CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT

School of Business and Management

Syllabus for
BBA (Tourism and Travel Management/Honours/Honours with Research)
Academic Year  (2023)

 
1 Semester - 2023 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBA101-1 MANAGEMENT AND BEHAVIOURAL PROCESS Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
BBA102-1 FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
BBAT103-1 TOURISM BUSINESS Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
BBAT161-1 GLOBAL ETIQUETTES IN TOURISM Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses 2 2 50
ECO142 ECONOMICS OF CORRUPTION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
ENG185-1 DEVELOPING FLUENCY AND CLARITY IN ENGLISH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses 2 2 50
EST141B READING TECHNOLOGY IN/AND SCIENCE FICTION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
EST142B GLOBAL ETHICS AND CONTEMPORARY SOCIETY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
HIS141 ENCOUNTERING HISTORIES: THE FUTURE OF THE PAST Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
HIS142 THE HISTORY OF URBAN SPACE AND EVOLUTION OF CITY FORMS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
MED142 UNDERSTANDING THE LANGUAGE OF CINEMA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
MED143 DEMOCRACY AND MEDIA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
POL143 DEMOCRACY AND ETHICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY141 ADVERTISEMENT PSYCHOLOGY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY157 SCIENCE OF WELLBEING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
2 Semester - 2023 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBA101-2 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
BBA102-2 MARKETING MANAGEMENT Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
BBA191-2 SOCIAL CONCERN PROJECT Skill Enhancement Courses 2 1 50
BBAT103-2 INDIAN TOURISM PRODUCTS AND RESOURCES Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
BBAT161-2 WORKING WITH SPREADSHEET Skill Enhancement Courses 2 2 50
ECO143 DEMOCRACY AND ECONOMY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
ECO144 DESIGNING POLICIES FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
ENG185-2 THOUGHT AND WRITING Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses 2 2 50
EST141 READING THE CITY: BANGALORE HISTORIES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
EST142 READING THE CYBERSPACE: THE PUBLIC AND THE PRIVATE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
HIS142 RELIGION: PHILOSOPHY AND POLITICS THROUGH AGES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
MED141 INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
POL141 POLITICS IN INDIA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY142 APPRECIATING AESTHETICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY146 HUMAN ENGINEERING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
    

    

Introduction to Program:

The Bachelor of Business Administration (Tourism and Travel Management), an undergraduate degree specialized in travel, tourism and hospitality industry was started in 2002. This program is an intensive and comprehensive program spread over three years. The dynamic curriculum design of the program prepares students to adapt to the demands and face the challenges of today’s tourism and travel industry. The program also lays strong emphasis on communication, customer relations and service. The program has both theory and skill development part of the syllabus. Teaching includes lectures and other forms of extension such as presentations, discussions, brainstorming, demonstrations and field visits. The program has a strong Institute and Industry Interface through guest talks, seminars, panel discussions etc. 

Programme Outcome/Programme Learning Goals/Programme Learning Outcome:

CO1: Students will be aware of and sensitive to social and ethical issues in the world

CO2: Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of business from a holistic and cross-functional perspective

CO3: Students will be able to communicate in a professional manner

CO4: Students will be able evaluate sustainability practices and standards of tourism sector

Programme Specific Outcome:

PSO1: Social Responsibility and Ethical Sensitivity

PSO2: Functional Knowledge and Application

PSO3: Communication

PSO4: Problem Solving

PSO5: Sustainability Orientation

Programme Educational Objective:

PEO1: To develop the students with professional and academic inputs to adapt to the evolving arenas of the Travel, Tourism and Hospitality industry.

PEO2: To embrace business practices with sustainable tourism orientation to meet tourism business standards.

PEO3: To build an entrepreneurial mindset with multi-functional implications to set up tourism business

PEO4: To equip students with tourism and travel Management skills

Assesment Pattern

        Quiz Sessions

        Assignments

        Field study reports

        Periodic Tests

        Assessment of Class Participation in case studies and discussions

        Any other appropriate method identified by the instructor that would ensure objective assessment of the student performance.

Examination And Assesments

End Semester Exam (ESE)     30%

Mid Semester Exam (CIA-II) 25%

Continuous Internal Assessments (CIA) -40

Attendance     05%

Total    100%

BBA101-1 - MANAGEMENT AND BEHAVIOURAL PROCESS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: The course focus on developing an understanding about managing human behaviour at the workplace for achieving organizational effectiveness. The course has been designed to provide valuable insights into the functions of modern-day managers. It involves tracing the historical evolution of management thoughts, exploring the concepts, principles and behavioural processes of management. The course provides an overview of human behaviours at individual, group and organization level.

Course Objectives: 

•To explain the basic concepts, principles and theories of management

•To examine the broad essential functions of a manager

•To identify the challenges posed by of globalization, diversity and ethics on today’s manager

•To analyse the individual’s personality, learning, attitudes and perceptions and its impact on their work behaviour

•To compare and contrast motivation and leadership styles of managers

•To assess the dynamics of group behaviours and its influence on group effectiveness

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Summaries the essential managerial functions for the organizational effectiveness.

CO2: Identify the impact of challenges posed by of globalization, diversity and ethics on managerial effectiveness.

CO3: Analyse the individual differences and its implications in the organisation.

CO4: Assess factors that motivate individuals at the workplace.

CO5: Evaluate various leadership styles that enhance group effectiveness.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT
 

Definition – nature, process and significance of management – Role of managers – Managerial Skills and Roles - Evolution of Management Thought: Classical Management Approaches, Behavioural Management Approaches, Quantitative Management Approach, Modern Management Approaches - Management as a Science or Art - Management as a profession- Administration and Management- Functions of Management – Functional Areas of Management. Challenges for 21st Century Business Managers.

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
PLANNING AND DECISION MAKING
 

Planning - Nature and Importance of Planning- Types of Plans - Levels of Planning - Steps in planning - Making Effective Plans- Objectives and Management By Objective (MBO) –Management By Exception (MBE) - Policy and Strategy-.Organizing - Nature and purpose -Principles of Organization - Types of Organization - Organizational Structure and Design – Line, Staff and functional authority – responsibility and Accountability - Principles of Delegation - Steps - Centralization Vs Decentralization – Factors determining the degree of Decentralization of authority.

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
CONTROLLING
 

Controlling - Concept, Nature and Importance - Essentials of Control - Requirements of an Effective Control System – Behavioural Implications of Control – Techniques of Managerial control.

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISATIONAL BEHAVIOUR
 

Definition of Organizational Behaviour, OB as systematic study, Contribution from other disciplines, OB Model/Framework- Individual, Group and Organisational Level.

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
UNDERSTANDING INDIVIDUAL BEHAVIOUR
 

Personality - Defining and Measuring Personality, Determinants of Personality, The Big Five Personality Model, Learning: Meaning of Learning; Theories of Learning- Classical Conditioning, Operant Conditioning, Cognitive Theory, Social Learning Theory, Principles of Learning; Attitude-Components of Attitude- ABC model, Work Attitudes- Job Satisfaction and Organisational Commitment. Perception: Meaning, Perceptual Process; Common Shortcuts in Judging Others.

 

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
MOTIVATION AND LEADERSHIP
 

Motivation- Basic Motivational Process, Content Model of Motivation- Maslow’s Need Hierarchy, Dual Factor Theory, Achievement Motivation Model, Process Model - Victor Vroom’s Expectancy Model. Leadership and Management, Trait Perspective of Leadership, behavioural Perspective- Ohio State Studies, Managerial Grid; Contemporary Perspective- Transformational, Transactional, Charismatic Leadership, Ethical Leadership, Shared Leadership.

 

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:6
GROUP DYNAMICS
 

Define Group, Types Groups, Functions of Group, Tuckman’s Model of Group Development, Group Cohesiveness, Sources of Group Cohesiveness, Common Threat to Group Effectiveness- Groupthink, Group Shift, Social Loafing.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

● Stephen P. Robbins, Timothy A. Judge and Neharika Vohra (2018), 18th Ed. Organizational Behaviour. Pearson Education Asia.

● Stoner, Freeman, Gilbert Jr. (2014). Management (6th edition), New Delhi: Prentice Hall India.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

● Aswathappa, K. (2016). Organizational Behaviour (Text, Cases and Games), 12th Ed. Bangalore: Himalaya Publication.

● Fred Luthans (2017). Organizational Behaviour: An Evidence - Based Approach, 12th Ed. McGraw Hill Education.

● Gupta, C. B. (2014). A textbook of organizational behaviour: With text and cases. NewDelhi: S Chand & Company.

● Daft, R. L. (2009). Principles of Management (1st edition), Cengage Learning.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1          20 Marks

CIA2          25 Marks

CIA3          20 Marks

ESE           30 Marks

Attendance  5 Marks

BBA102-1 - FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course intends to introduce basic accounting principles and practices. It also deals with subsidiary books maintained in business organizations. The students will have knowledge about the fundamental accounting processes such as journalizing, ledger posting, preparation of trial balance and final accounts in sole trading business. It also deals with providing an overview of accounting standards and IFRS. This course will be useful for all those who are desirous of having an understanding and application of financial dynamics of the business and become successful financial managers/entrepreneurs.

Course Objective:

      To provide an understanding of application of various principles and practice of Accounting.

      To demonstrate the knowledge on the process of accounting cycle and basic steps involved in Accounting.

      To extend the knowledge of systematic maintenance of books of accounts to real life business.

      To interpret Annual Financial statements of Sole proprietorship form of business.

  • To outline the need for Accounting standards and IFRS.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Identifies the application of various principles and practice of Accounting in preparation of accounting statements.

CO2: Demonstrate the knowledge on the process of accounting cycle.

CO3: Extend the knowledge of systematic maintenance of books of accounts to real life business.

CO4: Interpret Annual Financial statements of Sole proprietorship form of business.

CO5: Outline the need for Accounting standards and IFRS

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to Accounting
 

Level of Knowledge: Conceptual

 

Meaning, Need for accounting, Internal and External users of accounting information, limitations of accounting, accounting Concepts and Conventions, Accounting Practices, Generally Accepted Accounting Principles.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Accounting systems & process
 

Level of Knowledge: Analytical

 

Nature of Accounting, Accounting equation - Systems of Accounting, Process of Accounting transactions- types of Accounts, Rules of Accounting. Journal - Meaning, features, simple and compound entries, Including recording of GST transactions, Capital and revenue expenditures, Capital and revenue receipts, Contingent assets and contingent liabilities, Preparation of ledgers and Trial balance.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Subsidiary books
 

Level of Knowledge: Analytical

 

Conceptual introduction to subsidiary books - Sales book, Sales return book, Purchases book, Purchase returns book, receivable book, payable book. Practical problems in Cash Book- Single column, double column, and three columnar cash book.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Bank reconciliation statement
 

Level of KnowledgeAnalytical

 

Need for reconciliation and preparation of bank reconciliation statements.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
Rectification of Errors
 

Level of Knowledge:  Analytical

 

Need for rectification of errors, types of errors, process of rectification and accounting entries of rectification.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:12
Final Accounts
 

Level of Knowledge: Analytical

 

Preparation of Trading and Profit and Loss account and Balance Sheet of sole trading concerns.

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:4
Accounting standards and IFRS
 

Level of Knowledge: Conceptual

 

Types of Accounting standards Need for IFRS, Ind AS and IFRS.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Jain S.P., & Narang K L. (2020). Basic Financial Accounting I, New Delhi, Kalyani publishers.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Maheshwari, S.N., Maheshwari, S.K. (2020). Advanced Accountancy1, New Delhi: Jain Book Agency.
  2. Shukla, M. (2020). Advanced Accounts, New Delhi, S Chand Group
  3. Radhaswamy, M & Gupta, R.L. (2020). Advanced Accountancy 2, New Delhi, Sultan Chand & Sons.
  4. Reddy, A. (2020). Fundamentals of Accounting, New Delhi, Himalaya Publishing House
  5. Gupta, A. (2020). Financial Accounting for Management: An Analytical Perspective, Noida, Pearson Education.
  6. Raman, B. S. (2014). Financial Accounting (1stedi). I& II, New Delhi: United Publishers.
  7. Porter, G.A., & Norton, C.L. (2013). Financial Accounting (IFRS update) (6th edi), Cengage Learning.
  8. Jawahar Lal & Seema Srivastava (2013). Financial Accounting New Delhi: Himalaya Publishing House.
Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1: 20 Marks

CIA 2: 25 Marks

CIA 3: 20 Marks

Attendance: 5 Marks

ESE: 30 Marks

Total: 100 marks

BBAT103-1 - TOURISM BUSINESS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course introduces the important concepts and terminologies of tourism and their usage. It explains the emerging trends and changing scenario of tourism industry. It also elucidates the impacts and motivations of travel and tourism.

 

Course Objectives: 

To provide a basic understanding on principles involved in managing tourism business and challenges involved in tourism business management

To explain different motivation of tourists

To identify tourism and its supply components

To analyze the demand for tourism

To evaluate various impacts of tourism

To adapt business practices with regard to emerging trends and issues in tourism.

Course Outcome

CO1: Explain the principles involved in managing tourism business

CO2: Explain different travel motivation theories

CO3: Identify tourism and its supply components

CO4: Analyze the demand for tourism

CO5: Evaluate Socio-cultural economic and environmental impacts of tourism

CO6: Adapt business practices with regard to emerging trends and issues in tourism

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:4
Introduction to Tourism Business
 

Definition, Origin and growth of tourism; Characteristics of Tourism, Interrelationships and classifications Tourism System;–Tourism Deterrents War, Political and Civil Unrest, Inadequate Facilities, Non-Accessibility, International and national growth; Introduction, Tourism Business, Key Principles in Managing the Tourism Business, Need for Management in Tourism Business; What Tourism Managers manage, Marketing as a Management Function, Challenges in Tourism Business Management; Forces affecting the Tourism Industry, Tourism as a Global Phenomenon

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:4
Travel Motivations
 

Why do people travel? Studies on travel motivations Gray’s interpretations, Lundberg’s View; Educational and cultural motives, relaxation and pleasure, ethnic and others, MacIntosh Categorization, Robinson’s Classifications; relaxation and refreshment of body and mind, health, pleasure, curiosity and culture, Interpersonal reasons, spiritual purpose, Professional or Business reasons, Maslow’s Hierarchy of needs model and travel motivations, Plog’s psychographics classification of tourists and travel motivations;  Alo centric motivation, Near-Alo centric Motivations, Mid centric Motivations, Near- Psycho centric and Psycho centric Motivations, Travel Motivations as related to Demographics, Typologies of tourists, Distinction between travellers, visitor, tourists, excursionists and transit visitor History of Tourism, Famous Travelers Responsible tourism behaviour and sustainable citizenship, Motivations to adapt sustainable practices.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:4
Tourism Infrastructure
 

Air Transport; Domestic and International Airlines, Civil Aviation in India, Scheduled & Charter Airlines, Low Cost Carriers; IATA, ICAO, Airports Authority of India, Regulations in the Airlines Industry, Common Terminologies used in Air Travel; Rail Transport; Indian Railways, Railway zones, Tourist Trains, Indrail Pass, Road Transport; National and State Highways; Water Transport; Coastal Cruises and Inland water ways; Accommodation Primary Forms – Hotels, Definition, Types, Meal Plans, Rooms & Beds, FHRAI; Travel Formalities – Passports, VISA, Health regulations for International Travel – Customs Regulations – Taxes paid by Travellers – Travel Insurances; Travel Agents and Tour Operators: History, Definition, types, function; type of tours; Importance and role of tourist guides and tour escorts.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:4
Tourism Demand
 

Managing Tourism demand; Definition, Concepts, Demand Schedule, Measuring Demand for Tourism, Demand Determinants and Forecasting - Determinants of Demand for Tourism, Suppress Demand for Tourism, Forecasting Tourism Demand

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:4
Impacts of Tourism
 

Economic- The generation of economic impacts by tourist spending, leakages of expenditure, out of local economy, measurement of economic impact, multiplier concept, types of multiplier, methodological approaches, weakness and limitations of multiplier model, policy implication of multiplier analysis Environmental Impacts- Environmental impact assessment, EIA process, environmental auditing, environmental action programmes Socio- Cultural Impacts- Nature of socio-cultural impact of tourism approaches to the study of socio-cultural impact of tourism, tourism developmental process, psychological basis of tourism development, sociological basis of tourism development, general negative socio- cultural impacts of tourism, specific negative socio-cultural impacts of tourism, general positive socio-cultural impacts associated with tourism, methods of measuring the socio- cultural impacts of tourism

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:4
Tourism Organizations
 

Need for Travel and Tourism Organizations, International Organizations; - National and Regional Organizations, Non-governmental Organizations; International and National Travel and Tourism Associations (Governmental and Associated) involved in governing and promoting Tourism- UNWTO / WTTC / PATA; Ministry of Tourism, Government of India /ITDC/KSTDC .

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:4
Emerging trends in Tourism
 

Changing scenario of the tourism industry- SMERFS- tourists with special needs and differently abled tourist- emerging types of tourism-Tourism distribution system- online travel agents- zero percent commission era- Government initiatives for tourism. The future of tourism: The external environment for tourism; future drivers, social drivers of change, safety, security and risk, climate change, human resources for tourism Future drivers of the tourism system, future tourism product markets

Text Books And Reference Books:

Walker, R., & Harding, K. (2010). Tourism. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Robinson, P., Lück, M., & Smith, S. L. (2013). Tourism. Wallingford, Oxfordshire: CABI.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Tan, E. S., Yeoh, B. S., & Wang, J. (2010). Tourism management and policy: Perspectives from Singapore. Singapore: World Scientific Pub.
  2. Barwick, J., & Barwick, J. (2011). Tourism. Abbotsford, Vic.: Echidna.

Hannam, K., &Ateljevic, I. (2007). Backpacker tourism: Concepts and profiles. Clevedon, UK: Channel View Publications.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation pattern

End Semester Exam (ESE)     30%

Mid Semester Exam (CIA-II) 25%

Continuous Internal Assessments (CIA- I & III)       40%

Attendance     05%

Total    100%

BBAT161-1 - GLOBAL ETIQUETTES IN TOURISM (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course examines the relationship between language use, enormous variety of language experiences, belief systems, and behavioral patterns. On the other hand Etiquette helps smooth the path of our daily activities, whether it's meeting others in our daily interactions talking to someone on the phone, offering condolences properly or understanding how to talk to colleagues at a business conference. Being aware of the beliefs attitudes and etiquettes of individuals will help one to become more tolerant from one individual to the next and from one group to the next.

  • Students will practice critical thoughts in comprehending the notion of culture, its relationship with language
  • To identify etiquettes and the key concepts of cross –cultural Communication.
  • To familiar ways to apply proper courtesy in different situations.
  • To help better understand the change that constantly undergoes in personal and social use.

Course Outcome

CO1: Practice critical thoughts in comprehending the notion of culture, its relationship with language

CO2: Identify etiquettes and the key concepts of cross ?cultural Communication.

CO3: Familiarize ways to apply proper courtesy in different situations.

CO4: Understand the change that constantly undergoes in personal and social use.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Greetings and Courtesy
 

Greeting a person, - the different ways of greeting, saying good bye to another person, Thank You, Excuse me, Introduction to oneself, Yawning, Coughing, Interrupting, Offering help, refusing help, requesting privacy, speaking in a low voice, waiting for help, accepting or declining an invitation, expressing admiration, The key principles of common courtesy, professional manners and the Golden Rule as they are practiced in the workplace environment, Classroom Etiquette and Student Behavior Guidelines, The guidelines for maintaining a civil classroom environment.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Manners and Civility
 

Introduction to adjusting to a new culture, Theories on second language and culture acquisition, communication, National Standards, Culture acquisition through family and Homestays, Distinguish among the three main forms of communication in the workplace: verbal, nonverbal, and virtual. Proper and improper uses of workplace communication, the potential repercussions of poor listening in the workplace, the proper and improper use of technology in the workplace

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Etiquette
 

Why Etiquette Matters, Identify common cultural differences, taboos, and customs that may be practiced in the workplace, Discuss ways to navigate and honor cultural differences in the workplace, Describe how to express an appropriate awareness of international and other customs. The Common Courtesies of Life, Polite Conversation, Telephone Etiquette, Correspondence, Basic Table Manners, Overnight Guests, Wedding Etiquette, Moments of Sorrow, Appropriate Behavior for Children, Gift Giving Guidelines.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Business Etiquette
 

Introduction to Modern Etiquette, The Rules of the Workplace, Meetings and Introductions, Conversation and Listening Skills, Telephone/Cell Phone, Texting, Emailing and Internet Etiquette, Etiquette in Public Places, Employment/Volunteer Etiquette, Dining Etiquette, Social Gathering Etiquette (Guest and Host/Hostess), School Etiquette, Confidence Without Arrogance.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Personal and professional Presentation
 

Restaurant Etiquette, Cellphone Etiquette, Voice Mail Etiquette, Air Travel Etiquette, Cocktail Party Etiquette, Office Gossip Etiquette, Business Dress Etiquette, Email Etiquette, Social Media Etiquette, Job Interview Etiquette, International Etiquette.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Chaney, L. H. (2020). The essential guide to business etiquette. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Foster, D. (2002). The Global Etiquette Guide to Africa and the Middle East: everything you need to know for business and travel success. John Wiley & Sons..

Evaluation Pattern

 

Particulars

Weightage

CIA I

25

CIA II 

25

 

 

Total

50

 

ECO142 - ECONOMICS OF CORRUPTION (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

This course is aimed at undergraduate students to introduce to them the prominent debates in the economics of corruption. The course discusses how corruption acts as a constraint on economic growth using the theoretical constructs in Political Economy. It allows students to delve into the causes and consequences of corruption. In particular, the course will examine how corruption affects the emerging economies. The course will consider some of the seminal papers on the economics of corruption.

Course Objectives

 1. to create an understanding of the economic issues associated with corruption

 2. to enhance the student's understanding of the effect of corruption on growth and development

 3. to provide insights into the effect of corruption on emerging countries 

Course Outcome

CO1: identify the nuances in the way corruption is defined and interpreted in different economies

CO2: investigate some impacts of corruption on emerging economies

CO3: analyse the cause and consequences of corruption and examine some of the policy reforms aimed at tackling corruption

CO4: present complex ideas through written and oral presentation

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit I: Corruption, Poor Governance and Institutional Structure
 

Causes and Consequences of Corruption: What do we know from a cross-section of countries? Democratic Institutions and Corruption: Incentives and Constraints in Politics, Bargaining for Bribes: The Role of Institutions.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit II: Corruption and the Private Sector
 

The Privatization of Rent-Generating Industries and Corruption; Corruption in Private Sector, Why the private sector is likely to lead the next stage in the global fight against corruption.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit III: Tackling Corruption
 

Corruption and Policy Reform; Anti-Corruption Authorities: An Effective Tool to Curb Corruption?  Corruption and Competition: Fair Markets as an Anti-Corruption Device.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Auriol, E., & Straub, S. (2011). Privatization of Rent-generating Industries and Corruption. In S. Rose-Ackerman & T. Søreide, (Eds.). International Handbook on the Economics of Corruption, (Vol. 2). Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Pub.

Burger, E. S., & Holland, M. S. (2006). Why the private sector is likely to lead the next stage in the global fight against corruption. Fordham International Law Journal, 30, 45.

Meschi, P. X. (2009). Government Corruption and Foreign Stakes in International Joint Ventures in Emerging Economies. Asia Pacific Journal of Management, 26(2), 241-261.

Meyer, K. E., Estrin, S., Bhaumik, S. K., & Peng, M. W. (2009). Institutions, Resources, and Entry Strategies in Emerging Economies. Strategic Management Journal, 30(1), 61-80.

Nowakowski, K. (2010). Corruption in the Private Sector. Economics and Law, 6(1), 345-360.

Uhlenbruck, K., Rodriguez, P., Doh, J., & Eden, L. (2006). The Impact of Corruption on Entry Strategy: Evidence from Telecommunication Projects in Emerging Economies. Organization Science, 17(3), 402-414.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Cartier-Bresson, J. (2000). Economics of corruption. Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. The OECD Observer, (220), 25.

Jain, A. K. (2001). Corruption: A Review. Journal of Economic Surveys, 15(1), 71-121.

Jain, A. K. (Ed.). (2012). Economics of Corruption (Vol. 65). Springer Science & Business Media.

Rose-Ackerman, S. (1975). The Economics of Corruption. Journal of Public Economics, 4(2), 187-203.

Evaluation Pattern

 

            MSE/ CIA2

 

ESE

 

Attendance

45 Marks

50 Marks

5 Marks

ENG185-1 - DEVELOPING FLUENCY AND CLARITY IN ENGLISH (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

English is a global language for business. Fluency and clarity are critical skills for business communication. This course is designed for students of Business Studies to build business contexts using the English language. The course introduces students to reading and understanding the significance of Business English. It also teaches the basics of written and oral communication along with the knowledge of English grammar and syntax and their application in day-to-day communicative needs

The course aims to:

Familiarise the students with the importance of intercultural communication to meet global needs.

Develop linguistic and communicative skills for academic advancement and employment opportunities in national and global markets.

Enhance students' skills to be effective communicators in the digitally interconnected world.

Make students understand the significance of professional ethics in business correspondence.

 

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Develop basic language skills to deal with people in business contexts through case-based activities and tasks

CO2: Display advanced business writing skills through the deployment of critical tools in writing i.e., identify objects of study, construct arguments after evaluating the object, and provide a point of view to support the claims made.

CO3: Attain proficiency in business correspondence through formal and business letters

CO4: Engage in active problem-solving activities through the analysis of cases and reflect it through the creation of cases in the domain of business

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
English Language for Business
 

This unit discusses the importance of the English language in the business context. The unit introduces the students to the basics of the language and its communicative function to achieve national and global business goals. Respect for others (human value) in the communicative scenario is one of the concerns of this unit.

1. Language as a means of communication

2. Features of Professional Communication: Accuracy (Vocabulary), Fluency (Speed) and Effectiveness (Non-verbal Communication)

3. Levels of communication: Intrapersonal, Interpersonal, organizational and mass communication

4. Barriers to communication: i) Lisa Davis (1990). Where do We Stand? ii) Robert Levine (1997), Time Talks, with an Accent

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Essentials of Writing Skills
 

This unit will introduce students to the structures of academic writing that will enhance their employability skills in global business scenarios. The unit will enable students to create essays through reading and writing. Students would be specifically trained about the structure of an essay, its components, locating the argument, constructing one, and using sources to substantiate claims and evidence. This unit focuses on written communication to ensure professional ethics in the business context.

A. The Writing Process

1. Assessing the writing situation

2. Exploring and planning

3. Drafting

4. Revising

5. Editing and proofreading

B. Structure of an essay: introduction, body, and conclusion

1. Introduction: Thesis Statement, Argument

2. Body: Claims, Evidence

3. Conclusion: Summary, major deduction, and final statement

4. Referencing in an essay

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Communication Skills in Business
 

This unit will introduce students to business communication skills as a form of writing. Writing for business purposes is one of the required employability skills needed in a global professional setting. Students will learn the importance of inclusive communication to understand the human values of interlocutors in communication.

1. Mechanics of Note-Making: Topicalisation, Schematising, Reduction Devices, Methods of Sequencing

2. Written Documentation: Letter Writing, Memo, Report, Proposal

3. E-mail Communication: Characteristics of the successful E-mail message; Formatting E-mail message; Standard E-mail Practices, E-mail Writing Strategies

4. Case Studies on communication barriers

Text Books And Reference Books:

Anderson, Marilyn, et al. Critical Reasoning, Academic Writing and Presentation Skills. Delhi: Pearson, 2010.

Gardener, Peter. S. New Direction: Reading, Writing and Critical Thinking. Cambridge University Press, 2009.

Mukhopadhyay, Lina et al. Polyskills: A Course in Communication Skills and Life Skills. Foundation, 2012.

Raman, M. and Sangeeta Sharma. Professional Communication. Oxford University Press, 2017.

Rizvi, M. Ashraf. Effective Technical Communication. McGraw Hill Education, 2015.

Sen, Sanghita, et al. Communicative English 1. Cambridge University Press India Pvt Ltd, 2015.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Brieger. N. Teaching Business English Handbook. York Associates Publications, 1997.

McCarter, Sam, Norman Whitby. Writing Skills. Macmillan India, 2009.

Reinders, H, Marilyn L., and Linh Phung. Studying in English: Strategies for Success in Higher Education. Macmillan Education, 2017.

Robert, Barraas. Students Must Write. London: Routledge, 2006.

Evaluation Pattern

Components

CIA I

CIA II: MSE

CIA III

ESE

Attendance

Marks/Percentage

5 Marks

(10%)

10 Marks

(20%)

5 Marks

(10%)

25 Marks

(50%)

5 Marks

(10%)

EST141B - READING TECHNOLOGY IN/AND SCIENCE FICTION (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course aims to provide a basic introduction to understanding discourses of science and technology as represented in select science fiction narratives. The course will help students understand some of the basic questions about the human condition that are raised, debated, and negotiated in and through representative fiction that addresses global and national concerns. Keeping the contemporaneity of issues today, the course will also emphasize how there is a crucial intersection of various ideas that cut across several disciplines with regard to technology and life, thereby making it crucially relevant to engage with it in the contemporary context. Anyone interested in questions of science, fiction, and the human condition and the cross-cutting issues of gender, environment, technology, ethics, sustainability, etc may choose this course. The course will help develop theoretical knowledge about the genre, critical reading skills, and creative writing skills through class engagements and assignments.

 

Objectives:

• To introduce students to the field of science fiction

• Help students identify and raise questions through these works of fiction some relevant questions in the contemporary context

• To direct students towards realising the intersection of various issues raised across different disciplines.

Course Outcome

CO1: Recognize the concepts and debates raised in the genre and engage with the form critically.

CO2: Reflect on the implications of science fiction in contemporary times and illustrate it in their writings. CO3. Appraise the many representations of the human and nonhuman in science fiction and the concerns it makes evident.

CO3: Develop an interdisciplinary perspective towards analyzing science fiction.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Science Fiction Narratives
 

This unit will provide students with a basic overview of science fiction through some critical and conceptual lenses that are commonly identified across SF narratives globally. The New Critical Idiom Series: Science Fiction, would be used here to introduce aspects of SF that touch upon human values and concerns such as gender, environment, ethics, technology, etc. Locating the interdisciplinarity of the domain would be central to this module and will build theoretical knowledge and critical reading skills.

1. History of Science Fiction

2. Common Terminologies

3. Critical Concerns about Technology for Humanity

 

Essential readings:

1. Hollinger, Veronica. “Contemporary Trends in Science Fiction.” Science Fiction Studies. No. 78, Vol. 26, 1999.

2. Mendlesohn, Farah, and Edward James. The Cambridge companion to science fiction. Cambridge University Press, 2003.

3. Nicholls, Peter, and John Clute. "New Encyclopaedia of Science Fiction." (1999).

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
SF and technology
 

This unit will engage with how technology becomes a crucial part of negotiating contemporary existence as represented through SF. What are the fundamental concerns that Sf raises regarding technology and the human condition? How does technology come to be framed within SF? How are gender and sexuality framed within the discourses of SF? How SF addresses the anxieties of technology and the future would be some of the questions engaged with here. Critical reading skills and creative writing exercises will enable students to develop creative and critical skills.

1. The Matrix

2. Select Episodes of the series Stranger Things

3. Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid’s Tale

4. Any episode of Black Mirror

 

Essential readings:

● Ryder, W., Harbour, D. and Modine, M., 2016. Stranger Things | Netflix. [online] Netflix.com. Available at: <https://www.netflix.com/watch/80077368?trackId=200257859> [Accessed 8 November 2016].

● Wachowski, Andy, et al. Matrix. Burbank, CA: Warner Home Video, 1999.

● Atwood, Margaret. The Handmaid's Tale. New York: Everyday Library, 2006.

● “Hated in the Nation.” Black Mirror, season 3, episode 6, 21 Oct. 2016. Netflix.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Indian Science Fiction
 

This unit will engage with science fiction in the Indian context. One of the main points of

discussion would be to understand how SF writers from India have engaged with tropes of SF that we are

familiar with and what kind of an ‘India’ is imagined thereof which has implications socially, politically,

 

21

 and culturally. The unit enables critical insights into the concerns around human and non-human and the intersectionalities of it in the Indian context.

1. Vandana Singh “Delhi”

2. Manjula Padmanabhan, “Harvest”

3. Cargo

 

Essential readings:

1. Padmanabhan, Manjula. Harvest. Hachette UK, 2017.

2. Singh, Vandana. “Delhi.” Lightspeed, June, 2016, Delhi - Lightspeed Magazine. Accessed on 4 March 2023.

3. Kadav, Arati. Cargo. Mumbai: Fundamental Pictures, 2019. Netflix

Text Books And Reference Books:

Hollinger, Veronica. “Contemporary Trends in Science Fiction.” Science Fiction Studies. No. 78, Vol. 26, 1999.

2. Mendlesohn, Farah, and Edward James. The Cambridge companion to science fiction. Cambridge University Press, 2003.

3. Nicholls, Peter, and John Clute. "New Encyclopaedia of Science Fiction." (1999).

4. Ryder, W., Harbour, D. and Modine, M., 2016. Stranger Things | Netflix. [online] Netflix.com. Available at: <https://www.netflix.com/watch/80077368?trackId=200257859> [Accessed 8 November 2016].

5 Wachowski, Andy, et al. Matrix. Burbank, CA: Warner Home Video, 1999.

6 Atwood, Margaret. The Handmaid's Tale. New York: Everyday Library, 2006.

7 “Hated in the Nation.” Black Mirror, season 3, episode 6, 21 Oct. 2016. Netflix.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Malak, Amin. "Margaret Atwood’s “The Handmaid Tale” and the Dystopian Tradition." Canadian Literature 112 (1987): 9-16.

Howell, Amanda. "Breaking silence, bearing witness, and voicing defiance: the resistant female voice in the transmedia storyworld of The Handmaid’s Tale." Continuum 33.2 (2019): 216-229.

Barnett, P. Chad. "Reviving cyberpunk:(Re) constructing the subject and mapping cyberspace in the Wachowski Brother's film The Matrix." Extrapolation (pre-2012) 41.4 (2000): 359.

Wetmore Jr, Kevin J., ed. Uncovering Stranger Things: Essays on eighties nostalgia, cynicism and innocence in the series. McFarland, 2018.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 30 marks 

MSE 30 MARKS 

ESE 35 MARKS 

ATTENDANCE 5 MARKS 

EST142B - GLOBAL ETHICS AND CONTEMPORARY SOCIETY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course will introduce students to the major theoretical and applied debates

as well as major moral puzzles and challenges in the field of global ethics.

Ethics is gaining ground as an important humanities intervention in a

fast-changing world. A course on ethics is often an added advantage for students

as it helps them shape a socially-aware perspective of the social reality and

develop ethical skills and foster employability.. Drawing on interdisciplinary

perspectives and thematic issues in the fields of international politics, business,

communications and law, the course will challenge students to reflect on major

ethical theories and traditions as well as core problems such as corporate

governance, global distributive

justice, the ethics of making and sustaining peace, media ethics and legal

dimensions of ethics. By combining the works of both classic and contemporary

philosophers with contemporary applied global issues, students will be able to

critically reflect on fundamental normative questions from an interdisciplinary

perspective and reflect on the rights, responsibilities and challenges of ‘good

global citizenship’. Through this, student reflect on cross cutting issues of

human values, gender, sustainability and professional development.

Course Outcome

CO1: The general ability to critically compare, contrast and synthesise major theories and concepts and to apply them in a creative manner to conceptual debates and real-life ethical challenges; critically reflect on fundamental normative questions from an interdisciplinary perspective and reflect on the rights, responsibilities and challenges of ?good global citizenship?.

CO2: Analyse various ethical dilemmas present in the society and efficiently present it in the form of classroom debates and discussions.

CO3: Demonstrate a clear understanding of various schools of thoughts in the domain of ethics through their assignments.

CO4: Appraise their views on various aspects of ethics and present it with clarity through multiple engagements in the classroom.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction
 

This unit introduces students to the conceptual frameworks of integrity and ethics in local and

global contexts. IT exposes students to ethical dilemmas and provides conceptual clarity on nuances of

integrity, human values and ethical decision making. It develops ethical skills in order to enable better

professional behaviour and employability.

1. Global Ethics: Conceptual Definitions,

2. Historical Origins & Present Challenges

3. Introduction to the Ethics, Morals and Values

4. Cultural Relativism vs Universalism (case study)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Ethical Theories
 

This unit introduces students to various ethical theories, under the two categories of rationalist

ethical theories and the more recent alternatives. It enables students to apply these global and national

theoretical concepts to local and personal situations. By this application process, students reflect on cross

cutting issues of human values, gender, sustainability and professionalism and develop ethical thinking

skills that fosters employability. (Include LRNG, Employability, and Cross-cutting issues):

1. Rationalist Ethical Theories

2. Contractualist ethics

3. Deontological Ethics

4. Utilitarian Ethics

5. Discourse ethics,

6. Alternatives to Ethical Rationalism

7. Virtue Ethics

8. Feminist & Care Ethics

9. Postmodernist Ethics

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Applying Ethical Theories
 

This unit is based on some relevant contemporary applications of ethical theories learnt in the

previous unit. The unit sees the practical application of ethics in local, regional, national and global fields of

business, journalism, digital media and technology. It develops ethical skills in order to enable better

professional behaviour and employability.

1. Global Business Ethics and Arms Trade: The Ethics of Capitalism (Film Inside Job)

2. Global Journalism Ethics, Citizen Journalism

3. Digital Media Ethics and Whistleblowing Practices: Snowden and Whistleblowing

4. Ethical Implications of Emerging Technologies (Film The Social Network)

5. Genetics, stem cell and embryo research: Embryo research and women’s rights

Text Books And Reference Books:

Hutchings, K. (2010) Global Ethics. An Introduction, Polity: Cambridge

Ferguson, C. (2010). Inside Job. Sony Pictures Classics

Fincher, David. (2010) The Social Network. Columbia Pictures

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Copp, D. (ed.) The Oxford Handbook of Ethical Theory, Oxford: OUP.

Graham, G. (2008) Ethics and International Relations, 2nd Edition. Malden, MA: Blackwell.

LaFollette, H. (ed.) (2003) The Oxford Handbook of Ethical Practice, Oxford: OUP

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 30 MARKS

MSE 30 MARKS

ESE 35 MARKS

ATTENDANCE 5 MARKS 

HIS141 - ENCOUNTERING HISTORIES: THE FUTURE OF THE PAST (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The influence and presence of the past is felt everywhere and every day in our lives. Movies, newspapers or the internet

bombard us and expose us to the past – both familiar and unfamiliar. However, the barrage of information and the forces

of globalisation have led to increasing questions on the relevance and the value of the past – indeed a denial even. This

course will engage the students with the myriad ways in which the past, though no longer present – is a presence in our

lives today. It will introduce the students to think historically, relate to their memories of their own past and make them

aware of the multiple perspectives which will enable them to read, write and reflect on the past; or in other words, make

history.

This course will introduce students to the methodological and theoretical questions that animate and inform the practice

of history. How do professional historians work? What is their goal? How do they locate and analyze source materials?

What kinds of arguments do historians try to make? How, ultimately, is history produced? This course will ask how (or

whether) historians’ particular sources – and their location in the archives – can give voice to the ordinary and of things

‘past’. Moreover, the course will address how the advent of the information age impact upon the historians’ profession by

exploring how modern technology – whether film, photography, or the internet – changed the way historians work and

address their audience.

Course Outcome

CO1: Discover how and why historians debate issues of evidence and interpretation and learn to distinguish between various schools or styles of academic history.

CO2: Critically engage with representations of the past in the present to enable them to analyze and use evidence in interrogating historical accounts.

CO3: Critically reflect and engage with the interface between the past and the present, fostering a healthy appreciation for history and its imprint on our world.

CO4: Apply how historical narratives are shaped by states, organizations, and individuals.

CO5: Analyze the interaction between history and politics when following the news and in examining historical cases.

CO6: Apply how issues of identity and memory factor into our historical understandings and how this can condition present day policies and decision-making.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
The Many Pasts (Global, National, Regional, local)
 

Level of Learning: Theory/Basic

a) Doing History - The Place of the Past.

b) Facts, Fiction and Lies: Interrogating evidence - paintings, films, novels.

Level of Learning: Practical/Application

c) Facts, Fiction and Lies: Interrogating evidence - paintings, films, novels-Students will take any work of Historical

fiction, Historical Films as case studies and analyse the element of fact and fiction

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
The Use and Abuse of History (Global, National)
 

Level of Learning: Theory/Conceptual/Interpretative

a) Voice and the Subject: Narratives and Counter-narratives – Winston Churchill, Velupillai Prabhakaran, Pirates of the

Caribbean, Tom and Jerry

b) Locating the Popular: Historical Fiction or Fictionalised History – Exploring the Fantasy Worlds of Ice Age, Hogwarts,

Narnia, Westeros and Middle-earth.

c) The Past Today: The Ayodhya Debate and the Ram Janmabhoomi issue, Dwarka, Kapilavastu.

d) Historical Monuments and their Authorship/Ownership: The Temple Mount and Taj Mahal.

Level of Learning: Practical/Application

e) Voice and the Subject: Narratives and Counter-narratives – Winston Churchill, Velupillai Prabhakaran, Pirates of

the Caribbean, Tom and Jerry

f) Locating the Popular: Historical Fiction or Fictionalised History – Exploring the Fantasy Worlds of Ice Age,

Hogwarts, Narnia, Westeros and Middle-earth.

Screening of Documentaries, Speeches and Films followed by Student led panel discussion

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Locating Sources: The Historian?s Voice (Global, National)
 

Level of Learning: Analytical

a) History and the Visual: Photography, Film and the Image – Gladiator, Schindler’s List, 300, Gone with the Wind,

Jodha Akbar and Mohenjo Daro

b) Historical Re-enactments? Light and Sound Shows at Golconda, Red Fort and Khajuraho.

c) Alternate Histories: Oral Histories, Sports Histories, Graphic Novels, Caricatures and Political Cartoons.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Memory, Commemoration, and Silence (Global, National)
 

Level of Learning: Theory/Conceptual/Interpretative

a) Memory and History: Power and the Production of History – Museums and Memorials.

b) ‘Truth’ and ‘myth’: History as Conspiracy – Insider and Outsider Perspectives – the Aryan Debate, Hindutva

Ideology and Neo-Nazis.

c) Private Lives and Public Affairs: The British Monarchy, the Nehru-Edwina Affair.

d) Suppressing the Text: State Secrets and Declassification – Wikileaks and the Netaji Files.

Level of Learning: Practical/Application

e) Private Lives and Public Affairs: The British Monarchy, the Nehru-Edwina Affair.

f) Suppressing the Text: State Secrets and Declassification – Wikileaks and the Netaji Files

g) Case study of various Print mediums which have discussed these issues to analyse how media is responsible for

creating various memory narratives.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Davis, Natalie Z. 1981. The Possibilities of the Past, Journal of Interdisciplinary History, Vol. 12, No.2, The New History:

The 1980s and beyond II, pp. 267-275.

● Gaddis, John Lewis. 2002. The Landscape of History: How Historians Map the Past, New York: Oxford Univ Press.

● Gathercole, Peter and David Lowenthal (eds.) 1994. The Politics of the Past, New York: Routledge.

● Hodder, Ian and Scott Hutson. 2003 (Third Edition). Reading the Past, New York: Cambridge Univ. Press.

● Kumar, Ravinder 1989. The Past and the Present: An Indian Dialogue, Daedalus, Vol. 118, No.4, pp. 27-49.

● Thompson, Paul. 2000. The Voice of the Past: Oral History, New York: Oxford Univ Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Banerjee, Sumanta, 2003. Ayodhya: A future bound by the past, Economic and Political Weekly, Vol. 38, No. 27, pp.

2795-2796.

● Buchli, Victor and Gavin Lucas 2001. Archaeologies of the Contemporary Past, Routledge.

● Carr, E.H. 1967. What is History, Vintage.

● Chalcraft, David et.al. 2008. Max Weber Matters: Interweaving Past and Present, Ashgate.

● Chapman, James 2005. Past and Present: National Identity and the British Historical Film, I.B.Tauris.

● Clarke, Katherine 2008. Making Time for the Past: Local History and the Polis, Oxford Univ Press.

● Damm, Charlotte 2005. Archaeology Ethno-History and Oral Traditions: approaches to the indigenous past,

Norwegian Archaeological Review, Vol. 38, No. 2, pp. 73-87.

● Fowler, Don D. 1987. Uses of the past: Archaeology in the service of the state, American Antiquity, Vol. 52, No. 2, pp.

229-248.

● Greene, Naomi 1999. Landscapes of Loss: The Nationalist Past in Postwar French Cinema, Princeton Univ Press.

● Hamilakis et. al. 2001. Art and the Re-presentation of the Past, The Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, Vol. 7,

No. 1, pp. 153-156.

● Muller, Jan-Werner 2004. Memory and Power in Post-War Europe: Studies in the presence of the past, Cambridge Univ.

Press.

● Murray, Williamson and Richard Hart Sinnreich (eds.) 2006. The Past as Prologue: The Importance of History to the

Military Profession, Cambridge Univ Press.

● Piercey, Robert 2009. The Uses of the Past from Heidegger to Rorty: Doing Philosophy Historically, Cambridge Univ. Press.

● Shrimali, K.M. 1998. A Future for the Past? Social Scientist, Vol. 26, No. 9, pp. 26-51.

● Stone, Peter G. and Philippe G. Planel 1999. the Constructed Past, Routledge.

● Walsh, Kevin 1992. The Representation of the Past: Museums and heritage in the post-modern world, Routledge

Evaluation Pattern

 Course Code  HIS141

Course Title Assessment Details :  Encountering Histories: The Place of the Past

 

CIA1 - 20 Marks  Group assignment - Submission paper

MSE CIAII - 25 Marks - Submission paper

 

ESE - 50 Marks - Individual Assignment - Submission paper

 

 

HIS142 - THE HISTORY OF URBAN SPACE AND EVOLUTION OF CITY FORMS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

A focus on urban history offers fertile territory for a variety of topics. The development and inhabitation of cities has been an

important feature in Cartesian and human landscapes for thousands of years. Regardless of time and place, cities have always

brought together people and the products of their labor together in relatively limited spaces. Cities have thus been incubators for

experiments in social organization, policy-making, planning, environmental modification, and economic innovation.

Consequently, cities are dynamic and vital centers, which inform and are shaped by human experience. Studying how cities and

their inhabitants change over time—whether on a long or short horizon or on a global, national, regional, or local scale—offers an

informative framework within which to consider broader historical questions, such as the relationship between people, place,

work, culture, and politics. Studying cities, moreover, offers students a great opportunity to engage in comparative historical

study and to work with a variety of available technologies for studying cities.

Course Objectives:

● To deploy multiple analytical approaches to urban space, its organization, and inhabitation in order to analyze and situation

urban development as a historical process that takes place within a broader historical context

● To illustrate multiple approaches to understanding changes in economic, political, and social formations in cities over time, as

an important element in developing historical knowledge

● To acquaint the students how political development in historical context affected the rise and demise of urban centres

● To acquaint the students how modern notions of urban development emerged and the various trends of the modern urban

development

Course Outcome

CO1: At the end of the course the students will CO 1: Identify and deploy various approaches to comparatively analyzing cities, using critical thinking to analyze urban space and urban life from multiple perspectives

CO2: CO 2: Recognise and engage with the role of cities, suburbs, and urbanization in historical narratives

CO3: CO 3: Demonstrate an ability to negotiate with ideas of immigration, migration, and economic and technological change, and how they have shaped cities through history

CO4: CO 4: Reflect and analyse on the relationship of the built environment of cities with the environments surrounding them.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
What is Urban History?
 

Level of Knowledge: Conceptual

a) What is Urban History? Urbanism as an Interdisciplinary Project- Urbanism and Comparative Method

b) Historiography of Urbanism - Modern Studies of Urbanism: Henri Pirenne and Max Weber- Study of Urbanism in the

USA

c) Urbanism and Modernity

d) Urban Histories and the ‘Cultural Turn’

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Approaches to the Study of Ancient and Medieval Urban Centers
 

Level of Knowledge: Analytical

a) The Harappan Cities-Between the Harappan and the Early Historic: An Absence of Cities? The Early Historic Cities-Early

Historic Cities in Texts-Understanding Early Historic Urbanisation

b) Idea of Medieval Cities of Europe- the spread of urbanism and emergence of town planning- urban revival in western

Europe

c) Perceptions on Medieval Indian Cities-Commercially and Politically Charged Urbanism- Urbanism and Sufi and Bhakti

Spaces-Poliscracy- Portuguese Cities: Polisgarchic-‘City-States Of Medieval India

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Colonial Cities
 

Level of Knowledge: Conceptual

a) Dependent Urbanisation and New Urban Forms in Colonial India-City Planning in India under British Rule-Race, Class

and Ethnicity in the Colonial City

b) Modernity and the City in Colonial India-The City as the Site of Spectacles-The City as the Site of Movements

c) Case Study of Colonial Cities: Calcutta, Bombay, Madras, Delhi

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Approaches to the Study of Ancient and Medieval Urban Centers
 

● Students will create two models of urban layout: Indian and western.

● They will have an exhibition of their model layouts, where they will introduce their peers about the traits and differences

of these two layouts.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:7
Themes on Modern Cities
 

Level of Knowledge: Analytical

a) Space and Urban Theory- Materialities-Knowledge

b) Science, Planning and Expertise- Connections and Flows of modern cities

c) Emerging concepts- Global City, Inclusive City, Livable City, Safe City, Future City – Impact of new town movement on

post-independent Indian city planning -beginning of modern town planning in India

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
Themes on Modern Cities
 

● Students will create posters of these different kind of urban layouts and organize mock classrooms, where they will address the class with their teaching props.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Essential References:

● Adams R. McC., (1966) The Evolution of Urban Society: Early Mesopotamia and PrehispanicMexico (Chicago: Aldine).

● Basant, P. K., (2012) The City and the Country in Early India: A Study of Malwa (Delhi: Primus Books).

● Ballhatchet, Kenneth, (1980) Race, Sex, andClass under theRaj:ImperialAttitudes and Policies and Their Critics, 1793-1905 (

London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1980).

● Chandavarkar, Rajnarayan, (2009) History, Culture and the Indian City (Delhi: Cambridge UniversityPress).

● Bayly, C. A., (1992) Rulers, Townsmen and Bazaars: North Indian Society in the Age of British Expansion, 1770-1870 (Delhi:

Oxford University Press).

● Banga Indu (ed.), (1991) City in Indian History: Urban demography, Society and Politics (Delhi: Manohar).

● Chattopadhyaya,B., (2003) ‘The City in Early India: Perspectives from Texts’, in B. Chattopadhyaya, Studying Early India:

Archaeology, Texts, and Historical Issues (Delhi: Permanent Black), pp. 105-34.

● Edward Soja (2000): Postmetropolis, Critical Studies of cities and Regions, Blackwell Publisher Ltd. 17.

● Fischer, Claude S. 1975 Towards a subcultural theory of urbanism, Reprinted in J.J. Macionis and N. Benokraitis (ed.) 1989

Seeing Ourselves (pp 367-373).

● Frykenberg, R.E., (1986) Delhi Through Ages: Selected Essays in Urban History, Culture and Society (New Delhi: Oxford

University Press)

● G. P. Chapman, A.K. Dutt and R.W. Bradnock (ed.) (1999): Urban growth & Development in Asia, Vol.2: Living in the Cities,

Ashgate Publishing Ltd.

 

● Marshall, P.J., (2000),The White Town ofCalcutta under the Rule of the East India Company‟, Modern Asian Studies, Vol. 34,

No. 2 (May), pp. 307-331.

● Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey. Hayden, Dolores, (1996) The Power of Place: Urban Landscapes as Public

History (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press).

● Pirenne, Henri, (1969) Medieval Cities: Their Origins and the Revival of Trade (Princeton: Princeton University Press).

● Shane, Ewen, (2016) What is Urban History? (Cambridge: Polity Press). Southall, Aidan, (1998) The City in Time and Space

(Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).

● Trigger, B., (1972) ‘Determinants of Urban Growth in Pre-industrial Societies’ in Ucko, Ucko, P.J., Tringham R. and Dimbleby,

G.W. (eds.) Man, Settlement and Urbanism (London: Duckworth Publishers).

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Recommended References:

● Braudel, Fernand, (1989) The Identity of France (London: Fontana Press).

● Blake, Stephen, (1993) Shahjahanabad: The Sovereign City in Mughal India, 1639- 1739 (New Delhi: Cambridge University

Press).

● Braudel, Fernand (1973) Capitalism and Material Life, 1400-1800, tran. by Miriam Kochan (New York: Harper & Row).

● Cohen, R., (1979) ‘State Origins: A Reappraisal’ in Claessen, H.J.M. and Peter Skalnik (eds.) The Early State (Hague: Mouton).

● Champakalakshmi, R., (1996) Trade, Ideology and Urbanisation: South India, 300 BC and 1300 AD (Delhi: Oxford University

Press).

● Finley, M., (1977) ‘The ancient city: from Fustel de Coulanges to Max Weber and Beyond’ Comparative Studies in Society and

History, Vol. 19.

● Jacobsen T, Adams RMcC., (1958) ‘Salt and silt in ancient Mesopotamian agriculture’, Science, Vol. 128, pp. 1251-58. Fried,

Morton, (1967) The Evolution of Political Society (New York: Random House).

● Harvey, David, (1985) The Urbanisation of Capital: Studies in the History and Theory of Capitalist Urbanization (Baltimore:

John Hopkins University Press).

● Heitzman, James, (2008) TheCity in SouthAsia (London and NewYork: Routledge).

● Kenoyer, J. M., (1998) Ancient Cities of the IndusValley Civilization (Karachi: Oxford University Press). Kenoyer, J. M. and K.

Heuston, (2005) The Ancient South Asian World (Oxford: University Press).

● Latham A, et.al. (2009): Key Concepts in Urban Geography, Sage, Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, Singapore, Washington.

● Martindale, D., (1958) ‘The Theory of the City’ in Weber, Max, The City, Translated and edited by Martindale (New York: Don

and Neuwirth, G. Free Press).

 

● Mumford, L., (1961) The City in History (New York: Harcourt, Brace and World). Orans, Martin, (1966) ‘Surplus’, Human

Organization, Vol. 25, pp. 24-32

● Nightingale, CarlH., (2008) „Before Race Mattered: Geographies ofthe Color Line in Early Colonial Madras and New York‟,

The American Historical Review, Vol. 113, No. 1 (February), pp. 48-71

● Peers, Douglas M., (1998) „Privates offParade: Regimenting Sexuality in the NineteenthCentury Indian Empire‟, The

International History Review, Vol. 20, No. 4 (December), pp. 823-854.

● Pieterse E, (2008): City Futures, Confronting the Crisis of Urban Development, Zed Books Ltd, London and New York.

● Steward, J., (1968) ‘Cultural Ecology’ in The International Encyclopedia of The Social Sciences, Vol. 3. Tonkiss, Fran, (2009)

Space, the City and Social Theory (Cambridge: Polity Press).

● Weber, Max, (1958) The City, Translated and edited by Martindale, Don and Neuwirth, G. (New York: Free Press). Wirth,

Louis, (1938) ‘Urbanism as a way of life’ Reprinted in J.J. Macionis and N. Benokraitis (ed.) (1989) Seeing Ourselves

(pp.360-366) (New Jersey: Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs).

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1

It is a group assignment, where each group will submit a project work on any one topic listed below. This helps the

students to develop an understanding of the different schools of history, the practice of doing history and debates

related to the course, and exhibit their analysis of the same.

 

MSE

The exam will be a submission-based paper. This will be an individual assignment. The assignment will have two

components which will be correlated. The aim of the submission paper is to develop critical thinking and analysis

capabilities of the students whereby they will apply the conceptual knowledge about the evolution pattern of

urbanisation to understand modern day social systems. The questions for the submission paper will be given 10 days

prior to the date of submission.

 

CIA III

It is an individual assignment, where each student will submit an essay on any one topic listed. This helps the student

to develop an understanding of the different topics covered related to the course, and exhibit their analysis of the same.

 

ESE

The exam will be a submission-based paper. The onus will be on the original research component. The aim of the exam

is to test how the students can apply and analyse the concepts learnt through the entire course. The exam will examine

the research aptitude, critical analyses of data and justification of the narrative account of the submission paper. The

questions for the submission paper will be given 14 days prior to the date of submission.

MED142 - UNDERSTANDING THE LANGUAGE OF CINEMA (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course would provide students with a thorough knowledge of the conceptual and practical aspects of digital cinematography through engagement with the works of eminent cinematographers from around the world and the equipment.

The course aims to help students to:

  • Appreciate cinematography as a combination of artistic and technological endeavors
  • Understand the basics concepts of cinematography and shot design
  • Harness the power of natural and artificial lighting to compose powerful shots
  • Explore the creative possibilities of cinematography and understand its importance in effective storytelling.

Course Outcome

CO1: Identify and describe the visual elements in cinematography.

CO2: Demonstrate understanding of different tools of cinematography.

CO3: Apply knowledge of cinematography techniques to create films.

CO4: Use cinematography skills to make films on social issues.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to the language of cinema
 

Cinematography as an art; Art of visual storytelling; Evolution of cinematography; Eminent cinematographer’s from world cinema; Cinematography and effective storytelling.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
The Cinematographer?s medium and Tools
 

Light, Camera, Lenses, Basics of Lighting; Various types of light sources and their practical application;Color temperature, Lens Choice, Lens filters, Exposure/F‐Stop/Shutter/ISO; Depth of field Camera operating; Hands-on introduction to camera equipment

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Visualising and Shot Design
 

Composition & Framing; Types of Shots; Shot design for single camera and multi camera productions

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Camera Placement and Movement
 

Camera Placement -how does it affect the meaning; Motivated Camera Movement.

Text Books And Reference Books:

  • Pro, A. P. (2010). Adobe Premiere Pro.
  • Team, A. C. (2012). Adobe Premiere Pro CS6 Classroom in a Book: Adobe Perm Pro CS6 Classro_p1. Adobe Press.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

  • Block, B. (2013). The visual story: Creating the visual structure of film, TV and digital media. CRC Press.
  • Alton, J. (2013). Painting with light. Univ of California Press.
Evaluation Pattern
  • CIA 1: Submissions for 20 marks
  • Mid-Semester Submission: 30 marks
  • CIA 3: Submissions 20 marks
  • End Semester Submission: Submission for 30 marks

MED143 - DEMOCRACY AND MEDIA (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
The course provides an overview of the complex interrelation and interdependence between media and democracy. The normative objective of this course is to
understand and critically evaluate whether the existing forms and structures of media, enable, support and promote a democratic society. It also tries to explore whether new forms of media can empower media's role within democratic societies. The course also provides a deep understanding of complexities that arise in neoliberal democracies and contemporary media systems.
Course Objectives :
  • To equip students with tools for critical consumption of media.
  • To analyze the structural deficiencies preventing the media from performing its democratic functions.
  • To understand media as an Ideological State Apparatus' to 'manufacture consent'.

Course Outcome

CO1: Discuss the significance of the fourth estate in a constitutional democracy.

CO2: Recognize media's critical function of speaking truth to power.

CO3: Identify the threats of increasing corporatization, concentration of ownership, and evolving funding models in the digital economy.

CO4: Critique the undemocratic overrepresentation of social elites in Indian newsrooms.

CO5: Discern the role of mass and social media in manufacturing public opinion and reality.

CO6: Critique various forms of censorship and curbs on press freedom in India.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Theory, Concept, and Definitions
 
  • Definition of Democracy and Democratic theory.
  • Media as the fourth estate.
  • Democratic responsibilities of media.
  • Fundamental rights and the media's role in protecting them. 
  • Media as the voice of the voiceless.
  • Media as the watchdog of democracy.
  • Media as the platform for deliberation (Media as Public Sphere).
  • Media worker as the democratic warrior.
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Media, Democracy and Capitalism
 
  • Contemporary structure of media within capitalism:
  • Advertising funding and its implications on media's democratic functions.
  • Big business and government
  • Media as Big Business.
  • Use of SLAPP on media houses and self-censorship.
  • Media concentration, conglomeration, commercialization and its effect on democracy.

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Democratic Media
 
  • Media reform and democratic media.
  • Media policy and democratic reform.
  • Alternatives to commercial media models: Case studies of BBC, NPR, and Aljazeera.
  • Critical analysis of Doordarshan and Rajya Sabha TV as possible democratic media.
  • Emergence of digital news platforms and their role in democratic communication [The Wire, Quint News Laundry, The News Minute, Scroll].
  • Representation of Caste and minorities in the media.
  • Media trials and the creation of the common enemy.

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Social Media, Alternative Media and Democracy
 
  • Social media as the new public sphere.
  • Social media democratic elections in the current era (Case studies of 2016 US elections and 2019 Indian elections).
  • Alternative media spaces: Exploring community radio, Video Volunteers and Alt News.
  • Critical examination of alternative models of media

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:2
Video Voice for Social Change Manyam Praja Video : A Community Empowerment Initiative
 
  • Participatory Video (PV).
  • Manyam Praja Video.
  • Elements of Participatory Process.
  • Teaching Process. Community Video Producer (CVP). Community Video Unit (CVU).

 

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:2
Media Trial and at the time of Trialling Media: An Indian Perspective
 
  • Media trial. Sensationalism. Some instances of media trial in India.
  • Celebrity power and PR teams. Me Too. Cancel Culture. Ethical Consideration.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:
  • Curran, J. (2011). Media and democracy. Routledge.
  • Chattarji, S., & Ninan, S. (Eds.). (2013). The hoot reader: media practice in twenty-first century India. New Delhi: Oxford
  • Ghosh, S., & Thakurta, P. G. (2016). Sue the Messenger: How Legal Harassment by Corporates is Shackling Reportage and Undermining Democracy in India. Paranjoy Guha Thakurta.
  • Hardy, J. (2014). Critical political economy of the media: An introduction. Routledge.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Herman, E. S., & Chomsky,N. (2010). Manufacturing consent: 1he political economy of the mass media, Random House.
  • McChesney, R. W. (2016). Rich media, poor democracy: Communication politics in dubious times. New Press.
  • Thomas, P. N. (2010). Political Economy of Communications in India: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1st ed.). New Delhi, India: Sage Publication.

Research Articles:

  • Biswal, S. K. (2019). Exploring the role of citizen journalism in rural India. Media Watch, 10, 43-54.
  • Curran, J. (1991). Rethinking the media as a public sphere. Communication and citizenship, 27-57.
  • Khan, U. (2015). Indian media: Crisis in the fourth estate. Kennedy School Review, 15, 70
  • Rao, S., Mudgal, V. (2015). Introduction: Democracy, Journalism and Civic Society in India. Journalism Studies. 16(5), 615-623.
  • Saeed, S. (2015). Phantom journalism governing India's proxy media owners. Journalism Studies, 16(5), 663-679,
  • Thussu, D. K. (2007). TheMurdochization'of news? The case of Star TV in India. Media, Culture & Society, 29(4), 593-611.
Evaluation Pattern

Assessment outline

  • Overall end semester  evaluation for 95 marks
  • Project I: 20 Marks 
  • Project II: 25 Marks
  • Project III: 20 Marks
  • End semester Submission Project IV: 30 Marks. Attendance 5 Marks

 

POL143 - DEMOCRACY AND ETHICS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 The course  is designed to provide a sound working knowledge of policy-making actors and processes within the public sector at national and sub-national levels of government. In addition, the module provides an understanding of the principles of good governance in the public and corporate sectors, and knowledge and skills in the areas of professional values and ethics.

There are a large number of different forms of government, so this module focuses primarily on the actors and structures typically found in democratic states, but reference is made to other approaches where relevant. Even within democracies there is a large amount of variation, with differences such as federal or unitary arrangements, monarchies or republics, prime-ministerial or presidential systems, etc. As far as possible, this variety is reflected in the syllabus and learning materials, but inevitably there a limit to the extent to which all variations can be addressed. Where, for example, the materials focus on approaches applied in the UK, USA or EU in order to provide concrete cases that can be analysed alongside general or theoretical concepts, this is not intended to suggest that these approaches are in any way the ‘norm’. This course is designed to develop student’s capacity to critically analyze the terrain where politics and ethics intersect. It also examines some arguments for and against keeping the practice of politics separate from the sphere of ethics. It explores the problems of “dirty hands” and “many hands” in government, public organizations and public life. It discusses some of the ethical dilemmas confronting public officials and powerful institutions and organizations which have major impact on the life of ordinary citizens in a democratic polity. It offers a reflective and methodological approach to develop moral reasoning and analytical skills to evaluate ethical issues and to guide decision-making in government and public life. The rationale of the study is to make the pupils aware of the importance of democracy. What constitute democracy, what is its

importance from the point of view of the role of individual and what exactly can an individual get if he performs his role well in the society. This module also aims to make the individual understand the different aspects of democracy and its implications in the overall development of the state. The course on “Democracy and Ethics” is to introduce and discuss the moral foundations of democracy in principle, and democratic institutions, in particular. The students are initiated to various types of moral discourses in political philosophy. Further, this course looks at the development of democracy, in the global and national realm. Democracy as an ideal gets fructified in the form of a government, which in turn is based on the principles of justice, freedom, equality, and fraternity. Ethics acts as the premise on which a successful democracy rests. syllabus is introduced from the point of view that all students upon entering into the college, enroll themselves as voters and encourage and enthuse other members of the society to participate not only in election process but also electoral and political process in general.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Discover and analyse the terrain where politics and ethics intersect, based on different theoretical perspectives

CO2: Critically assess the problems of ?dirty hands? and ?many hands? in government and public organizations and evaluate by reflecting on and applying various ethical and political theories of responsibility.

CO3: Discover and critically investigate the ethical dilemmas confronting public officials in discharging their public duties, based on different ethical perspectives

CO4: Acquire and enhance skills in moral reasoning and ethical analysis to guide their personal and professional lives

CO5: Discuss and apply principles and concepts of ethical behaviour

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Foundations of Principle of Moral Philosophy - Justice between Peoples
 

 

 

1.      Nature of ethics and its relevance

2.      How ethics reinforces democratic principles

3.      Common unethical means adopted in democracy: identify and rectify

4.      Difference between Ethics, Morals and Values

 

5.      Human Rights,

 

6.       Distributive Justice,

 

7.      Decision-theoretic Consequentialism, Deontology

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:11
Political Responsibility: The Problem of Dirty Hands and Many Hands
 

                                    

1.      Platonic Concept of Virtue


2.      Aristotle’s Account of Rational Agents, Choice, Deliberation and Action


3.      Practice of Virtue and Attainment of Happiness


4.      Kant: Good Will as source of moral action


5.      Duty Ethics


6.      Sources of Utilitarianism in John Stuart Mill and Jeremy Bentham


7.      Utility as the Moral criterion

8.       Liberalism, ‘“Precommitment” and “Post commitment”

9.      Hindu Tradition: Dharma and Karma, Purusharthas

10.  Buddhist Tradition: Four Noble Truths and Eight- fold Path

11.   Indian Principles in Ethical Context: Saravana, Manana and Nidhidhyasana

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Democracy
 

1.      Principles of Democracy: Freedom, Equality and Fraternity,

2.      Government by Consent


3.      Constitutional Government and Rule of Law

4.      Democracy and Human Rights society

 

5.      Instrumentalist Conceptions of Democratic Authority

 

6.      Democratic Consent Theories of Authority

 

7.      Limits to the Authority of Democracy

 

8.      Leadership: Servant, Participative, Consensus, leaderships in Democracy

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Indian Democracy and Path to Enlightened Democracy
 

1.      History and Democratic Heritage, Freedom Struggle,


2.      The Indian Constitution: Preamble and other constitutional values


3.      Ethical Code of Conduct for Politicians


4.      Citizenship, Fundamental Rights and Fundamental Duties of Indian Citizens

 

5.      Character record of members of legislature

 

6.      Ethical use of majority in parliament

 

7.      Avoidance of ‘floor crossing’ and defection

 

8.      Respecting independence of judiciary and media

 

9.      Safeguarding national history and avoiding distortion

 

10.  Ensuring political neutrality of Universities and their syllabi

 

Judicious allocation of central funds to states Free and fair elections

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      Aristotle, (1955). Nichomachean Ethics, trans. J. A. K. Thomson, Baltimore, Maryland: Penguin Books.


2.      Christiano, T. (Ed.). (2002). Philosophy and Democracy, Oxford: Oxford University Press.


3.      Cortella, L. (2015). The Ethics of Democracy: A Contemporary Reading of Hegel's Philosophy of Right, Giacomo Donis (tr.), New York: SUNY Press.


4.      Dewey, J. (1993). Philosophy and Democracy [1919] and The Ethics of Democracy [1888] in The Political Writings, ed. D. Morris, I. Shapiro, Indianapolis: Hackett, 1993.


5.      Finnis, J. (1983). Fundamentals of Ethics. Oxford: Clarendon Press.


6.      Gandhi, M. K. (1927). An Autobiography or The Story of My Experiments with Truth. Ahemadabad: Navajivan Mudranalaya.


Granville, A. (2000). The Indian Constitution: Cornerstone of a Nation. New Delhi: Oxford University Press

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.      Jain, S. (2000). The Constitution of India: Select Issues and Perceptions. New Delhi: Taxmann.


2.      Locke, J. (Ed.). (1980). Second Treatise on Civil Government, (1690), C. B. MacPherson, Indianapolis, IN: Hackett.


3.      Kant, I. (1959). Foundations of the Metaphysics of Morals. trans. Lewis White Beck, Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merril.


4.      KANT, Immanuel, Critique of Practical Reason, translated by Lewis White Beck, Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merril, 1956.


5.      MACHIAVELLI, The Prince [1513], ed. Q. Skinner, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1988.


6.      PLATO, The Republic, revised/trans. by Desmond Lee, Harmondsworth, UK: Penguin Books, 1974.


7.      RAWLS, John, Political Liberalism, New York: Columbia University Press, 1996.


8.      SANDEL, Michael (ed.), Justice-A Reader, Oxford University Press, 2007.


9.      SINGER, Peter, Democracy and Disobedience, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1973.


10.  WALZER, Michael, "Philosophy and Democracy", Political Theory, Vol.9, No.3, 1981, 379-399.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1   25

CIA 2   25

CIA 3   45

PSY141 - ADVERTISEMENT PSYCHOLOGY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course will develop an understanding of how advertising affects the human mind by giving unique and valuable insight from the industry. The course will help in studying the relationship between advertising and human mind and also apply this learning to advertising strategy, positioning, brand, and marketing communications that prepare students for the competitive world of advertising and marketing.

Course objectives

This course aims to

  • Introduce psychological perspectives of advertisements in real life situations. 
  • Orient students towards the various functions and roles of cognitive, affective and behavioral responses in the field of advertisement.
  • Help students to identify and apply the various theories and principles of advertisement psychology in the field of marketing.

Course Outcome

CO1: Apply the psychological perspectives of advertisements in the real-life setting.

CO2: Integrate different domains such as cognitive, affective and behavioral responses in the field of advertisement.

CO3: Develop the ability to make applications based on understanding of marketing strategies.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit I: Introduction to advertisement psychology
 

 

Introduction to advertisements; Its objectives and importance; Types and forms of advertising; Effects of advertisements a psychological perspective; Classic and contemporary approaches of classifying advertisement effectiveness.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Unit II: Cognitive processing of advertisements
 

Influence of advertisements on buying behaviors; Dynamics of Attention,Comprehension,Reasoning for advertisements; Attitudes and attitude changes with the influence of advertisements;Principles of persuasion and attitude change; Achieving advertisement compliance without changing attitude.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Unit III: International Advertising and Creating Brand
 

Emergence of International Advertising; Advertising in Multicultural Environment; Ethics in Advertising; Integrated marketing communication and marketing mix.

Text Books And Reference Books:

 Fennis,B.M.,&Stroebe,W.(2015).ThePsychologyofAdvertising.NewYork:PsychologyPress.

Andrew,A.Mitchell.(1993).AdvertisingExposure,MemoryandChoice.LawrenceErlbaumAssociates.Hillsdale,NJ.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

Linda,F.Alwitt & Andrew,A.Mitchell (1985).PsychologicalProcessesandAdvertising Effects:Theory,Research,andApplications. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Hillsdale, NJ. London.

Rolloph,M.E.&Miller,G.R.(Eds)(1980).Persuasion:NewDirectionsinTheoryandResearch.Sage.N.Y.

Eddie.M.Clark,Timothy.C.Brock,&DavidW.Stewart.(1994).Attention,AttitudeandAffectinResponsetoAdvertising.LawrenceErlbaumAssociates.Hillsdale,NJ.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I

CIA II

CIA III

25

35

35

PSY157 - SCIENCE OF WELLBEING (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This multidisciplinary course will focus on those aspects that help individuals thrive. The course sheds its light on well-being and its components and also clears all the misconceptions revolving around it. The students will be exposed to certain theories, concepts and practice procedures of well-being and its components. This programme will help the students to reflect on their life experiences on these dimensions and to know how to improve them and flourish in their life. 

Course Outcome

CO1: Explain the concept of well-being and its components

CO2: Analyze the role of happiness and emotions in enhancing well-being using relevant theories

CO3: Apply various concepts of well-being on the life experiences of students

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Well-being
 

Well-being - components of well-being: subjective happiness and life satisfaction

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Well-being - components of well-being
 

subjective happiness and life satisfaction

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Happiness & Emotion
 

Happiness - Definition, Significance Misconceptions, types and interventions  Emotion - types, emotion regulation

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Happiness
 

Definition, Significance Misconceptions, types and interventions Emotion - types, emotion regulation

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Mindfulness- components
 

Mindfulness- components: gratitude, forgiveness, kindness-compassion

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:25
Mindfulness components
 

Gratitude, forgiveness, kindness-compassion

Text Books And Reference Books:

·       Carr, A. (2004). Positive Psychology. New York: Routldge.

·       Hupper, F. A., Baylis, N., & Keverne, B. (2005). The science of well-being. Oxford Scholarship.

·       Hupper, F. A., Baylis, N., & Keverne, B. (2005). The science of well-being. Oxford Scholarship.

·       Ivtzan, I. & Lomas, T.(Ed.) (2016) Mindfulness in Positive Psychology. New York: Routldge.

·       Kabat-Zinn, J. (2012). Mindfulness for beginners: reclaiming the present moment—and your life. Boulder, CO, Sounds True.

·       Linley, P. A., & Joseph, S. (Eds.). (2004). Positive psychology in practice. John Wiley & Sons, Inc.. https://doi.org/10.10 02/9780470939338

 

·       Maddux, J. E. (2018). Subjective Wellbeing and Life Satisfaction. New York: Routldge.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

.

Evaluation Pattern

 

 

CIA1

CIA2

CIA3

Class attendance & Participation

20 marks

20 marks

50 marks

10

BBA101-2 - FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Financial Management is an introductory core course that is offered with intent to equip the students with the basic knowledge of finance theory and its application to develop relevant financial strategies pertinent to profit-seeking organizations. The theme of financial management is structured around three decision making financial areas: Investment- long term as well as working capital, Financing and Dividend policy. This imbibes students with analytical and decision-making skills in managing finance through application of theoretical questions and practical problems.

 

Course Objectives: 

      To understand the basics of finance function and the concepts of financial management

      To apply the knowledge in taking finance decisions

      To develop analytical skills to identify financial management problems and solve them.

      To analyse the relationship among capital structure, cost of capital, dividend decisions, and value of the business.

To assess a firm’s requirement for long-term assets by applying capital budgeting techniques

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate understanding of the principles and concepts of financial management

CO2: Summarize the motives behind financial decision making

CO3: Interpret the relevant theories and concepts of various practices of financial management and ethics in Finance.

CO4: Analyze the relationship among capital structure, cost of capital, dividend decisions, and value of the business.

CO5: Evaluate projects for profitability

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to Financial Management
 

Meaning of finance and financial management, Types of finance, Scope of financial management, Approaches to finance function relationship of finance with other business functions, Objectives of financial management – profit maximization and wealth maximization - merits and criticisms Financial decisions, Internal relation of financial decisions, Factors influencing financial decisions, Functional areas of financial management, Functions of a finance manager, Agency Cost, Definition of ethics and the importance of ethics in Finance.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Sources of Finance
 

Ownership securities – Equity shares, Preference shares, Deferred shares, No par stock/shares, Shares with differential rights, Sweat Equity Creditorship securities – Debentures – Zero coupon bonds, Zero interest bonds, Callable bonds, Deep discount bonds Internal financing or ploughing back of profit – factors affecting ploughing back of profits – merits and demerits Loan financing – short term and long term sources. Startup finance-Bootstrapping, Series Funding

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Capital Structure & Capitalization
 

Meaning of capitalization – Theories of capitalization – cost theory and earnings theory. Over capitalization and under capitalization (Theory) – causes – effects and remedies, Watered stock, Over trading and under trading. Meaning of capital structure and financial structure, principles of capital structure, Optimum Capital Structure, Determinants of capital structure, capital gearing-Theories of Capital structure, Effect of capital structure on EPS, EBIT-EPS Analysis, Point of indifference-Practical Problems

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Cost of Capital and Leverages
 

Meaning of cost of capital, significance of cost of capital, components of cost of capital – Computation of Cost of capital and Weighted Average Cost of Capital, CAPM-Practical Problems. Meaning of Leverage, Types of Leverages – operating, financial and combined leverage, risk and leverage – practical problems

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
Capital Budgeting
 

Meaning of Capital Budgeting, Importance, Need, Time value of money-Present and Future Value (Simple Problems), Capital budgeting process, project appraisal by using traditional methods and modern methods, Practical problems on Payback Period, Net Present Value, Profitability Index, IRR and MIRR methods

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
Dividend Policy decisions
 

Meaning, Kinds, Bonus shares – Merits and Demerits, Theories of dividend decisions, determinants of dividend policy decisions, Companies Act, 2013 and SEBI Guidelines on Dividend Distribution (Theory only)

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:7
Management of Working Capital
 

Meaning of working capital, types of working capital, working capital cycle, adequate working capital, determinants of working capital, estimation of working capital-Practice problems. Management of cash. Management of inventory and debtors – Theory only

Text Books And Reference Books:

Khan, M, Y, & Jain, P, K (2018). Financial Management. Tata Mc Graw Hill. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Chandra, P. (2019).Financial Management. New Delhi, India. Tata McGraw Hill Book Co.
  2. Pandey,I.M.(2015). Financial Management. New Delhi, India. Vikas Publishing House.
  3. Gupta, S, K., Sharma, R.K. & Gupta, N (2013). Financial Management. Kalyani Publishers.
  4. Khan, M, Y, & Jain, P, K (2018). Financial Management. Tata Mc Graw Hill. 

Brigham and Houston (2021), Fundamentals of Financial Management, Cengage Learning, 14 edition

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I- 20 Marks

CIA II- 50 Marks

CIA II- 20 Marks

ESE- 50 Marks

Attendance : 5 Marks

BBA102-2 - MARKETING MANAGEMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Marketing a particularly stimulating subject for learners, since its practical application is visible every day. Old rules of marketing are no longer useful to those who want to influence these new consumer’s choices. This course will lead the exploration of the leading edge of this paradigm shift that is now underway. This course introduces students to the concepts and processes of marketing and takes them deeper into the world of marketing.

Course Objectives: This course intends

  • To explain fundamental concepts of marketing and their application to different markets.
  • To give an understanding about marketing mix elements and strategies.
  • To explain about consumers buying behavior.
  • To critically examine and evaluate existing marketing strategies and tactics.
  • To study the social responsibility and ethics of marketing.

Course Outcome

CO1: Explain fundamental concepts of marketing and their application to different markets.

CO2: Understand elements and strategies about marketing mix.

CO3: Explain about consumers buying behavior.

CO4: Critically examine and evaluate existing marketing strategies and tactics.

CO5: Study the social responsibility and ethics of marketing.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Introduction to Marketing Fundamentals
 

Meaning and Definition of Marketing; Scope of marketing - What Is Marketing? What Is Marketed? Who Markets, Evolution of marketing - The Production Concept, The Product Concept, The Selling Concept, The Marketing Concept, The Holistic Marketing Concept; Core marketing concepts - Needs, Wants, and Demands, Target Markets, Positioning, and Segmentation, Offerings and Brands, Value and Satisfaction, Marketing Channels, Supply Chain, Competition Marketing Environment

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Connecting with Customers
 

Consumer behavior model (Black box) Factors affecting consumer Behavior, Types of Buying Decision Behavior, The Buyer Decision Process, The Business Buyer Decision Process, Institutional and Government Market. Segmentation, targeting and positioning for competitive advantage.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Product Decision
 

Setting Product Strategy: Product Classification, Product Levels, Product and Services Differentiation, New product development stages, categories of new product, reasons for launching new products and its failure. Product life cycle strategies and its extension, Ansoff’s Matrix, meaning of services, unique characteristics of services, 7Ps of service marketing, Service delivery process.

Competitive Dynamics: Competitive Strategies for Market, Other Competitive Strategies – Market Challenger Strategies Market Follower Strategies, Market Nicher Strategies.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Pricing
 

Types of pricing, Pricing strategies: New product pricing strategies, Product mix pricing strategies, Price adjustment strategies, Price changes, Public policy and pricing.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
Distribution Channels
 

Marketing channels, structure, types and criteria of selecting a channel, wholesaling, retailing, and physical distribution, Channel Management (Channel design and Channel Conflict)

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Promotion
 

Significance of Integrated Marketing communication, Advertising, sales promotion, personal selling and sales management.  Public and customer relations, direct and online marketing, multi-level marketing-the new marketing model. Other promotional strategies (Buzz Marketing, Stealth Marketing and Guerilla Marketing)

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:6
Competitive Dynamics and Socially Responsible Marketing
 

Sustainable Marketing, Social Criticisms of Marketing, Marketing’s Impact on Individual, Marketing’s Impact on Society as a Whole, Marketing’s Impact on Other Businesses, Actions to Promote Sustainable Marketing, Business Actions Toward Sustainable Marketing, Principles and Marketing Ethics.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Kotler.P, &Keller.K.L., Koshy & Jha  (2020). Marketing Management, 20th edition, Pearson.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Marshall & Johnston, Marketing Management, McGraw Hill
  2. Kotler & Armstrong, 15th ed., Principles of Marketing Management, Pearson publication
  3. Chernev & Kotler, 5th ed., Strategic Marketing Management, Brightstar Media
  4. Stanton, Etzel, Walker, Fundamentals of Marketing, Tata-McGraw Hill, New Delhi.
  5. Saxena, Rajan, Marketing Management, Tata-McGraw Hill, New Delhi.
  6. McCarthy, E.J., (2016). Basic Marketing: A managerial approach. Irwin, New York.
Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1- for 20 marks. Report submission either individual or in group

CIA 2 - For 25 marks- Written exam for 50 marks, converted to 25 marks.

CIA 3 - For 20 Marks- Report Submission either individual of in group.

ESE- For 30 Marks- Written Exam conducted for 2 hours for 50 Marks converted to 30

Attendance percentage - carry a maximum of 5 Marks.

BBA191-2 - SOCIAL CONCERN PROJECT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:1

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This project is an opportunity to students understand social issues and challenges around their society. A short term association of students with NGO’s help them to learn other side reality of society which enable them to consider social issues in their future corporate decision makings. This project facilitate the students to effectively  utilizing their skills and competences to contribute the people, community and society

Course Outcome

CO1: Identify the social problems and issues

CO2: Students able to analyze the opportunities to be agents of social change

CO3: Develop the students to become socially responsible citizens

CO4: Motivate to help them to realize what they learn and do can resolve social problems and issues by their contributions towards people, community, or society

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
Social Responsibility Project
 

Social Responsibility Project

Text Books And Reference Books:

       An external guide(from NGO) must be identified and informed to the teacher teaching Business ethics and sustainability.

       A mail confirming the details-Name of the external guide, designation, email id, phone number, address to be sent to teacher.

       A mail from the external guide must be sent to the teacher accepting your proposal to work with them and clearly mention your work, roles and responsibilities.

       Team leaders to coordinate which teams go when and complete what task and inform the teacher about the same

       A flow chart must be prepared by cluster coordinator showing each teams work to be completed and time line.

       A log book must be maintained by each group mentioning the individual contribution and work completion on a daily basis

       No more than 1 group from each cluster can go for project on any given day

       Each student is expected to put in a 25 hrs work towards project they undertake. The burden of proof lies with each student.

       Failure to report the day to day activities and update log book will lead to cancellation of project.

       Sufficient documents shall be made available both to the faculty guide and mentor at the NGO, for the work completed.

       It may consider  working with corporate foundations and in house CSA

       It is the group’s responsibility to ensure that the mentor at the NGO is aware about these guidelines. 

       Attendance shall be granted subject to confirmed participation by each student on a daily basis. NO attendance shall be given during class hours.

        At the end of each day's work it is the responsibility of the team leader to coordinate with the faculty mentor and get attendance sorted for their team.  No white forms or note is issued by anybody for this purpose.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Approved NGO by Department

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

VIVA-VOCE (50 Marks): -Implementation

• Demonstrate awareness of social issues -20 marks

• Propose initiatives for future commitment -20 marks

• Summarise key facts with clarity- 10 marks

REPORT VALUATION (25 Marks) &amp; RELECTIVE/FEEDBACK SESSIONS (25

Marks)

• Analyze stakeholder impact on social issues 10 marks

• Demonstrate clarity and coherence in writing – 10 marks

• Develop documents with appropriate structure and style- 5 marks

BBAT103-2 - INDIAN TOURISM PRODUCTS AND RESOURCES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This subject emphasizes the importance of having an in depth knowledge about Indian Tourism products and geography. It elucidates different types of tourism products and their role in promoting tourism.

Course Objectives

  • To differentiate types of tourism products and its economic contribution through foreign exchange and spending patterns of tourists
  • To identify prominent hill stations, deserts, island destinations and also various adventure and sports activities associated with these destination
  • To familiar with heritage, historical, religious and cultural tourism products of India
  • To explain the significance of Manmade resources in tourist destination
  • To relate wildlife protection act pertaining to wildlife tourism product

 

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Differentiate types of tourism products and its economic contribution through foreign exchange and spending patterns of tourists

CO2: Identify prominent hill stations, deserts, island destinations and also various adventure and sports activities associated with these destinations

CO3: Familiar with heritage, historical, religious and cultural tourism products of India

CO4: Explain the significance of Manmade resources in tourist destination

CO5: Relate wildlife protection act pertaining to wildlife tourism product

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Tourism Resource / Product
 

Understanding Tourism Product. Defining categories of tourism products: Natural, Historical, Geographical, Spiritual, Religious, Socio-cultural, and Adventurous etc.. Statistics in terms of arrivals (domestic & international) contribution to tourism revenue, popularity, etc   

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Natural Tourism Resources
 

Mountain & Hill Resources: All destinations in India popular mountain and hill tourism. Adventure Tourism associated with mountain tourism: Trekking, Rock-Climbing, Wind Surfing, Camping, White Water Rafting, Skiing etc.. Island, Sea & River Tourism: Coastlines, Beaches, Lagoons, Backwaters Fishing Camps, Water Sports, environmental concerns, issues relating to the depletion of marine life. Desert Tourism: Desert Safaris, Desert Sports, etc.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Historical- Social Resources
 

Architectural Heritage of India: Styles adapted over the ages. Historical Monuments: Significant to tourism from ancient, medieval to contemporary styles. Spatial and religious dimensions Important Historical and Archeological sites Renowned Museums, Art Galleries, and Libraries, location assets and characteristics. Religious shrines / centers – Hindu, Buddhist, Jain, Sikh, Muslim, Christian and others. Yoga meditation, martial arts, and other contemporary mind & body healing concepts.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Cultural Resources
 

Performing Arts of India; Classical Dances and various Dance styles Indian Folk Dances, Centre for learning and performances. Indian Music and Musical instruments Different schools of Indian Music  Status of vocal and instrumental music, new experiments Indian Painting Handicrafts of India  Fairs & Festival – Social, religious and commercial fairs, festivals Tourism promotional fairs – Kite festival, white water festival, snake boat race etc..Indian Folk Culture – folk custom and costumes, settlement patterns, religious observations, folklore and legends

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Manmade Resources
 

Created tourist destinations – Academic, scientific, and industrial institutions

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Wildlife Flora & Fauna
 

National Parks, Sanctuaries, Biosphere Reserve etc. Wildlife Protection laws and regulations, rare and extinct species.  

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:10
Geographical Features & Bio-diversity
 

Physical features of India & Biodiversity

Text Books And Reference Books:

Acharya, Ram (2007), Tourism and Cultural Heritage of India, RBSA Publishers, Jaipur. Basham, A. L. (2008), The Wonder that was India:Rupa& Co, New Delhi.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Scott, J., & Selwyn, T. (2010). Thinking through tourism. Oxford: Berg.
  2. Fuller, G. (2012). The trivia lover's guide to the world: Geography for the lost and found. Lanham, MD: Rowman& Littlefield.
  3. Berger, A. A. (2011). Vietnam tourism. New York: Haworth Hospitality Press.
Evaluation Pattern

Particulars

Weightage

CIA I

20

CIA II (MSE)

25

CIA III

20

ESE

30

Attendance*

05

Total

100

BBAT161-2 - WORKING WITH SPREADSHEET (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

This is a basic course about spreadsheet development. This course will instruct and provide a hands-on experience to the students in the basic concepts, procedures, and importance of electronic spreadsheets. Students will learn the basics in using a spreadsheet with formulas and functions, creating charts, graphs and introductory level editing functions. This course would also provide insights on the fundamentals of database management thereby enabling the students to develop professional looking spreadsheets.

 

Cousre Objectives

To understand the concept of Spreadsheet and its features

To apply the formulas and functions of Spreadsheet to provide information for managerial decisions

To apply the in-built features for editing data, formatting cells to construct a formatted Spreadsheet

To create various types of enhanced chart

To analyze alternatives to Excel Spreadsheets

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the concept of Spreadsheet and its features

CO2: Apply the formulas and functions of Spreadsheet to provide information for managerial decisions

CO3: Apply the in-built features for editing data, formatting cells to construct a formatted Spreadsheet

CO4: Create various types of enhanced charts

CO5: Analyze alternatives to Excel Spreadsheets

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Getting Started with MS Excel 2021
 

Basic Concepts of Spreadsheet, Workbook, Worksheet, Cell, Rows, Columns, Cell Reference: relative and absolute references, Ranges, Entering values, Labels, , Cut, Copy, Paste, Paste Special Feature, Drag and Drop Features, Naming, Saving, Renaming and Retrieving files

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Formulas and Functions
 

Formulas, Built-in Formulas, Creating Custom Formulas, Conditional Expressions, Functions: Built-in Functions, IF Functions, Date and Time Functions, Look up and Reference: HLOOKUP, VLOOKUP, Mathematical Functions, Logical Functions, Text Manipulation function, Financial Function

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:7
Data and Cell Formatting
 

Using Fill and Autofill command, Import and Copy Data from External Sources, Data Validation: Data Validation Form, Data Formatting: Conditional Formatting, Formatting Cells, Formatting Tables, Generating Reports

Using Solver, Scenario Analysis, What – if Analysis, Goal Seek Analysis, Growth and Trend Analysis

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Charts
 

Creating 2 D and 3 D Charts:  Pie charts, Column charts, Bar charts and Line charts. Editing Charts: Legends, Data points, Data tables, Gridlines, Titles, Drawing tools, Clip art, Colours, Borders, Shadows. Creating data maps

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Alternatives to MS Excel
 

Google Sheet, Zoho Sheet, Apache OpenOffice Calc, LibreOffice Calc, WPS Office Spreadsheets, Smartsheet

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. John Walkenbach, “Excel 2021 Bible”, Wiley Publication
  2. Mary Anne Poatsy Keith Mulbery, Lynn Hogan, Jason Davidson, Linda Lau, “Exploring Microsoft 365: Excel 2021”, 1st edition, Pearson
  3. William Fischer, “Excel: Quickstart Guide from Beginner to Expert (Excel, Microsoft Office)”, Createspace Independent Pub.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Lokesh Lalwani, “Excel 2019 All-in-One”, BPB Publications; 1st edition.
  2. Paul McFedries, “Microsoft Excel Formulas and Functions (Office 2021 and Microsoft 365)” 1st Edition, Pearson.
Evaluation Pattern

 

Particulars

Weightage

CIA I

25

CIA II 

25

Total

50

 

ECO143 - DEMOCRACY AND ECONOMY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is aimed at undergraduate students to introduce to them the prominent debates on democracy and emerging issues in economies.  The course discusses how various socioeconomic factors act as constraints on economic growth and development. This basic framework allows a student to delve into the causes and consequences of various strategies/methods taken/applied by policymakers and practitioners and how it affects the overall objective of the state/economy through a trifocal analysis of the economy, society, and market keeping the central theme of ‘Democracy.’This course will introduce students to:

  • Growing crisis of wealth distribution and income inequality.
  •  Sectoral significance and state intervention in policy making.
  • Informal sector and labor market participation and rights.
  • Analyze corruption in emerging economies through various case studies.
  • Discuss the informal economy through concepts, theory, and measurement.

Course Outcome

CO1: Recognise the growing crisis of wealth and income inequality among the members of the economy.

CO2: Understand the economic crisis in different sectors and government interventions in practices.

CO3: Get familiar informal sector and labour market participation and rights.

CO4: Understand debates about transparency, competition and privatization and its relevance to corruption.

CO5: Investigate issues from various perspectives, such as, viewing challenges in economies through the lens of democracy.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Democracy, Democratization and Society
 

Theories of Democratization; Democratic and Undemocratic States; Measuring Democracy and Democratization; The Global Wave of Democratization; Causes and Dimensions of Democratization: The Political Economy of Democracy; Political Culture, Mass Beliefs and Value Change; Gender and Democratization; Social Capital and Civil Society; Social Movements and Contention in Democratization Processes: Role, impact on policy reforms and cultural change.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Democracy, Democratisation and Society
 

Theories of Democratisation; Democratic and Undemocratic States; Measuring Democracy and Democratisation; The Global Wave of Democratisation; Causes and Dimensions of Democratisation: The Political Economy of Democracy: Political Culture, Mass Beliefs, and Value Change; Gender and Democratisation; Social Capital and Civil Society; Social Movements and Contention in Democratisation Processes: Role, Impact on Policy Reforms and Cultural Change

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Actors and Institutions
 

Conventional Citizen Participation;   Institutional Design in New Democracies; Gender and Democratization; A Decade of Democratic Decline and Stagnation.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Actors and Institutions
 

Conventional Citizen Participation; Institutional Design in New Democracies; Gender and Democratisation; A Decade of Democratic Decline and Stagnation.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Democracy and Redistribution
 

A Theory of political transitions: Choice of the economic and political regime; Theoretical extensions: growth, trade, political institutions; Democracy and the public sector; the state, the treat of expropriation and the possibility of development: Social and economic wellbeing and policy reforms.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Democracy and Redistribution
 

A Theory of Political Transitions: Choice of Economic and Political Regime; Theoretical Extensions: Growth, Trade, Political Institutions; Democracy and the Public Sector; the State, the Threat of Expropriation and the Possibility of Development: Social and Economic Wellbeing and Policy Reforms

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Democracy and Economic Growth and Development
 

A Marxian theory of democracy; The Importance of Social Class in Historical Comparative Perspective; Dependency and Development; Democracy in Developing Countries; Transitions from Authoritarian Rule: Tentative Conclusions about Uncertain Democracies.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Democracy and Economic Development
 

A Marxian Theory of Democracy; The Importance of Social Class in Historical Comparative Perspective; The Case Study of India; Dependency and Development; Democracy in Developing Countries; Transitions from Authoritarian Rule: Tentative Conclusions about Uncertain Democracies

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Democracy and Economic Growth and Development Indian Experience
 

India’s Tryst with Destiny; Democracy, Inequality, and Public Reasoning; A case study on Gujarat experience of development: Approaches, impact, and outcome; Kerala experience of development: Approaches, impact, and outcome.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Democracy and Economic Development: Indian Experience
 

India's Tryst with Destiny; Democracy, Inequality and Public Reasoning, A Case Study on Gujarat's Experience of Development: Approaches, Impact and Outcome; Kerala's Experience of Development: Approaches, Impact and Outcome

Text Books And Reference Books:

Bhagwati, J. N., & Panagariya, A. (2012). India's Tryst with Destiny: Debunking Myths that Undermine Progress and Addressing New Challenges. HarperCollins Publishers.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Boix, C. (2003). Democracy and Redistribution. Cambridge University Press.

Drèze, J., & Sen, A. (2015). An Uncertain Glory: India and Its Contradictions. Economics Books.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1: 20 marks

CIA 2: 20 Marks

CIA 3: 45 Marks

Attendance: 5 Marks

ECO144 - DESIGNING POLICIES FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is aimed at undergraduate students to introduce to them the idea of sustainable development and public policies within that context. The course discusses the challenges of sustainable development. This course will equip students with the knowledge and skills necessary to design policies that promote sustainable development.

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the principles and goals of sustainable development.

CO2: Explain the interdependence of economic, social, and environmental factors and how they must be balanced to promote sustainability.

CO3: Understand problems from interdisciplinary perspective.

CO4: Think of integrated solutions to the current problems.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:17
Sustainable Development
 

Concepts; Historical roots; Measurement; Indicators of sustainable development; Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and indicators.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Challenges to Sustainable Development
 

Poverty; Population Growth; Public Health; Education; Biodiversity Conservation; Climate Change and Migration; Gender Discrimination.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:13
Constraints on Public Policy and Sustainable Approaches
 

Constraints on Public Policy -- Economic constraints; Political Feasibility: Interests and Power; Institutional Constraints; Social and Cultural Factors: Constraining and Enabling.

Sustainable Approaches -- Participatory approach to development; Inclusive growth; Gender mainstreaming; Policy Coherence and Technological Innovations.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Dreze, Jean & Amartya Sen (eds.) 1999. Indian Development Selected Regional Perspectives. Delhi: Oxford University Press.

Mulligan, Martin. 2010. An Introduction to Sustainability, Environmental, Social and Personal Perspectives. Routledge.

Sachs, J. 2015. The Age of Sustainable Development. Columbia University Press.

Moran, M., Rein, M., & Goodin, R. E. (2006). The Oxford handbook of public policy. Oxford University Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Addison, T., Harper, C., Prowse, M., Shepherd, A., Armando Barrientos, with, Braunholtz-Speight, T., Zohir, S. (2009). The Chronic Poverty Report 2008–09. Retrieved from https://www.odi.org/sites/odi.org.uk/files/odi-assets/publications-opinion-files/2566.pdf

Bellinger, W. K. (2007). The economic analysis of public policy. Routledge.

Hausman, D. M., & McPherson, M. S. (2006). Economic analysis, moral philosophy, and public policy. Cambridge University Press.

Kates, R. W., Parris, T. M., & Leiserowitz, A. A. (2005). What is sustainable development? Goals, indicators, values, and practice. Environment (Washington DC), 47(3), 8-21.

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

 

CIA I

Marks

CIA II

Marks

CIA III

Marks

Attendance

Marks

10 (conducted out of 20)

10 (conducted out of 20)

25 (conducted out of 50)

5

 

 

ENG185-2 - THOUGHT AND WRITING (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Business perceives the world’s realities and formulates strategies to market products accordingly. This perception requires thought or thinking and an understanding of language to materialize business purposes.  The course comprises practicals such as responding to audio, visual and written prompts. The course contents are indicative of global trends in business communication as well as the significance of cross-cultural (national and regional ) communication strategies. 

This course aims to

1. Develop an organic sense of coherence between thought and writing.

2. Help students read, interpret and deploy different oral, written, and visual cues to effectively articulate, compose and create content for their professional requirements.

3. Equip the students with the cross-cutting issues of professional ethics and human values in business communication

Course Outcome

CO1: Contrast thinking processes and identify strategies for improving academic writing and language skills

CO2: Analyse and interpret written and visual data and reflect that through various writing activities, including original research with primary and secondary sources

CO3: Create meaningful and relevant visual data in the form of posters, videos, etc. for business contexts.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Basics of Thought and Writing
 

 The unit provides basic concepts elucidating the significance of thinking and writing in the local and global business contexts. It also aims to equip the students with the necessary clarity on critical thinking and essential parameters of academic writing.

1. Gregory Crawford: “Writing as Thinking: Why Writing is Still a Critical Skill in Business”. Forbes 2021.

2. Bill Birchard: “The Science of Strong Business Writing”. Harvard Business Review, 2021.

3. Gina L Vallis: “Critical Thinking and Academic Writing”.

4. Rajeev Bhargava: "A Nation is a People in Conversation". 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Reading and Interpreting Texts
 

This unit provides reading and writing exercises on reading and interpreting oral, written and visual texts on gender, environment and human values in business writing. This unit will facilitate students to be able to read, analyse and interpret written and visual fields. A wide range of data from the visual context including infographics, advertisements, films, documentaries, social media, fashion, among others will be used to train students to develop modes of critical, analytical and written skills to analyse and interpret the data. Social, political and cultural factors that determine the creation, dissemination and interpretation of visuals in our contemporary context. 

1. Marge Piercy: “Barbie Doll” 

2. LG television advertisement https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ai2vSAvIPZI /

3. Why Investing in Fast Food May Be a Good Thing by Amy Domini (Essay)

4. Heng’s Cartoon on India’s Mars Mission in New York Times (2014)

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Creating Effective Visual/Written Contents
 

This unit will facilitate students to create meaningful, critically informed and culturally sensitive written/visual content that will aid in their business contexts. Employability skills like mind mapping techniques, advertisements, photo essays, documentaries, and other forms of visual infographics and vlogs will be facilitated as newer modes of engaging with business today. It also caters to cross-cutting issues like gender, human values and environmental concerns.

1. Gender sensitivity/inclusivity: Bhima Jewellery: Pure as Love

2. Human Values: Exposure: The Portrait of a Corporate Crime by Raghu Rai

3. Environmental Concerns: “A Fable for Tomorrow” from silent Spring by Racheal Carson

4. Professional Ethics: Screening of film Manjunath (2014) by Sandeep A. Varma

Text Books And Reference Books:

Prescribed texts

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Berger, John. Ways of Seeing. Penguin UK, 2008.

Bhargava, Rajeev. Between Hope and Despair: 100 Ethical Reflections in Contemporary India. Bloomsbury, 2022.

Butler, Grant. Think Write Grow: How to Become a Thought Leader and Build Your Business by Creating Exceptional Articles, Blogs, Speeches, Books and More. 2012

Anderson, Marilyn, et al. Critical Reasoning, Academic Writing and Presentation Skills. Delhi: Pearson, 2010.

Ramachandran V. S. “Seeing and Selection”. The Telltale Brain, W. W. Norton & Company, 2012.

Vallis. G. L. Reason to Write: Applying Critical Thinking to Academic Writing, Kona Publishing, 2010.

 

 

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

Components

CIA I

CIA II: MSE

CIA III

ESE

Attendance

Marks/Percentage

5 Marks

(10%)

10 Marks

(20%)

5 Marks

(10%)

25 Marks

(50%)

5 Marks

(10%)

 

 

EST141 - READING THE CITY: BANGALORE HISTORIES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The urban spaces of India have transformed immensely with increased global influences. The course attempts to explore various aspects of cultural identity and compare those identities formed, represented, and reproduced in the metropolitan context of Bangalore. The course enables students to think of the concept of 'the city' as a dynamic entity and analyse how our understanding of, and interaction with the city produces knowledge of space, emerging subjectivity and the “Other”. The city will be examined as a physical and socio-political structure. Metropolitan cities are considered nowadays as sites in the transnational network of financial and technological activities and hence they must be studied as global spaces in addition to its local and regional specificities.

The course is conceptualized with the following objectives:

1. To introduce students to the idea of the city and enable them to ask some relevant questions in the contemporary context.

2. To introduce students to narratives as told by monumental and representational cultures of cities.

3. To make students reflect on how cosmopolitanism and diversity are expressed in urban environments. and how urban space mediate transnational and global links.

Course Outcome

CO1: Recognize the politics that constitutes the notion of a city with contextual understanding of the specificities of Bangalore through classroom discussions and assignments

CO2: Reconstruct the idea of city space in the contemporary context of globalisation and transnationalism and reflect upon it in the forms of various classroom engagements

CO3: Critically appreciate the plurality of contemporary cosmopolitan spaces through various classroom engagements and assignments

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
The Past and the Present
 

This unit attempts to look at the histories of Bangalore from cultural, literary and socio-political aspects. It aims to give a detailed understanding of how the city space has evolved during the precolonial, colonial and postcolonial eras

1. Bangalore from the Pre-colonial to the Age of Globalisation: From The Promise of the Metropolis: Bangalore's Twentieth Century Janaki Nair.

2. Past and Present of the City through folklore and other write-ups- From “Multiple City: Writings on Bangalore” Aditi De.

3. Everyday City Experiences- “Majestic: The Place of Constant Return” Zac O’Yeah.

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Understanding the City of the Global Digital Age
 

This unit looks at the sense of the city in the global digital age and how the city is formed of politically aware people making it a public space of contestations and demonstrations.

1. Reading the City in a Global Digital Age: The Limits of Topographic Representation” Saskia Sassen

2.“The Problem” Michael Goldman, Vinay Gidwani, Carol Upadhya

3.“The City as Dichotomy” Sharadini Rath.

4.“Contestations Over Public Spaces” Lekha Adavi, Darshana Mitra And Vinay Sreenivasa

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Fictional Representation of the City and City Walk
 

This unit tries to look the history of the city through a fictional representation. Karnad toasts to 'Bendakalooru', the place of boiled beans. The unit also proposes City Walk. Based on the ideas about the past and present of the city discussed in the previous two units, the students may take out a city walk in any area of their choice and bring out documentary evidence of the same in the form of photographs and write-ups.

1.“Boiled Beans on Toast: A Play” by Girish Karnad

2. City Walk

Text Books And Reference Books:

Prescribed texts

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Massey, Doreen. “City as a Global Space”  City Worlds

2. Madanipour, Ali. Urban Design, Space and Society. 2014.

3. Sabiki, Ranjit. A Sense of Space: The Crisis of Urban Design in India, 2019.

4. Shaw, Annapurna. Indian Cities in Transition.

5.Friedman, Thomas L. The World is Flat: The Globalized World in the Twenty-First Century.

Evaluation Pattern

Components

CIA I

CIA II: MSE

CIA III

Attendance

Marks/Percentage

20%

 

25%

 

50%

 5%

EST142 - READING THE CYBERSPACE: THE PUBLIC AND THE PRIVATE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

We become savvy about the world on a daily basis. Cyberspace aided by the internet is one agency that enables our knowledge and entertainment production, dissemination and consumption. We interact with the virtual space much more than we often interact with the real to the extent that the simulacra we live in have become more real/hyperreal than the real itself. In this scenario, it is important to read, understand, critique and reorient our relationship with the cyber world we live in and breathe through. The course will also deal with aspects of the public as personal and the personal as public. This course is an attempt to engage with these aspects by negotiating with the virtually real.

 

 

This course aims to equip students to understand literature as

  • Introduce students to the critical evaluation of the digital space 

  • Reconfigure the confluences and disjuncture of cyberspace 

  • To orient students towards recognising the nebulous division between the public and the private in digital spaces

Course Outcome

CO1: Assess the notion of cyberspace and its contemporary implication and present it through classroom debates and discussions.

CO2: Distinguish between the virtual and the real and present it in their writings and discussions.

CO3: Raise awareness about the contemporary problems pertaining to this field through multiple engagements

CO4: Assess and evaluate the use of social media for promoting various social and cultural issues.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Cyberculture and the Cyberspace
 

General introduction to the key concepts related to cyberculture 

1. Lister et al : “New Media in Everyday Life” 

 

2. Pramod K Nayar: “Reading” Cybercultures 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Cyberliteratures
 

 This unit will attempt to enable students to deal with new forms of literature enabled by the cyberspace. It will look at how the internet and the cyberworld has reconfigured language, grammar, meaning, form and content for the digital native cyborg who seamlessly traverse the real and the virtual, the banal and the political. This section will deal with genres and the student and faculty can mutually decide on select examples from each genre. 

• Terribly Tiny Tales 

• Fan fiction 

• Hypertext Poetry 

• Slam Poetry 

 

• Twitterature

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Social Networking and Online Shopping
 

This unit will discuss aspects of freedom and the empowerment of communities through the cyberspace be it through social networking sites, online shopping, youtubing, Netflix, vlogging and blogging. It will look at how choices are mediated in the name of empowering the common public and how a certain hegemony gets constructed through manipulated consent. 

1. Lloyd Morrisset: “Technologies of Freedom” 

2. Film: The Social Network 

3. Drama: An episode from Black Mirror 

4. Andrei Gornyk: “From Youtube to Ru Tube, or How I Learnt to Love All Tubes”

5. Netflix 

6. Vlogging and Blogging 

 

7. Online Shopping – Amazon/Flipkart 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Surveillance and Knowledge Systems
 

This unit will attempt to look at the various aspects of surveillance that the digital and cybertechnology has equipped us with. It will examine how this constructs discourses of the body, gender and selfhood. This unit will also look at the manner in which knowledge and information has also been reconfigured and appropriated through digital and cybertechnology. 

 

1. Pramod K Nayar: Biometric Surveillance 

 

2. Swati Chaturvedi: I am a Troll: Inside the Secret World of the BJP’s Digital Army.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Lister et al : “New Media in Everyday Life” 

 

Pramod K Nayar: “Reading” Cybercultures

Lloyd Morrisset: “Technologies of Freedom” 

Film: The Social Network 

Drama: An episode from Black Mirror 

 

Andrei Gornyk: “From Youtube to Ru Tube, or How I Learnt to Love All Tubes”

Pramod K Nayar: Biometric Surveillance 

 

Swati Chaturvedi: I am a Troll: Inside the Secret World of the BJP’s Digital Army.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bell, D. (2001). An introduction to cybercultures. London: Routledge. 

Lister, M., Dovey, J., Giddings, S., Grant, I., & Kelly, K. (2010). New media: A critical introduction. London: Routledge. Nayar, P. K. (2010). An introduction to new media and cybercultures. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. 

 

Snickars, Pelle and Patrick Vonderau, eds. (2009). The Youtube Reader. National Library of Sweden.

Evaluation Pattern

 

CIA 1: 20 marks 


Students will be tested on their conceptual clarity, theoretical engagements, application and analysis of given texts and contexts through means that the facilitator deems appropriate and suitable for the students.

CIA 2: 20 Marks

Students will be tested on their conceptual clarity, theoretical engagements, application and analysis of given texts and contexts through means that the facilitator deems appropriate and suitable for the students. 

ESE 1: 20 (marks

The students can be evaluated through exhibitions, visual essays or visual stories, mini-documentaries, performances, creating social media content and promotions, cumulative portfolios, student seminars, organising public output, docudramas and other modes of creative evaluation suitable for the course.

ESE 2: 30 marks (Submission) Pattern

Students will be tested on their conceptual clarity, theoretical engagements, application and analysis of given texts and contexts

MED141 - INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The aim of the course is to offer students the opportunity to understand, explore and appreciate the nature of human diversity and globalisation by providing a direct international experience in a virtual collaborative learning environment with students. It aims to form an intercultural perspective, provide knowledge of communication and behaviour within and between different cultures.

Course Objectives

The course aims to help students to:

 

  • Identify and explain basic theories of human interaction within multi-cultural environments.

  • Understand  basic principles of communication within various cultural settings.

  • Identify and explain the specific culturally oriented communication needs of a variety of marginal or sub-cultural groups

Course Outcome

CO1: Apply principles of human communication in cross-cultural settings

CO2: Create media content for cross cultural communication

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction
 

 

  • Definitions and a basic understanding of cross-culture communication

  • Differences between cross culture and intercultural communication

  • Dimensions & Models for Cultural Analysis- Popular models of cross cultural communication.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Context, Culture and Identity
 

 

  • Context, Situation & Action Chains- Culture, Technology

  • Workforce and environment, 

  • Countering oppression through inclusion

  • Culture & Identity - Educational attainment, Geographical locations, ethnicity.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Global Identity
 

 

  • Intercultural Relations and Globalisation (Case Study Work)

  • Global Identity; Communicating with a Cross-Cultural Audience

  • Reading: Cross-cultural conflict by Kevin Avruch (UNESCO EOLSS (Encyclopaedia of life support systems)

Text Books And Reference Books:

Adler, R. B., Rodman, G. R., & Du Pré, A. (2016). Understanding human communication (Vol. 13). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Condon, E. C. (1973). Introduction to cross cultural communication. Rutgers University.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Adorno, Theodor W. and Horkheimer, Max. 1972. “The Culture Industry: Enlightenment as Mass Deception”. Dialectic of Enlightenment (trans. John Cumming). New York: Herder and Herder, 120-167.

Gudykunst, W. B. (2003). Cross-cultural and intercultural communication. Sage.

Ting-Toomey, S., & Chung, L. C. (2005). Understanding intercultural communication. New York: Oxford University Press.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment outline

Over all end semester evaluation for 45 marks

CIA I: 20 Marks 

CIA II: 20 Marks

End semester Submission CIA III: 50 Marks.

Attendance 5 Marks

 

POL141 - POLITICS IN INDIA (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

India is the largest democracy of the world and its diverse society, vast geographical expanse and different cultural-social values make it an extremely complex political system. How does politics in a country like this operate? What are the historical influences and their impact on the modern democratic institutions of India? How has modern India managed to accommodate or shed off its century’s old traditional values in the clash between tradition and modernity? How have modern democratic institutions in India evolved, what are the pressures working upon them and how have these institutions performed till now? How does developmental state in India device and run welfare policies, maintain legitimacy and respond to crisis? The present course will give the students a basic understanding of all these aspects so that they can make sense of the ways in which democracy and political system operates in the country.

Course Outcome

CO1: Relate to the fundamental aspects of Indian Political System.

CO2: Examine the politics in India through study of its strengths and fault lines.

CO3: Assess how democracy and democratic institutions function and are challenged in India.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction and Background
 

Colonial State and Economy; Development of India’s Constitution

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Institutions and Structures
 

The Indian Parliament; The Judicial System of India; Union and State Executive, Office of the Governor and Bureaucracy; Federalism; Party System in India. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
The Processes and Fault lines
 

Elections in India; Movements in India; Communalism and Secularism; Caste and Reservations

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Policies and Problems
 

Public Policy; Foreign Policy; Regionalism and Terrorism

Text Books And Reference Books:

Chatterjee, Partha (ed.), 1997. State and Politics in India, New Delhi: Oxford University Press.
Jayal, Niraja Gopal and Mehta, Pratap Bhanu (eds.), 2019. Politics in India, New Delhi: OUP.
Roy, Himanshu and Singh, Mahendra Prasad (eds.), 2018. Indian Political System, New Delhi: Pearson.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bhargava, Ashutosh and Acharya, Ashok (eds.), 2017. Poltical Theory: An Introduction, New Delhi: Pearson
Austin, Granville, 2014. The Indian Constitution: Cornerstone of a Nation, New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I

CIA II

CIA III

Attendance

Weightage

20

25

50

05

PSY142 - APPRECIATING AESTHETICS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course aims at exploring the phenomenon of aesthetics from a multidisciplinary perspective. Further it helps the students to get exposed to multidisciplinary approach of understanding realities.

Course Objectives:

After the completion of this course, students will be able to:

1.      Understand the philosophy behind aesthetics
2.      Understand human perception of aesthetics
3.      Appreciate morality and aesthetic judgements
4.      Take cognizance of the influence of technology on aesthetics

Course Outcome

CO1: Understanding the philosophy of aesthetics.

CO2: Appreciating aesthetics from varied perspectives.

CO3: Creating/Designing aesthetically appealing products.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Aesthetica
 

Origin of modern aesthetics; philosophy behind Aesthetics

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Aesthetic Mind
 

Psychology of Aesthetics; morality; aesthetic judgements; appreciation of environment

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Functional Aesthetics
 

Globalization and Technological influence on Aesthetics; digital interface; military; fashion; culture; art and architecture

Text Books And Reference Books:

Carlson, A. (2002). Aesthetics and the environment: The appreciation of nature, art and architecture. Psychology Press.

Kivy, P. (Ed.). (2009). The Blackwell guide to aesthetics. John Wiley & Sons.     

Schellekens, E., & Goldie, P. (Eds.). (2011). The aesthetic mind: Philosophy and psychology. Oxford University Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Hughes, F. (2009). Kant's' Critique of Aesthetic Judgement': A Reader's Guide. Bloomsbury Publishing.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I

CIA II

CIA III

20

20

50

PSY146 - HUMAN ENGINEERING (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course is an overview on the design and construction of equipment, products, work systems, management systems and tasks that can affect mental wellbeing. The course also helps the students to understand application of human factors and machine interactions that potentially reduce human error, increase system availability, lower lifecycle costs, improve safety and enhance overall system performance.

Course Outcome

CO1: Explain how man-machine interaction is an important aspect to work upon for increasing the efficiency of the people.

CO2: Outline factors that are important for making an optimum working space and conditions.

CO3: Translate theoretical knowledge of human engineering and ergonomics-related factors in day-to-day settings.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Human Factors and Ergonomics
 

Introduction to human factors and ergonomics; Human Factors Engineering and Systems Design; Sensation and Perception; Cross-Cultural Design

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Job, Equipment, Workplace and Environmental Design
 

Task Design and Motivation; Job and Team Design; Workplace Design

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Design for Health, Safety and Comfort
 

Health and Safety Management: Organization and public spaces; Warnings and Hazard Communications; Design for People with Functional Limitations; Design for Aging

Text Books And Reference Books:

Guastello, S. J. (2013). Human factors engineering and ergonomics: A systems approach, CRC Press.

Salvendy, G. (Ed.). (2012). Handbook of Human Factors and Ergonomics (4th ed.). New Jersey, USA: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Robbins, S. P., Judge, T. A., & Vohra, N. (2019). Organizational behaviour by Pearson (18th ed.). Pearson Education India.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bridger, R. (2017). Introduction to human factors and ergonomics, CRC press.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1

(20 marks)

CIA2

(20 marks)

CIA3

(50 marks)