A. (1990). Justice: Means versus Freedoms, Philosophy & Public Affairs, 19(2), pp. 111-121.

Evaluation Pattern

The evaluation of the course is by submission. There will be four submissions as per the following suggested pattern.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1

CIA2

CIA3

CIA 4

Attendance

Weightage

20

25

20

30

05

 

BECO161A - INSTITUTIONS AND INFORMAL ECONOMY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

The primary aim of this course is to introduce students to the concept of institutions and the informal economy in a global context. The discourse examines the informal economy through the lens of institutional economics. The aim is to acquaint students to significant discourses and issues in policy design and intervention.  

 

Course Objectives

This course aims to help students to:

  • outline the concept of institutions and institutional change through some of the major theoretical constructs in institutional economics.
  • summarize and illustrate the various mechanisms of the informal economy connecting the theoretical concept to issues of measurement.
  • examine the linkages of formal and informal economy;
  • train students to hone their writing and presentation skills to effectively discuss these complex ideas.

Course Outcome

CO1: Illustrate the major concepts and explain some of the theoretical discourses in the study of institutional change and the informal economy.

CO2: Examine how the formal and informal economies are no longer separate watertight compartments but function together as an interactive system

CO3: Apply these complex ideas of property rights and transaction costs to their own research

CO4: Demonstrate their research findings through written and oral presentation

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Institutions and Institutional Change
 

Institutions, Economic Theory and Economic Performance; Informal Constraints; Formal Constraints; The Path of Institutional Change

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Elements of Institutional Economics
 

Contracts and Property Rights: the Concepts of Exchange and Property, Critique of the Utilitarian Calculus; Transaction Costs, Bargaining Power; Markets as Institutions; Firms and Markets

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Informality: Concepts, Theory and Measurement
 

Bureaucratic Form and the Informal Economy; The Relevance of the concepts of formality and informality : A Theoretical Appraisal; Formal and Informal Enterprises: Concepts, Definition, and Measurement Issues in India

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Linking the Formal and Informal Economy
 

Rethinking Informal Economy: Linkages with the Formal Economy and the Formal Regulatory Environment; Technology and Informality

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
Empirical Studies in Institutional Change and Informality
 

The Impact of Regulation on Growth and Informality: Cross-Country Evidence; Blocking Human Potential: How Formal Policies Block the Economy in the Maputo Corridor; Enforcement and Compliance in Lima’s Street Markets: The Origins and Consequences of Policy Incoherence towards Informal Traders

Text Books And Reference Books:

Essential Readings

Alston, L. J., Eggertsson, T., & North, D. C. (Eds.). (1996). Empirical Studies in Institutional Change. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Guha-Khasnobis, B., Kanbur, R., & Ostrom, E. (Eds.). (2006). Linking the Formal and Informal Economy: Concepts and Policies. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Misztal, B. (2002). Informality: Social theory and Contemporary Practice. Routledge.

North, D. (1990). Institutions, Economic Theory and Economic PerformanceInstitutions, Institutional Change and Economic Performance. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Recommended Readings

Arias, O., Fajnzylber, P., Maloney, W., Mason, A., Perry, G., & Saavedra-Chanduvi, J. (2007). Informality: Exit and Exclusion. Washington: The World Bank.

Harris, J. (2006). Power Matters: Essays on Institutions, Politics, and Society in India. New York: Oxford University Press.

Mehta, P. B., & Kapur, D. (2005). Public Institutions in India: Performance and Design. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

Nayyar, D. (Ed.). (2002). Governing Globalization: Issues and Institutions. Oxford University Press.

Oviedo, A. M. (2009). Economic Informality: Causes, Costs, and Policies: A Literature Survey of International Experience. Country Economic Memorandum (CEM).

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

Course title

MSE (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

Attendance

Institutions and Informal Economy

45%

50%

5%

 

Mid Semester Examination

Group/Individual Assignment

45 Marks

 

End Semester Examination

Group/Individual Assignment

50 Marks

 

BECO161B - ECONOMICS OF CORRUPTION (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

This course is aimed at undergraduate students to introduce to them the prominent debates in the economics of corruption. The course discusses how corruption acts as a constraint on economic growth using the theoretical constructs in Political Economy. It allows students to delve into the causes and consequences of corruption. In particular, the course will examine how corruption affects the emerging economies. The course will consider some of the seminal papers on the economics of corruption.

 Course Objectives:

This course will help students to:

  1. acquaint with significant debates about transparency, competition and privatization and their relevance to corruption;
  1. analyse corruption in emerging economies through various case studies;
  1. discuss issues from various perspectives, such as viewing corruption as erosion of trust and abuse of power;
  2. train the students to hone their writing and presentation skills to effectively discuss complex ideas.

Course Outcome

CO1: identify the nuances in the way corruption is defined and interpreted in different economies.

CO2: investigate some impacts of corruption on emerging economies.

CO3: analyse the cause and consequences of corruption and examine some of the policies and reforms aimed at tackling corruption

CO4: present complex ideas through written and oral presentations.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Corruption, Poor Governance and Institutional Structure
 

Causes and Consequences of Corruption: What do we know from a cross-section of countries? Democratic Institutions and Corruption: Incentives and Constraints in Politics, Bargaining for Bribes: The Role of Institutions.

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Corruption and the Private Sector
 

The Privatization of Rent-Generating Industries and Corruption; Corruption in Private Sector, Why the private sector is likely to lead the next stage in the global fight against corruption.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Tackling Corruption
 

Corruption and Policy Reform; Anti-Corruption Authorities: An Effective Tool to Curb Corruption?  Corruption and Competition: Fair Markets as an Anti-Corruption Device. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Auriol, E., & Straub, S. (2011). Privatization of Rent-generating Industries and Corruption. In S. Rose-Ackerman & T. Søreide, (Eds.). International Handbook on the Economics of Corruption, (Vol. 2). Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Pub.

Burger, E. S., & Holland, M. S. (2006). Why the private sector is likely to lead the next stage in the global fight against corruption. Fordham International Law Journal, 30, 45.

Meschi, P. X. (2009). Government Corruption and Foreign Stakes in International Joint Ventures in Emerging Economies. Asia Pacific Journal of Management, 26(2), 241-261.

Meyer, K. E., Estrin, S., Bhaumik, S. K., & Peng, M. W. (2009). Institutions, Resources, and Entry Strategies in Emerging Economies. Strategic Management Journal, 30(1), 61-80.

Nowakowski, K. (2010). Corruption in the Private Sector. Economics and Law, 6(1), 345-360.

Uhlenbruck, K., Rodriguez, P., Doh, J., & Eden, L. (2006). The Impact of Corruption on

Entry Strategy: Evidence from Telecommunication Projects in Emerging Economies. Organization Science, 17(3), 402-414. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Cartier-Bresson, J. (2000). Economics of corruption. Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. The OECD Observer, (220), 25.

Jain, A. K. (2001). Corruption: A Review. Journal of Economic Surveys, 15(1), 71-121.

Jain, A. K. (Ed.). (2012). Economics of Corruption (Vol. 65). Springer Science & Business Media.

Rose-Ackerman, S. (1975). The Economics of Corruption. Journal of Public Economics, 4(2), 187-203.

Evaluation Pattern

 

Course title

MSE (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

Attendance

The Economics of Corruption

45%

50%

5%

Mid Semester Examination

Group/Individual Assignment

45 Marks

End Semester Examination

Group/Individual Assignment

50 Marks

 

 

BENG121 - ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION I (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

English Language and Composition course is an intensive program for two semesters for all the students of the BA/BSc programmes (ENGH, ECOH, JOUH, PSYH, EPH and EMP) that introduces students to a wide range of expository works in order to develop their knowledge of rhetoric and make them aware of the power of language. The course is designed to meet the rigorous requirements of graduate-level courses and therefore includes expository, analytical, personal, and argumentative texts from a variety of authors and historical contexts. It would provide students with the opportunity to work with the rhetorical situation, examining the authors’ purposes as well as the audiences and the subjects in texts. The course is designed to engage students with rhetoric in multiple mediums, including visual media such as photographs, films, advertisements, comic strips, music videos, and TED talks; students would develop a sense to comprehend how a resource of language operates in any given text. In the semester the course focuses on the famous rhetorical pieces from across the world to familiarise the learners with various techniques and principles.

Course Objectives:

The purpose of the course is to

  • Introduce learners to various types of rhetorical pieces - written, oral text and visual texts.
  • Provide an understanding of various rhetorical strategies in various compositional pieces
  • Famarlize learners with various strategies of reading and writing by exposing them to effective and ineffective rhetorical pieces.
  • Promote analytical reading and formulate arguments based on the readings.
  • Enable learners to employ rhetorical strategies in their own writing.

Course Outcome

CO1: Analyse and interpret samples of good writing by identifying and explaining an author?s use of rhetorical strategies and techniques.

CO2: Evaluate both visual and written texts and determine if it is effective or ineffective rhetoric.

CO3: Create and sustain arguments by applying effective strategies and techniques in their own writing.

CO4: Communicate effectively in different mediums by developing their LSRW skills.

CO5: Demonstrate their knowledge in the form of cogent well-written report.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Language of Composition
 

The unit will focus on understanding rhetoric and various rhetorical situations. The aim is to assert the idea that rhetoric is always contextual and there is a link between the speaker, audience and what the content of the text is. This will enable students to understand the significance of context while analysing and composing a text.

1. Introduction to Rhetoric and Rhetorical Situation.

a. Lou Gehrig (1939) “Farewell Speech” (Speech) https://www.lougehrig.com/farewell/

2. SOAP Analysis: Through the analysis of the text the aim is to look at the mode in which various

factors like subject, occasion, audience and purpose impact rhetoric. 

a. George W. Bush (2001) “9/11 Address to the Nation” (Speech) http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/gwbush911addresstothenation.htm

b. Jawaharlal Nehru (1947) “Tryst with Destiny” (Speech) http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/jawaharlalnehrutrystwithdestiny.htm

3. Ethos, Pathos and Logos: Understanding Aristotle’s concept of Ethos, Pathos and Logos is significant in understanding effective rhetoric. By looking at some of the famous rhetorical works the aim is to understand how the writer’s/ orators of some of the famous rhetorical pieces have used these elements to persuade the reader/ audience.

a. Ethos

i. King George VI (1939) “The King’s Speech” (Speech, can play part of the movie) https://www.awesomestories.com/asset/view/George-VI-King-s-Speech-September-3-1939

ii. Judith Ortiz Cofer (1992) “The Myth of Latin Women: I Just met a Girl Named Maria” (Essay) https://www.quia.com/files/quia/users/amccann10/Myth_of_a_Latin_Woman

b. Logos

i. Alice Waters (2006) “Slow Food Nation” (Essay) https://www.thenation.com/article/slow-food-nation/

c. Pathos

i. Dwight D. Eisenhower (1944) “Order of the Day” (Speech) https://www.whatsoproudlywehail.org/curriculum/the-american-calendar/order-ofthe-day-6-June-1944

d. Combining Ethos, Logos, and Pathos

i. Rabindranath Tagore (1941) “Crisis of Civilization” https://www.scribd.com/doc/163829907/Rabindranath-Tagore-The-Crisis-of-Civili

zation

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Reading Written Texts
 

Focus of the unit would be to introduce multiple ways of analysis, close reading, and usage of argumentative statements and diction. 

1. Ralph Ellison (1962) “On Bird, Bird-Watching and Jazz” (Essay) http://www.unz.org/Pub/SaturdayRev-1962jul28-00047

2. Virginia Woolf (1942) “The Death of the Moth” (Essay) https://www.sanjuan.edu/cms/lib8/CA01902727/Centricity/Domain/3981/Death%20of%20A%20Moth-Virginia%20Woolf%20copy.pdf

3. Groucho Marx (2006) “Dear Warner Brothers” (Letter) https://archive.org/details/Groucho_Marx_Letter_to_Warner_Brothers

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Reading Visual Texts
 

The unit will focus on how to read a visual text and the impact it has on the audience.

 

1. ACLU (2000) “The Man on the Left” (Advertisement) https://www.mansonblog.com/2016/10/aclu-charles-manson-martin-luther-king.html

2. R. K. Laxman Political cartoons (Cartoon) http://webneel.com/rk-lakshman-editorial-cartoons-indian-cartoonist (Political Cartoons)

3. Times of India (2017) ISRO launch cartoon (Cartoon) https://www.tatacliq.com/que/isro-launch-breaks-record-memes/ISROLaunch

https://indianexpress.com/article/trending/trending-in-india/times-of-india-isro-104-satellite-launch-in-response-to-new-york-times-mangalyaan-cartoon-twitter-reactions-4529893

Analysing Advertisements (Fair and Lovely,…), gender stereotypes in ads

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Determining Effective and Ineffective Rhetoric
 

The unit will engage with the questions on why few texts are effective rhetorical pieces as opposed to others. A few texts will be analysed to look at different rhetorical situations, and how it is effective and ineffective in persuading the audience/ reader.

1. PETA, Feeding Kids Meat Is Child Abuse (Advertisement) https://www.peta.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/childabuseBB72.jpg

2. Anne Applebaum (2011) “If the Japanese Can’t Build a Safe Reactor, Who Can?” (Essay) https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/if-the-japanese-cant-build-a-safe-reactor-who-can/2011/03/14/ABCJvuV_story.html?utm_term=.8

3. Simon Lancaster (2016) Ted Talk: Speak Like a Leader (Speech) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bGBamfWasNQ

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
From Reading to Writing
 

By carefully reading the viewpoints of others and considering a range of ideas on an issue, one develops a clearer understanding of our own beliefs — a necessary foundation to writing effective arguments. The unit will focus on analysing elements of argument as a means of critical thinking and an essential step toward crafting argumentative essays. The unit will focus on making an argument and supporting it by synthesising multiple sources.

1. Understanding Argument

Csalexander03 (2012) Why Investing in Fast Food May Be a Good Thing by Amy Domini (Essay) https://csalexander03.wordpress.com/2012/12/04/why-investing-in-fast-food-may-be-a-good-thing-by-amy-domini/

2. The New York Times (2004) Felons and the Right to Vote (Essay) http://www.nytimes.com/2004/07/11/opinion/felons-and-the-right-to-vote.html

3. Using Visual text for Argument 

Objevit.cz (2017) “Holocaust + Selfie Culture = ‘Yolocaust’” (Video) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mjjV_X5re4g

4. Using sources to inform an Argument

5. Using Sources to Appeal to Audience

Text Books And Reference Books:

ACLU. (2000). The man on the left. The Manson family blog. https://www.mansonblog.com/2016/10/aclu-charles-manson-martin-luther-king.html

Adhwaryu, S. (2017). ISRO launch cartoon. Times of India. https://www.tatacliq.com/que/isro-launch-breaks-record-memes/ISROLaunch or

https://indianexpress.com/article/trending/trending-in-india/times-of-india-isro-104-satellite-launch-in-response-to-new-york-times-mangalyaan-cartoon-twitter-reactions-4529893 

Applebaum, A. (2011). If the Japanese can’t build a safe reactor, who can? Washington Post. https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/if-the-japanese-cant-build-a-safe-reactor-who-can/2011/03/14/ABCJvuV_story.html?utm_term=.8

Bush, G. W. (2001). 9/11 address to the nation. American Rhetoric: Rhetoric of 9/11. https://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/gwbush911addresstothenation.htm

Cofer, J. O. (1992) The myth of Latin women: I just met a girl named Maria. Many Voices, Many Lives. https://www.quia.com/files/quia/users/amccann10/Myth_of_a_Latin_Woman

Csalexander03. (2012). Why investing in fast food may be a good thing by Amy Domini. Csalexander03 blog. https://csalexander03.wordpress.com/2012/12/04/why-investing-in-fast-food-may-be-a-good-thing-by-amy-domini/

Ellison, R. (1962). On bird, bird-watching and jazz. The Saturday Review, 47-49. http://www.unz.org/Pub/SaturdayRev-1962jul28-00047

Gehrig, L. (1939). Farewell speech. Lou Gehrig. https://www.lougehrig.com/farewell/

King George VI King’s speech. (1939). Awesome Stories. https://www.awesomestories.com/asset/view/George-VI-King-s-Speech-September-3-1939

Laxman, R. K. (n.d.) Political cartoons. Webneel. http://webneel.com/rk-lakshman-editorial-cartoons-indian-cartoonist

Marx, G. (2006). Dear Warner Brothers. Archive,org. https://archive.org/details/Groucho_Marx_Letter_to_Warner_Brothers

McGeveran, T. (2008). Toni Morrison's letter to Barack Obama. Observer. http://observer.com/2008/01/toni-morrisons-letter-to-barack-obama/

Nehru, J. (1947). Tryst with Destiny. American Rhetoric: Online speech bank. http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/jawaharlalnehrutrystwithdestiny.htm

Nixon, R. (1952). Checkers speech. Watergate. http://watergate.info/1952/09/23/nixon-checkers-speech.html

Objevit.cz. (2017, Jan. 28). Holocaust + selfie culture = ‘yolocaust’ [Video]. YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mjjV_X5re4g

PETA. (2010). Feeding kids meat is child abuse. https://www.peta.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/childabuseBB72.jpg

Tagore, R. (1941). Crisis of civilization. Scribd. https://www.scribd.com/doc/163829907/Rabindranath-Tagore-The-Crisis-of-Civilization

Tedx Talks. (2016, May 23). Speak like a leader-Simon Lancaster-TEDxVerona [Video]. YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bGBamfWasNQ

Waters, A. (2006) Slow food nation. The Nation. https://www.thenation.com/article/slow-food-nation/

Woolf, V. (1942). The death of the moth. In V. Woolf, The death of the moth and other essays (pp. 1-3). Harcourt Inc. https://www.sanjuan.edu/cms/lib8/CA01902727/Centricity/Domain/3981/Death%20of%20A%20Moth-Virginia%20Woolf%20copy.pdf

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Kubota, R., & Lehner, A. (2004). Toward critical contrastive rhetoric. Journal of Second Language Writing, 13(1), 7-27.

Mohr, K. A., & Mohr, E. S. (2017). Understanding Generation Z students to promote a contemporary learning environment. Journal on Empowering Teaching Excellence, 1(1), 84-94.

Seaboyer, J., & Barnett, T. (2019). New perspectives on reading and writing across the disciplines. Higher Education Research and Development, 38(1), 1-10.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1, Individual Assignment: 20 marks

CIA 2, Mid-Semester Submission: 25 marks

End Semester Submission (Practical): 50 marks

 

BENG161A - READING TECHNOLOGY IN/AND SCIENCE FICTION (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This common core course aims to provide a basic introduction to understanding discourses of science and technology as represented in select science fiction. The course will help students understand some of the basic questions about the human condition that are raised, debated and negotiated in and through the representative fiction. Keeping the contemporaneity of issues today, the course will also emphasize how there is a crucial intersection of various ideas that cut across several disciplines with regard to technology and life, thereby making it crucially relevant to engage with it in the contemporary context. Anyone interested in questions of science, fiction and human condition may choose this course.

Objectives:

• To introduce students to the field of science fiction

• Help students identify and raise questions through these works of fiction some relevant questions in the contemporary context

• To direct students towards realising the intersection of various issues raised across different disciplines.

Course Outcome

CO1: By the end of the course the learner should be able to: Recognise the issues and debates raised as being interdisciplinary in nature, and hence engage with the form at a more critical level

CO2: Reflect on the implications of science fiction in the contemporary times and show it in their writings.

CO3: Debate about various issues related to the portrayal of humanity in science fictions.

CO4: Provide an inter-disciplinary perspective towards analyzing science fiction.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Introduction
 

This unit will provide students a basic overview of science fiction through some critical and conceptual lens. The New Critical Idiom Series, Science Fiction, would be used here to introduce aspects of SF to students. Locating the interdisciplinarity of the domain would be central in this module. Reference material would be handed out by the course instructor.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Negotiating 'Reason'
 

This unit will raise crucial debates in and around questions of ‘science’ and ‘reason’. The unit will also help students recognize the importance of raising these questions from various disciplinary points of view, an important one being philosophy.

• Isaac Asimov short story “Reason”

• Select Episodes of the series Stranger Things

The Matrix

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
SF and Technology
 

This unit will engage with how technology becomes a crucial part of negotiating SF. What are the fundamental concerns that Sf raises regarding technology and the human condition? How does technology come to be framed within SF? How is gender and sexuality framed within discourses of SF? How does SF address the anxieties of technology and future would be some of the questions engaged with here. Any one of the following novels may be taken up for discussion along with the viewing suggestion given below.

• Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

• William Gibson, Neuromancer

• Margaret Atwood, Oryx and Crake

• “Hated in the Nation” from Black Mirror Season 3

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Indian Science Fiction
 

This unit will engage with the science fiction in the Indian context. One of the main points of discussion would be to understand how Indian SF writers have engaged with tropes of SF that we are familiar with and what kind of an ‘India’ is imagined thereof which has implications socially, politically and culturally.

• Vandana Singh “Delhi”

• Sumit Basu, Turbulence

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Compilation

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bell, David and Barbara M. Kennedy. Eds. The Cybercultures Reader. Routledge, 2000. (Excerpts) Carey, Peter. What is Post-humanism? Minneapolis, University of Minnesota Press, 2010.

Carey, Peter. What is Post-humanism? Minneapolis, University of Minnesota Press, 2010.

Hollinger, Veronica. “Contemporary Trends in Science Fiction.” Science Fiction Studies. No. 78, Vol. 26, 1999.

Evaluation Pattern

Assignments: 95 marks

Attendance: 5 marks

BENG161B - GLOBAL ETHICS FOR CONTEMPORARY SOCIETIES (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course will introduce students to the major theoretical and applied debates as well as major moral puzzles and challenges in the field of global ethics. Ethics is gaining ground as an important humanities intervention in a fast-changing world. A course on ethics is often an added advantage for students as it helps them shape a socially-aware perspective of the social reality.

Drawing on interdisciplinary perspectives and thematic issues in the fields of international politics, business, communications and law, the course will challenge students to reflect on major ethical theories and traditions as well as core problems such as corporate governance, global distributive justice, the ethics of making and sustaining peace, media ethics and legal dimensions of ethics. By combining the works of both classic and contemporary philosophers with contemporary applied global issues, students will be able to critically reflect on fundamental normative questions from an interdisciplinary perspective and reflect on the rights, responsibilities and challenges of ‘good global citizenship’.

Learning Objectives: On completing the course, students will be able to:

• Open-mindedly consider different viewpoints in moral controversies.

• Identify the strengths and weaknesses of different philosophical and popular arguments on the various topics.

• Demonstrate understanding of the major moral philosophical approaches and techniques in moral reasoning.

• Formulate and critically assess personal positions/convictions.

Course Outcome

CO1: On the completion of the course, students will be equipped with: The general ability to critically compare, contrast and synthesise major theories and concepts and to apply them in a creative manner to conceptual debates and real-life ethical challenges; critically reflect on fundamental normative questions from an interdisciplinary perspective and reflect on the rights, responsibilities and challenges of ?good global citizenship?. CO2: Analyse various ethical dilemmas present in the society and efficiently present it in form of classroom debates and discussions. CO3: Demonstrate a clear understanding of various school of thoughts in the domain of ethics through their assignments. CO4: Appraise their views on various aspects of ethics and present it with clarity through multiple engagements in the classroom.

CO2: Analyse various ethical dilemmas present in the society and efficiently present it in form of classroom debates and discussions.

CO3: Demonstrate a clear understanding of various school of thoughts in the domain of ethics through their assignments.

CO4: Appraise their views on various aspects of ethics and present it with clarity through multiple engagements in the classroom.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Introduction
 

Global Ethics: Conceptual Definitions, Historical Origins & Present Challenges Introduction to the course Ethics, Morals and Values Cultural Relativism vs Universalism (case study)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Ethical Theories
 

Rationalist Ethical Theories Contractualist ethics Deontological Ethics Utilitarian Ethics Discourse ethics, Alternatives to Ethical Rationalism Virtue Ethics Feminist & Care Ethics Postmodernist Ethics

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Applying Ethical Theories
 

Ethics of International Aid and Development: Humanitarian Aid in Conflict Zones

Global Distributive Justice and Global Poverty: Models for International Economic Justice

Ethics of War: Torture in Abu Ghraib (Case Study)

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Ethics of Making and Sustaining Peace
 

Rohingya Issues: Are humanitarian interventions justified? The case study of Myanmar/Burma

Global Environmental and Climate Ethics: Trade Agreements and Global Environmental Ethics

Global Business Ethics and Arms Trade: The Ethics of Capitalism (Film Inside Job)

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Ethics of International Law
 

Natural Resources Extraction from the Kimberley process towards universal legislation (Movie: Blood Diamond),

Global Journalism Ethics, Digital Media Ethics and Whistleblowing Practices: Snowden and Whistleblowing

Ethical Implications of Emerging Technologies: Genetics, stem cell and embryo research: Embryo research and women’s rights

Text Books And Reference Books:

Hutchings, K. (2010) Global Ethics. An Introduction, Polity: Cambridge

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Copp, D. (ed.) The Oxford Handbook of Ethical Theory, Oxford: OUP

Graham, G. (2008) Ethics and International Relations, 2nd Edition. Malden, MA: Blackwell.

LaFollette, H. (ed.) (2003) The Oxford Handbook of Ethical Practice, Oxford: OUP

Evaluation Pattern

Assignments: 95 marks

Attendance: 5 marks

BHIS161A - ENCOUNTERING HISTORIES: THE FUTURE OF THE PAST (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

The influence and presence of the past is felt everywhere and every day in our lives. Movies, newspapers or the internet bombard us and expose us to the past – both familiar and unfamiliar. However, the barrage of information and the forces of globalisation have led to increasing questions on the relevance and the value of the past – indeed a denial even. This course will engage the students with the myriad ways in which the past, though no longer present – is a presence in our lives today. It will introduce the students to think historically, relate to their memories of their own past and make them aware of the multiple perspectives which will enable them to read, write and reflect on the past; or in other words, make history. 

This course will introduce students to the methodological and theoretical questions that animate and inform the practice of history. How do professional historians work? What is their goal? How do they locate and analyze source materials? What kinds of arguments do historians try to make? How, ultimately, is history produced? This course will ask how (or whether) historians’ particular sources – and their location in the archives – can give voice to the ordinary and of things ‘past’. Moreover, the course will address how the advent of the information age impact upon the historians’ profession by exploring how modern technology – whether film, photography, or the internet – changed the way historians work and address their audience.

Course Objectives:

  • To familiarize the students with foundational concepts in history and historical enquiry such as fact, fiction, truth, narrative, memory, conservationism and counterfactuals.
  • To identify and make students aware of the importance of historical awareness to arrive at independent and informed opinion and contribute meaningfully in local and global affairs and debates.
  • To equip students with an understanding of ‘history’ and the characteristics of ‘the past’ in present day society.
  • To help develop proficiency in research, analysis and writing; and to encourage wide, independent, selective reading on historical subject matter to foster a sustained, reasoned, well focused argument, based on a broad selection of evidence.
  • To identify arguments in historical works in order to be able to critique evidence used in support of the arguments.
  • To interpret varied sources and place them within their proper historical context to integrate secondary sources into their own original narratives and distinguish between different kinds of history.

 

 

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Discover how and why historians debate issues of evidence and interpretation and learn to distinguish between various schools or styles of academic history.

CO2: Critically engage with representations of the past in the present to enable them to analyze and use evidence in interrogating historical accounts.

CO3: Critically reflect and engage with the interface between the past and the present, fostering a healthy appreciation for history and its imprint on our present world.

CO4: Apply how historical narratives are shaped by states, organizations, and individuals.

CO5: Analyze the interaction between history and politics when following the news and in examining historical cases.

CO6: Analyze the interaction between history and politics when following the news and in examining historical cases.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
The Many Pasts
 

a)     Doing History - The Place of the Past.

b)    Facts, Fiction and Lies: Interrogating evidence - paintings, films, novels.

 Level of Learning: Practical/Application

c) Facts, Fiction and Lies: Interrogating evidence - paintings, films, novels-Students will take any work of Historical fiction, Historical Films as case studies and analyse the element of fact and fiction

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
The Use and Abuse of History
 

a) Voice and the Subject: Narratives and Counter-narratives – Winston Churchill, Velupillai Prabhakaran, Pirates of the Caribbean, Tom and Jerry

b) Locating the Popular: Historical Fiction or Fictionalised History– Exploring the Fantasy Worlds of Ice Age, Hogwarts, Narnia, Westeros and Middle-earth.

c) The Past Today: The Ayodhya Debate and the Ram Janmbhoomi issue, Dwarka, Kapilavastu.

d) Historical Monuments and their Authorship/Ownership: The Temple Mount and Taj Mahal.

Level of Learning: Practical/Application

a)                Voice and the Subject: Narratives and Counter-narratives – Winston Churchill, Velupillai Prabhakaran, Pirates of the Caribbean, Tom and Jerry

 

b)               Locating the Popular: Historical Fiction or Fictionalised History – Exploring the Fantasy Worlds of Ice Age, Hogwarts, Narnia, Westeros and Middle-earth.

 

Screening of Documentaries, Speeches and Films followed by Student-led panel discussion

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Locating Sources: The Historian's Voice
 

a)     History and the Visual: Photography, Film and the Image – Gladiator, Schindler’s List, 300, Gone with the Wind, Jodha Akbar and Mohenjo Daro

b)    Historical Re-enactments? Light and Sound Shows at Golconda, Red Fort and Khajuraho.

 

c)     Alternate Histories: Oral Histories, Sports Histories, Graphic Novels, Caricatures and Political Cartoons.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Memory, Commemoration, and Silence
 

a)     Memory and History: Power and the Production of History –Museums and Memorials.

b)    ‘Truth’ and ‘myth’: History as Conspiracy – Insider and Outsider Perspectives – the Aryan Debate, Hindutva Ideology and Neo-Nazis.

c)     Private Lives and Public Affairs: The British Monarchy, the Nehru-Edwina Affair.  

d)    Suppressing the Text: State Secrets and Declassification – Wikileaks and the Netaji Files.

Level of Learning: Practical/Application

a)                  Private Lives and Public Affairs: The British Monarchy, the Nehru-Edwina Affair.

b)                 Suppressing the Text: State Secrets and Declassification – Wikileaks and the Netaji Files

c) Case study of various Print mediums which have discussed these issues to analyse how media is responsible for creating various memory narratives.

Text Books And Reference Books:

·    Davis, Natalie Z. 1981. The Possibilities of the Past, Journal of Interdisciplinary History, Vol. 12, No.2, The New History: The 1980s and beyond II, pp. 267-275.
·    Gaddis, John Lewis. 2002. The Landscape of History: How Historians Map the Past, New York:  Oxford Univ Press.
·    Gathercole, Peter and David Lowenthal (eds.) 1994. The Politics of the Past, New York: Routledge.
·    Hodder, Ian and Scott Hutson. 2003 (Third Edition). Reading the Past, New York: Cambridge Univ. Press.
·    Kumar, Ravinder 1989. The Past and the Present: An Indian Dialogue, Daedalus, Vol. 118, No.4, pp. 27-49.
·    Thompson, Paul. 2000. The Voice of the Past: Oral History, New York: Oxford Univ Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

·      Banerjee, Sumanta, 2003. Ayodhya: A future bound by the past, Economic and Political Weekly, Vol. 38, No. 27, pp. 2795-2796.
·      Buchli, Victor and Gavin Lucas 2001. Archaeologies of the Contemporary Past, Routledge.
·      Carr, E.H. 1967. What is History,Vintage.
·      Chalcraft, David et.al. 2008. Max Weber Matters: Interweaving Past and Present, Ashgate.
·      Chapman, James 2005. Past and Present: National Identity and the British Historical Film, I.B.Tauris.
·      Clarke, Katherine 2008. Making Time for the Past: Local History and the Polis, Oxford Univ Press.
·      Damm, Charlotte 2005. Archaeology Ethno-History and Oral Traditions: approaches to the indigenous past, Norwegian Archaeological Review, Vol. 38, No. 2, pp. 73-87.
·      Fowler, Don D. 1987. Uses of the past: Archaeology in the service of the state, American Antiquity, Vol. 52, No. 2, pp. 229-248.
·      Greene, Naomi 1999. Landscapes of Loss: the Nationalist Past in Postwar French Cinema, Princeton Univ Press.
·      Hamilakis et. al. 2001. Art and the Re-presentation of the Past, The Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, Vol. 7, No. 1, pp. 153-156.
·      Muller, Jan-Werner 2004. Memory and Power in Post-War Europe: Studies in the presence of the past, Cambridge Univ. Press.
·      Murray, Williamson and Richard Hart Sinnreich (eds.) 2006. The Past as Prologue: The Importance of History to the Military Profession, Cambridge Univ Press.
·      Piercey, Robert 2009. The Uses of the Past from Heidegger to Rorty:Doing Philosophy Historically, Cambridge Univ. Press.
·      Shrimali, K.M. 1998. A Future for the Past? Social Scientist, Vol. 26, No. 9, pp. 26-51.
·      Stone, Peter G. and Philippe G. Planel 1999. the Constructed Past, Routledge.
·      Walsh, Kevin 1992. The Representation of the Past: Museums and heritage in the post-modern world, Routledge

Evaluation Pattern

CIA - Evaluation Pattern

Assignment 1

Assignment 2

Total

20

20

40

 

Mid Semester Examination

Submission

Presentation

Total

30

20

50

 

End Semester Examination

Submission

Presentation

Total

30

20

50

 

BHIS161B - THE HISTORY OF URBAN SPACE AND EVOLUTION OF CITY FORMS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

A focus on urban history offers fertile territory for a variety of topics. The development and inhabitation of cities has been an important feature in Cartesian and human landscapes for thousands of years. Regardless of time and place, cities have always brought together people and the products of their labor together in relatively limited spaces. Cities have thus been incubators for experiments in social organization, policy-making, planning, environmental modification, and economic innovation. Consequently, cities are dynamic and vital centers, which inform and are shaped by human experience. Studying how cities and their inhabitants change over time—whether on a long or short horizon or on a global, national, regional, or local scale—offers an informative framework within which to consider broader historical questions, such as the relationship between people, place, work, culture, and politics. Studying cities, moreover, offers students a great opportunity to engage in comparative historical study and to work with a variety of available technologies for studying cities.

Course Objectives:

       To deploy multiple analytical approaches to urban space, its organization, and inhabitation in order to analyze and situation urban development as a historical process that takes place within a broader historical context

       To illustrate multiple approaches to understanding changes in economic, political, and social formations in cities over time, as an important element in developing historical knowledge

       To acquaint the students how political development in historical context affected the rise and demise of urban centres

  • To acquaint the students how modern notions of urban development emerged and the various trends of the modern urban development

Course Outcome

CO1: Identify and deploy various approaches to comparatively analyzing cities, using critical thinking to analyze urban space and urban life from multiple perspectives

CO2: Recognise and engage with the role of cities, suburbs, and urbanization in historical narratives

CO3: Demonstrate an ability to negotiate with ideas of immigration, migration, and economic and technological change, and how they have shaped cities through history

CO4: Reflect and analyse on the relationship of the built environment of cities with the natural environments surrounding them

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
What is Urban History?
 

Level of Knowledge: Conceptual

a)What is Urban History? Urbanism as an Interdisciplinary Project- Urbanism and Comparative Method

b)Historiography of Urbanism - Modern Studies of Urbanism: Henri Pirenne and Max Weber- Study of Urbanism in the USA

c) Urbanism and Modernity

d)Urban Histories and the ‘Cultural Turn’

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Approaches to the Study of Ancient and Medieval Urban Centers
 

Level of Knowledge: Analytical

a)The Harappan Cities-Between the Harappan and the Early Historic: An Absence of Cities?  The Early Historic Cities-Early Historic Cities in Texts-Understanding Early Historic Urbanisation

b)Idea of Medieval Cities of Europe- the spread of urbanism and emergence of town planning- urban revival in western Europe

c)Perceptions on Medieval Indian Cities-Commercially and Politically Charged Urbanism- Urbanism and Sufi and Bhakti Spaces-Poliscracy- Portuguese Cities: Polisgarchic-‘City-States Of Medieval India

Skill-Based

●Students will create two models of urban layout: Indian and western.

●They will have an exhibition of their model layouts, where they will introduce their peers about the traits and differences of these two layouts.

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Colonial Cities
 

Level of Knowledge: Conceptual

a)Dependent Urbanisation and New Urban Forms in Colonial India-City Planning in India under British Rule-Race, Class and Ethnicity in the Colonial City

b)Modernity and the City in Colonial India-The City as the Site of Spectacles-The City as the Site of Movements

c)Case Study of Colonial Cities: Calcutta, Bombay, Madras, Delhi

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Themes on Modern Cities
 

Level of Knowledge: Analytical

a)Space and Urban Theory- Materialities-Knowledge

b)Science, Planning and Expertise- Connections and Flows of modern cities 

c)Emerging concepts- Global City, Inclusive City, Livable City, Safe City, Future City – Impact of new town movement on post-independent Indian city planning -beginning of modern town planning in India

Skill-Based

 ●Students will create posters of these different kind of urban layouts and organize mock classrooms, where they will address the class with their teaching props.                                 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Essential References:

●Adams R. McC., (1966) The Evolution of Urban Society: Early Mesopotamia and PrehispanicMexico (Chicago: Aldine).

●Basant, P. K., (2012) The City and the Country in Early India: A Study of Malwa (Delhi: Primus Books).

●Ballhatchet, Kenneth, (1980) Race, Sex, andClass under theRaj:ImperialAttitudes and Policies and Their Critics, 1793-1905 ( London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1980).

●Chandavarkar, Rajnarayan, (2009) History, Culture and the Indian City (Delhi: Cambridge UniversityPress).

●Bayly, C. A., (1992) Rulers, Townsmen and Bazaars: North Indian Society in the Age of British Expansion, 1770-1870 (Delhi: Oxford University Press).

●Banga Indu (ed.), (1991) City in Indian History: Urban demography, Society and Politics (Delhi: Manohar).

●Chattopadhyaya,B., (2003) ‘The City in Early India: Perspectives from Texts’, in B. Chattopadhyaya, Studying Early India: Archaeology, Texts, and Historical Issues (Delhi: Permanent Black), pp. 105-34.

●Edward Soja (2000): Postmetropolis, Critical Studies of cities and Regions, Blackwell Publisher Ltd. 17. 

●Fischer, Claude S. 1975 Towards a subcultural theory of urbanism, Reprinted in J.J. Macionis and N. Benokraitis (ed.) 1989 Seeing Ourselves (pp 367-373).

●Frykenberg, R.E., (1986) Delhi Through Ages: Selected Essays in Urban History, Culture and Society (New Delhi: Oxford University Press)

●G. P. Chapman, A.K. Dutt and R.W. Bradnock (ed.) (1999): Urban growth & Development in Asia, Vol.2: Living in the Cities, Ashgate Publishing Ltd.

●Marshall, P.J., (2000),The White Town ofCalcutta under the Rule of the East India Company‟, Modern Asian Studies, Vol. 34, No. 2 (May), pp. 307-331. 

●Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey. Hayden, Dolores, (1996) The Power of Place: Urban Landscapes as Public History (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press). 

●Pirenne, Henri, (1969) Medieval Cities: Their Origins and the Revival of Trade (Princeton: Princeton University Press). 

●Shane, Ewen, (2016) What is Urban History? (Cambridge: Polity Press). Southall, Aidan, (1998) The City in Time and Space (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press). 

●Trigger, B., (1972) ‘Determinants of Urban Growth in Pre-industrial Societies’ in Ucko, Ucko, P.J., Tringham R. and Dimbleby, G.W. (eds.) Man, Settlement and Urbanism (London: Duckworth Publishers).

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

●Braudel, Fernand, (1989) The Identity of France (London: Fontana Press).

●Blake, Stephen, (1993) Shahjahanabad: The Sovereign City in Mughal India, 1639- 1739 (New Delhi: Cambridge University Press). 

●Braudel, Fernand (1973) Capitalism and Material Life, 1400-1800, tran. by Miriam Kochan (New York: Harper & Row).

●Cohen, R., (1979) ‘State Origins: A Reappraisal’ in Claessen, H.J.M. and Peter Skalnik (eds.) The Early State (Hague: Mouton). 

●Champakalakshmi, R., (1996) Trade, Ideology and Urbanisation: South India, 300 BC and 1300 AD (Delhi: Oxford University Press).

●Finley, M., (1977) ‘The ancient city: from Fustel de Coulanges to Max Weber and Beyond’ Comparative Studies in Society and History, Vol. 19. 

●Jacobsen T, Adams RMcC., (1958) ‘Salt and silt in ancient Mesopotamian agriculture’, Science, Vol. 128, pp. 1251-58. Fried, Morton, (1967) The Evolution of Political Society (New York: Random House). 

●Harvey, David, (1985) The Urbanisation of Capital: Studies in the History and Theory of Capitalist Urbanization (Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press).

●Heitzman, James, (2008) TheCity in SouthAsia (London and NewYork: Routledge).

●Kenoyer, J. M., (1998) Ancient Cities of the IndusValley Civilization (Karachi: Oxford University Press). Kenoyer, J. M. and K. Heuston, (2005) The Ancient South Asian World (Oxford: University Press).

●Latham A, et.al. (2009): Key Concepts in Urban Geography, Sage, Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, Singapore, Washington.

●Martindale, D., (1958) ‘The Theory of the City’ in Weber, Max, The City, Translated and edited by Martindale (New York: Don and Neuwirth, G. Free Press).

●Mumford, L., (1961) The City in History (New York: Harcourt, Brace and World). Orans, Martin, (1966) ‘Surplus’, Human Organization, Vol. 25, pp. 24-32

●Nightingale, CarlH., (2008) „Before Race Mattered: Geographies ofthe Color Line in Early Colonial Madras and New York‟, The American Historical Review, Vol. 113, No. 1 (February), pp. 48-71

●Peers, Douglas M., (1998) „Privates offParade: Regimenting Sexuality in the NineteenthCentury Indian Empire‟, The International History Review, Vol. 20, No. 4 (December), pp. 823-854.

● Pieterse E, (2008): City Futures, Confronting the Crisis of Urban Development, Zed Books Ltd, London and New York.

●Steward, J., (1968) ‘Cultural Ecology’ in The International Encyclopedia of The Social Sciences, Vol. 3. Tonkiss, Fran, (2009) Space, the City and Social Theory (Cambridge: Polity Press). 

●Weber, Max, (1958) The City, Translated and edited by Martindale, Don and Neuwirth, G. (New York: Free Press). Wirth, Louis, (1938) ‘Urbanism as a way of life’ Reprinted in J.J. Macionis and N. Benokraitis (ed.) (1989) Seeing Ourselves (pp.360-366) (New Jersey: Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs).

 

Evaluation Pattern

Course Code 

Course Title

Assessment Details 

BHIS 191 B

 Urban History: The History of Urban Space and Evolution of City Forms

CIA

20 Marks 

MSE

 

CIAII

20 Marks 

ESE 

50 Marks

Group Assignment

(The Assignment will have 2 components related to each other)

Submission Paper

Individual

Assignment 

Submission  paper

(Research based)

BMED151B - UNDERSTANDING THE VISUAL LANGUAGE OF CINEMA (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course would provide students with a thorough knowledge of the conceptual and practical aspects of digital cinematography through engagement with works of eminent cinematographers from around the world and the equipment.


The course aims to help students to:

  • Appreciate cinematography as a combination of artistic and technological endeavors
  • Understand the basics concepts of cinematography and shot design
  • Harness the power of natural and artificial lighting  to compose powerful shots
  • Explore the creative possibilities of cinematography and understand its importance in effective storytelling.

Course Outcome

CO1: Identify and describe the visual elements in cinematography.

CO2: Demonstrate understanding of different tools of cinematography.

CO3: Apply knowledge of cinematography techniques to create films.

CO4: Use cinematography skills to make films on social issues.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Cinematography
 
  • Cinematography as an art
  • Art of visual storytelling
  • Evolution of cinematography
  • Eminent cinematographer’s from world cinema
  • Cinematography and effective storytelling.
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
The Cinematographer?s medium and Tools
 
  • Light, Camera, Lenses
  • Basics of Lighting 
  • Various types of light sources and their practical application
  • Colour temperature, Lens Choice, Lens filters, Exposure/F-stop/Shutter/ISO
  • Depth of field Camera operating
  • Hands-on introduction to camera equipment.
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Camera placement and Shot Design
 
  • Composition & Framing
  • Types of Shots
  • Shot design for single camera and multi camera productions
  • Camera Placement -how does it affect the meaning
  • Motivated Camera Movement.
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Video editing
 
  • Introduction to video editing application
  • Video editing on smartphone
  • Editing on Adobe Premiere Pro-creating projects, workspaces and workflows, capturing and importing, video effects and transitions, graphics, titles, and animation, compositing, colour correction and grading, improving performance and troubleshooting.
Text Books And Reference Books:

Pro, A. P. (2010). Adobe Premiere Pro.
Team, A. C. (2012). Adobe Premiere Pro CS6 Classroom in a Book: Adobe Prem Pro CS6 Classro_p1. Adobe Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Block, B. (2013). The visual story: Creating the visual structure of film, TV and digital media. CRC Press.
Alton, J. (2013). Painting with light. University of California Press.
 

Evaluation Pattern

Overall end-semester evaluation for 95 marks
Project I: 20 Marks 
Project II: 25 Marks
Project III: 20 Marks
End semester Submission Project IV: 30 Marks. Attendance 5 Marks

BMED161A - MEDIA LITERACY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Media literacy is designed to help students develop an informed and critical understanding of the nature of an ever expanding and increasingly dominating mass media –as information sources, as entertainment, and as an industry–as well as to examine, interpret, and evaluate the messages contained within, and their social, cultural and political implications. This course exposes the student to the base complexities of media literacy, develop critical thinking skills, provides the methods of analysis necessary to interpret media content as well as methods of critical writing appropriate for media analysis.

Course Objectives

The course aims to help students to:

  • Think critically about the role of the media in human rights promotion;
  • Identify ethical dilemmas facing journalists, filmmakers and other media professionals.
  • Understand the historical and contemporary perspective of human rights
  • Use analytical tools to examine pertinent case studies and relevant global trends.
  • Assess and examine what human rights are in terms of its relationship to media production.

Course Outcome

CO1: Analyse and critically appraise various media products for specific audiences

CO2: Develop critical media literacy and skills to analyse media content

CO3: Critically assess and improve their own texts

CO4: Develop an understanding of ideology in the context of our media system

CO5: Develop skills pertaining to act responsibly in Online environment

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Media Literacy
 

Understanding what is media literacy? 
Media Literacy Skills and key concepts 
Conditions for Media Learning
Deconstructing media and literacy expectations  

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Media and the Social World
 

The Media Triangle
Media logs and historical perspectives
Understand, analyze and evaluate- finding hidden messages
Fake News, Deep Fakes 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Uses and abuses of Digital Media
 

Understanding Web 2.0: Understanding digital information literacy
Digital Storytelling 
Online Learning Communities & Connectivism

Text Books And Reference Books:

Alexander, A. & Hanson, J. (2007). Taking Sides: Clashing Views in Media and Society. 
McGraw-Hill Contemporary Learning Series: Dubuque, IA. 384 pp.
Hiassen C. (1998). Team Rodent: How Disney Devours the World. Ballantine Books. 96 pp
Potter, J (2013). Media Literacy. Sage Publication, New Delhi

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Kilbourne, J. (1999). Can’t Buy My Love: How Advertising Changes the Way We Think and Feel. Simon and Schuster: New York. 366 pp.
McLuhan, M. (1998) Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man. Seventh Printing. MIT Press: MA 365 pp. (orig. pub. In 1911).

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment outline
Overall end-semester evaluation for 95 marks
Project I: 20 Marks 
Project II: 25 Marks
Project III: 20 Marks
End semester Submission Project IV: 30 Marks. Attendance 5 Marks

BPOL161A - PEACE AND CONFLICT MANAGEMENT (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description 

This course views conflict as an ever-present component of any decision-making environment, including Planning and Public Administration and International Relations. It offers tools for: understanding the nature of conflict at different levels and of individual and joint decision-making processes; devising individual and group strategies that minimize the destructive consequences of conflict; and, identifying solutions satisfactory to all involved. Some conflict-related concepts and processes are general and context-free, while others are specific to the planning and policy fields. Some simulation games and cases, and the students' reaction to them, will provide the basis for class discussions about the nature of various decision mechanisms and the role of perceptions in managing conflicts. The course introduces students to the key concepts and theoretical approaches employed to explain and understand conflict, and the range of policies and practices that seek to manage, resolve and transform conflicts. Case studies from South Asia and the rest of the world are used to provide empirical illustrations in class. Students will be invited to analyze the successes/failures of different techniques employed by peace activists, policy makers, and peace research scholars. 

Course Objectives

The course aims to help students to:

  • understand the concepts, theories and practices, with a focus on equipping students with toolkits of handling conflict and negotiation.
  • understand the mechanism of creating values and achieving integrative negotiation outcomes.
  • assess the debates over the main ideas that constitute the fields of conflict management and peace.

Course Outcome

CO1: identify the importance of, and the ability of using communication and information exchange in conflict and negotiation contexts.

CO2: apply concepts in handling conflicts with employers, colleagues, customers, business partners, and clients from different cultural/country backgrounds.

CO3: examine the study of conflict management and peace studies and understand how this subject has prompted enormous scholarly debate and disagreement both in history and other fields

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction
 

The Nature and Origins of Conflict: How and Why People Conflict; Differences, diversity and opportunity; Conflict: Meaning, Nature and types and levels of conflict; Violent and Non-Violent Conflicts; Conflict Mapping and Tracking; Conflict Management and Conflict Resolution

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Conflict Management
 

A Holistic Approach to Conflict Management; Conflict Prevention and Preventive Diplomacy; Conflict Prevention and Early Warning; Stages in Conflict Management

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Peace building
 

Understanding Peace Process; Stages in the Peace Process; Peace-making, Peacekeeping and Peacebuilding; Negotiation and Mediation; Arbitration and Adjudication 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Challenges for conflict management
 

Variation in Contexts: Culture, Religion, and Identity; Contemporary Challenges: (1) Terrorism; (2) Environmental Conflicts; Prospects for Conflict Resolution 

Text Books And Reference Books:
  • Baker, D. P. (2010). Conflict management for peacekeepers and peacebuilders: by Cedric de Koning and Ian Henderson
  • Galtung, Johan (1969), “Violence, Peace, and Peace Research”, Journal of Peace Research, 6(3): 167-191.
  • Bajpai, Kanti (2004), “A Peace Audit on South Asia”, in Ranabir Sammadar (ed.) Peace Studies: An Introduction to the Concept, Scope, and Themes, New Delhi: Sage.
  • Pammer, W. J., & Killian, J. (Eds.). (2003). Handbook of conflict management. CRC Press.
  • Fischer, R., Ury, W., & Patton, B. (1981). Getting to yes. Negotiating Agreement Without Giving in.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Bercovitch, Jacob and Richard Jackson (2009), Conflict Resolution in the Twenty-first Century: Principles, Methods and Approaches, Ann Arbor (MI): University of Michigan Press.
  • Levy, Jack S. (2007), “International Sources of Interstate and Intrastate War”, in Chester
  • Crocker et al. (eds.) Leashing the Dogs of War, Washington DC: USIP.
  • Menon, Ritu (2004), “Doing Peace: Women Resist Daily Battle in South Asia”, in
  • Radhika Coomaraswamy and Dilrukshi Fonseka (eds.), eace Work: Women, Armed Conflict and Negotiation
  • Zartman, I. William (2001), “Preventing Deadly Conflict”, Security Dialogue, 32(2): 137-154.
  • Ramsbotham, Oliver et al. (2011), Contemporary Conflict Resolution, 3rd Edition.
Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 - 25

CIA 2 (Mid sem) - 25

ESE - 45

Attendance- 5

BPOL161B - GLOBAL POWER POLITICS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The global balance of power is changing dramatically. As the world seems to be moving away from American Hegemony, the question of where power lies in global politics is becoming ever more significant. Great powers remain as the critical actors in the international system and the nature of the international order is determined by their interactions in war and peace. This course focuses on the transformation of the global power politics particularly focusing on the power shifts in the post-cold war international system. The course will also introduce students to the emergence of new powers such as China, India, Brazil and South Africa and the changing dynamics of the international system. The course will examine whether great powers can cooperate in addressing the consequential challenges in the new century; climate change, nuclear proliferation, refugee crisis, international terrorism and other issues. The course will also examine the competition among the great powers in the South and East China Sea, and the West Asian region.

 

CourseObjectives:

The course aims to help students to:

  • introduce to the key concepts and theories of international relations.
  • examine the key issues pertaining to great power politics in the twenty first century. 
  • outline the dynamics of strategic interaction between great powers and focuses on great power competition during World Wars, Cold War period and the post-Cold War period. 
  • develop an understanding of the great power dynamics, the use of power by great powers in international relations.

Course Outcome

CO1: Analyze the global power politics in the twenty-first century

CO2: Examine the major contemporary issues and challenges in global politics

CO3: Evaluate the changing power dynamics and power shifts in international relations

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to International Relations
 

International Relations: Meaning, nature and scope of international relations; Key Concepts of International Relations: Sovereignty (territorial sovereignty), Balance of Power, National Power, Security and Globalization.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:11
Theorization of Great Power in International Relations
 

Theories of International Relations: Realism (Classical Realism and Neo-Realism), Liberalism (Neoliberalism), Constructivism.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Great Power Politics in the Cold War Era
 

First World War, Second World War: Causes and Consequences, dynamics of strategic interaction between the great powers including the alliances, Inter war period (multipolarity), the Cold War (bipolarity) and the post-Cold War period (unipolarity).

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Power shifts in the Post-Cold War
 

Power shifts in the post-Cold War international system, Great Powers: traditional and non-traditional security threats, Emergence of new powers (rise of China and India as a challenge to the west).

Text Books And Reference Books:

Baylis, J. and Smith, S. (eds.) (2011), The Globalization of World Politics. An Introduction to International Relations, London: OUP.

Heywood, A (2014), Global Politics, Palgrave Foundation.

John J. Mearsheimer, The Tragedy of Great Power Politics, updated ed. (New York: Norton, 2014).

Martin Griffiths and Terry O Callaghan (2002) ‘International Relations: The Key Concepts’.     Routledge London and New York.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Barry Buzan and Ole Weaver (2003), ‘Regions and Powers: The structure of International Security’ Cambridge.

Ikenberry, G. John, Ed. 2002. America Unrivaled: The Future of the Balance of Power, Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.  

Devatak, D, Anthony Burke and Jim George (2007), ‘An Introduction to International Relations: Australian Perspectives’, Cambridge University Press.

Hans J Morgenthau (1948). Politics among Nations: The Struggle for Power and Peace, Alfred A Knopf, New York.

Kenneth Waltz (1979) ‘Theory of International Politics’. Addison-Wesley Publications.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Outline:

Course Code

Course Title

Assessment Details

BPOL161B

Global Power and Politics

CIA 1

MSE

(CIA 2)

CIA 3

ESE

Attendance

20

Marks

25

Marks

20

Marks

30

Marks

05

Marks

Individual Assignment

Written Exam

Group Assignment

Written Exam

 

 

 

 

Section A:

3 x 25= 15 Marks

Section B:

2 x 10= 20 Marks

Section C:

1 x 15 = 15 Marks

 

Section A:

3 x 5 = 15 Marks

Section B:

2x 10 = 20 Marks

Section C:

1 x 15 = 15 Marks

 

BPSY161A - SCIENCE OF WELLNESS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

This course heralds the emergence of a new field of science that endeavours to understand how individuals and societies thrive and flourish, and how this new knowledge can be applied to foster happiness, health and fulfillment. Taking a dynamic, cross-disciplinary approach, the course explores the most promising routes to well-being, derived from the latest research in psychology, neuroscience, economics, and the effects of our natural environment. The course provides an overview of the latest insights and strategies for enhancing our individual well-being, or the well-being of the communities in which we live and work

Course Objectives

This course aims to:

  • Understand the evolution and development of health and well-being
  • Develop a holistic approach to living life well
  • Create optimal programs for individuals and populations

Course Outcome

CO1: Analyze various perspectives from the latest research in psychology, neuroscience, economics, and the effects of our natural environment on well being

CO2: Develop a holistic perspective on wellbeing

CO3: Design interventions to enhance positive mental health in individuals and populations

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Well-Being
 

Well being as a concept, happiness, and subjective well-being, Expanding the repertoire of positive emotions: The broaden-and-build theory of positive emotions; Relationship with reality and its role in the well-being of young adults; Increasing happiness in life, Positive mental health in individuals and populations

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Well-being across life-span
 
Living well at every stage of life: Resilience in childhood, positive youth development, life tasks of adulthood and successful aging; Role of meaningful relationships: infant attachment, adult attachment, love and flourishing relationships; Seeing the future through self efficacy and optimism; Role of Self efficacy in life arenas, learned optimism.
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Socio-cultural and Economic Considerations
 

The relevance of subjective well-being to social policies: optimal experience and tailored intervention; The social context of well-being; Does money buy happiness?; A well-being manifesto for a flourishing society.  

Text Books And Reference Books:

Huppert, Baylis, & Keverne (2005). The Science of Well-Being.  Oxford  University Press.

Synder, & Lopez (2007). Positive Psychology. New Delhi: Sage Publishing House

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Coan, R. W. (1977). Hero, artist, sage, or saint? A survey of what is variously called mental health, normality, maturity, self-actualization, and human fulfillment. New York: Columbia University Press.

Boniwell, I. (2012). Positive Psychology In a Nutshell: The Science of Happiness (3rd edition). London: Mc Graw Hill.

Bradburn, N. M. (1969). The structure of psychological well-being. Chicago, IL: Aldine.

Evaluation Pattern

 

Individual Assignment

Group Assignment

End semester

Attendance

25

25

45

05

BPSY161B - ADVERTISEMENT PSYCHOLOGY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

Advertisement psychology is a branch of psychology which studies the pattern of responses by the human system to advertisement stimuli. Advertising is the art of influencing human behaviors to buy certain products. Recently  advertisers are discovering the need to know the facts which psychology can give about what attracts attention, what sticks in memory, what gives a pleasant impression, what persuades and what leads to the act of purchase. The field helps marketers and copyrighters to prepare effective advertisements.

Course Objectives

This course aims to:

  • Understand the historical and scientific origin and development of the fie
  • Learn the cognitive,affective and behavioural responses to the advertisement stimuli
  • Develop the skills to evaluate the effectiveness of advertisements from psychological perspectives 

Course Outcome

CO1: Apply the psychological perspectives of advertisements in the real life setting.

CO2: Integrate different domains such as cognitive, affective and behavioral responses in the field of advertisement.

CO3: Develop the ability to make applications based on understanding of marketing strategies.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit I: Introduction to advertisement psychology
 

Introduction to advertisements; its objectives and importance;

Types and forms of advertising;

Effects of advertisements - a psychological perspective;

Classic and contemporary approaches of classifying advertisement effectiveness.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit II: Cognitive proc