CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT

School of Business and Management

Syllabus for
Bachelor of Business Administration (Honours)
Academic Year  (2022)

 
1 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBA131 PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT Core Courses 4 4 100
BBA132 FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING Core Courses 4 4 100
BBA133 MICROECONOMICS Core Courses 4 4 100
BBH111 SOCIAL SENSITIVITY SKILLS Skill Enhancement Course 2 0 50
BBH134 BUSINESS MATHEMATICS Core Courses 4 4 100
BBS161A COURTESY AND ETIQUETTES Generic Elective 3 3 100
BBS161B A LIFE WORTH LIVING-FROM HEALTH TO WELL BEING Generic Elective 3 3 100
BBS161C MAHABHARATHA AND MODERN MANAGEMENT Generic Elective 3 3 100
BECO161A INSTITUTIONS AND INFORMAL ECONOMY Generic Elective 3 3 100
BECO161B ECONOMICS OF CORRUPTION Generic Elective 3 3 100
BEN121 LANGUAGE IN CONTEXT-I Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
BENG161A READING TECHNOLOGY IN/AND SCIENCE FICTION Generic Elective 3 3 100
BENG161B GLOBAL ETHICS FOR CONTEMPORARY SOCIETIES Generic Elective 3 3 100
BHIS161A ENCOUNTERING HISTORIES: THE FUTURE OF THE PAST Generic Elective 3 3 100
BHIS161B THE HISTORY OF URBAN SPACE AND EVOLUTION OF CITY FORMS Generic Elective 3 3 100
BMED151B UNDERSTANDING THE VISUAL LANGUAGE OF CINEMA Generic Elective 3 3 100
BMED161A MEDIA LITERACY Generic Elective 3 3 100
BPOL161A PEACE AND CONFLICT MANAGEMENT Generic Elective 3 3 100
BPOL161B GLOBAL POWER POLITICS Generic Elective 3 3 100
BPSY161A SCIENCE OF WELLNESS Generic Elective 3 3 100
BPSY161B ADVERTISEMENT PSYCHOLOGY Generic Elective 3 3 100
LAN121 DEVELOPING FLUENCY AND CLARITY IN ENGLISH FOR BUSINESS Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
2 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBA231 ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOUR - 4 4 100
BBA232 BUSINESS STATISTICS - 4 4 100
BBA233 MACROECONOMICS - 4 4 100
BBA281 SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY PROJECT - 1 1 100
BBH211 EXPRESSIVE SKILLS - 2 0 50
BBH234 CORPORATE ACCOUNTING - 4 4 100
BBS261A CONSUMPTION AND CULTURE IN INDIA - 3 3 100
BBS261B GLOBAL LEADERSHIP AND CULTURE - 3 3 100
BBS261C TOURISM, CULTURE AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT - 3 3 100
BECO261A ECONOMICS AND LITERATURE - 3 3 100
BECO261B DESIGNING POLICIES FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT - 3 3 100
BEN221 LANGUAGE IN CONTEXT-II - 3 3 100
BENG261A READING CITYSCAPES: BANGALORE HISTORIES - 3 3 100
BENG261B READING THE CYBERSPACE: PUBLIC AND THE PRIVATE - 3 3 100
BHIS261A THE POLITICS OF MEMORY: THE MAKINGS OF GENOCIDE - 3 3 100
BHIS261B RELIGION: PHILOSOPHY AND POLITICS THROUGH AGES - 3 3 100
BMED251B AUDIO CONSUMPTION IN EVERYDAY LIFE - 3 3 100
BMED261A INTER-CULTURAL COMMUNICATION - 3 3 100
BPOL261A POLITICS IN INDIA - 3 3 100
BPOL261B STATE AND TERRORISM - 3 3 100
BPSY261A APPRECIATING AESTHETICS - 3 3 100
BPSY261B HUMAN ENGINEERING AND ERGONOMICS - 3 3 100
LAN221 THOUGHT, WRITING AND VISUALITY - 3 3 100
3 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBA331 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT Core Courses 4 4 100
BBA332 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT Core Courses 4 4 100
BBA333 MARKETING MANAGEMENT Core Courses 4 4 100
BBH311 KNOWLEDGE ACQUISITION SKILLS Skill Enhancement Course 2 2 50
BBH335 INDIAN FINANCIAL SYSTEM Core Courses 4 4 100
BBH354 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS ANALYTICS Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
BBH361A EVENTS AND SPORTS MANAGEMENT Discipline Specific Elective 3 3 50
BBH361B HEALTHCARE SERVICES MANAGEMENT Discipline Specific Elective 3 3 100
BBH361C MUTUAL FUNDS SERVICES Discipline Specific Elective 3 3 100
BBH361D BANKING AND INSURANCE Discipline Specific Elective 3 3 100
4 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBA431 COST AND MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING - 4 4 100
BBA432 ENTREPRENEURSHIP DEVELOPMENT - 4 4 100
BBA433 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY - 4 4 100
BBH411 KNOWLEDGE APPLICATION SKILLS - 2 0 50
BBH434 INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND E-BUSINESS - 4 4 100
BBH435 COMPANY LAW AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE - 4 4 100
BBH461A ENTREPRENEURIAL LEADERSHIP - 3 3 100
BBH461B SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP - 3 3 100
BBH461C PRINCIPLES OF LEAN START-UPS - 3 3 100
BBH461D SOCIAL FINANCE - 3 3 100
5 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBA531 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT Core Courses 4 4 100
BBA532 TAXATION LAWS Core Courses 4 4 100
BBA581 INTERNSHIP PROJECT Skill Enhancement Course 2 2 100
BBH511A SELF ENHANCEMENT SKILLS I-FINANCE Skill Enhancement Course 2 0 50
BBH511B SELF ENHANCEMENT SKILLS I-MARKETING Skill Enhancement Course 2 0 50
BBH511C SELF ENHANCEMENT SKILLS I-HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT Skill Enhancement Course 2 0 50
BBH511D SELF ENHANCEMENT SKILLS I-ENTREPRENEURSHIP DEVELOPMENT Skill Enhancement Course 2 0 50
BBH533 GLOBAL BUSINESS Core Courses 4 4 100
BBH541A SECURITY ANALYSIS AND PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
BBH541B BRAND AND LUXURY MARKETING Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
BBH541C INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS LAW Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
BBH541D DESIGN THINKING Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
BBH542A GLOBAL BUSINESS FINANCE Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
BBH542B RETAIL MANAGEMENT AND ANALYTICS Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
BBH542C PERFORMANCE AND COMPENSATION MANAGEMENT Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
BBH542D FAMILY BUSINESS MANAGEMENT Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
BBH543B SALES MANAGEMENT AND ANALYTICS Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
BBH543C TALENT ACQUISITION AND RETENTION Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
BBH543D STRATEGIC BUSINESS NEGOTIATIONS Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
BBH544A FINANCIAL DERIVATIVES Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
BBH544B CONSUMER BEHAVIOR AND NEUROMARKETING Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
BBH544C EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE & MANAGERIAL COUNSELING Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
BBH545A STRATEGIC COST MANAGEMENT Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
BBH545B MARKETING RESEARCH Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
BBH545C STRATEGIC HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
BBH545D INNOVATION MANAGEMENT Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
BBH553A FINANCIAL MODELLING Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
BBH554D ENTREPRENEURIAL LIVE PROJECT Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
6 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBA631 PRODUCTION AND OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT - 4 4 100
BBA632 BUSINESS LAWS - 4 4 100
BBA681 RESEARCH PROJECT - 2 4 100
BBH611A SELF ENHANCEMENT SKILLS II-FINANCE - 2 0 50
BBH611B SELF ENHANCEMENT SKILLS II-MARKETING - 2 2 50
BBH611C SELF ENHANCEMENT SKILLS II-HUMAN RESOURCES - 2 1 100
BBH611D SELF ENHANCEMENT SKILLS II-ENTREPRENEURSHIP DEVELOPMENT - 2 0 50
BBH641A GST AND CUSTOMS DUTY - 4 4 100
BBH641B MARKETING SENTIMENT AND OPINION MINING - 4 4 100
BBH641C ORGANIZATION DEVELOPMENT - 4 4 100
BBH641D INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS - 4 4 100
BBH642A MERGERS AND ACQUISITIONS - 4 4 100
BBH642B DIGITAL AND SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING - 4 4 100
BBH642C LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT - 4 4 100
BBH642D ENTREPRENEURIAL FINANCE - 4 4 100
BBH643A PROJECT APPRAISAL - 4 4 100
BBH643B RURAL AND AGRICULTURAL MARKETING - 4 4 100
BBH643C INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT - 4 4 100
BBH643D PROJECT ASSESSMENT AND BUSINESS PLAN - 4 4 100
BBH644B STRATEGIC MARKETING - 4 4 100
BBH644C DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION - 4 4 100
BBH644D DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION FOR BUSINESS - 4 4 100
BBH645A DIGITAL FINANCE - 4 4 100
BBH645B ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT - 4 4 100
BBH645C PEOPLE ANALYTICS - 4 4 100
BBH645D CLIENTELE DEVELOPMENT - 4 4 100
BBH654A FINANCIAL ECONOMETRICS - 4 4 100
      

    

Department Overview:

BBA Honors Programme provides high quality professional education in Business Administration for young men and women who wish to join as management executives in industry, business or non-profit organizations and to seek entrepreneurial or self-employment positions. The rigorous training offered by the University helps the young minds to prepare for the challenging managerial opportunities of the 21st century. Our training program focuses on equipping each individual with conceptual, analytical, communication skills and healthy attitudes to ensure excellent performance and committed service to both businesses and the society at large

Mission Statement:

VISION

Our Vision is to be an Institution of excellence developing leaders serving enterprises and society globally

MISSION

Our Mission is to develop socially responsible business leaders with the spirit of inquiry through academic and industry engagement

Introduction to Program:

The undergraduate programme in Bachelor of Business Administration - Honors (BBAH) offered by School of Business and Management focuses on an inter-disciplinary approach towards developing students in order to excel in managerial and entrepreneurial skills. The students will be exposed to various functional areas of Management such as Marketing, Finance, Human Resource and Entrepreneurship. The programme will offer an opportunity for every student to determine, to design and to develop his/her own areas of expertise. The student-centric learning will be adopted through various pedagogical tools like business games, management games, simulations, case studies, internships, guest lectures, conferences, research projects, and industrial visits. The Inter-disciplinary Courses embedded into the programme encompasses the various nuances of technology, sociology, philosophy, economics, life, tourism, history, political science and media. The three year programme will also train the students to develop social sensitivity skills, expressive skills, knowledge acquisition skills, knowledge application skills, self enhancement skills and business research skills. The National and International Level Management Fests and Co-Curricular Activities of the School will also enable the students to develop their leadership and their decision making skills, which are not only essential to face the challenges of today's business world but also to contribute immensely to both businesses and soci

Program Objective:
PLG 1 : ? Social Responsibility and Ethical Sensitivity

PLO 1.1: Demonstrate awareness of social issues (RBTL2)

PLO 1.2: Identify ethical issues in business (RBTL3)

PLO 1.3: Compare ethical practices in different contexts (RBTL4)

PLO 1.4: Analyze stakeholder impact on social issues (RBTL4)

PLO 1.5: Evaluate ethical perspectives of business actions (RBTL5)

PLO 1.6: Propose initiatives to address social issues (RBTL6)

PLG 2: Functional Knowledge and Application

PLO 2.1: Demonstrate understanding of concepts/theories of management (RBTL2)

PLO 2.2: Utilize domain specific concepts/techniques to address business problems (RBTL3)

PLO 2.3: Examine business decisions with cross functional lens (RBTL4)

PLO 2.4: Compare organizational practices to theoretical frameworks (RBTL5)

PLO 2.5: Estimate relevance of management theories in business scenarios (RBTL6)

PLG 3: ? Communication

PLO 3.1: Oral Communication - Summarize key facts with clarity (RBTL2)

PLO 3.2: Oral Communication - Organize content with appropriate structure and style (RBTL3)

PLO 3.3: Oral Communication - Choose appropriate language (verbal and non-verbal) while expressing views (RBTL5)

PLO 3.4: Written Communication - Demonstrate clarity and coherence in writing (RBTL2)

PLO 3. 5: Written Communication - Develop documents with appropriate structure and style (RBTL3)

PLG 4: Problem Solving (Our students will be equipped to solve problems in a scientific manner)

PLO 4.1 : Outline relevant facts in the context (RBTL2)

PLO 4.2: Identify causes of the problem (RBTL3)

PLO 4.3: List relevant assumptions (RBTL4)

PLO 4.4: Choose appropriate framework for analysis (RBTL5)

PLO 4.5: Propose possible solutions with their implications (RBTL6)

PLG5: Managerial Acumen(PSO)

PLO5.1: Demonstrate understanding of business stakeholders? perspectives PLO 5.2 Identify business opportunities and challenges (RBTL3)

PLO5.2: Identify implications of business decisions on relevant stakeholders (RBTL3)

PLO5.3: Examine business decisions from compliance perspectives (RBTL4)

PLO5.4: Estimate business risks through environmental scanning (RBTL5)

PLO5.5: Discuss models for business performance from a multi-stakeholder perspective (RBTL6)

Assesment Pattern

CIA 1 - 20 Marks  - Quiz / Test / Written Assignment/Case analysis/Simulation exercises

CIA 2 - Mid sem exam - 50 Marks converted to 25 Marks - Simple/Medium/Complex questions - 2/5/10 Marks + Case study - 10 Marks

CIA 3 - 20 Marks - Presentation/Role Play/Case presentation/Mini project/Research based - Article review/Book review/Mastery project

End sem exam - 50 Marks converted to 30 Marks - Simple/Medium/Complex questions - 2/5/10 Marks + Case study - 10 Marks

Attendance - 5 Marks

 
Examination And Assesments

Classroom instruction through audio visual aids.

Case studies.

Role-play.

Industry visits.

Industry placements.

Projects.

Field visits.

Seminar presentations.

BBA131 - PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

The dynamic business environment, compels managers to perform a challenging role in steering the organisations' success to new heights. This comprehensive introductory course has been designed to provide valuable insights into the functions of modern day managers. By tracing the historical evolution of management thought, it explores the basic concepts, principles and theories of management. It orients the learners towards basic understanding of managerial functions like planning, organising, staffing, motivation, communication, controlling and supervision. By focusing on the contemporary challenges faced by organizations in recent years, it enables the proponents to cater to global needs and gather skills that ensures employability and sustainability in the corporate world. 

 

 

  • To outline the fundamental activities of managers

  • To explain the basic concepts, principles and theories of management 

  • To examine the broad functions of management

  • To propose initiatives to address the contemporary social issues and challenges in the field of management 

  • To determine ethical workplace practices

Course Outcome

C01: Demonstrate understanding the role of managers in an organisation

CO2: Summarise the elementary concepts, principles and theories of management

CO3: Examine the managerial functions having an impact on the organisational effectiveness

CO4: Identify the contemporary issues and challenges in management

CO5: Develop ethical workplace practices

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT
 

Definition – nature, process and significance of management –Role of managers – Managerial Skills and Roles - Evolution of Management Thought : Classical Management Approaches, Behavioural Management Approaches, Quantitative Management Approaches, Modern Management Approaches -  Management as a Science or Art - Management as a profession- Administration and Management- Functions of Management – Functional Areas of Management. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
PLANNING AND DECISION MAKING
 

Planning - Nature and Importance of Planning- Types of Plans - Levels of Planning - Steps in planning - Making Effective Plans- Objectives and Management By Objective (MBO) –Management By Exception (MBE) -  Policy and Strategy- Forecasting and Decision Making - Nature of decision making - Types of decisions – Decision Making Process – Rational Perspectives and Behavioural Aspects of decision making.         

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
ORGANIZING
 

Organizing - Nature and purpose - Principles of Organization - Types of Organization - Organisational Structure and Design – Line, Staff and functional authority – Conflict between Line and Staff – Overcoming the Line-Staff Conflict. Committees, Departmentation - Span of control – Authority, Responsibility and Accountability - Principles of Delegation - Steps - Centralization Vs Decentralization – Factors determining the degree of Decentralization of authority.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
STAFFING
 

Staffing - Nature and Purpose of staffing – Importance of staffing – Components of Staffing - Manpower planning - Recruitment and Selection - Training and Development - Performance Appraisal.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
DIRECTING
 

Directing – Nature of Directing function - Principles – Importance of Effective Direction – Motivating people at work – Motivation theories: Early theories, Contemporary theories – Morale Building – Job Satisfaction - Effective Communication skills for directing – Barriers of communication.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:7
CONTROLLING AND SUPERVISION
 

Controlling - Concept, Nature and Importance - Essentials of Control - Requirements of an Effective Control System – Behavioural Implications of Control – Techniques of Managerial control - Co-ordination – Need for co-ordination – Types of Co-ordination - Techniques of Coordination - Cooperation. Supervision – Position of a supervisor – Qualities of a good supervisor – Key Man – Man in the middle – Middle marginal man – Human relations specialist – Essential requirements of effective supervision.

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:4
CONTEMPORARY ISSUES AND CHALLENGES IN MANAGEMENT OF 21st CENTURY
 

Leadership and change, Total quality management, Work force diversity, Globalization and innovation, Enterprise mobility, How to manage and control virtual teams, creating an ethical workplace.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Stoner, Freeman, Gilbert Jr. (2014). Management (6th edition), New Delhi: Prentice Hall India.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Daft, R. L. (2009). Principles of Management (1st edition), Cengage Learning.
  2. Gupta, R.S., Sharma, B.D., & Bhalla. N.S. (2011). Principles & Practices of Management (11th edition). New Delhi: Kalyani Publishers.
  3. Williams. Management, (International edition) South-western Cengage Learning.
  4. John R. Schermerhorn. Management, Wiley-India
  5. Koontz, H., & Weihrich, H.  Essentials of Management, McGraw Hill Publishers.
  6. L M Prasad, (2007). Principles and Practices of Management, Himalaya Publishing House
  7. Rao, P.S. (2009). Principles of Management, Himalaya Publishing House.
  8. Moshal, B.S. Principles of Management, Ane Books.
Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 - 20 M

CIA 2 - 50 M

CIA 3 - 20 M

End Semester - 50 M

BBA132 - FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course intends to introduce basic accounting principles and practices. It also deals with subsidiary books maintained in business organizations. The students will have knowledge about the fundamental accounting processes such as journalizing, ledger posting, preparation of trial balance and final accounts in sole trading business. It also deals with providing an overview of accounting standards and IFRS. This course will be useful for all those who are desirous of having an understanding and application of financial dynamics of the business and become successful financial managers/entrepreneurs. 

 

Course Objectives:

  • To provide an understanding of application of various principles and practice of Accounting.
  • To demonstrate the knowledge on the process of accounting cycle and basic steps involved in Accounting.
  • To extend the knowledge of systematic maintenance of books of accounts to real life business.
  • To estimate Annual Financial statements of Sole proprietorship form of business.
  • To outline the need for Accounting standards and IFRS.

 

 

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Identify the application of various principles and practice of Accounting in preparation of accounting statements.

CO2: Demonstrate the knowledge on the process of accounting cycle.

CO3: Extend the knowledge of systematic maintenance of books of accounts to real life business.

CO4: Estimate Annual Financial statements of Sole proprietorship form of business

CO5: Outline the need for Accounting standards and IFRS

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to Accounting
 

Meaning, Need for accounting, Internal and External users of accounting information, limitations of accounting, accounting Concepts and Conventions, Accounting Practices, Generally Accepted Accounting Principles.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Accounting systems & process
 

Nature of Accounting, Accounting equation - Systems of Accounting, Process of Accounting transactions- types of Accounts, Rules of Accounting. Journal - Meaning, features, simple and compound entries, Including recording of GST transactions, Capital and revenue expenditures, Capital and revenue receipts, Contingent assets and contingent liabilities, Preparation of ledgers and Trial balance.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Subsidiary books
 

Conceptual introduction to subsidiary books - Sales book, Sales return book, Purchases book, Purchase returns book, receivable book, payable book. Practical problems in Cash Book- Single column, double column, and three columnar cash book.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Bank reconciliation statement
 

Need for reconciliation and preparation of bank reconciliation statement.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
Rectification of Errors
 

Need for rectification of errors, types of errors, process of rectification and accounting entries of rectification.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:12
Final Accounts
 

Preparation of Trading and Profit and Loss account and Balance Sheet of sole trading concerns.

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:4
Accounting standards and IFRS
 

Types of Accounting standards, Need for IFRS, Ind AS and IFRS.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Jain S.P.,& Narang K L. (2020). Basic Financial Accounting I, New Dehli, Kalyani publishers.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Maheshwari, S.N., &Maheshwari, S.K. (2020). Advanced Accountancy1, New Delhi: Jain Book Agency.
  2. Shukla, M. (2020). Advanced Accounts, New Delhi, S Chand Group
  3. Radhaswamy, M & Gupta, R.L. (2020).Advanced Accountancy 2, New Delhi, Sultan Chand & Sons.
  4. Reddy, A. (2020). Fundamentals of Accounting, New Delhi, Himalaya Publishing House
  5. Gupta, A. (2020). Financial Accounting for Management: An Analytical Perspective, Noida, Pearson Education.
  6. Raman, B. S. (2014). Financial Accounting (1stedi).I & II, New Dehli:United Publishers.
  7. Porter, G.A., & Norton, C.L. (2013). Financial Accounting (IFRS update)( 6thedi), Cengage Learning.
  8. Jawahar Lal & Seema Srivastava (2013). Financial Accounting  New Delhi:Himalaya Publishing House.
  9. Arora M. N. (2013). Accounting For Management. New Delhi: Himalaya Publishing House.
  10. Bhattacharya .(2013). Essentials of Financial Accounting (Based on IFRS) (2ndedi), Prentice Hall India.
Evaluation Pattern

Component of Final Grade

Max Marks per Component

Weightage towards Final Grade

Total Marks per Component in Final Grade

CIA-I

20

20 %

20

CIA-II

50

25 %

25

CIA-III

20

20 %

20

End – Term

50

30 %

30

Attendance

5

5 %

5

Total

   

100

BBA133 - MICROECONOMICS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

This common core course helps students to think in the economic way of establishing a connection between unlimited wants and limited resources available to an individual, firm and the society.  It deals with the application of economic analysis in formulation of business decisions.  In this context, the course deals with demand, supply, pricing, theory of consumer choice, theories of production and market structures.

Course Objectives: This course aims to help students to:

● Describe how economic trade-offs and social values impact business decisions.

● Understand the causes and consequences of different market conditions.

●  Explain the theory of consumer choice using the utility concepts.

● Make use of the concept of market equilibrium in business decisions.

● Analyse cost of production and revenue of business operations.

 

● Evaluate the market outcome(s) under different market structure.

Course Outcome

CO1: Describe how economic trade-offs and social values impact business decisions.

CO2: Understand the causes and consequences of different market conditions

CO3: Explain the theory of consumer choice using the utility concepts.

CO4: Make use of the concept of market equilibrium in business decisions.

CO5: Analyse cost of production and revenue of business operations

CO6: Evaluate the market outcome(s) under different market structure

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Unit I Basic Concepts
 

 

Ten Principles of Economics: How People Make Decisions - How people Interact - How the Economy as a Whole Works; Thinking Like an Economist - Role of Observations, Theory and Assumptions in Economics; Role of Economic models - The Circular Flow Diagram - Production Possibility Frontier - Opportunity Cost; Central Problems of an Economy; Microeconomics and Macroeconomics.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Unit II The Basics of Supply and Demand
 

Markets and Competition; Demand - Law of Demand, Exceptions to the Law - Market Demand - Changes in Demand; Supply - Law of Supply, Exceptions to the Law - Market Supply - Changes in Supply; Equilibrium – Steps - Changes in Equilibrium.    

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:7
Unit III Elasticity and its Application
 

Elasticity of Demand - Price Elasticity and Its Determinants - Methods of Measurement - Degrees of Price Elasticity - Total Revenue and Price elasticity; Income Elasticity Demand; Cross Elasticity Demand; Elasticity of Supply-Determinants - Measurement and Degrees.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Unit IV Theory of Consumer Behaviour
 

Utility - Characteristics and Types - Cardinal and ordinal Utility analysis – Law of Diminishing Marginal utility; Budget Constraint; Indifference curves - Properties, Consumer’s equilibrium - Price Effect - Income Effect and Substitution Effect.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Unit V Market Efficiency and Externalities
 

Consumers, Producers and the Efficiency of the Markets: Consumers surplus (Marshall) - Producer surplus and Market efficiency; Externalities and Market Inefficiency - Negative and Positive.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Unit VI Theory of Production and Cost
 

Production Function; Law of Variable Proportions; Law of returns, Economies of Scale; Iso-quants and Iso-cost lines. Cost Function - Important Cost Concepts; Short Run and Long Run Cost Analysis (traditional theory) - Modern theory of cost; Long Run and short Run Revenue analysis.

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:12
Unit VII Market Structure and Competitive Strategy
 

Market structure - Perfect Competition - Price and Output Determination - Role of Time Element in Market Price Determination; Monopoly - Price and output determination, Price Discrimination; Monopolistic Competition - Price and Output Determination-Selling Costs - Product Differentiation – Oligopoly - Duopoly Example - Price Determination (Collusive Pricing, Price Leadership).                                      

Text Books And Reference Books:

Essential Reading:

 

Gregory Mankiw, N. (2019), Principles of Economics, 8th Edition, Cengage Learning India.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Recommended Reading

1. Robert S Pindyck and Daniel L Rubinfeld (2013), Microeconomics, 8th Edition, New York: Pearson.

2. Salvatore, D. (2011). Managerial Economics in a Global Economy (7thed.). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

3. Sen, Anindy (2006). Microeconomics: Theory and application (2nded.). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

4. Salvatore, D. (2019). Microeconomics Theory and Applications (5thed.). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

5. Lipsey, R. G., & Chrystal, K. A. (1999). Principles of Economics (9thed.). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

 

6. Samuelson, P. A., & Nordhaus, W.D. (2010). Economics (19thed.). New Delhi:  McGraw-Hill Companies.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-I – 20 Marks

            CIA 1 A-Assignment - Marks: 20 (Will be brought down to 10 Marks)

            CIA 1 B- Quiz- Marks: 20 (Will be brought down to 10 Marks)

CIA II- Mid Semester Examination- 25 Marks

(MSE 50 Marks, will be brought down to 25 Marks)

CIA III-20 Marks

CIA III-Assignment - Marks: 20

End Semester Exam 30 Marks

(MSE 50 Marks, will be brought down to 25 Marks)

Attendance 5 Marks

 

Total 100 Marks

BBH111 - SOCIAL SENSITIVITY SKILLS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:0

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course develops social sensitivity skill, a practice by which an individual can observe, identify, and understand the indications from socio-cultural contexts and social interactions or relationships. Social sensitivity allows students to be respectful of people around them and their respective environment. Social sensitivity combines emotional, social, and adaptive intelligence and helps students to fully prepare for ‘new normal’ expectations from all walks of life, especially business.

Course Objectives:

 

1)      To create self-awareness on social and cultural diversity and individuality

 

2)      To sensitize in responsible and meaningful behaviour with multicultural people and/or milieu

Course Outcome

CLO1 : Develop listening, observing, interactive and participative skills

CLO2: Develop empathy, objective analysis, and self-reflection

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:13
Capacity building
 

UNIT–I                                                                                                                       10 Hrs

 

Level of Knowledge: Basic

Capacity building – how to listen, how to observe, how to interact, how to participate, how to develop ‘we-feeling’, how to understand ‘other’, how to solve problems.

 

EVALUATION–I                                                                                                       3 Hrs

Individual Activity

Capturing Lifestory – Choose a person you like and ask him/her to narrate the lifestory to you. Record it and convert into text exactly (verbal and nonverbal cues - voice, tone, emotions, pause, etc.). Now interpret (without any judgment) his/her lifestory in your own words and present it in the class.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:17
Relationship building
 

Level of Knowledge: Conceptual

 

Relationship building – emotional intelligence, social intelligence, adaptive intelligence, mindfulness, daily reflection, acceptable and respectful behaviour, positive and helping attitude, constructive criticism and feedback.

 

EVALUATION–II                                                                                                         3 Hrs

Group Activity (2 member team)

Exchanging Culture– Choose a classmate from a very different cultural background than your own. Interact with each other and learn about each other’s culture. Make notes on the cultural differences and cultural shock (if any) with thoughtful understanding. Present each other’s culture as a team in the class - highlighting uniqueness in your friend’s culture, breaking stereotypes and identity labelling of his/her culture.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Theresa Cheung. The Sensitivity Code: Life strategies for thriving in an overwhelming world. London, Thread Publication, 2020 (editions in Paperback, Kindle, Audiobook).

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Martin M. Antony and Richard P. Swinson. The Shyness and Social Anxiety Workbook: Proven, Step-by-Step Techniques for Overcoming Your Fear. Oakland: Canada, New Harbinger Publications, Inc., 2017 (editions in Paperback, Kindle).

Evaluation Pattern

EVALUATION–I                                                                                                       3 Hrs

Individual Activity

Capturing Lifestory – Choose a person you like and ask him/her to narrate the lifestory to you. Record it and convert into text exactly (verbal and nonverbal cues - voice, tone, emotions, pause, etc.). Now interpret (without any judgment) his/her lifestory in your own words and present it in the class. ( 50 Marks)

EVALUATION–II                                                                                                         3 Hrs

Group Activity (2 member team)

 

Exchanging Culture– Choose a classmate from a very different cultural background than your own. Interact with each other and learn about each other’s culture. Make notes on the cultural differences and cultural shock (if any) with thoughtful understanding. Present each other’s culture as a team in the class - highlighting uniqueness in your friend’s culture, breaking stereotypes and identity labelling of his/her culture.

 

BBH134 - BUSINESS MATHEMATICS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: In recent times Mathematics has emerged as the key for major decision making process. The subject is introduced as to give the basic subject giving emphasis on the applications in business. Understanding of mathematical models is essential to project the real life scenario in s simplified form in business. The study of matrices helps to handle mathematical models with many variables. The decision making environment is so complex that the right and appropriate decision can only be made with good analytical skills. The subject is introduced with such an outlook.

Course Objectives

  he basic objective of teaching Business Mathematics is for students to appreciate and apply mathematical concepts in decision making.

     To understand difference between mathematical equations and inequalities and their solutions

     To be able to appreciate uses of Mathematical models in real life situations

  •  To understand commercial arithmetic and calculus and its applications

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the importance of Mathematical concepts in business environment.

CO2: Apply Mathematical concepts in solving simple problems

CO3: Demonstrate knowledge of mathematics and apply in business situations

CO4: Compare techniques learnt and apply them in real life scenario

CO5: Construct simple mathematical models and compare them

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
Linear Models:
 

Linear Equations and Straight Lines- Coordinate systems and Graphs

Linear Inequalities – standard form, slope of a straight line. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
System of Linear Equations And Matrices
 

Addition of matrices – System of linear equations, addition and multiplication of Matrices –Determinants – Inverse of a matrix by Gauss Jordan method.  Application of matrices and Determinants – Solution of a system of linear equations- Gauss elimination method.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Linear Programming Problems
 

Definition – Linear Programming Problem – Formulation – Solution by Graphical method – minimization and maximization problems – concept of simplex method (only theory).

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Transportation and Assignment Models
 

TP as a LP model, Nature and scope of transportation and allocation models, Methods of allocation, different methods for finding initial solution -  N-W Corner Rule, Least Cost Method and VAM.  Unbalanced TP, Problems. AP a variant of Transportation model, Hungerian method, Problems.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Commercial Arithmetic
 

Simple interest – Compound Interest. Equivalent Rate –   Depreciation - Present value. Annuity – Sinking Fund.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Calculus
 

Limits – Differentiation - Methods of differentiation – Second order derivative – Maxima and Minima. 

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:5
Application to commerce and Economics
 

Revenue Function – Cost function –      Profit function – Elasticity of demand – Breakeven point.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Singh, J.K (2017). Business Mathematics (6th Edition). Mumbai, Himalaya Publishing House.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

        Sancheti, D. C., & Kapoor, V. K. (2009). Business Mathematics. New Delhi: Sultan Chand and Sons.

 

        Padmalochan, H. (2015). A Text Book of Business Mathematics, New Delhi: Sultan Chand and Sons.

 

        G K Ranganath& T V Narasimha Rao. Business Mathematics. New Delhi: Himalaya Publishing House.

Larry J Goldstein, David I Schneider  & Martha J Siegel Finite Mathematics and its

 

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment:

CIA 1

20 marks

Mid Semester

25 Marks

 

CIA III

20 Marks

End semester

30 Marks

Total Marks

Individual Assignment

Written Exam =50 marks

 

 

Group

Assignment

Written Exam =50 marks

 

100

BBS161A - COURTESY AND ETIQUETTES (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course examines the relationship between language use, enormous variety of language experiences, belief systems, and behavioral patterns. On the other hand Etiquette helps smooth the path of our daily activities, whether it's meeting others in our daily interactions talking to someone on the phone, offering condolences properly or understanding how to talk to colleagues at a business conference. Being aware of the beliefs attitudes and etiquettes of individuals will help one to become more tolerant from one individual to the next and from one group to the next.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Able to practice critical thoughts in comprehending the notion of culture, its relationship with language, Etiquettes and the key concepts of cross ?cultural Communication.

CO2: Describes ways to apply proper courtesy in different situations

CO3: Understand the change that constantly undergoes in personal and social use.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction: Greetings and Courtesy
 

Greeting a person, - the different ways of greeting, saying goodbye to another person, Thank You, Excuse me, Introduction to oneself, Yawning, Coughing, Interrupting, Offering assistance/ help, refusing help, requesting privacy, speaking in a low voice,(speaking etiquette) waiting for help, accepting or declining an invitation, expressing admiration, The key principles of common courtesy, professional manners and the Golden Rule as they are practiced in the workplace environmentClassroom Etiquette and Student Behavior Guidelines, The guidelines for maintaining a civil classroom environment

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Manners and civility
 

Introduction to adjusting to a new culture, Theories on second language and culture acquisition, communication, National Standards, Culture acquisition through family and Homestays, Distinguish among the three main forms of communication in the workplace: verbal, nonverbal, and virtual. Proper and improper uses of workplace communication, the potential repercussions of poor listening in the workplace, the proper and improper use of technology in the workplace

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Etiquette
 

Why Etiquette Matters, Identify common cultural differences, taboos, and customs that may be practiced in the workplace, Discuss ways to navigate and honor cultural differences in the workplace, Describe how to express an appropriate awareness of international and other customs. The Common Courtesies of Life, Polite Conversation, Telephone Etiquette, Correspondence, Basic Table Manners, Overnight Guests, Wedding Etiquette, Moments of Sorrow, Appropriate Behavior for Children, Gift Giving Guidelines.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Business Etiquette
 

Introduction to Modern Etiquette, The Rules of the Workplace, Meetings and Introductions, Conversation and Listening Skills, Telephone/Cell Phone, Texting, Emailing and Internet Etiquette, Etiquette in Public Places, Employment/Volunteer Etiquette, Dining Etiquette, Social Gathering Etiquette (Guest and Host/Hostess), School Etiquette, Confidence Without Arrogance

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:7
Personal and professional Presentation
 

Restaurant Etiquette, Cellphone Etiquette, Voice Mail Etiquette, Air Travel Etiquette, Cocktail Party Etiquette, Office Gossip Etiquette, Business Dress Etiquette, Email Etiquette, Social Media Etiquette, Job Interview Etiquette, International Etiquette

Text Books And Reference Books:

Books on Common etiquettes

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Etiquette books

Evaluation Pattern

Students are evaluated on the basis of class performance and they have to do CIAs and exclusive Class presentations and workshops to create awarness on the etiquettes they have learned in the class

BBS161B - A LIFE WORTH LIVING-FROM HEALTH TO WELL BEING (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course focuses on the knowledge and skills that students require to lead a healthy, productive and balanced life.

To examine health in its truest sense, one must explore beyond the limits of medicine to engage a much wider set of questions embracing social, cultural, political, economic, moral and spiritual aspects of human experience. 

Course Outcome

CLO1: Explain health as a multi-dimensional and dynamic concept, which necessarily integrates individual, societal, biomedical, spiritual, cultural and historical influences, and how this relates to health issues encountered in everyday life.

CLO2: Assess the inter-relatedness of health perceptions and practices across cultures.

CLO3: Discuss personal responsibilities towards achieving well being in a rational way and how this contributes to the individual, community and global good

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to health
 

Health of individuals and communities – The significance of determinants of health and how these raise or lower the health of individuals and communities - Health promotion to improve health - Personal and popular attitudes and beliefs and their impact on decision making - self-management - interpersonal and key consumer health skills - Factors influencing health, and actions and strategies to protect and promote health, through investigation and inquiry processes.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Food and Values
 

Philosophy of food, Values – Three different types of values, Meat – Is it wrong to eat animals?Hunger – Do we have a duty to help starving people? - Drugs – Why is it wrong to take drugs? - GM food – How should food technology be regulated? - Capitalism – Food, globalization, and equality - Art – Can food be art? What is art? - Taste – Is taste entirely subjective? - Science – Can science explain conscious taste experiences? -Eating – Eat to live, or live to eat

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Nutrition
 

Balanced diet & Nutrition, Macro and micro nutrients – Nutritive and non nutritive components of diet – Eating for weight control – healthy weight – The pitfalls of dieting – food intolerance and food myths – Food supplements for adolescents. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Physical Education
 

Concept of physical education – Meaning – definition – aims – objectives of physical education and fitness – Need & importance of fitness – Types of fitness – Health related physical fitness – performance related physical fitness – physical activities and health benefits - Activities for developing physical fitness

What is sleep? – The phylogeny of sleep – Developmental course of sleep – Dreams- Functions of sleep – Daytime sleepiness and alertness – Sleep disorders.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Spirituality, Religion and Social Change
 

Meaning of life - Meaning of death- Indian Rituals, symbols, and myths - Spirituality, altruism and moral justice - Resources to deal with stress, temptations, disappointments and failures, social oppression, the loss of possessions and of loved ones, and with one’s own death. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Indian Journals of health and well being

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Indian Journals of health and well being

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1: 20 marks

Midterm exam: 25

CIA 3: 20

Endterm exam: 30

Attendance: 5

 

BBS161C - MAHABHARATHA AND MODERN MANAGEMENT (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

The Mahabharata of the great Maharishi Veda Vyasa is a treasure trove of knowledge, principles and paradigms. It is written that what is not in the Mahabharata will not be found elsewhere. Written nearly thousands of years ago, the Mahabharata is as yet a source of knowledge, especially modern management principles.In essence it highlights the victory of Dharma in times of Adharma.This subject is a comprehensive learning on management lessons which can be inferred from the great epic. It gives a clear understanding and comparison of management Principles, practices and the various functions of management with the epic. The syllabus is structured to provide basic conceptual knowledge on the principles of management. It also deals with behavioral issues in the individual processes, group and interpersonal processes.

Course Objectives:

  •  Discuss the epic by summarizing the various parvas/units in class in accordance with the management concept
  •  Review and make a critical estimate of the epic with a focus on morals, ethics, legal and management concepts
  • To develop competencies and knowledge of students to become effective professionals

Course Outcome

CO1: Explain the fundamentals of management, its functions and the utilization of critical thinking skills in relation to principles, and theories.

CO2: Explain the structure and the operations of management by citing relevant situation/instances from the epic

CO3: Develop an understanding of moral, ethical & legal dimension before any decision by citing relevant situation/instances from the epic

CO4: Express the literary beauty and cultural significance of Mahabharata and to reflect the relevant content to the issues of our own times

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to Mahabharatha
 

The older generations-The Pandava and Kaurava princes- Lakshagraha (the house of lac)

Establishment of the kingdom-Administration and Management principles

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Marriage and Building of New city
 

Marriage to Draupadi- An event study approach.

Indraprastha-A new beginning- Pressure for change – Change process, Types of change, Factors influencing change, Resistance to change

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
The Big Game
 

The dice game- Cooperative strategies & Reasons for strategic alliances-

Exile and return- Risks and costs of strategic alliances

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
The battle at Kurukshetra
 

The battle at Kurukshetra - Strategic Planning and Management- levels at which strategy operates- Event approaches to strategic decision making,

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Post Kurukshetra
 

The end of the Pandavas- Succession Planning,Authority and Responsibility

The reunion Organizing- Choosing the organizational structure

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Stoner, Freeman, Gilbert Jr. (2014). Management (6th edition), New Delhi: Prentice Hall India.

Rao, V.S.P., & Krishna, V.H., (2011). Strategic Management: Text and Cases. New Delhi: Excel Books.

Pratap Chandra Roy ,The complete Mahabharata translated into English prose directly from the original sanskrit text.(1st Edition) oriental publishing co.

Source: Jaya - An Illustrated Retelling of the Mahabharata

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

C Rajagopalachari (2017). Mahabharata (63rdedition), Mumbai: Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 10 Marks

MSE   30 Marks

CIA 3 10 Marks

End Assesment 50 Marks

BECO161A - INSTITUTIONS AND INFORMAL ECONOMY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

The primary aim of this course is to introduce students to the concept of institutions and the informal economy in a global context. The discourse examines the informal economy through the lens of institutional economics. The aim is to acquaint students to significant discourses and issues in policy design and intervention.  

 

Course Objectives

This course aims to help students to:

  • outline the concept of institutions and institutional change through some of the major theoretical constructs in institutional economics.
  • summarize and illustrate the various mechanisms of the informal economy connecting the theoretical concept to issues of measurement.
  • examine the linkages of formal and informal economy;
  • train students to hone their writing and presentation skills to effectively discuss these complex ideas.

Course Outcome

CO1: Illustrate the major concepts and explain some of the theoretical discourses in the study of institutional change and the informal economy.

CO2: Examine how the formal and informal economies are no longer separate watertight compartments but function together as an interactive system

CO3: Apply these complex ideas of property rights and transaction costs to their own research

CO4: Demonstrate their research findings through written and oral presentation

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Institutions and Institutional Change
 

Institutions, Economic Theory and Economic Performance; Informal Constraints; Formal Constraints; The Path of Institutional Change

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Elements of Institutional Economics
 

Contracts and Property Rights: the Concepts of Exchange and Property, Critique of the Utilitarian Calculus; Transaction Costs, Bargaining Power; Markets as Institutions; Firms and Markets

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Informality: Concepts, Theory and Measurement
 

Bureaucratic Form and the Informal Economy; The Relevance of the concepts of formality and informality : A Theoretical Appraisal; Formal and Informal Enterprises: Concepts, Definition, and Measurement Issues in India

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Linking the Formal and Informal Economy
 

Rethinking Informal Economy: Linkages with the Formal Economy and the Formal Regulatory Environment; Technology and Informality

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
Empirical Studies in Institutional Change and Informality
 

The Impact of Regulation on Growth and Informality: Cross-Country Evidence; Blocking Human Potential: How Formal Policies Block the Economy in the Maputo Corridor; Enforcement and Compliance in Lima’s Street Markets: The Origins and Consequences of Policy Incoherence towards Informal Traders

Text Books And Reference Books:

Essential Readings

Alston, L. J., Eggertsson, T., & North, D. C. (Eds.). (1996). Empirical Studies in Institutional Change. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Guha-Khasnobis, B., Kanbur, R., & Ostrom, E. (Eds.). (2006). Linking the Formal and Informal Economy: Concepts and Policies. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Misztal, B. (2002). Informality: Social theory and Contemporary Practice. Routledge.

North, D. (1990). Institutions, Economic Theory and Economic PerformanceInstitutions, Institutional Change and Economic Performance. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Recommended Readings

Arias, O., Fajnzylber, P., Maloney, W., Mason, A., Perry, G., & Saavedra-Chanduvi, J. (2007). Informality: Exit and Exclusion. Washington: The World Bank.

Harris, J. (2006). Power Matters: Essays on Institutions, Politics, and Society in India. New York: Oxford University Press.

Mehta, P. B., & Kapur, D. (2005). Public Institutions in India: Performance and Design. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

Nayyar, D. (Ed.). (2002). Governing Globalization: Issues and Institutions. Oxford University Press.

Oviedo, A. M. (2009). Economic Informality: Causes, Costs, and Policies: A Literature Survey of International Experience. Country Economic Memorandum (CEM).

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

Course title

MSE (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

Attendance

Institutions and Informal Economy

45%

50%

5%

 

Mid Semester Examination

Group/Individual Assignment

45 Marks

 

End Semester Examination

Group/Individual Assignment

50 Marks

 

BECO161B - ECONOMICS OF CORRUPTION (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

This course is aimed at undergraduate students to introduce to them the prominent debates in the economics of corruption. The course discusses how corruption acts as a constraint on economic growth using the theoretical constructs in Political Economy. It allows students to delve into the causes and consequences of corruption. In particular, the course will examine how corruption affects the emerging economies. The course will consider some of the seminal papers on the economics of corruption.

 Course Objectives:

This course will help students to:

  1. acquaint with significant debates about transparency, competition and privatization and their relevance to corruption;
  1. analyse corruption in emerging economies through various case studies;
  1. discuss issues from various perspectives, such as viewing corruption as erosion of trust and abuse of power;
  2. train the students to hone their writing and presentation skills to effectively discuss complex ideas.

Course Outcome

CO1: identify the nuances in the way corruption is defined and interpreted in different economies.

CO2: investigate some impacts of corruption on emerging economies.

CO3: analyse the cause and consequences of corruption and examine some of the policies and reforms aimed at tackling corruption

CO4: present complex ideas through written and oral presentations.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Corruption, Poor Governance and Institutional Structure
 

Causes and Consequences of Corruption: What do we know from a cross-section of countries? Democratic Institutions and Corruption: Incentives and Constraints in Politics, Bargaining for Bribes: The Role of Institutions.

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Corruption and the Private Sector
 

The Privatization of Rent-Generating Industries and Corruption; Corruption in Private Sector, Why the private sector is likely to lead the next stage in the global fight against corruption.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Tackling Corruption
 

Corruption and Policy Reform; Anti-Corruption Authorities: An Effective Tool to Curb Corruption?  Corruption and Competition: Fair Markets as an Anti-Corruption Device. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Auriol, E., & Straub, S. (2011). Privatization of Rent-generating Industries and Corruption. In S. Rose-Ackerman & T. Søreide, (Eds.). International Handbook on the Economics of Corruption, (Vol. 2). Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Pub.

Burger, E. S., & Holland, M. S. (2006). Why the private sector is likely to lead the next stage in the global fight against corruption. Fordham International Law Journal, 30, 45.

Meschi, P. X. (2009). Government Corruption and Foreign Stakes in International Joint Ventures in Emerging Economies. Asia Pacific Journal of Management, 26(2), 241-261.

Meyer, K. E., Estrin, S., Bhaumik, S. K., & Peng, M. W. (2009). Institutions, Resources, and Entry Strategies in Emerging Economies. Strategic Management Journal, 30(1), 61-80.

Nowakowski, K. (2010). Corruption in the Private Sector. Economics and Law, 6(1), 345-360.

Uhlenbruck, K., Rodriguez, P., Doh, J., & Eden, L. (2006). The Impact of Corruption on

Entry Strategy: Evidence from Telecommunication Projects in Emerging Economies. Organization Science, 17(3), 402-414. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Cartier-Bresson, J. (2000). Economics of corruption. Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. The OECD Observer, (220), 25.

Jain, A. K. (2001). Corruption: A Review. Journal of Economic Surveys, 15(1), 71-121.

Jain, A. K. (Ed.). (2012). Economics of Corruption (Vol. 65). Springer Science & Business Media.

Rose-Ackerman, S. (1975). The Economics of Corruption. Journal of Public Economics, 4(2), 187-203.

Evaluation Pattern

 

Course title

MSE (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

Attendance

The Economics of Corruption

45%

50%

5%

Mid Semester Examination

Group/Individual Assignment

45 Marks

End Semester Examination

Group/Individual Assignment

50 Marks

 

 

BEN121 - LANGUAGE IN CONTEXT-I (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is an attempt by the English Studies, School of Business Studies and Social Sciences, Christ University to recognise and bring together English language in context i.e.,  in a natural way through the contents that are important not only to self but also to society.

The course titled Language in Context aims to familiarise the first-year students of Business Studies (Honours & Tourism) with literatures in varieties of forms, thereby, enabling them to learn more about culture, ethos contemporary societies through writings from different regions. We have tried in our little way to represent the world through sensible expressions in the form of short stories, poems, essays, videos and blogs. This course is designed to impart the linguistic skills of the student as well. The course consists of four units such as Society and Self, Democracy and Dissent, Equity and Equality, and Ecological Care and Concerns. Each unit is composed of an essay, poem, short story, blog posts, graphic essay and comics related to identified areas. It is aimed at improving students’ linguistic skills that can help them to take a leap from textbooks to newspapers or full-length novels. The contents of the course carry the message of ethical concerns that future business entrepreneurs are supposed to equip themselves with for a progressive and equitable society.

The various texts across the two semesters deal with various social, economic, and political issues that are relevant to the modern-day world and it helps us to negotiate with everyday situations in a more proactive way. The various short stories and poems touch upon questions of self and identity, human interactions, and social relationships sometimes in a straightforward manner, sometimes in an abstract way. But all of them, be it in the manner of their writing or the themes they deal with, or the ideologies that govern them are quintessentially contemporary in ethos, sense and sensibility, whether written by Indians or authors from other parts of the world. 

Pedagogy:

The teachers in charge of taking this course to the class are not only expected to elaborate, discuss and deliberate upon the topics given as a part of this course but are also expected to incorporate passive grammar and vocabulary development instructions as deemed fit according to the needs of the learners.

Course Objectives:

The course aims to inculcate in students:

●  An understanding of the English language through contexts.

●  An ability to discern different challenges that our society is facing now.

●  Facilitate acquisition of vocabulary, grammar, and discourse.

●  Integrate grammar and vocabulary skills to facilitate contextual understanding.

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate the ability to read and appreciate simple as well as complex essays or poems in English through class discussions and assignments.

CO2: Creatively demonstrate the concerns and care they have for society and self through class discussions and assignments.

CO3: Speak on the topics that address the common people's concerns through presentations.

CO4: Apply reading, writing, listening, speaking and critical thinking skills within the context of the topics studied through composing essays and term papers.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Society and Self
 

Introducing the idea of individual as self and his/her inextricable link with the society. The problems one encounters as part of his/her societal interaction. Moreover, the texts also look at the ‘becoming’ process within the individual which comes as result of such interactions and interventions.

  • Subroto Bagchi (2006): Go Kiss the World (IIM B, Inaugural Speech)
  • Sushrut Jadhav et. al. (2015): Mental Health in India: Ecologies of Suffering‘New’ Caste https://psmag.com/news/how-english-creates-a-new-caste-system-in-india
  • ‘New’ Caste https://psmag.com/news/how-english-creates-a-new-castesystem- in-india
  • Linda Pastan: Girl Leaving Home (Cycle: Slam poetry at UnErase Poetry)

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Democracy and Dissent
 

Looking at the societal set up based on the discourse of consent and dissent. The texts selected, creates a platform for the students to ponder on practices which they found intelligently or contradictorily placed within the democratic fabric they follow.

       Amartya Sen: Democracy as Public Reason (Essay)

       Naomi Shihab Nye: To Any Would-Be Terrorists (Letter)

       Thangjam Ibopishak: I want to be Killed by an Indian Bullet (Poetry)

       Santosh Desai: The Death Penalty as a sign of the times? (Essay)

       O. Henry: The Cop and the Anthem (Short Story)

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Equity and Equality
 

Throwing more light on dissent and the nature of its evolution. The texts deliberate more specifically on the sections within the democratic set up, who still are designated as beings belonging to the periphery.

       Manjushree Thapa: Women Have No Nationality (Essay)

       Noam Chomsky (2015): One Day in the Life of a Reader of the New York Times

https://chomsky.info/20150406/

Or

       Noam Chomsky (2015): We Are All … Fill in the Blank

https://chomsky.info/20150110/

       Can ‘Castelessness’ fix caste? EPW Engage Infographic based on Satish Deshpande’s Caste and Caste and Castelessness: Towards a biography of ‘General Category’

       Hansda Sowvendra Shekhar (2017) November is the Month of Migrations (Story)

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Ecological Care and Concerns