CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH AND CULTURAL STUDIES

School of Arts and Humanities

Syllabus for
Master of Arts (English with Communication Studies)
Academic Year  (2022)

 
1 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MEL111A TECHNICAL WRITING Skill Enhancement Course 3 3 50
MEL111B MASS COMMUNICATION AND JOURNALISTIC WRITING Skill Enhancement Course 3 3 50
MEL131 BRITISH LITERATURE FROM RENAISSANCE TO POSTMODERNISM Core Courses 4 4 100
MEL132 INDIAN LITERATURES IN ENGLISH AND TRANSLATION Core Courses 4 4 100
MEL133 LITERARY CRITICISM AND THEORY-I Core Courses 4 4 100
MEL134 LINGUISTICS AND APPLIED LINGUISTICS Core Courses 4 4 100
MEL135 AUDIO VISUAL STUDIES: APPROACHES Core Courses 4 4 100
MEL136 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY-I Core Courses 2 2 50
2 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MEL211 SPEECH AND ACCENT - 3 2 50
MEL231 AMERICAN LITERATURES: VOICES FROM THE NATION - 4 4 100
MEL232 POSTCOLONIAL LITERATURES: CONCEPTS AND APPROACHES - 4 4 100
MEL233 LITERARY CRITICISM AND THEORY-II - 4 4 100
MEL234 CULTURAL STUDIES: FIELDS, ISSUES, METHODS - 4 4 100
MEL235 THEATRE FOR COMMUNICATION - 4 4 100
MEL236 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY-II - 2 0 0
3 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MEL341 POSTMODERN LITERATURES:TOWARDS CRITICAL POST HUMANISM Core Courses 4 4 100
MEL342 POSTCOLONAIL LITERATURES:TOWARDS DECOLONIALITY Core Courses 4 4 100
MEL343 LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE: TEACHING METHODS AND APPROACHES Core Courses 4 4 100
MEL344 LANGAUAGE AND SOCIETY Core Courses 4 4 100
MEL345 SOCIAL, POLITICAL AND OTHER ARENAS OF DEBATE ON CULTURE Core Courses 4 4 100
MEL346 GENDER STUDIES Core Courses 4 4 100
MEL347 DEVELOPING MEDIA SKILLS Core Courses 4 4 100
MEL348 DEVELOPING NARATIVES Core Courses 4 4 100
MEL349A INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY Discipline Specific Elective 3 2 50
MEL349B NET TRAINING Discipline Specific Elective 3 0 0
MEL381 INTERNSHIP Core Courses 4 4 100
4 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MEL441 WORLD LITERATURES - 4 4 100
MEL442 CREATIVE WRITING - 4 4 100
MEL443 LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE:TESTING AND ASSESSMENT - 4 4 100
MEL444 LANGUAGE,COGNITIVE ABILITIES AND DISORDERS - 4 4 100
MEL445 THE CULTURAL AND THE URBAN:INTERFACES AND INTERSECTIONS - 4 4 100
MEL446 CULTURES OF THE EVERYDAY:CONFLICTS,NEGOTIATIONS,AND POWER IN MANAGING - 4 4 100
MEL447 SOUND AS POPULAR CULTURE - 4 4 100
MEL448 FILM AND FILM CULTURE - 4 4 100
MEL449A SOCIAL INNOVATION AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP - 3 3 50
MEL449B SERVICE LEARNING - 3 3 50
MEL481 DISSERTATION - 4 4 100
      

    

Department Overview:

The Department of English in consonance with its mission statement is committed to promoting an intellectual climate through artistic creation, critical mediation and innovative ideation. The Department inculcates among its students a critical reading of the self, the society and the imagined with the aim of moulding them into responsible and socially sensitive citizens. The Department facilitates their holistic development by building emotional, academic, social, professional and global competencies. The Department aspires to create a nuanced understanding of canonical and non-canonical literary and cultural texts, their social milieu for an engaged and enduring understanding of life. The Department offers the following core courses: English Studies and MA English with Communication Studies; two full time Research Programmes namely: MPhil and PhD

Mission Statement:

Vision Towards critically reading Self, Society and the Imagined Mission The Department of English aspires to promote an intellectual climate through artistic creation, critical mediation and innovative ideation in a culture of reciprocal transformation.

Introduction to Program:

The Masters programme in English with Communication Studies aspires to sustain and revive an academic interest in literary and cultural theories. The papers offered are as contemporarily relevant as possible, even eclectic. A conscious effort is made to ensure that theories are grounded in textual readings, wherever possible. Testing and evaluation patterns aim at fostering a culture of research rather than an exam driven system, which will enhance student reading and creativity. In keeping with practical demands, ELT, communication study papers and the internship component are skill based and endeavour to make the programme application oriented. The programme will offer one value added course per semester at the Postgraduate level for the first three semesters alone. Value added courses provide students an opportunity to develop discipline specific and inter-disciplinary skills.These courses will give the adequate training to the students to develop their own interests and aptitudes. The objective is to help them enhance and gain a nuanced understanding of their curriculum.

Program Objective:
Assesment Pattern

CIA - 50

ESE - 50

Examination And Assesments

Continuous internal assessment will have written assignments, oral presentations, performances

End Semester Exams will have centralised exams, portfolio submission, Dissertations, performances

 

Research Requirements

Research is an integral part of the programme. To foster the research culture it is mandatory for students to undertake research presentations at seminars and publications in various academic journals. Students will be awarded credits according to the merit of their efforts. Research presentations and publications are mandatory towards building their dissertation / project in the fourth semester.

Students in the first year are expected to make presentations at national / international seminars which will earn them 1/ 2 credits accordingly. Research publications in any recognized academic journals / books with ISSN / ISBN number will fetch 2 credits respectively.

Students in the second year are expected make presentations at national / international seminars which will earn them 1 credit. Research publications in any recognized academic journals / books with ISSN / ISBN number and UGC recognized journals will fetch 1 and 2 credits respectively.

MEL111A - TECHNICAL WRITING (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course aspires to enable the learners to develop rhetorical and professional competencies to plan, draft, revise, edit and produce technical documents by employing the appropriate research methods as well as comprehending the ethical standards for the same. The focal point of the course will be on technical writing. However, oral communication of scientific and technical information will also form a vital component of the course. As the paper is intended to add value to the learners’ professional skills, the prescribed readings and the mode of assessment endeavour to embed as well as extend the course on technical writing within and beyond the syllabus.

 

Course Objectives

 

·       To understand and analyse the technical-writing process for producing the technical documents

·       To identify the legal and ethical considerations in technical content-creation.

·       To correspond in professional environments equipped with skills in content creation, copyedit as well as content review.

·         To demonstrate the adequate skills for adopting the appropriate graphics/visuals, instructions/language and layout for technical documents.

·         To create technical documents with rhetorical and professional competencies.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: To understand and analyse the technical-writing process for producing the technical documents

CO2: To identify the legal and ethical considerations in technical content-creation.

CO3: To correspond in professional environments equipped with skills in content creation, copyedit as well as content review.

CO4: To demonstrate the adequate skills for adopting the appropriate graphics/visuals, instructions/language and layout for technical documents.

CO5: To create technical documents with rhetorical and professional competencies

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to Technical Writing
 

The unit will engage with the technical and/or scientific writing at a basic level, discuss technical writing process and related genres, critically analyze the need and scope for technical writing as a necessary professional skill, in the form of email, business letters, and other such correspondences.

 

·         Professional Writing

·         Introduction to technical writing

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:14
The Technical Writing Process: Planning and Structure
 

The unit will engage with the technical writing at the pragmatic level. The lessons will help the learners understand the nuances of planning which include project-scope, audience analysis, tools-selection, templates/style guides/checklists, also understanding the ethical and legal considerations in technical-writing. The learners will also identify and apply the strategies for planning of a technical-writing project.

 

·         Scope, creation of documentation plan and documentation schedule

·         Audience or end users

·         Tools, techniques, templates/ style guides/checklists

·         Participants in planning-process

·         Structure

·         Ethical and legal considerations

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
The Technical Writing Process: Writing, reviewing and publishing
 

The unit will engage with the writing of technical writers. The lesson will help the learners understand the nuances of writing style, content-creation, language-skills, content-review and copy-editing skills. The learners will also identify and apply the strategies for creating, editing, and proofreading the technical documents.

 

·         Writing style or methods

a.       Technical Language, Instructions, Grammar and Punctuation Review

·         Review and revision

·         Review, copyedit and publish the technical documents: Needs and best practices

 

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Graphics, Page Design and Layout in Technical Writing
 

The unit will inform and assess the graphical aids (including tables and figures), page design and layout-related-techniques adopted in technical documents. The lesson will enhance the learner’s visual aid, page design and layout application skills for the technical and/or scientific content that they develop. 

 

·         Tables and figures (including charts and illustrations) and best practices.

·         Page-design and layout and best practices.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Technical Writing Project
 

The unit will encourage the students to engage in creating a technical document applying the principles and strategies undertaken during the course lectures. The students will present the project in the written and/or verbal format.

 

·         Apply the technical writing planning and structuring strategies

·         Apply the technical writing, and reviewing strategies

·         Apply the strategies described for graphics, page design and layout

·         Develop a technical document

Text Books And Reference Books:

·         Laplante, P. A. (2018). Technical Writing: A Practical Guide for Engineers, Scientists, and Nontechnical Professionals. CRC Press.

·         Alred, G. J., Brusaw, C. T., & Oliu, W. E. (2019). Handbook of technical writing. Bedford/St. Martins.

·         Sommers, N., & Hacker, D. (2014). A writer’s reference. Bedford/St. Martin’s.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

·         Laplante, P. A. (2018). Technical Writing: A Practical Guide for Engineers, Scientists, and Nontechnical Professionals. CRC Press.

·         Alred, G. J., Brusaw, C. T., & Oliu, W. E. (2019). Handbook of technical writing. Bedford/St. Martins.

·         Sommers, N., & Hacker, D. (2014). A writer’s reference. Bedford/St. Martin’s.

·         Kolln, M., & Gray, L. S. (2009). Rhetorical grammar. Longman.

·         Kristin R. Woolever - Writing for the Technical Professions (2008, Longman)

·         Pringle, A. S., & O'Keefe, S. (2003). Technical writing 101: A real-world guide to planning and writing technical documentation. Scriptorium Publishing.

·         Woolever, K. R. (1999). Writing for the technical professions. Longman.

Evaluation Pattern

End Semester: Technical Writing Project Submission

·         The Project is a technical-document created by the students and it will apply all the aspects of technical-writing process (Planning, structuring, writing, and reviewing). This form of assessment allows for a learner to apply the course knowledge as they develop their technical writing skills (25Marks).

·         CIA1 and CIA2 will assess both practical and theoretical understanding of the topics discussed. The assignment could be individually maintained or collaborative, depending on the class dynamics and size. Could range from Quiz/oral presentation/written assignments (CIAI 15 marks and CIA II 10 marks).

 

MEL111B - MASS COMMUNICATION AND JOURNALISTIC WRITING (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 The course is designed to provide students considerable input regarding areas related to communication, the news industry, the profession of reporting & the legal-ethical issues linked to news writing and news dissemination.

 

Course Objectives

 

·         To enable students garner considerable knowledge regarding the communication process and the news industry.

·         To familiarize students with mass media theories essential for creating content for varied media platforms.

·         To inculcate in students the skill to write journalist pieces.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate conceptual and theoretical knowledge of Journalism and Mass Communication.

CO2: Understand the dynamics within the news industry.

CO3: Write journalistic pieces on a range of topics-politics, economy and society

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Communication
 

·         Definitions, process, elements, function, barriers

·         Kinds of communication- intra/inter-personal, group, mass.

·         Communication, society & socialization.

·         Models of communication: Aristotle, Harold Laswell, Frank Dance.

·         Media Effects Theories: News Framing; Media Priming; Social-Cognitive theory of mass communication; Uses and Gratifications.

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Mass Media Communication
 

·         History of newspapers-world/India.

·         Newspapers in India post-independence. Iconic individuals and their contributions to Indian journalism. Philosophy & Editorial stands of select newspapers-TOI, The Hindu, Hindustan Times, Indian Express. Regional newspapers and their relevance. Milestones in Indian journalism.

·         Broadcast media in India-AIR, DD & Satellite TV. Brief history, Broadcast Content, Pertinent Issues.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
News Reporting
 

·         Aspects of beat reporting- research, reading & recording of information.

·         Cultivating news sources.

·         Reporting Techniques-Investigative, interpretative, depth reports, human interest.

·         Conducting interviews.

·         Reporting different domains-Politics, economy, crime, sports, law, lifestyle.

·         Legal & ethical issues while reporting.

Text Books And Reference Books:

·         Berlo, D. K. (1960). The Process of Communication. Canada:Holt, Rinehart & Winston Pub.

·         McQuail, D. (1994). Mass Communication Theory. New Delhi: Sage Publication.

·         Harris, J. (1981).  The Complete Reporter.  NY, USA: Macmillan Pub.

·         Kamath, M.V. (1980). Professional Journalism. New Delhi: Vikas Publications.

·         Alexander, L. (1982). Beyond the Facts: A guide to the art of the Feature writing. USA:

Gulf Publishing Company.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

·         Berlo, D. K. (1960). The Process of Communication. Canada:Holt, Rinehart & Winston Pub.

·         McQuail, D. (1994). Mass Communication Theory. New Delhi: Sage Publication.

·         Harris, J. (1981).  The Complete Reporter.  NY, USA: Macmillan Pub.

·         Kamath, M.V. (1980). Professional Journalism. New Delhi: Vikas Publications.

·         Alexander, L. (1982). Beyond the Facts: A guide to the art of the Feature writing. USA:

Gulf Publishing Company.

 

Evaluation Pattern

One comprehensive current affairs test based on news reading (online or offline content)-20 marks (Individual)

 

Portfolio-A collection of articles written by the student. One article every week by each student on either Google classroom or LMS. Each article would represent the different journalistic styles discussed in class-80 marks (Individual).

The evaluation though is for 80 marks it will be reflected for 50 marks

MEL131 - BRITISH LITERATURE FROM RENAISSANCE TO POSTMODERNISM (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The introductory course for the 1 semester students, British Literature from English Renaissance to Postmodernism is a chronological survey of the major forces and voices that have contributed to the development of a British English literary tradition and studies a selection of British texts and their contexts. It intends to cover the literary ground from the English Renaissance Period till the 21st century focusing on the emergence, evolution and progress of English language and literature through different ages and periods. The course will highlight major literary moments, movements and events in the context of the social, political, religious and economic changes that shaped England and its history from the late 15th century onwards. Students learn to read this literature both formally and culturally, in relation to the charged and constantly changing social, political, religious, and linguistic landscape of pre-modern and modern Britain. The syllabus attends to the early history of literary forms, to the developing idea of a vernacular literary canon, and to the category of the literary and canon itself. This paper actively engages students in the critical reading process-to read, comprehend, respond to, analyse, interpret, evaluate and appreciate a wide variety of fiction, nonfiction and poetic texts.

Course Outcome

CO1: The ability to read complex texts, closely and accurately.

CO2: The ability to comprehend both traditional and contemporary schools/methods of critical theory and apply them to literary texts to generate relevant interpretations.

CO3: The knowledge of literary history of particular periods of British literature.

CO4: The ability to effectively conduct independent research.

CO5: The ability to write clear, grammatically correct prose for a variety of purposes besides literary analysis.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
English Renaissance and Elizabethan Period
 

The unit focuses on Renaissance and marks a difference between the Italian Renaissance and the English Renaissance. The great age of English literary awakening, this period is also called Elizabethan Age. The new culture was refined by other European influences mainly Italian followed by French and Spanish. The evolution of the theatre, novels and religious poetry are results of Italian encounters. Reformation marks a break from this influence and the need to establish an English national character which was an antithesis to the Italian character. Unlike the medieval age, patriotism became the guiding force which desired to monopolize God and resulted in the triumph of Protestantism. The written works of England became as successful as their voyages, discoveries and political conquests in the sixteenth century. The emergence of English poetry intoxicated with the newness of metre and the freshness of vocabulary.

 

Key Concepts and Movements: Renaissance, Reformation, Humanism, Anglicanism, English Theatre, Greek Tragedy and Comedy, Bible Translations, Protestantism, The Dissolution of Monasteries, University Wits, Puritanism, Sonnets, Epic, Metaphysical poetry, Royal Society of London, Oliver Cromwell and British Commonwealth.

 

·         ‘Songs and Sonnets’ (excerpts of poems by Wyatt and Surrey) SLB

·         Excerpts from Utopia, Thomas More SLB

·         Excerpts from Apologie for Poetry Philip Sydney SLC

·         Selections from “Amoretti”Edmund Spenser SLB

·         Dr. Faustus (Select monologues) Christopher Marlowe SLC

·         The Tempest William Shakespeare SLC

·         “Of Revenge” Francis Bacon SLC

·         “On his Blindness”John Milton  SLC

·         “To His Coy Mistress”Andrew Marvell SLC

 

Additional Readings (SLA)

·         Antony and Cleopatra

·         Sonnet Selections from Spenser and Shakespeare

·         Sonnet 104 and 130

·         Prose selections from Bacon’s Essays (any two)

·         Of Deformity

·         Of Envy

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
The Restoration Age to Enlightenment
 

In continuation with the survey of British social history, this unit deals with the latter half of the seventeenth century after the restoration of the monarchy to Charles II. As is characteristic of the age, a new revival of classics (neoclassical) by the learned men of letters made it an Age of Reason. The spirit of inquiry popularized by the influence of Renaissance gave impetus to empirical experience. The intellectual vigour made people move away from orthodoxy and the literate middle class even the poor felt dogmatism to be dangerous. A ‘homogenous coterie audience’ gave rise to Comedy of Manners. The Church of England became very powerful with its sacrament. The emergence of the political parties due to the decline of confidence in the monarchy (James I being catholic) and the civil war had its impact on literature. The latter half of the seventeenth century saw the emergence of a new genre of writing called the novel. There was a need to respect private and individual life as is evident in the writings of diaries and letters.

 

Key Concepts and Movements: Reaction to Puritanism, Heroic couplet, prose allegories, Coffee houses of London, Restoration Comedy, town poetry, (high and low verse), mock-epic, The Rise of the Novel, travelogues, Journalistic writing, diaries, The Whigs and the Tories.

 

·         Macflecknoe (Part I) John Dryden SLC

·         The Pilgrim’s Progress (Chapter one and final Chapter) John Bunyan - SLB

·         Samuel Pepys Excerpts from the Diary SLC

·         Preface to Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot Alexander Pope SLC

·         Daniel Defoe Journal of the Plague Year- Excerpts SLC

·         Jonathan Swift excerpts from The Travels SLB

·         Oliver Goldsmith -The Village Schoolmaster SLC

·         William Blake- The Tyger SLC

 

Additional Reading (SLA)

·         Part I of Hind and the Panther by John Dryden

·         Richardson Pamela

·         Thomas Gray Elegy

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
The Romantic Age
 

 In the aftermath of the French Revolution, ideas of equality, liberty and fraternity found echoes in literature and the arts across Europe. Romanticism thus emerged as a differential aesthetic which radically rethought the purpose and meaning of literature, emphasizing connections with nature and society. The transcendental and sublime were extensively explored by Romantic poets who highlighted imagination as a powerful approach to realizing the world in subjective terms. Poetic language and diction became more accessible and ushered in the spirit of democracy in Literature. The Gothic Novel and the Novel of Romance and Sensibility alike introduced more women writers into popular fiction.

 

Key Concepts and Movements:   Revolution and reaction, Spirit of the age, Romanticism as an aesthetic category, The Romantic Novel

 

·         William Wordsworth: Selections from Lucy poems SLC

·         Lord Byron: She Walks in Beauty SLC

·         Percy Bysshe Shelley: “The Skylark” SLC

·         William Hazlitt: Excerpts from “The spirit of the Age” SLC

·         John Keats: “Ode upon a Grecian Urn” SLC

·         Coleridge: “Kubla Khan” SLC

·         Selection of one Gothic short story -Aphra Behn SLB

·         Jane Austen: Emma SLB

·         Charles Lamb - Dream Children- A Reverie SLC

 

Additional Reading (SLA)

·         Excerpts from Preface to Lyrical Ballads

·         Michael – W Wordsworth

·         Coleridge On the Construction of the Church and the State

·         Keats - The Nightingale

·         William Hazlitt- The English Poets (Excerpts)

·         Jane Austen- Pride and Prejudice

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
The Victorian Age
 

The Victorian Age marked the rise of British imperialism, material prosperity and global cosmopolitanism on the one hand and crisis of faith and fear of moral decadence on the other. Both colonial outreach and rise in scientific temper characterize the spirit of inquiry, quest and self-analysis evident in early and late Victorian literature. Darwin’s theory of evolution shook the foundation of Religion while asserting human agency, flux and change. Empiricism and Utilitarian ideologies transformed worldviews. Industrialization and large-scale urbanization, coupled by huge class divides, growing corruption and increasing poverty reflected themselves in realistic modes of writing. Much of Victorian literature gave expression to the stark contrast between private and public worlds and increasing mechanization of human relationships. Many Victorian writers thus retrieve the past to make sense of a changing world, be it classical or medieval

 

Key Concepts and Movements: Spirit of Quest, Industrialization, Cosmopolitanism, Urban Economy and Class Divide, Women in Victorian Times, Art for Art’s Sake

 

·         Alfred Tennyson: Excerpts from “In Memoriam” SLC

·         Robert Browning: My Last Duchess SLC

·         Elizabeth Barrett Browning: “The Cry of the Children” SLC

·         Annie Besant: Excerpts from White Slavery in London SLC

·         Charles Dickens: Christmas Carol SLC

·         Christina Rossetti: “Goblin Market” SLB

·         Oscar Wilde: The Importance of Being Earnest- SLC

 

Additional Reading (SLA)

·         Tennyson Tithonus

·         Elizabeth Browning How do I Love Thee?

·         D G Rossetti The White Ship

·         The Rise of the Novel

·         George Eliot Mill on the Floss

·         Hardy Jude the Obscure

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
The Age of Modernism
 

The unit on early and late Modernism will seek to explore, define, and critique several key concepts that emerged in 20th Century British literature and were expressed in terms of sociology, history, and politics. Many of the Modernist British writers were ‘outsiders’ (Irish, immigrants, expatriates, exiles) - Joyce, Eliot, Lawrence, Conrad and others. The unit will also survey several momentous periods from the end of the Victorian period through the First World War and the height of the Empire to the first ‘modern’ revolutionary attempts to undermine British imperialism. The unit will go on to examine the years between the two World Wars, the post-War period and the slow dismantling of the imperial state.

 

 Key Concepts and Movements: Modernism, Bildungsroman, Stream of consciousness novel, nationalism, imperialism, regionalism, post-industrialization, class, race and gender, world wars, rise of mystery thrillers, absurd drama, modernism in other art forms

 

·         “The Twentieth Century and After” Norton Anthology of English Literature, pages 1827-1847 SLB

·         Thomas Hardy – The Convergence of the Twain SLC

·         Joseph Conrad – Preface to “The Nigger and the Narcissus” SLC

·         W. B. Yeats -- “The Second Coming” SLC

·         Virginia Woolf – A Haunted House SLC

·         Wilfred Owen - Dulce et Decorum Est SLB

·         James Joyce- The Sisters SLC

·         DH Lawrence – The Odour of Chrysanthemums SLC

·         TS Eliot – The Waste Land (Excerpts) SLC

·         WH Auden- Unknown Citizen SLC

·         Doris Lessing- To Room Nineteen SLC

·         Angela Carter- The Werewolf SLC

·         Adrian Henri- Where ‘Er you walk SLC

 

Additional Reading (SLA)

·         G M Hopkins God’s Grandeur

·         T S Eliot Four Quartets

·         Virginia Woolf (Selections from the Common Reader)

·         James Joyce Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

·         D H Lawrence Lady Chatterly’s Lover

·         Katherine Mansfield- The Garden Party

·         GK Chesterton- Upon this Rock

 

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
Contemporary British Writing
 

The unit introduces students to concerns of globalization, multiculturalism, diasporic identity and the postcolonial bulwark of writings which characterize postmodernity in the UK of the late 20th and early 21st centuries.

 

Key Concepts and Movements: The rise of conservatism and neoliberalism in the 1980s and ‘90s, the reappearance of armed resistance to British rule in Northern Ireland, and the moves toward devolution in Scotland and Wales.

 

          Salman Rushdie: English is an Indian Literary Language SLC

          Monica Ali: Brick Lane SLC

          Carol Ann Duffy- Medusa SLC

          Kazuo Ishiguro: Never Let Me Go SLB

          Buchi Emecheta- Second Class Citizen SLB

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

·         Antony and Cleopatra

·         Sonnet Selections from Spenser and Shakespeare

·         Sonnet 104 and 130

·         Prose selections from Bacon’s Essays (any two)

·         Of Deformity

·         Of Envy

·         Part I of Hind and the Panther by John Dryden

·         Richardson Pamela

 

·         Thomas Gray Elegy

·         Excerpts from Preface to Lyrical Ballads

·         Michael – W Wordsworth

·         Coleridge On the Construction of the Church and the State

·         Keats - The Nightingale

·         William Hazlitt- The English Poets (Excerpts)

 

·         Jane Austen- Pride and Prejudice

·         Tennyson Tithonus

·         Elizabeth Browning How do I Love Thee?

·         D G Rossetti The White Ship

·         The Rise of the Novel

·         George Eliot Mill on the Floss

·         Hardy Jude the Obscure

 ·         G M Hopkins God’s Grandeur

·         T S Eliot Four Quartets

·         Virginia Woolf (Selections from the Common Reader)

·         James Joyce Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

·         D H Lawrence Lady Chatterly’s Lover

·         Katherine Mansfield- The Garden Party

·         GK Chesterton- Upon this Rock

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

·         Attridge, Derek. The Rhythms of English Poetry, 1982

·         Baugh, Albert. A Literary History of England, 1967

·         Brantlinger, Patrick. Rule of Darkness: British Literature and Imperialism, 1830-1914, 1988

·         Conrad, Peter. Modern Times, Modern Places. 1998

·         Doody, Margaret. The True Story of the Novel. 1996

·         Ellmann, Richard and Feidelson, Charles (ed.) The Modern Tradition: Backgrounds of Modern Literature, 1965

·         Pinsky, Robert. The Sounds of Poetry: A Brief Guide, 1998

·         Poovey, Mary. Making a Social Body: British Cultural Formation, 1830-1864, 1995

·         Watt, Ian. The Rise of the Novel, 1957

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I and III can be either written analysis/presentation of a movement or dominant idea of the time, literary quiz or debates or seminar/panel discussions.

 

Mid semester exam will be a written paper on the modules covered for 50 marks (5 questions out of 6, (10 marks each)

 

End-semester exam- One Section: Five questions to be answered out of six. (20 marks each)

MEL132 - INDIAN LITERATURES IN ENGLISH AND TRANSLATION (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course attempts to introduce the nuances of Indian Literatures within a limited time frame. Expository in nature, it familiarizes students with various Indian Writing in English and Bhasha literature in English translation. The multi-lingual, multi-ethnic and multi-religious entity that India is makes it next to impossible to know all the languages and their respective/corresponding literatures. However, this course attempts to engage with the Cultural and Linguistic plurality of India. A categorization of Indian Literatures into The Beginnings, Post-Independent Indian Literature and 21 Century Indian Literature has shaped the broader conceptual contours of the course. The texts have been selected keeping in mind the myriad socio-political concerns within a region expressed in languages which may not be familiar to all.  Hence translation theories, which are specific to the Indian languages and practice are included to enrich the reading of the texts. The syllabus has been classified into four modules: 1) Introductory Concepts 2) Prose, Poetry and Drama 3) Bhasha Literatures in Translation 4) Indian Literatures Today and Future. These broad, general categorizations are done to avoid any kind of affiliations in foregrounding ideologies or polarities. This course with its content intends to offer scope for deliberations on all discourses like Postcolonial Studies, Indology, Genre Studies, Aesthetics of Indian Literatures and Translation Studies.

 

Course Objectives

 

·         To introduce and sensitize students to concerns and problems in Indian Literatures.

·         To expose students to the nuanced engagement with Translation Studies.

·         To empower students to make critical and academic engagement with Indian literary works in English or in Translation.

·         To trace the historical, socio-cultural and political incidents in India and its impact on various Bhasha literatures.

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will be able to discern the historical, socio-cultural and political incidents in India and its impact on various literatures.

CO2: Students could get a comprehensive understanding of Bhasha Literatures through translated works.

CO3: Academic engagement with the process of translation and the problems associated with it will give students a better understanding of the category of Indian literatures.

CO4: This course is also intended to give a better understanding of the literatures written in various linguistic and socio- cultural contexts in India.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Reading Indian Literatures: Approaches
 

This unit is designed to provide a proper foundation for students to understand and engage with Indian Literature. The selection of prose pieces in this unit do trace the trajectory of Indian literature and problematizes the category and nomenclature. A Historical overview and theoretical insight would enable students to place all the literary texts prescribed in context to engage with them. This unit will also provide a strong foundation to the beginnings of Indian literary tradition including the epics and other early literary and cultural products.

  • “The Anxiety of Indianness” - Meenakshi Mukherjee
  • “Towards the Concept of a New Nationhood: Languages and Literatures in India” - U. R. Ananthamurthy
  • “Why Comparative Indian Literature?” - Sisir Kumar Das
  • P.P Raveendran: “Genealogies of Indian Literature” Economic and Political Weekly. Vol 41. No. 25. June 24-26, 2006.Pp 2558-2563
  • “On Interpretation” - Suresh Joshi (Gujrati; Chintamayi Manasa)

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Reading Literary Types
 

This unit is designed to provide a historical understanding of the emergence and development of different genres like Prose, Poetry, Novel and Drama. The focus of the selection here is on Indian Writing in English in all these genres. A selective choice of texts in this unit is meant for both classroom engagement and for self-study. It would enable students to engage with works from these genres with more clarity and confidence. Apart from the engagement with the genres the paper with the works included would provide a better insight into the social and cultural fabric of India.

 

Poetry: (SLC)

·         Rabindranath Tagore:  Gitanjali- (12,36,63), ‘The Time my journey takes is long’, ‘This is my prayer to Thee’, ‘Thou hast made me known to friends’

·         Jayanta Mahapatra: The Abandoned British Cemetery at Balasore

·         Nissim Ezekiel: Background, casually, Goodbye Party for Miss Pushpa T. S.

·         Kamala Das: An Introduction

·         Syed Ammanuddin: Don’t Call me Indo-Anglian

·         Arun Kolatkar - “The Butterfly”

 

Short story: (SLC)

·         Janice Pariat: Pilgrimage (Short story from Boats on Land)

·         PudumaiPithan - Teaching (Tamil Short story)

·         Anjum Hasan - Sisters

·         Sudha Murthy - Selections from Grandma’s bag of stories

·         Shashi Taroor - The Five Dollar Smile and Other Stories

 

Novel:

·         Amitav Ghosh: The Shadow Lines (SLC)

·         Anees Salim: Vanity Bagh- SLB

·         Pratibha Rai: Yajnaseni- The Story of Draupadi- SLC

·         Aravind Adiga: The White Tiger- SLB

·         Ruskin Bond: Delhi is Not Far/ The Flight of Pigeons - SLC

·         Buddadeva Bose: It Rained All Night- SLB

 

Plays:

·         Vijay Tendulkar: Ghashiram Kotwal- SLB

·         Purva Ramesh- OK Tata bye bye - SLC

·         Mahesh Dattani- Mango Souffle - SLB

·         K.A. Gunasegaran- Scapegoats - SLC

·         Girish Karnad- Tughlaq- SLB

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Bhasha Literatures in Translation
 

History and development of the languages of a nation is essential to understand and respond to the nation and its culture. A detailed historical and cultural analysis of India through negotiation with bhasha literatures in English translation would definitely enrich the understanding of India and its culture. Since Bhasha literatures is a vast area the works selected in this module are highly representative in nature.

 

Poems: (SLC)

·         (From TheOxford Indian Ramanujan, ed., Molly Daniels, OUP, 2004).

·         Kapilar - Akananooru (pg. 82) Purananooru (pg. 356) (Tami)l

·         K Ayyappa Paniker - I Met Walt Whitman Yesterday: An Interview (Malayalam)

·         Debi Roy - Woman (Bengali) translated by Niranjan Mohanty

·         Himmat Khadoosrya - Numbers (Gujrati) Translated by K. M Sherrif and E. V Rarnakrishnan

·         K S Nonkynrih - Requiem (Khasi)

·         Dina Nath Nadim: The Moon (Kashmiri)

 

Short Stories:( SLC)

·         Ismat Chughtai: Tiny’s Granny [Nanhi Ki Naani: Urdu]

·         Gopinath Mohanty: Tadpa [Tadpa: Oriya]

·         Uday Prakash - Mohandas (Hindi- Novella)

·         Sharan Kumar Limbale - Dalit Brahmin (Marathi)

·         K R Meera - Angel’s Beauty Spot

 

Novels:

·         Bhisham Sahni: Tamas -SLC

·         MT Vasudevan Nair (translated by Gita Krishnankutty): Bhima: Lone warrior-SLB

·         Bama translated by Lakshmi Holmstrom: Karukku -SLC

·         Johny Miranda (translated by Sajai jose): Requiem for the Living - SLB

·         O.V. Vijayan - Saga of Dharmapuri - SLB

·         S. L. Bhyrappa: Avarana - SLB

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Indian Literatures Today
 

This unit will explore the emergence of translated vernacular texts that articulate postcolonial conditions where the nation-state is rendered obsolete in the age of networked cultures, where the nation state has a reduced role to play because policies- economic, military and even political- are determined and decided by transnational bodies. The unit will also look at the emerging field of ‘toxic discourse’ like unorganised migrant labour, land claims, nature degradation, farmers and ‘postcolonial pastoral’ leading to global precarity as Judith Butler calls it.

 

·         TD Ramakrishnan: Francis Itty Kora SLC

·         Benyamin: Goat Days- SLB

·         Varma Sreejith R and Swarnalatha Rangarajan - The Politics of land, water and toxins: Reading the life narratives of three oikos-carers from Kerala (Routledge) SLC

·         Suhas Sundar and Deepak Sharma: Odayan (Graphic Novel) SLB

·         Jeet Thayyil - Narcopolis SLB

·         Perumal Murugan - One Part Woman SLC

·         Gopinath Mohanty - Paraja SLB

Text Books And Reference Books:

Poems: (SLC)

·         (From TheOxford Indian Ramanujan, ed., Molly Daniels, OUP, 2004).

·         Kapilar - Akananooru (pg. 82) Purananooru (pg. 356) (Tami)l

·         K Ayyappa Paniker - I Met Walt Whitman Yesterday: An Interview (Malayalam)

·         Debi Roy - Woman (Bengali) translated by Niranjan Mohanty

·         Himmat Khadoosrya - Numbers (Gujrati) Translated by K. M Sherrif and E. V Rarnakrishnan

·         K S Nonkynrih - Requiem (Khasi)

·         Dina Nath Nadim: The Moon (Kashmiri)

 

Short Stories:( SLC)

·         Ismat Chughtai: Tiny’s Granny [Nanhi Ki Naani: Urdu]

·         Gopinath Mohanty: Tadpa [Tadpa: Oriya]

·         Uday Prakash - Mohandas (Hindi- Novella)

·         Sharan Kumar Limbale - Dalit Brahmin (Marathi)

·         K R Meera - Angel’s Beauty Spot

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

·         Devy, G.N, “Indian Literary Criticism: Theory and Interpretation” Hyderabad: Orient Longman, 2002.

·         Nandy,Ashis. The Intimate Enemy: Loss and Recovery of Self under Colonialism. OUP, Delhi.1983. Print.

·         Basu, Tapan, Ed. Volume 2. Translating Caste: Studies in Culture and Translation, Katha, New Delhi.2002. Print.

·         K.R.S. Iyengar, Indian Writing in English, Bombay, 1962

·         Ahmad, Aijaz. In Theory: Nations, Classes, Literatures. London: Verso, 1992. Print.

·         Raja Rao, Foreword to Kanthapura (New Delhi: OUP, 1989) pp.v–vi.

·         Salman Rushdie, ‘Commonwealth Literature does not exist’, in Imaginary Homelands (London: Granta Books, 1991) pp.61–70.

·         Mukherjee,Meenakshi. The Perishable Empire (New Delhi: OUP, 2000)

·         Said,Edward. Orientalism. Penguin Books (India 2001)

·         Mukherjee, Meenakshi. Early Novels in India. Sahitya Academy 2002.

·         Poduval,Satish, Ed. Refiguring Culture. Sahitya Academy 2005.

·         Prasad, JVG, Writing India, Writing English. Routledge, NewDelhi: 2011.

·         Naik, M.K. History of Indian English Literature, Sahitya Academy, New Delhi,1982.

·         Mukherjee, Meenakshi, The Perishable Empire, Oxford, New Delhi 2000. 

·         K.R.S. Iyengar, Indian Writing in English, Bombay, 1962

·         Krishnaswami, Subasree, Ed..Short fiction from South India, Oxford University Press. 2005.

·         Tiwari, Shubha.Ed.. Indian Fiction in English Translation. New Delhi, Atlantic, 2005. Print.

·         The Little Magazine. Vol- VIII issues 1, 2&3 Sahitya Academy. New Delhi.2009. Print.

·         The Little Magazine. Vol- VIII issues 4 &5 Sahitya Academy. New Delhi. 2009. Print.

·         Ahmad, Aijaz. In Theory: Nations, Classes, Literatures. London: Verso, 1992. Print.

·         Goswami, Indira. The Moth- eaten Howdah of the Tusker.Rupa 2004.

·         Grassman, Edith. Ed. Why Translation Matters, Orient Blackswan. New Delhi.2011. Print

·         Venuti, Lawrence. (2012). The Translation Studies Reader, 3rd ed. London: Routledge.

·         Mehrotra, Aravind Krishna, “The Oxford India Anthology of Twelve Modern Indian Poets”, OUP.1992.

·         Thayil, Jeet, “60 Indian Poets” Penguin Books.

·         Asaduddin, Mohammed, “The Penguin Classic Urdu Stories”, Penguin, Viking, 2006.

·         Vinay Dharwadkar, ‘Orientalism and the Study of Indian Literature’, in Orientalism and the Postcolonial Predicament: Perspectives on South Asia, ed. Carol A. Breckenridge and Peter van der Veer (New Delhi: OUP, 1994) pp.158–95.

·         Raja Rao, Foreword to Kanthapura (New Delhi: OUP, 1989) pp.v–vi.

·         Nandy, Ashish. The Intimate Enemy: Loss and Recovery of the Self Under Colonialism (Oxford India Paperback) New Delhi. 1983.

·         Salman Rushdie, ‘Commonwealth Literature does not exist’, in Imaginary Homelands (London: Granta Books, 1991) pp.61–70.

·         Bruce King, ‘Introduction’, in Modern Indian Poetry in English (New Delhi: OUP,2nd edn, 2005) pp.1–10

·         Rao, Raja. The Meaning of India: Vision Books. New Delhi, 2007. Print.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I and III can be either written analysis/presentation of a selected work or prominent idea of an author or debates or seminar/ panel discussions.

Mid semester exam will be a written paper on the modules covered for 50 marks (5 questions out of 6, 10 marks each, open book or crib sheet exam)

 End-semester: Written Exam - 100 marks.

MEL133 - LITERARY CRITICISM AND THEORY-I (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Literary Criticism and Theory is a course that will be offered across two semesters. Part I of this paper will be offered in Semester 1. This is a paper that introduces students to the major assumptions, perceptions, arguments and discussions that surround the study of ‘Literature’.

 

 Literary Criticism and Theory – I traces the history of several ideas that connect the literary work to the world, the author and the reader. History is studied usually as a linear progression of events. The history (or herstory or history) of ideas, however, can be studied as a series of interwoven dialogues that may appear to be discontinuous and fissured. At the surface of Time, sometimes the debate may be around the author as the source of meaning. And at other times, the debate may be about how style contributes to meaning-making. As we look under the surface, we may be able to establish the connections that appear to have been lost simply because they were not foregrounded. And therefore, this paper foregrounds themes that are part of literary criticism in favour of a chronological study of contributions by thinkers and theorists.

 

The course will study how this cultural construct called ‘Literature’ has been received over the several years since Plato. It will look at what constitutes ‘value’; where is the location of meaning (in the writer? in the reader? in the written word?); what are the ways of reading a text; and, the contribution of canonical writes towards their understanding of what constitutes literature.

 

The course focuses largely on thinkers from the Euro-American canonical tradition. That tradition is undoubtedly at the centre. However, in every Unit, an attempt has been made to introduce foundational ideas about poetics that were at the heart of similar debates also in ‘India’.

 

Course Objectives

 

The course aims to demonstrate how discussions around Literature - its production and consumption - emerge from an intellectual climate that is in dialogue with its past. Towards this end, this paper will:

·         Provide a broad overview of discussions around World – Author –Text - Reader.

·         Encourage students to participate and engage with the discussions that surround the production and consumption of literary texts.

·         Enable students to read seminal essays from the primary sources.

·         Persuade students to think creatively and interpret critically.

·         Help students to express their ideas coherently in both the written and the oral formats.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the arguments that surround the study of literary criticism and theory

CO2: Read and interpret seminal essays closely.

CO3: Construct their own arguments around key issues like Literature and value, Literature and Method, Literature and the Reader-Critic.

CO4: Critically discuss and respond to ideas (Orally and/or in the written format) expressed by canonical thinkers.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Literature and Value
 

The unit will look at how, over the years, different thinkers have studied the ‘use value’ of literature. Questions like: ‘How exactly does the poet contribute to society?’, ‘What is the purpose of literature?’, ‘What is the connection of literature to reality?’ will be dealt with in this unit.

 

·         Plato - Republic Book 10 / Book 7 / Ion

·         Horace

·         David Hume: Of the Standard of Taste

·         Karl Marx. Capital Vol 1- Part 1 (Commodities and Money)- Chapter 1 (Commodities) - Section 4: The Fetishism of Commodities and the Secret Thereof.

·         Sri Aurobindo: The Power of the Spirit (Chapter 5 of The Future Poetry)

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Literature and the Artist
 

Who is a poet / author? What makes this person different from other individuals? Are all poets original? Where and how do they get inspiration from? This unit will study what writers and poets have had to say about the creative process and about cultivating an authentic voice.

 

·         Charles Baudelaire, “The Painter of Modern Life” III. An Artist, Man Of The World, Man Of Crowds, And Child

·         Wordsworth: Preface to the Lyrical Ballads

·         Shelley: Defense of Poetry

·         Matthew Arnold: Preface to the Poems

·         Tagore: The Creative Ideal from ‘Creative Unity’

·         Eliot - Tradition and the Individual talent

·         Rilke: Letters to a Young Poet – Letter 1

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Literature and Method
 

Is the reading of literature a subjective enterprise? Are there specific ways in which books have to be read? Are there, hidden within the text, suggestions of how it must be approached? Is the appreciation of art a craft that can be developed by following the rules of reading? These will be the issues taken up for deliberation in this Unit.

 

·         Aristotle - From Poetics

·         Excerpts from Bharatmuni, Bhartrhari, Anandavardhana, Kuntaka, Abhinavagupta from Neerja Gupta’s Student’s Handbook of Indian Aesthetics.

·         Eichenbaum: Theory of the “Formal Method”

·         Brooks: The Language of Paradox

·         Viktor Shklovsky: Art as Technique

·         Benjamin: Work of Art in the age of Mechanical Reproduction

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Literature and the Textual Principle
 

The unit looks at critical thinkers and creative writers who share their thoughts on what constitutes the literary principle. How is a literary canon formed? What should the markers of a ‘great’ piece of work be? Are writers the best people to talk about the nature of their work? Can the literary principle be deduced from the study of canonical texts? These issues will be discussed in this Unit.

 

·         F R Leavis: The Great Tradition

·         Kundera: Dialogue on the Art of the Novel

·         Henry James: Art of Fiction

·         Poe: The Poetic Principle

·         Ohmann: The Shaping of the Canon

·         Raja Rao: The Ultimate Word

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Literature and the Practice of Criticism
 

An interesting aspect of literary criticism is the reception of great writers by the succeeding generations. The readers are sometimes canonical poets / writers themselves who share their expectations from the poets who have preceded them. Sometimes, the reader-critic brings into focus not what the text talks about but what the text is silent about. This Unit will look at the directions mapped out in the area of analysing the merit of a writer / text.

 

·         Johnson: Lives of Poets / Preface to Shakespeare

·         Eliot: Metaphysical poets

·         Achebe: Racism in Conrad

·         Showalter: Feminist Criticism in the Wilderness

·         Sharankumar Limbale: Introduction from Towards an Aesthetic of Dalit Literature.

·         Susan Sontag: Against Interpretation

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Suggested readings for Unit 1

 

·         Edmund Burke: From A Philosophical inquiry into the origin of our ideas of the Sublime and the Beautiful: Introduction: On Taste. Part I - Section 7.  Part II - Sections I / II/ II / XXVII. Part IIi: Section V

·         Extracts from Kant’s Critique of Judgement.

·         Tagore: The Poet’s Religion from Creative Unity

Suggested readings for Unit 2

 

 

  • Sir Philip Sidney (for Self -study - often prescribed for undergraduate studies)
  • Wimsatt and Beardsley: The Intentional Fallacy
  • Orwell: Why I Write
  • Freud: Creative Writers and Day-dreaming
  • Barthes: Death of the Author.

 Suggested readings for Unit 3

 

  • Dryden: Preface to the Fables

·         Pope: Essay on Criticism

  • Johnson: Lives of Poets / Preface to Shakespeare
  • I A Richards: Practical Criticism
  • Wellek and Warren: The Function of Literature
  • Arnold: The Function of Criticism
  • Suggested readings for Unit 4

     

    ·         Ghalib: Poetry as freedom (134 – 136) From G. N Devy

    • Terry Eagleton:  The Nature of Fiction
    • Coetzee: What is a Classic?
    • Sartre: What is Literature - chap 2 - Why Write?
    • Fish: Is there a text in this Class? / Interpreting the Variorum
    • Kurt Vonnegut: Palm Sunday
    • Tolstoy: What is Art?

Suggested readings for Unit 5 

 

·         Dryden: Preface to the Fables

·         Christopher Caudwell: Illusion and Reality

·         Meenakshi Mukherjee: Reality and Realism

·         Ian Watt: The Rise of the Novel

·         Raymond Williams: Realism and the Contemporary Novel

·         Kolodny: Dancing through the Minefield

·          Barbara Christian: Race for theory

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

·         Cambridge History of Literary Criticism – Volumes 1 – 7

·         Devy, G.N. Ed. Indian Literary Criticism. New Delhi: Orient Longman, 2002. 

·         Habib, M.A.R. A History of Literary Criticism and Theory: from Plato to the Present. Blackwell, 2005.

·         Leitch, Vincent and William Cain. Eds. The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism. Norton, New York, 2010.

·         Gupta, Neerja A. Students’ Handbook of Indian Aesthetics. Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2017.

·         Limbale, Sharankumar. Introduction from Towards an Aesthetic of Dalit Literature: History, Controversies, and Considerations. Delhi: orient Longman, 2012.

·         Norton Anthology of English Literature – 8th ed., Vol 2

·         Richter, David. Ed. The Critical Tradition: Classic Texts and Contemporary Trends. 3rded.Boston: Bedford / St. Martin’s, 2007.

·         Routledge Critical Thinkers Series. 

·         Zima, Peter V. The Philosophy of Modern Literary Theory. Athlone, London.1999.

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1: Written submissions for 20 marks

Mid Semester: Written examination for 50 marks

CIA 3: Written / Oral Presentations for 20 marks

End Semester: Written exam for 100 marks

 

 

MEL134 - LINGUISTICS AND APPLIED LINGUISTICS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course aims at providing a comprehensive understanding of theories, methodologies of linguistics, applied linguistics and English Language Learning through which the foundation of linguistics is made acquainted with the learners. The principles of linguistics and fundamentals of Education with respect to English will be dealt with. Language learning and Language theories are focused in this paper in an attempt to help the learner to trace their relevance in linguistics. Concepts of research in Linguistics and Applied linguistics will be familiarised to encourage students’ progress in research.

 

Course Objectives

 

·         To introduce the core concepts of Linguistics and Applied Linguistics

·         To develop intellectual skills that are essential for advanced degrees in the discipline.

·         To comprehend the basic structure of Language.

·         To be able to analyse linguistic data from different languages.

·         To understand the fundamental theories of Language Acquisition and Learning.

Course Outcome

CO1: Familiarity with concepts of Linguistics and Applied Linguistics

CO2: Developed intellectual skills essential for advanced degrees in the discipline.

CO3: Comprehension of the basic structure of Language.

CO4: Ability to analyse linguistic data from different languages.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Language and Linguistics
 

This unit will introduce the students to the discipline of Linguistics. Fundamentals of language use and typology will be discussed.

·         Introduction

·         Design Features of Human Language

·         Functions of Language

·         Approaches in the study of language

·         Language families

·         Important branches of linguistics

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Phonetics and Phonology
 

This unit will familiarise the students with basic principles of Phonetics and Phonology. Phonemic analysis will help the students to identify phonemes from various world languages.

  • Speech organs and production

·         Articulation process

  • IPA and transcription
  • Segmental and Suprasegmental Phonetics
  • Phoneme Vs Allophone
  • Distinctive Feature
  • Identification of phonemes: phonetic similarity, minimal pair, Free variation, Contrastive Vs Complementary distribution
  • Phonemic Analysis- Data sets
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Introduction to Morphology
 

The unit will introduce the students to the basic structure of words. Data sets from different languages will be used to explain the concepts in the content provided.

  • Concepts of morpheme, morph, allomorph, zero allomorph
  • conditions on allomorphs
  • Lexeme and word;
  • Types of morphemes—free and bound; root, stem, base, suffix, infix, prefix, portmanteau morpheme, suppletive, replacive; affixes vs. clitics; Level 1 and 2 affixes
  • word-formation process
  • Identifying morphemes- Data set
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Syntax
 

This unit will provide an understanding of how human sentences are studied and analysed. It will look at the basic analysis of sentence structure. 

  • The native speaker: grammaticality and acceptability
  •  The Poverty of the Stimulus, Universal Grammar, Principal and Parameter
  • Basic syntactic units: word, phrase, sentence
  • Constituents and Constituency tests
  • Fundamentals of argument structure and thematic roles
  • Phrase structure
  • The structure of sentences

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Semantics and Pragmatics
 
  • Types of meaning
  • Sense and reference; connotation and denotation; sense relations (homonymy, hyponymy, antonymy, synonymy, etc.).
  • Ambiguity, sentence meaning and truth conditions, contradictions, entailment, presupposition and implicature
  • Language use in context; communication
  • Sentence-meaning and utterance meaning
  • Speech acts; deixis; Gricean maxims
Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
Introduction to Applied Linguistics
 

This unit will aim to provide a foundation for understanding the various sub-disciplines of Applied Linguistics.

  • Historical linguistics
  • Sociolinguistics
  • Psycholinguistics

 

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:13
Language Acquisition and Learning Theories
 

This unit will provide an understanding of the processes of how a child is able to acquire language in context. It will also highlight some of the theories related to language learning.

  • L1 and L2
  • Theories of language learning (Krashen’s model, Chomsky, Piaget, Vygotsky)
  • Language acquisition and learning
  • Interlanguage and Fossilization
  • Error stages
  • Acculturation and Accommodation Theories
  • Variable competence Theory
  • Discourse Theory
  • Markedness
  • Aptitude and Attitude
Unit-8
Teaching Hours:8
Concepts in Language Learning and Education
 

The unit aims to explain the issues related to language learning, teaching and education, especially looking at English language.

·         Language learning and language acquisition

·         English as a second language (ESL) and foreign Language (EFL)

·         Vygotsky’s zone of proximal development

·         Individual differences, motivation, aptitude in Second language learning

·         Competence Vs Performance

·         Language proficiency: Fluency Vs Accuracy

·         Learning environment

 

Unit-9
Teaching Hours:4
Introduction to Research in Linguistics and Applied Linguistics
 

 The unit will introduce the process of doing research in the areas of linguistics and applied linguistics.

Text Books And Reference Books:
  • Akmajian, A., R.A. Demers, A.K. Farmer, & R.M. Harnish. (2001). Linguistics: An Introduction to Language and Communication. Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT Press.
  • Aronoff, M., & Fudeman, K. (2011). What is morphology? (Vol. 8). John Wiley & Sons.
  • Cruse, A. (2011). Meaning in language: An introduction to semantics and pragmatics.
  • Dörnyei, Z. (2005) The Psychology of the Language Learner: Individual Differences in Second Language Acquisition, Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
  • Ellis, R. (1991). Understanding Second Language Acquisition. Oxford:OUP.
  • Fromkin, V., Rodman, R. & Hyams., N. (2010). An Introduction to Language. 7th ed. Boston: Thomson Heinle.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Akmajian, A., R.A. Demers, A.K. Farmer, & R.M. Harnish. (2001). Linguistics: An Introduction to Language and Communication. Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT Press.
  • Aronoff, M., & Fudeman, K. (2011). What is morphology? (Vol. 8). John Wiley & Sons.
  • Cruse, A. (2011). Meaning in language: An introduction to semantics and pragmatics.
  • Dörnyei, Z. (2005) The Psychology of the Language Learner: Individual Differences in Second Language Acquisition, Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
  • Ellis, R. (1991). Understanding Second Language Acquisition. Oxford:OUP.
  • Fromkin, V., Rodman, R. & Hyams., N. (2010). An Introduction to Language. 7th ed. Boston: Thomson Heinle.
  • Haegeman, L. 1991. (rev. Ed.). Introduction to Government and Binding Theory. Oxford: Blackwell.
  • Katamba, F. (Ed.). (2004). Morphology: Morphology: its relation to semantics and the lexicon (Vol. 5). Taylor & Francis.
  • Ladefoged, P., & Maddieson, I. (1996). The sounds of the world's languages (Vol. 1012). Oxford: Blackwell.
  • Ouhalla, J. (1999). Introducing transformational grammar: From principles and parameters to minimalism. Edward Arnold (Publishers) Limited.
  • Richards Jack C. and Rodgers Theodore S. (1986). Approaches and Methods in Language Teaching. Cambridge University Press.
  • Richards, J.C. and Rogers,T. 2001. Approaches and Methods in Language Teaching.
  • Prakasam, V. &Anvita, A. (1985). Semantic Theories and Language Teaching. New Delhi, Allied Publishers.
Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 - 20 marks - Testing IPA/ transcription/phonemic analysis

CIA 2 - 50 marks - Written exam based on units 1, 2 and 3

CIA 3- 20 marks- Case Study

ESE - 100 marks- Written exam based on all the units

 

MEL135 - AUDIO VISUAL STUDIES: APPROACHES (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course provides a foundation for Audio-visual studies. It is aimed at students who have a basic understanding of literary theory/ies and language studies. It will familiarise the students with the basic concepts, modes of visuality and aurality, performativity, methodologies for studying the varied visual and aural texts and aim for a practical hands-on training for undertaking a project for the said course.

 

Course Objectives

 

·         To introduce students to the study of audio-visual texts

·         To familiarise students with the contemporary engagements with audio-visual studies

·         To familiarise students with the methodologies for interpreting audio-visual texts.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of core ideas of analysing audio-visual texts and performances

CO2: Students will be able to critically analyse the core ideas underlying audio-visual texts and performances

CO3: Students will be able to analyse audio-visual texts using select methodological framework

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Defining the aim and scope: Fundamentals
 

The unit will provide a brief overview of the core ideas and concepts that would be used consistently throughout the course. These are core ideas that have been drawn from cinema studies, sociology, anthropology and technology of film and audio-visual production, and audio-visual culture.

·         Representations

·         Vision and Visuality

·         Sound and Aurality

·         Scopic Regimes

·         Soundscapes

·         Visual culture

·         Ways of seeing

·         Ideology

·         Power

·         Discursive practices

·         Multimodes

·         Sites of production

Sites of interpretation

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Narrativising visual images
 

The unit will familiarise the students with historical, anthropological and politico-economical aspects of visuality and aurality.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Narrativising auditory images
 

 

 This unit will familiarise the students with contemporary narratives centering around

Modes of hearing by focussing centrally on the issues of representation and narrativisation.

 

       Modes of hearing

       Histories of sound and technologies

       Sound space

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:11
Audio and Visual Images: Methodologies & Approaches
 

 

  Content analysis

·         Semiotics

·         Cultural studies

·         Postcolonial

·         Psychoanalysis

·         Anthropology

·         Discourse Analysis

·         Postmodern

·         Audience Approach

Text Books And Reference Books:

·         The visual culture reader by Nicholas Mirzoeff

·         Bull, M ed. 2003. The Auditory Culture Reader. Berg Press

·         Hall, S. (1997). The work of representation. Representation: Cultural representations and signifying practices, 2, 13-74.

  • Mark M. Smith (ed.), 2004. Hearing History. University Georgia Press
  • Veit Erlmann (ed.), 2004. Hearing Cultures: Essays on Sound, Listening and Modernity. Berg Press
  • Timothy D. Taylor, 2001. Strange Sounds: Music, Technology, and Culture. Routledge Press

·         Knowles, J. G., & Cole, A. L. (2008). Handbook of the arts in qualitative research: Perspectives, methodologies, examples, and issues. Sage.

·         Outhwaite, W., & Turner, S. (Eds.). (2007). The SAGE handbook of social science methodology. Sage.

·         Denzin, N. K., & Lincoln, Y. S. (Eds.). (2011). The Sage handbook of qualitative research. sage.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

·         Sturken and Cartwright, “Media in Everyday Life” | PoL 223–264

·         Audio Culture, pp. 40-46, 88-93, 94-109

·         The Auditory Culture Reader, pp. 137-163, 303-374

·         Hearing History, pp. 85-111, 267-278, 319-330

·         The Oxford Handbook of Sound Studies, pp. 39-78, 273-319, 526-543

·         Sound, pp. 187-193, 208-210

·         The Sound Studies Reader, pp. 105-116, 140-151, 186-196, 265-282, 329-335,

·         Marita Sturken and Lisa Cartwright, Practices of Looking: An Introduction to Visual Culture, 2nd ed. (PoL) (Oxford, 2009) | ISBN-13: 978-0195314403

·         Sturken and Cartwright, “Images, Power, and Politics” | PoL 9–48 Amelia Jones, “The Body and/in Representation” Sturken and Cartwright, “Viewers Make Meaning” | PoL 49–92

·         Carolyn Dean. “The Trouble with (the Term) Art.” Art Journal, 65.2 (2006): 24-32. -

·         Jonathan Crary. “Modernity and the Problem of the Observer.” In Techniques of the Observer. On Vision and Modernity in the Nineteenth Century, 1-24. Cambridge: MIT Press, 1990.

·         W.J.T. Mitchell. “There Are No Visual Media.” In the Visual Culture Reader, edited by Nicholas Mirzoeff, 7-14. London: Routledge, 2013.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1: Proposal for the project

CIA 2: Mid semester centralised

CIA 3:  Rationale for the project

End Semester: submission of the final portfolio

MEL136 - RESEARCH METHODOLOGY-I (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course introduces research skills relevant to postgraduate work in English language and literature. Topics centre on research practices, research tools, and dissertation preparation. The goal of the course is to equip students with both practical tools and guiding principles for issues like the identification of a research question, the use of relevant literature, the collection and analysis of data, the format and style of writing, and the methods and methodologies followed in the field of English literary studies.

 

Course Objectives

·         To introduce students to the fundamentals of research

·         To train students on the process of organizing and drafting a research paper/project,

·         To help students to identify, and use a wide variety of sources in the service of responsible research and scholarship,

·         To introduce students to different methods and methodologies pertaining to English literary studies

·         To prepare students to produce a paper using MLA documentation and manuscript styles.

Course Outcome

CO1: Apply the theoretical and methodological understanding and skills into devising researchable ideas and specific research questions and hypotheses

CO2: Utilize various sources to gather data for a research paper

CO3: Organize ideas, write annotated bibliographies, and thesis statement

CO4: Conduct a focused review of the relevant literature and create appropriate conceptual framework

CO5: Think through and articulate a chapter-by-chapter outline of the intended dissertation

CO6: Communicate research ideas and their appropriate theoretical and methodological issues effectively and efficiently.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
Fundamentals, Philosophy and Theory of Research
 

 

 Defining the ‘Construct’ of Research – Research Approaches - Nature of Research -Translation, Documentation and Archiving - Nature of inquiry in Physical Sciences - Social Sciences and Humanities - Positivism, Post-positivism, Constructivism, Interpretivism

·         Subjectivities, Identities, Vulnerabilities and Biases - Criticism and Evolution of Research in literature

·         Reading for Research, Pre-reading, Pre-writing (Mind mapping, Concept mapping, Analysing and Synthesizing), Language, Style and Types of Discourses (Scholarly, Narrative, Argumentative, Expository, Descriptive) - Contemporary fields of research, Genres of Academic writing: response paper, essay, reviews, annotated bibliography

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:3
Writing Research Proposals
 

Components/Elements of Writing Research Proposals

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Research: Design & Writing
 

 Design

·         Research Problem

·         Abstract

·         Introduction

·         Identification of a Research Gap and Rationale

·         Research Questions

·         Literature Review

·         Theoretical and Methodological framework

·         Formulation of Thesis or Hypothesis

·         Data Collection & Analysis

·         Discussion - Inferences and implications

·         Protocols for Submission

·         Ethics in research - Plagiarism and Consensus and Conflict of interest

·         Referencing and citation - MLA & amp; APA (SLA)

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

·         Kothari C.R., Research Methodology Methods and Techniques, New Age International,New Delhi, (Reprint 2011) 

·         Carter V. Good. “Fundamentals of Research: Methodology. “The Journal of Educational Research Vol. 31, No. 2 (Oct. 1937), pp. 138-139

·         Griffin, Gabriele. Research Methods for English Studies. Edinburgh University Press, 2014

·         James C. Raymond. “Rhetoric: The Methodology of the Humanities.” College English. Vol. 44, No. 8 (Dec. 1982), pp. 778-783

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

·         Kothari C.R., Research Methodology Methods and Techniques, New Age International,New Delhi, (Reprint 2011) 

·         Carter V. Good. “Fundamentals of Research: Methodology. “The Journal of Educational Research Vol. 31, No. 2 (Oct. 1937), pp. 138-139

·         Griffin, Gabriele. Research Methods for English Studies. Edinburgh University Press, 2014

·         James C. Raymond. “Rhetoric: The Methodology of the Humanities.” College English. Vol. 44, No. 8 (Dec. 1982), pp. 778-783

·         Paul Rico. “The Model of the Text: Meaningful Action Considered as a Text.” Interpretive Social Science: A Reader edited by Paul Rabinow, William M. Sullivan

·         Rens Bod and Julia Kursell. “Introduction: The Humanities and the Sciences.” Isis. Vol. 106, No. 2 (June 2015), pp. 337-340

Srivastava, Raju. Research Methodolgy in English Studies. Sublime publications, 2013

Evaluation Pattern

Preparing a research Proposal

Students should prepare a research proposal based on which they should also complete a research paper using up to two primary sources and a minimum of ten secondary sources, correctly documented utilizing MLA / APA style citations, with a Works Cited page. The students are supposed to submit the complete proposal and the research paper that they will be working in the first and second semester to their respective guide in the third semester to be fine-tuned, to be properly shaped and to be published in reputed journals.

MEL211 - SPEECH AND ACCENT (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Although most Indian students are well versed in reading and writing English, their speaking and listening skills still lag behind. In today’s globalized world, where addressing the international audience is a requirement, it is necessary to have the desired speaking skill which is not impregnated with mother tongue/ first language (L1) influence. Although L1 interferences are natural and acceptable, it is desirable if a learner of English language can attain near-native fluency. This course will facilitate the students to improve their English-speaking skills, focusing on pronunciation, syllable structure, stress and intonation.

 

Course Objectives

 

·         To introduce the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA)

·         To acquaint the learners with segmental features of English

·         To acquaint the learners with suprasegmental/prosodic features of English

·         To enable Dictionary assisted learning of English pronunciation

·         To minimize Mother Tongue interferences in the learners’ English Speech

Course Outcome

CO1: Learners will be acquainted with IPA scripts and symbols

CO2: Learners will be equipped to use a dictionary (physical or online or apps) to facilitate

CO3: Self-learning

CO4: Learners will be able to distinguish English consonant and vowel sounds from other languages.

CO5: Learners will have knowledge of syllable structure, stress and intonational patterns in English.

CO6: ? PO 08-Learners will be aware of Mother Tongue (MT) interferences and the ways to overcome such interferences.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
Introduction to Phonetics
 

This unit will engage with topics such as speech production and articulatory phonetics. International Phonetic Alphabet/ IPA helps the learners to understand the phonemes of all known languages and thereby, facilitates the learners to distinguish English sounds from others. This unit will also train the students to use a dictionary in order to enhance their pronunciation.

 

·         Speech Production

·         Organs of Speech

·         Manner and Place of Articulation

·         IPA Chart

·         Phonetic Transcription

·         Dictionary Assisted Learning

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Segmental Features of English
 

This unit will familiarize the students with the segmental properties of English language.

 

·         English Vowels (monophthongs, diphthongs and triphthongs)

·         English Consonants

·         English Diphthongs

·         Case study: Analysis of own speech to identify segmental errors.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Suprasegmental Features of English
 

Learners will be introduced to the concept of syllabification and other prosodic features such as stress and intonation. This will help the learners to use appropriate accent and tone while delivering a sentence.

 

·         Syllable Structure and Types of Syllables (Stress timed and syllable-timed language)

·         Syllable Structure in English

·         Accent

·         Word Stress

·         Strong and Weak forms of structure words

·         Phonemic Stress

·         Intonation Patterns

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:13
Mother Tongue Interferences and Accent Neutralization
 

   For a speaker to eliminate MT/L1 interferences, s/he has to be aware of such interferences. Features of Indian English varieties will be discussed so that the learners know the extent of MT/L1 influence in the variety of English they speak.

 

·         Mother Tongue Interferences

·         Interferences in Segmental level

·         Interferences in Suprasegmental level

·         Syllable Structure in Indian English Varieties- Case Study

·         Minimizing Interferences

·         Accent Neutralization

Text Books And Reference Books:

·         Jones, D. (1922). An outline of English phonetics. BG Teubner.

·         Jones, D. (2006). English pronouncing dictionary. Cambridge University Press.

·         Ladefoged, P., & Johnson, K. (2014). A course in phonetics. Nelson Education.

·         Pierrehumbert, J. B. (1980). The phonology and phonetics of English intonation (Doctoral dissertation, Massachusetts Institute of Technology).

·         Roach, P. (2009). English Phonetics and Phonology Paperback with Audio CDs (2): A Practical Course. Cambridge university press.

·         Sethi, J., & Dhamija, P. V. (1999). A course in phonetics and spoken English. PHI Learning Pvt. Ltd.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

·         Jones, D. (1922). An outline of English phonetics. BG Teubner.

·         Jones, D. (2006). English pronouncing dictionary. Cambridge University Press.

·         Ladefoged, P., & Johnson, K. (2014). A course in phonetics. Nelson Education.

·         Pierrehumbert, J. B. (1980). The phonology and phonetics of English intonation (Doctoral dissertation, Massachusetts Institute of Technology).

·         Roach, P. (2009). English Phonetics and Phonology Paperback with Audio CDs (2): A Practical Course. Cambridge university press.

·         Sethi, J., & Dhamija, P. V. (1999). A course in phonetics and spoken English. PHI Learning Pvt. Ltd.

·         Carr, P. (2019). English phonetics and phonology: An introduction. John Wiley & Sons.

·         Fromkin, V., Rodman, R., & Hyams, N. (2018). An introduction to language. Cengage Learning.

·         Ladefoged, P., & Johnson, K. (2014). A course in phonetics. Nelson Education.

Evaluation Pattern

Students will be continuously assessed for their speaking skills and phonetic transcription.

Homework and class tests: Homework assignments will be distributed almost every week and will often include transcription of sound files. (10 marks)

Quizzes: Occasional dictation-style transcription quizzes will be held during most lectures. Best three quiz scores will be considered for evaluation. (10 marks)

Speaking Exercise 1: Each student’s skills at accurately producing various speech sounds will be tested individually. (20 marks)

Speaking Exercise 2: Students will be asked to speak on various topics for 5-10 minutes. Pronunciation, stress assignment and intonation will be assessed. (10 marks)

 

MEL231 - AMERICAN LITERATURES: VOICES FROM THE NATION (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course offers a survey of American Literature from the Beginning to the Contemporary time period. It attempts to map out the socio-political and cultural domains of the Nation from its formative years to the struggle and shaping and forging of an American ethos across centuries. The syllabus has a vast representation from all forms of literature, thus giving learners the opportunity to have a dialogue with oral, written and audio-visual texts that zooms one’s vision to the intricate mixture of identities and aesthetic sensibilities of the ages; from ‘melting pot’ to ‘salad bowl’ culture. A conscious attempt is made to include texts from different parts of the continent and not just restricted to USA. A range of texts pertaining to different forms have been selected to factor in the eclectic nature together with the socio-cultural and historical specificity.  The uniqueness of the syllabus lies in the selection of the texts under each period which attempts to help the learners understand the nature and composition of literatures across times.

 

Course Objectives

 

The course intends to enable learners to:

·         Critically appreciate literary texts

·         Systematically study the pattern in the historicity of America leading to Nation formation

·         Understand the uniqueness and singular identities that many writers of America have

·         Interact with the richness of culture and concepts that the various literatures represent

 

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate familiarity with fundamental terminology and concepts relevant to the analysis of American literature.

CO2: Apply critical thinking skills to understand texts.

CO3: Identify and appreciate the language of expression present in the various selections presented.

CO4: Formulate a thesis through readings and support it with evidence and argumentation.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Exploring Origins, Contact Zone and American Revolution (Native American ? 1820)
 

The unit introduces the learners to the history of Native America and the first stories of nation formation. The focus of this unit will be on the history of settlers, invaders and colonizers. The unit aims to help learners understand how the initial settlements, invasions and establishment of colonies shaped the nation formation. An overview of the entry of Columbus, John Smith and others will enable us to establish the history. The unit will focus on the Enlightenment period with specific reference to religion and science. The unit will also highlight the history and life in the original thirteen colonies, the American Revolution, the expansion of the nation, the origins of American democracy, and American Independence.

 

·                     “The Iroquois Creation Story”

·                     Jan van der Straet, called Stradanus - Discovery of America: Vespucci Landing in America ca. 1587–89

·                     Excerpts from The Declaration of Independence

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Creating an American Idiom and New Trajectories (1820- 1914)
 

The unit will highlight the major changes that took place in America with the expansion of the nation. Racism would be discussed. The focus will be on Civil war and other major movements with regards to philosophy and literature - Transcendentalism, Romanticism and Dark Romanticism.

 

·         Longfellow – “A Psalm of Life” (SLB)

·         Emerson – “Brahma”

·         Abraham Lincoln – “Gettysburg Address” (Audio text)

·         Walt Whitman – “One's Self I Sing”

·         Mark Twain - “The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County”

·         Phyllis Wheatley - “On Being Brought from Africa to America”

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Modernism: Breaking/ Re-envisioning Traditions (1914-1945)
 

The unit will focus on the new forms in literature, African-American writers, key concepts and movements such as Modernism, Harlem Renaissance and the American Dream. The central theme will also be World War and its effects on the psyche of the people of the nation. The fundamental idea of modernism and its influence on literature will be highlighted.

 

·         Sandburg – “Cool Tombs”

·         Wallace Stevens – “Of Modern Poetry”

·         William Carlos Williams - “The Red Wheelbarrow” and “This is Just to Say”

·         Zora Neal Hurston – “How it feels to be Colored me”

·         e.e.cummings – “I Carry Your Heart with Me”

·         Prudence Heward – “Rollande”, 1929 - SLB

·         William Faulkner – “A Rose for Emily”

·         Baz Luhrmann - The Great Gatsby

·         Dorothea Lange – “Migrant Mother”, California, 1936

·         Woody Allen - Midnight in Paris – SLA

·         George Middleton - Tradition

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:20
Coming of Age Literature (1945 - present)
 

The unit will cover the post war effect on the nation. The American psyche that underwent a metamorphosis post world war and emerged as the superpower will be central to this unit. This unit has a wide range of texts to be discussed with specific reference to the contexts.

 

 

·         Allen Ginsberg – “A Desolation”

·         Gwendolyn Brooks – “Kitchenette Building”

·         Anne Sexton – “The Black Art”

·         Ernesto Cardenal - “Prayer for Marilyn Monroe”

·         Alejandra Pizarnik - “The Cage”

·         Alfredo Jaar – “A Logo for America”

·         Michael Kantor - B’Way Broadway - American Musical

·         Bob Dylan – “All along the Watchtower”

·         Hunter S Thompson – Excerpt from Generation of Swine: Tales of Shame and Degradation in the '80's

·         Barack Obama – 2008 Presidential Election Victory Speech

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

·         The Norton Anthology of American Literature. 9th ed

·         American Literature, Volume 1: Colonial and Early National Writing, (ed) Darrel Abel.

·         American Literature, Volume 2: Literature of the Atlantic Culture, (ed) Darrel Abel.

·         Recent American Literature to 1930, (ed) Heiney and Downs Lenthiel H, Volume 3; Barron’s Educational Series

·         Recent American Literature After 1930, (ed) Heiney and Downs, Lenthiel H. Volume 4; Barron’s Educational Series

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

·         The Norton Anthology of American Literature. 9th ed

·         American Literature, Volume 1: Colonial and Early National Writing, (ed) Darrel Abel.

·         American Literature, Volume 2: Literature of the Atlantic Culture, (ed) Darrel Abel.

·         Recent American Literature to 1930, (ed) Heiney and Downs Lenthiel H, Volume 3; Barron’s Educational Series

·         Recent American Literature After 1930, (ed) Heiney and Downs, Lenthiel H. Volume 4; Barron’s Educational Series

·         Literary History of The United States.  (ed) Spiller, Thorp, Johnson, Canby, Ludwig,  

·         Third Edition: Revised; Amerind Publishing Co. Pvt. Ltd.

·         The Heath Anthology of American Literature, Volume 1, Second Edition; (ed) Lauter, Yarborough et al, Heath

·         The Harper American Literature, Compact Edition; (ed) McQuade, Atwan et al, Harper and Row

·         Herman Melville: The Paradise of Bachelors and The Tartarus of Maids

·         Sarah Margaret Fuller:“Woman in the Nineteenth Century”

·         American Literature; Its position in the present time, and prospects for the future

·         Sojourner Truth: Address to the first Annual Meeting of the American Equal Rights Association

·         Frances Ellen Watkins Harper: The Colored People in America and the “Woman Question”

·         Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo (1808-1890): An Account of the Gold Rush

·         Lydia Howard Huntley Sigourney (1791-1865): The suttee

·         Sherwood Anderson: From Winesburg, Ohio

·         John Dos Passos:  U.S.A

·         Elizabeth Bishop: In the waiting room

·         Adrienne Rich: Upper Broadway

·         Gary Snyder: Sixth-month song in the foothills

·         Vladimir Nabokov: Lolita

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I: The students are required to analyse any literary text based on Units 1 & 2 and write an analytical essay reviewing and examining the text closely with reference to the socio-political context. The text chosen could be either teacher’s selection list or student choice based on the class dynamics.

 

CIA II: Mid-semester exam

Short essays based on the texts 3x10 = 30 marks

Long essay may be based on a single text or comparison of texts with reference to an age, phenomenon, movement or any socio-political discourse. 1 x 20= 20 marks

 

CIA III: Students may base their assignment on Understanding America through Hollywood, through Television shows, Advertisements, Popular Culture, Paintings and the like and present their analysis in the form of an essay or presentation. The assignment is to be done in groups.

 

End Semester Exam

Short Essay type 1- 4 x 10 = 40 (Short essays could be based on genre, context, concept / movement and the like, questions could also include comparison of texts)

Essay type 2- 3 x 20 = 60 (Socio-Political discourse-based questions)

MEL232 - POSTCOLONIAL LITERATURES: CONCEPTS AND APPROACHES (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course on ‘Postcolonial Literatures: Concepts and Approaches’ will explore colonialism and anti-colonial resistance through the cultural legacies and literary imprints that they leave. It will also be an introduction to the specialised field of Postcolonial studies which started emerging during the 1980s and ever since then has come to occupy a significant position within the various humanities departments across the world. This course will also look at issues, themes and debates in writing from Asia, Africa, Australia, South America and other formerly colonized spaces. Postcolonial Literatures will also be looked at as writing which is an attempt at retrieving local, native and particular community histories freed from Euro-American versions of the same. This course will enable students to competently navigate the complex maze of theoretical terms and concepts that characterise postcolonial studies and explore the variety and richness of the literature that is today classified under the rubric of Postcolonialism.

 

Course Objectives

 

·         Ability to extend beyond basic comprehension of a text in order to evaluate and appraise its themes, motifs, characters, and structure.

·         Participate in theoretical discussions about the text and produce extended oral and written arguments regarding themes, motifs, characterization, etc.

·         Develop proficiency in written analysis demonstrating the ability to develop and expand upon ideas which support a clear and well formulated thesis.

·         Demonstrate awareness of rhetorical and grammatical conventions in all written assignments.

·         Understand the relevant social, historical, political and artistic contexts of these literary works.

Course Outcome

CO1: Increased knowledge of postcolonial literatures and an enhanced awareness of debates surrounding the issues of postcolonial identities.

CO2: The ability to read complex texts, closely and politically.

CO3: The ability to comprehend both traditional and contemporary schools/methods of critical theory and apply them to literary texts to generate relevant interpretations.

CO4: The knowledge of particular community histories

CO5: The ability to effectively conduct literary research.

CO6: The ability to write clear, grammatically correct prose for a variety of purposes besides literary analysis.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction
 

This unit will introduce key concepts, thinkers, scholars, theorists, movements and discourses that will be the launch pad to contemporary debates, issues and narratives to Postcolonial understanding in the 21st century. The Unit will be a historical survey of Postcolonial theory from early Imperial turn to anti-colonial struggle to Gandhi and his resistance method, Fanon and the psychopathology of Colonialism, Aime Cesaire and Negritude to Edward Said, Orientalism and the Postcolonial moment. Facilitators are encouraged to bring in literary texts to augment the theories prescribed.

 

Key Concepts and Movements: Colonialism, Imperialism, Neocolonialism, White Studies, decolonization, Settler colonialism, Race, Discourse, Anti-colonial Struggle, Mk Gandhi

 

  • Postcolonial Literature- An introduction- Pramod Nayar (pp1-35) SLB
  • What is postcolonialism? SLC
  • Commonwealth Literature SLC
  • The Fact of Blackness- Frantz Fanon SLB

  

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Colonial Discourses
 

The unit will discuss debates and conversations regarding Colonial discourses and Imperialism and look at modes of representation and narratives where Europeans constructed the natives in politically significant ways. This unit will attempt to unpack literary figures, themes and representations that have enforced imperialist ideology, colonial dominance and continuing western hegemony.

 

  • Colonial Discourse Analysis: Michel Foucault - What is Discourse? SLC
  • Colonial Discourse Analysis: Edward Said- Orientalism SLC
  • Joseph Conrad- Heart of Darkness SLC
  • Colonialism: The African Perspective - The Image of Africa SLC
  • Chinua Achebe- Things Fall Apart SLB
  • Colonialism: The Australian Perspective- The Rabbit- Proof Fence (Film)- Philip Noyce 2002 SLC
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Decolonisation and the Discourse of Nationalism and History
 

The Unit will explore the myriad ways of contesting Colonialism, among which the most important tool for decolonising is nationalism and making use of history and historiography. The Unit will also look at how specific ‘Other histories’ were constructed, represented and the underpinning narratives formed. The essays prescribed will form the theoretical underpinning for understanding the texts.

                    

Key Concepts and Movements: methods of questioning colonialism, History as a tool of decolonization, Cultural alienation, nationalism, making mimic men, cultural fundamentalism, importance of retrieving histories, Subaltern Studies, white histories, Other histories, race, space, memory, representation, fiction, identity

 

  • The Context of India - Anand Math- Bankim Chandra SLC
  • The Harp of India -Henry Derozio SLC
  • Kanthapura- Raja Rao SLC
  • Indian Critic of Nationalism: Rabindranath Tagore SLC
  • African Critic of Nationalism: Frantz Fanon   SLC
  • Literature as History of Social Change- KN Panikkar SLB
  • Rebel Sultans- Manu S Pillai (pp 1-20) SLB
  • Mahavamsa, Dipavamsa and the Sinhalese Bhuddist narrative in Srilanka SLB
  • Chief Dan George’s speech “A Lament for Confederation:” (Canada’s former first nation chief) SLC
  • Songlines of Aboriginal Australia SLB
  • Gandhi (kannada short story) - Besagarahalli Ramanna SLC

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Cultural Hybridity and Cosmopolitanism
 

This unit will explore the concepts of Subject, Subalternization and third space. The question of identity is central to much postcolonial literature, especially since this literature often operates in contexts of individual and collective transformation. At stake is not simply a redefinition of selfhood, but also a re-imagining of political and cultural community and its relationship to a changing world. Accordingly, texts that balance literary concerns with wider political and ethical concerns, including diasporic literature will be explored here.

 

Key Concepts and Movements: Constructing the nation, locality, community, identity, Imagi- Nations, Imagined Communities, Cultural Identity, Aime Cesaire, nativism, writing Aboriginal, multinational citizenship, religion and spirituality, Postcolonial Subalternization, Continuing colonialism, postcolonial protest spaces

 

  • Homi Bhabha and the concept of Cultural Hybridity SLC
  • Cosmopolitanism SLC
  • Derek Walcott- Selections from Caribbean Poetry:  SLC
  • Jhumpa Lahiri - Selections from Interpreter of Maladies SLC
  • Gayatri Spivak- Answering the question “Can the Subaltern Speak?”  SLC
  • Mahasweta Devi- Pterodactyl SLC
  • Jean Rhys- “Let Them Call It Jazz" SLC
  • Edwin Thumboo- Ulysses by the Merlion SLC
  • Hanif Khureshi - My Son, the Fanatic SLB
  • Sudheesh Mishra- Fiji SLC

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Cultural and Gendered Representations
 

The Feminist critics have argued that the empire was always a ‘masculine adventure’. This has resulted in the effacement of women in studies of colonialism. Feminist readings have foregrounded both the racial as well as the gendered contexts and problems of both European and native women in the colonial context. Imperialism also had a problematic relationship with other forms of sexuality. This unit will look at contemporary theorizations that have called into question the problematic linkage of caste and class configurations with that of national identity, gender roles and sexuality.

 

Key Concepts and Movements:   Postcolonial feminism, gendered nation, national movements and women, gendered traditions and modernities, diasporas and women, marriage and family, Motherism, Motherhood, African feminism, motherland, mother tongue, patriarchy, fundamentalism, war, Islamic feminism, body, desire, sexuality, subaltern women and life writing, queer, queering identities, queering borders

 

  • Nampally Road- Meena Alexander SLC
  • Women at Point Zero- El Saadawi SLB
  • Parinayam (Malayalam movie with subtitles) SLB
  • Kamasutra- Vatsyayna (Excerpts) SLB
  • Scent of Love- Hoshang Merchant SLC
  • Our Sister Killjoy - Ama Ata Aidoo SLC
  • Sultana’s Dream - Rokheya Hossain SLC
  • A History of Impurity (Introduction), A History of Desire in India - Madhavi Menon SLC

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

·           Poems and interviews of Lemn Sissay - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y10_PqZvnW0; https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uwj5XKzOadM&t=3s

·           Our Nearest Great Country - Alfred Deakin (Of Sadhus and Spinners: Australian Encounters with India)

·           Stories from the anthology - Representation of Gandhi edited by C N Ramachandra

·           Partition graphic narratives from -This side that side

·           Andrea Levy - from Six Stories and an Essay

·           Sam Selvon - one or two chapters from Lonely Londeners 

·           Brij Lal - Mr Tulsi’s store (any chapter from this book - Fiji diaspora)

·           Buchi Emecheta - Joys of Motherhood

·           Shashi Deshpande - Writing from the Margin; why i am a feminist

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

·         Postcolonial Literature- An Introduction- Pramod k  Nayar

·         Achebe, Chinua. "An Image of Africa: Racism in Conrad's Heart of Darkness." Massachusetts Review, Vol. 18, 1977.

·         Achebe, Chinua. Things Fall Apart. UK: Heinemann, 1958.

·         Bhabha, Homi K. The Location of Culture. London: Routledge, 1994.

·         Boehmer, Elleke. Colonial and Postcolonial Literature: Migrant Metaphors. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1995.

·         Conrad, Joseph. Heart of Darkness. UK: Blackwood's Magazine, 1899.

·         Derozio, Henry Louis Vivian. “The Harp of India.” In Songs of the Stormy Petrel: Complete Works of Henry Louis Vivian Derozio. Ed. Abirlal Mukhopadhyay. Kolkata: Progressive Publisher, 2001.

·         Derozio, Henry Louis Vivian. “To India - My Native Land.” In Songs of the Stormy Petrel: Complete Works of Henry Louis Vivian Derozio. Ed. Abirlal Mukhopadhyay. Kolkata: Progressive Publisher, 2001.

·         Devi, Mahasweta. “Pterodactyl.” In Imaginary Maps: Three Stories. Tr. Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak. New York & London: Routledge, 1994.

·         Fanon, Frantz. The Wretched of the Earth. New York: Grove Press, 1963.

·         Foucault, Michel. “The Order of Discourse.” In Untying the Text: A Post-Structuralist Reader. Ed. Robert Young. Boston: Routledge & Keagan Paul Ltd., 1971.

·         Lahiri, Jhumpa. Interpreter of Maladies. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1999.

·         Loomba, Ania. Colonialism/Postcolonialism. London: Routledge, 1998.

·         Rao, Raja. Kanthapura. London: New Directions, 1938.

·         Said, Edward. Orientalism. New York: Pantheon Books, 1978.

·         Spivak, Gayatri Chakravorty. "Can the Subaltern Speak?" In Marxism and the Interpretation of Culture. Ed. Cary Nelson and Lawrence Grossberg. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1988. 

·         Tagore, Rabindranath. Nationalism. San Francisco: The Book Club of California, 1917.

·         Walcott, Derek. “A Far Cry from Africa.” Collected Poems, 1948-1984. New York: Noonday Press, 1986.

·         Walcott, Derek. “North and South.” Collected Poems, 1948-1984. New York: Noonday Press, 1986.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I and III can be either written analysis/presentation of a movement or dominant idea of the time, literary quiz or debates or seminar/ panel discussions.

Mid semester exam will be a written paper on the modules covered for 50 marks (5 questions out of 6, 10 marks each, open book or crib sheet exam)

End-semester: Submission of a Research Paper

MEL233 - LITERARY CRITICISM AND THEORY-II (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

In continuation with the paper on Literary Studies (MEL 133), this paper will examine the primary positions and concerns in literary theory beginning with Structuralists and formalists and traversing through post-humanism. It includes Structuralism, post-structuralism, psychoanalysis, post-modernism, gender theory, race theory and queer theory, Marxism and post-humanism and the others. The course will deliberate on the critical theoretical thinking of several prominent thinkers on literature. They will further critically examine the dominating influence of these theorists in shaping the ways in which the world and the text can be viewed and received. Specifically, they will apply the theoretical premises and techniques to select literary works so as to understand these techniques as well as the nature of literature across literary texts at an application level. In doing so, the students will explore the multidisciplinary between the various theories and the literary texts. The paper highlights the shift in the journey of critical-literary thinking from what constitutes meaning to how meanings are produced. We conclude this paper with reflections on the future of literary theory.

 

Course Objectives

 

·         To identify, define and describe the key terms and ideas that contributed to the critical and theory-driven movements.

·         To interpret/critique/respond to literary texts in relation to philosophical, intellectual, social and historical contexts.

·         To interpret and demonstrate interconnectedness between the various genres of critical thinking in literature

·         To create analytical texts based on the readings of these theoretical movements and arguments

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the critical theoretical thinking of several prominent thinkers on literature

CO2: Apply multiple frames of thinking to a text

CO3: Develop the ability to respond to (orally/written) any one thinker or theoretical framework

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Literature and Language
 

This unit will analyse the structural and post-structural understanding of language and its relation to literature. In doing so, this unit will expose the students to the theoretical and analytic traditions in literary studies.

 

·         Saussure - “Course on General Linguistics”

·         Roman Jakobson - “Linguistics and Poetics”

·         Derrida – “Writing and Difference,” Structure Sign and Play in the Discourse of Human sciences

·         Kristeva-Extracts from Desire and Language 

·         Toril Moi- “Introduction,” Revolution of the Ordinary: Literary Studies after Wittgenstein, Austin, and Cavell

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Literature and Culture
 

This unit analyses the tradition of critical theory in the study of cultural phenomena. By the end of the unit, the students are introduced to understand the multiple ways in which literary studies operate on culture and society. 

 

·         Vladimir Propp “Morphology of the Folktales”

·         Claude Levi-Strauss - “The Effectiveness of Symbols” 

·         Roland Barthes - “Myth, Today”, Mythologies

·         Judith Butler- “Performative Acts and Gender Constitution”

·         Bakhtin - “From the Prehistory of Novelistic Discourse,” Rabelais and His World

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Literature and Interpretation
 

This unit addresses multiple ways in which literary and cultural texts are interpreted. It analyzes the nature of reality and the location of meaning.

 

·         Lacan- “Desire and the Interpretation of Desire in Hamlet”

·         Wolfgang Iser - “The Reading process: A Phenomenological Approach”

·         Baudrillard- “Simulation and Simulacra”

·         Lyotard - “The Postmodern Condition”

·         Gerard Genette - “Fictional Narrative, Factual Narrative,” Fiction and Diction

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Literature and Identities
 

This unit will critically analyse the numerous debates around issues of ‘identity’ relating to the question of geographical and cultural locations through the literary texts.

 

·         Frantz Fanon - “Algeria, Unveiled” 

·         Spivak - “Can the Subaltern Speak”

·         Lila Abu-Lughod- “Guest and Daughter,” Veiled Sentiments: Honour and poetry in a Bedouin Society

·         Bhabha - “Hybridity and Ambivalence,” Location of Culture

·         Irigaray - “The Bodily Encounter with the Mother”

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Literature and Society
 

This unit looks at the influence of socio-economic-political factors on the production and consumption of literature. It critiques the role of power and hegemony in the construction of the literary canon.

 

·         Excerpts from On Literature and Art by Marxs and Engels 

·         Michel Foucault - “What is Enlightenment,” The Foucault Reader 

·         Althusser- “Ideology and Ideological State Apparatuses: (Notes towards an Investigation),Lenin and Philosophy

·         Gramsci- “Notes on Italian History”

·         Jameson- “The Political Unconscious:Narrative as a Socially Symbolic Act”

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Literature and Its New Frontiers
 

This unit will expose the learner to the emerging fields within the discipline of literary studies. 

 

·         Rita Felski “The Stakes of Suspicion,” Limits of Critique

·         Rosi Braidotti- Post-human knowledge 

·         Dipesh Chakravorthy- “The Climate of History”

·         Jodi Dean - “Net and Multiple Realities”

·         Sukanta Chaudhuri - “The bounds of the text,” The Metaphysics of Text

Text Books And Reference Books:

·         Kristeva-Extracts from Desire and Language 

·         Toril Moi- Extracts from Revolution of the Ordinary: Literary Studies after Wittgenstein, Austin, and Cavell

·         Langston Hughes- “The Negro Artist and the Racial Mountain”

·         Jacques Lacan-“Seminar on The Purloined Letter”

·         Jamaica Kincaid - “A small place”

·         Habermas-Theory of Communicative Action

·         Jameson - “Postmodernism/Cultural Logic of Late Capitalism”

·         Donna Haraway - Cyborg Manifesto

·         Amitav Ghosh “The Great Derangement”

·         Rita Felski - Uses of Literature

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

·         Cambridge History of Literary Criticism – Volumes 1 - 7

·         Leitch, Vincent and William Cain. Eds. The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism. Norton, New York, 2010. (Introduction)

·         Tyson, Lois. Critical theory Today: A user-friendly guide. Routledge, 2006.

·         Habib, M.A.R. A History of Literary Criticism and Theory: from Plato to the Present. Blackwell, 2005.

·         Rice, Phillip and Patricia Waugh. Modern Literary Theory. Hodder Arnold, London. 1989.

·         Sturrock,John. Structuralism and Since: from Levi-Strauss to Derrida. Oxford University Press, 1979.

·         Routledge Critical Thinkers Series.

·         Zima, Peter V. The Philosophy of Modern Literary Theory. Athlone, London.1999.

·         Klages, Mary. Literary Theory: A Guide for the Perplexed. A &C Black, 2006.

·         Hall, Donald. Literary and Cultural Theory. Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001.

·         Richter, David. Ed. The Critical Tradition: Classic Texts and Contemporary Trends. 3rded.Boston: Bedford / St. Martin’s, 2007.

·         Cuddon, John Anthony. Dictionary of Literary Terms and Literary Theory. John Wiley and Sons, 2012.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1: Written submissions for 20 marks

Mid Semester: Written examination for 50 marks

CIA 3: Written / Oral Presentations for 20 marks

End Semester: Written exam for 100 marks

MEL234 - CULTURAL STUDIES: FIELDS, ISSUES, METHODS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is designed to provide a foundational understanding of Cultural Studies as a discipline globally as well as in the Indian context. It will acquaint the learners of abiding epistemological and methodological issues and concerns of Cultural Studies since its inception along with familiarizing them with emerging fields and cutting-edge research in the discipline.

 

Course Objectives

 

·         To introduce students to cultural studies as an academic discipline.

·         To introduce theoretical debates and interventions in studying culture and power from within culturalstudies.

·         To help students analyse cultural artefacts, institutions, and practices.

Course Outcome

CO1: Critical comprehension of key ideas and theoretical debates within the discipline of cultural studies.

CO2: Ability to investigate cultural phenomena and artefacts with empirical and analytical rigor.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Defining Culture: Cross-Disciplinary Mapping
 

This unit introduces the idea of “culture” as contested with various disciplinary inflections especially after the “Cultural Turn” in Humanities and Social Sciences globally as well as in India.

 

·         Raymond Williams — “Culture” from Keywords

·         Clifford Geertz — “Thick Description: Toward an Interpretive Theory of Culture.”

·         James Clifford — “Partial Truths.”

·         Nivedita Menon — “Between the Burqa and the Beauty Parlour? Globalization, Cultural Nationalism, and Feminist Politics.”

·         Satish Deshpande — “After Culture: Renewed Agendas for Political Economy of India.”

·         Urmila Pawar and Meenakshi Moon — Excerpts from We Also Made History: Women in the Ambedkarite Movement.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Cultural Studies: Beginnings, Evolution and Contemporary Reassessments
 

This unit provides a critical evaluation of Cultural Studies as a discipline both globally as well as in India since its inception and continuing evolution. The unit covers the beginnings of Cultural Studies in the “Birmingham School,” its spread in the Anglophone academic institutions and the institutionalization of the discipline in the Indian academia.

 

·         Stuart Hall — “The Formation of Cultural Studies.”

·         Ien Ang — “On Cultural Studies, Again.”

·         Tony Bennett — “Towards a Pragmatics for Cultural Studies.”

·         Henry A Giroux — “Cultural Studies, Public Pedagogy, and the Responsibility of Intellectuals.”

·         M. Madhava Prasad — “Cultural Studies in India: Reason and a History.”

·         Simi Malhotra — “Popular Culture Studies in India: Issues and Problems.”

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Nation, Culture, Identities
 

This unit locates the study of culture within the discourse of nation-state and various identity claims on nationhood. The unit will provide a critical theoretical understanding of nation and within the Indian context examine the issue of nationalist ideologies, migration, caste, race, and queer lives embedded in the whole concept of national culture.

 

·         Etienne Balibar — “The Nation Form.”

·         Partha Chatterjee — “There is an Indian Ideology, But It’s Not This.”

·         Ranabir Samaddar — “The Nation’s Two Subjects.”

·          Sharmila Rege — “Understanding Popular Culture: The Satyashodhak and Ganesh Mela in Maharashtra.”

·         Ditilkeha Sharma — “Nations, Communities, Conflict and Queer Lives.”

·         Duncan Mcduie-Ra — “Let’s Stop Pretending There’s No Racism in India.”

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Economies and Technologies of Culture
 

This unit introduces the students to the issues of cultural production and technological innovations within cultural practices. This unit will give preliminary understanding of how culture is shaped by capital and how human and non-human entities create cultural fields as a result.

 

·         Theodor W. Adorno and Anson G. Rabinbach — “Culture Industry Reconsidered.”

·         Pierre Bourdieu — “The Field of Cultural Production, the Economic World Reversed.”

·         Bruno Latour — “On Actor Network Theory: A Few Clarifications.”

·         Laurence Grossberg — “Cultural Studies vs. Political Economy: Is Anybody else Bored with the Debate?”

·         Anna Tsing — “Supply Chain Capitalism and the Human Condition.”

·         Martin Heidegger — “The Question Concerning Technology.”

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
Cultures of Consumption
 

This unit provides introductory ideas about consumption cultures. The unit also posits cultural consumption as work and labour in the contemporary times of globalization and neoliberalism.

 

·         George Ritzer — “An Introduction to Mcdonaldization.”

·         Zygmunt Bauman — “Consuming Life.”

·         Deepa S Reddy — “Work without Labor: Consumption and the Imagination of Work Futures in India.”

·         Anisha Datta — “Are you Neoliberal Fit? The Politics of Consumption under Neoliberalism.”

·         Nita Mathur — “Shopping Malls, Credit Cards, and Global Brands: Culture and Lifestyle of India’s New Middle Class.”

·         Rohit Varman and Russell W. Belk — “Weaving a Web: Subaltern Consumers, Rising Consumer Culture, and Television.”

 

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:8
Space, Mobilities, Networks
 

This unit introduces the students to the analytical paradigms of space, mobility, and network to study cultural phenomena. The readings will provide students a rigorous understanding of cultural dimensions of border, gendered urban spaces, and migration with a strong critical theoretical background.

 

·         Walter Benjamin — “The Arcades of Paris.”

·         Henri Lefebvre — “Space and the State.”

·         Jonas Larsen, John Urry, and Kay Axhausen — “Mobilities.”

·         Manuel Castells — “Informationalism, Networks and the Network Society.”

·         Sandro Mezzadra and Brett Neilson — “Between Inclusion and Exclusion: On the Topology of Global Space and Borders.”

·         Shilpa Phadke — “Unfriendly Bodies, Hostile Cities: Reflection on Loitering and Gendered Public Space.”

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:8
Digital Cultures: Data, Software, Virtuality
 

This unit introduces students to both digitalization of cultures as well as digital cultures. The unit provides an understanding of the issues involved in the study of digital and virtual cultures with special emphasis on data, bodies, algorithm and work cultures.

 

·         Christian Fuchs — “Hebert Marcuse and Social Media.”

·         Nick Seaver — “Algorithms as Culture.”

·         Alexander Galloway — “Gamic Action, Four Moments.”

·         Phoebe V Moore — “E(a)ffective Precarity, Control and Resistance in the Digitalised Workplace.”

·         Niimi Rangaswamy and Nithya Sambasivan — “Cutting Chai, Jugaad, and Here Pheri: Towards UbiComp for a Global Community.”

·         Preeti Mudliar — “Broken Data: Repair in the Reproduction of Biometric Bodies.”

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:8
Governance, Institutions, and Regulation of Culture
 

This unit introduces students to the myriad ways in which cultural lives of people are regulated through intricate network of public and private institutions and organizations. Students will get acquainted with conservation, museums, art galleries, and festivals as modes of governing and regulating national and regional culture and identities as well as culture as soft power in the realm of public diplomacy.

 

·         Michel Foucault — “History, Discourse, and Discontinuity.”

·         Susan Pearce — “Collecting the Other, Within and Without.”

·         Geeta Kapoor — Koci-Muziris Biennale: Site Imaginaries.”

·         Tapati Guha-Thakurta — “The production and Reproduction of a Monument: The Many Lives of Sanchi Stupa.

·         Olivier Roueff — “Elite Delights: The Structure of Art Gallery Network in India.”

·         Yudhishthir Raj Isar — “Cultural Diplomacy: India does it Differently.”

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

·         Raymond Williams — “Culture” from Keywords

·         Clifford Geertz — “Thick Description: Toward an Interpretive Theory of Culture.”

·         James Clifford — “Partial Truths.”

·         Nivedita Menon — “Between the Burqa and the Beauty Parlour? Globalization, Cultural Nationalism, and Feminist Politics.”

·         Satish Deshpande — “After Culture: Renewed Agendas for Political Economy of India.”

·         Urmila Pawar and Meenakshi Moon — Excerpts from We Also Made History: Women in the Ambedkarite Movement.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

·         Stuart Hall — “The Formation of Cultural Studies.”

·         Ien Ang — “On Cultural Studies, Again.”

·         Tony Bennett — “Towards a Pragmatics for Cultural Studies.”

·         Henry A Giroux — “Cultural Studies, Public Pedagogy, and the Responsibility of Intellectuals.”

·         M. Madhava Prasad — “Cultural Studies in India: Reason and a History.”

·         Simi Malhotra — “Popular Culture Studies in India: Issues and Problems.”

·         Etienne Balibar — “The Nation Form.”

·         Partha Chatterjee — “There is an Indian Ideology, But It’s Not This.”

·         Ranabir Samaddar — “The Nation’s Two Subjects.”

·          Sharmila Rege — “Understanding Popular Culture: The Satyashodhak and Ganesh Mela in Maharashtra.”

·         Ditilkeha Sharma — “Nations, Communities, Conflict and Queer Lives.”

·         Duncan Mcduie-Ra — “Let’s Stop Pretending There’s No Racism in India.”

 

Evaluation Pattern

Students are required to submit a project report taking any one of the units as primary by the endofthesemester.Theprojectcouldbeadetailedunderstanding,review,analysis,production (e.g., a documentary (short) written, shot, edited by the individual or an exhibition, designed, curatedbytheindividual)ofanyoftheculturaltexts.Theywillbegivenaframeworkinwhich they should submit the report. The report will be typed in Times New Roman, 12, double spaced with the author name and project initials mentioned on header. Plagiarism will not be tolerated.Properreferencingformatshouldbeused.It’sanindividualsubmission.Thestudent will be evaluated on selection of theme, rationale of the study, an argument to justify why the question should be handled in Cultural Studies, provide a review of literature with a critical approach wherein, the ideas should be shown as contested, and the student’s attempt to negotiate the constructedness with an argument of his/her own. The report should be bound and submitted 2 days prior to thedeadline.

 

CIA I: For CIA 1, the student will be asked to submit the proposal for the project. It will be evaluated on the selection of theme, rationale of the study, an argument to justify why the question should be handled in Culture Studies. Academic format should be followed and will be an aspect for evaluation. (20 marks, 5 marks each for each criterion)

 

CIA II - Mid Semester Examination: Section A (10X5=50 marks) – Centralised

 

CIA III: The student is required to provide a review of literature with a critical approach wherein, the ideas should be shown as contested, and the student’s attempt to negotiate the constructedness with an argument of his/her own. Academic format should be followed and will be an aspect for evaluation. (20 marks, 5 marks each for each criterion)

End Semester Examination: Submission of a project for100 marks

 

MEL235 - THEATRE FOR COMMUNICATION (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course introduces theatre as a complex network of varied skills and arts. It brings in least academically engaged theatrical forms and explores complexities and possibilities in such experimentations by creating new texts.

 

Course Objectives

 

·         To re-examine ideas of playwright, script, stage, audience and their interrelationships

·         To ensure performance as an experiential mode of learning

·         To encourage theatrical creation, experimentation

·         To empower students as decision-makers in the learning process

Course Outcome

CO1: Handle the stage with a lot more ease and confidence

CO2: Realize the potential of theatre methodology in socio-cultural contexts

CO3: Pick up team management, time management and crisis management skills

CO4: Understand the complexities of theatre from an insider's perspective

CO5: Understand the artistic potential of theatre and its possibilities of application in different contexts

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Actor's Skill
 

  Introducing participants to basic skills required for exploring role as an actor - inclusive of three-dimensional learning through mind, body and voice. Understanding the dimensions and exploration of the three through guided facilitation - to be prepared for characters in relation to situations.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Movement, Speech and Imagination
 

Using movement, speech and imagination to create scenic representation as per need of script and orientation of play. Imagining, Articulating, Sensing, Projecting, Improvising 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Script Reading
 

Play reading, Reading of role, Analysing a role, Identifying objectives.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Character Analysis to Prepare the Actor
 

  Building a character, playing complex character, understanding character growth, Acting ‘As if’.  The session will orient the participants to understand characters through analysis and snippets of performances - based on characters who are identified/created.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Working with others - Working on Stage
 

 Reacting, Co-ordinating, Working in pairs, Working in groups, Stage positions and compositions. Blocking moves, entries and exits.

 

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:30
Theory in Theatre and Play production
 

Introduction of Stanislavski and Brecht.

Creation and showcasing of a performance/s as decided by course facilitator in consultation with the allocated batch of students.

Text Books And Reference Books:

·         Oscar Brockett's the Essential Theatre and History of Theatre.

·         Kenneth Cameron and Patti Gillespie, The Enjoyment of Theatre, 3rd edition, (Macmillan, 1992).

·         Oscar Brockett and Robert Findlay, Century of Innovation, 2nd edition (Boston: Allyn and Bacon, 1991).

·         Kambar, Chandrasekhar. The Shadow of the Tiger and Other Plays, Seagull Books Pvt. Ltd.

·         Karnad, Girish. Collected Plays (Volume One), New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2005. ISBN: 019567311-5

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

·         Oscar Brockett's the Essential Theatre and History of Theatre.

·         Kenneth Cameron and Patti Gillespie, The Enjoyment of Theatre, 3rd edition, (Macmillan, 1992).

·         Oscar Brockett and Robert Findlay, Century of Innovation, 2nd edition (Boston: Allyn and Bacon, 1991).

·         Kambar, Chandrasekhar. The Shadow of the Tiger and Other Plays, Seagull Books Pvt. Ltd.

·         Karnad, Girish. Collected Plays (Volume One), New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2005. ISBN: 019567311-5

·         Banegal, Som. A Panorama of Theatre in India. Bombay: Popular Prakashan, 1968.

·         Robert Cohen, Acting Power (London: Mayfield, 1978) and Theatre, 4th edition (London: Mayfield, 1997).

·         Huberman, Pope, and Ludwig, the Theatrical Imagination (N.Y.: Harcourt, 1993).

·         Gerald Bordman, the American Musical: A Chronicle. (N.Y.: Oxford, 1978).

·         Garff Wilson, Three Hundred Years of American Theatre and Drama (Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1982).

·         Millie Barranger, Theatre: A Way of seeing, 3rd edition (Belmont, CA: Wadsworth, 1991).

·         Dennis J. Spore, the Art of Theatre (Prentice-Hall, 1993).

·         Marsh Cassady, Theatre: An Introduction (Lincolnwood, Il.: NTC Publishing: 1997).

·         Edwin Wilson, The Theatre Experience (7th edition (McGraw-Hill, 1998).

·         Spolin Viola. Improvisation for the Theatre, Evanston, Ill.: Northwestern University press, 1963

·         Banham, Martin, ed. The Cambridge Guide to Theatre. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

·         Elam, K. The Semiotics of Theatre and Drama, London: Zed Books, 1980.

·         Esslin, Martin. An Anatomy of Drama. New York: Hill & Wang, 1976.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I: Solo Presentation – 25 Marks

Presenting short solo presentation and enabling peer evaluation

CIA II: Scene Work - 25 Marks

Working on short group scenes and presenting it to invited audience

End Semester: Play Performance – 50 Marks

The marks will be allocated by the teaching faculty and the invited guest faculty

 

MEL236 - RESEARCH METHODOLOGY-II (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:0
Credits:0

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is designed to provide an exposure/hands on experience to basic research skills in Language and Literature that the students have learned in Research Methodology 1. Students will be exposed to acquire research skills and research writing skills through Guest Lectures, Talks, Seminars and discussion. Moreover, Guest Lectures, Seminars, discussions will be organized in the emerging broader areas of English Language and Literature and other areas of inter-disciplinary subjects such as Psychology, Theatre studies, Performing Arts, Music, Sociology, etc., The purpose behind organizing such events is to expose students to various areas of research related to Language and Literature as well as other Inter-disciplinary subjects so as to help them identifying the specific area for their current as well as future research besides being familiar with practical tools and guiding principles to frame research questions, the use of relevant literature, to use suitable method for data collection, and analysis of data, to inculcate suitable format and style of writing, and to be acquainted with  the methods and methodologies used in the field of English language, literary studies, cultural studies and media and communication.

 

Course Objectives

 

         To enhance and equip the fundamentals of research skills through Guest Lectures, Talks, Seminars, etc., by various subject experts,

         To facilitate the students’ various areas of research related to Language and Literature as well as other Inter-disciplinary subjects

         To train students on the processes of writing research paper/project

         To introduce students to different methods and methodologies of research pertaining to English literary Studies

         To introduce students to be familiar with various processes of data collection, methods of data interpretation and methods of organizing and developing the research contents

         To prepare students to produce a research paper using the appropriate documentation and manuscript styles.

Course Outcome

CO1: Able to identify their specific area of research

CO2: Apply the theoretical and methodological understanding and skills into devising researchable ideas and specific research questions and hypotheses,

CO3: Utilize various sources to gather data for a research paper

CO4: Organize ideas, write annotated bibliographies, and thesis statements,

CO5: Conduct a focused review of the relevant literature and create appropriate conceptual framework

CO6: Think through and articulate a chapter-by-chapter outline of the intended dissertation,

CO7: Communicate research ideas and their appropriate theoretical and methodological issues effectively and efficiently

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Research Methods and Writing
 

The unit offers a recap of the mechanics of research students have learnt during semester I. The intention is to help them work towards choosing a research topic and work towards a research paper worthy of publication.

·         Selecting Research Topics

·         Writing Abstracts

·         Preparing Literature Review,

·         Formulating Research Objectives and Rationale

·         Developing/ Formulating Research Questions

·         Finding Research Gap Drawing up the theoretical and Methodological Outline

·         Developing a Thesis statement / Hypothesis

·         Data Collection & Techniques (Questionnaire, Interview, Content Analysis), Logics of Enquiry – Data Analysis and Interpretations: Discussion, Inferences and Implications

·         Research Design and Characteristics

·         Protocols for submitting research articles

·         Ethics in research - Plagiarism and Consensus and Conflict of interest

·         Referencing and Citation - MLA & APA (SLA)

·         Developing and Proofreading the Contents: Drafting, Methods of organizing of ideas, Proof-reading, Editing

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:25
Research Areas: Approaches, Concerns and Possibilities
 

Guest Lectures, seminars, discussions and workshops will be arranged connected to the areas of research provided below. With an aim to introduce students to the established and emerging areas of research the focus will be directed towards helping them realize the diverse research possibilities, approaches, aspects and concerns. The emphasis is on helping students choose their research areas prudently with clear focus. Seminars and discussions are not be limited to the below mentioned areas alone but to include the latest possibilities:

 

·         Literature, Arts and Aesthetics, Audio-visual Studies, Language Studies, Theology, Comics and Graphics, Comparative Literature,  Linguistics, Computational linguistics, Creative Writing,  Critical theory,  Cultural Studies, Dalit Studies, Digital Humanities, Ecological Studies Electronic textualities, Psychology, Genre Studies, Gender Studies, Health humanities, Cinema, Epics, Mythology, Politics, Life writing studies, , Media and Communication, Sound Studies, Mythology, Narratology, NLT, Pandemic Studies, Partition Diaspora, Peace studies, Performance Studies, Philosophy, Popular Culture, Postcolonial Studies, Race Studies, South Asian Studies, Translation Studies, Visual arts, World Literatures

Text Books And Reference Books:

·         Kothari C.R., Research Methodology Methods and Techniques, New Age International,New Delhi, (Reprint 2011) 

·         Srivastava, Raju. Research Methodology in English Studies. Sublime publications, 2013

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

·         Kothari C.R., Research Methodology Methods and Techniques, New Age International,New Delhi, (Reprint 2011) 

·         Srivastava, Raju. Research Methodology in English Studies. Sublime publications, 2013

Evaluation Pattern

 Students should prepare should also complete a research paper using up to two primary sources and a minimum of ten secondary sources, correctly documented utilizing MLA / APA style citations, with a Works Cited page. The students are supposed to submit the complete proposal and the research paper that they have worked in the first and second semester to their respective guide in the third semester to be fine-tuned, to be properly shaped and to be published in reputed journals.

 

MEL341 - POSTMODERN LITERATURES:TOWARDS CRITICAL POST HUMANISM (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course will introduce students to the basic concepts and themes of Postmodernism and contemporary media/ cyber culture. We will read some of the major literature of postmodernism, along with significant essays in theories of the postmodern. The way postmodern literature explores the tensions between the dream of utopia on the one hand and the spectre of apocalypse on the other will be one of the chief themes we investigate in this course. Other themes will include the phantasmagoria of contemporary culture and the society of the spectacle, the culture industry, the emergence of radical new forms of consciousness and technology, and the ways in which postmodern culture re-imagines the Other through such categories as gender, race, the machine, and the Posthuman. We will then consider the question of what it means to be human in a culture mediated by the image. This paper will also situate the Humanities and the learning of it in the context of the pandemic and other global crisis as it challenges our existing ways of thinking, including how we inhabit the world, how we connect with others, what we eat, and where and how we work. The magnitude of imagining new worlds and of thinking analytically and creatively about matters that were not on our radar just a few years before is something at which the Humanities excel and the paper will help to explore that.

 

Course Objectives:

The main objectives of the course are to:

• To develop the student’s ability for analysis, synthesis and interpretation of representative  

   works

• To foster comprehensive knowledge of relevant critical theory with which to investigate the

   politics and aesthetics of the texts

 • To develop research skills and sub skills appropriate to the field of study

Course Outcome

CO1: Read complex texts, closely and accurately using reading methods introduced in class

CO2: Analyse texts in terms of form and language, meaning and formal innovations

CO3: Apply critical thinking and sound reasoning to a written critique or an essay

CO4: Identify theoretical and philosophical concepts associated with the Texts under study to make relevant interpretation

CO5: Write clear, grammatically correct structured essay providing sound argumentation and reliable evidence.

CO6: Conduct independent research

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Postmodernism
 

What is Postmodernism?

“Postmodernism, or The Cultural Logic of Late Capital,” Frederic Jameson

“In Plato’s Cave,” Susan Sontag (pages 10-28 from On Photography. Read in advance of class).

Slide show: postmodern architecture and the photographs of Cindy Sherman, La Jetee, Chris Marker.

https://www.nytimes.com/1981/11/22/arts/photography-view-cindy-sherman-a-playful-and-political-post-modernist.html

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Pandemic Literature
 

Totaro Rebecca. The Plague in Print: Essential Elizabethan Sources, 1558-1603. Duquesne University Press, 2010. [bubonic plague] [Google Scholar]

Hawthorne Nathaniel. “Minister’s Black Veil.” The Token and Atlantic Souvenir. Boston, 1832. [mask wearing] [Google Scholar]

Saramago José. Blindness. Harcourt Brace & Company, 1998. [“white blindness”] [Google Scholar]

Coetzee J. M. “On the Moral Brink,” The New York Review of Books, October 28, 2010.

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Environmental Precarity
 

Kasmir S. (2018) Precarity. The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Anthropology

Han C. (2018) Precarity, Precariousness, and Vulnerability.  Annual Review of Anthropology 47: 331-343, Selections pages 331-338

Nally D. (2015) Governing Precarious Lives: Land Grabs, Geopolitics, and 'Food Security'. The Geographical Journal 181: 340- 349, Selections pp

Das V and Randeria S. (2015) Politics of the Urban Poor: Aesthetics, Ethics, Volatility, Precarity. Current Anthropology  56: S3-S14

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
PostHumanism
 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0CewnVzOg5w

Rosi Braidotti, “Posthuman Knowledge”

Alba: The Bioluminescent Bunny

Jonathan Harris, "The Web's Secret Stories"

Jonathan Harris, We Feel Fine & Universe

 David Cronenberg, The Fly (film)

 Harriet Ritvo, "Barring the Cross: Miscegenation and Purity in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Britain"

Caroline Walker Bynum, "Why All the Fuss About the Body? A Medievalist's Perspective "

(The units are indicative and the reading list in class will be decided by the facilitator) 

Text Books And Reference Books:

“On Fear and The Risk Society,” An Interview with Ulrich Beck

“The Culture Industry,” Theodor Adorno and Max Horkheimer

“The Precession of Simulacra,” Jean Baudrillard

https://web.stanford.edu/class/history34q/readings/Baudrillard/Baudrillard_Simulacra.html (Links to an external site.)

White Noise, Chapters 1-4, Don DeLillo

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Rosi Braidotti, “Posthuman Knowledge”

Alba: The Bioluminescent Bunny

Jonathan Harris, "The Web's Secret Stories"

Jonathan Harris, We Feel Fine & Universe

Evaluation Pattern

Response paper (1 each, 2 pp.). This is a two-page paper due on the first week that discusses some aspect of the course’s themes based on the readings.

Analytical papers (1 each, 4 pp.). The focus of this paper will be on a close reading of a particular scene or passage from one of the readings.

The final paper (1 each) will be a paper of 12-15 pages; Graduate students will be required to use secondary sources in their papers; The paper can take various forms. It might compare two or more texts covered in class, delineating a common theme; or it might elaborate or expand on the analytical paper, drawing on further research and engagement with scholarship; or it might track more broadly how representations of the postmodern have developed across time.  The facilitator will work with students individually to help them select their topics.  Due on the final day of class.

 

MEL342 - POSTCOLONAIL LITERATURES:TOWARDS DECOLONIALITY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Postcolonial theory explores the impact of European colonization upon the societies which it subjugated, recognizing that the cultural and political struggles which colonization set in motion continue to influence the present. Central concerns relate to the impact of European languages, institutions and epistemologies on colonized societies. When it came into being as an academic field, the foundational gesture of postcolonialism consisted in uncovering the link between Western knowledge systems, exemplified through Edward Said’s notion of “Orientalism,” and the maintenance of colonial power. As a historiographical method and mode of literary or cultural analysis, postcolonialism orients itself to the struggles of all sectors of colonial society, both elite and popular, in order to analyze colonialism and the opposition it engendered. Many early interventions in postcolonial theory were concerned with forms of resistance on the part of the colonized, and explored the struggles over racialized identity and gender, as well as representations of place and history in a colonial setting. The course traces the indebtedness of these ideas to traditions of anti-colonial thought expressed in the writings of Frantz Fanon and others. At the same time, it moves beyond what might be called a postcolonial canon to examine the manner in which the legacies of postcolonial theory are currently being challenged by paradigms such as settler colonial theory and decolonial theory. Decolonial theory for its part counters European accounts of modernity that is seen as fundamental to Western imperialism while orienting itself to the manner in which the European conquest replaced indigenous knowledge systems and practices. Throughout the course, these concerns will be treated in relation to works of expressive culture: cinema, literary texts and visual culture.

Course Objectives

The main objectives of the course are to:

• Develop the student’s ability for analysis, synthesis and interpretation of representative works

• Foster comprehensive knowledge of relevant critical theory with which to investigate the politics and aesthetics of the texts

 • Develop research skills and subskills appropriate to the field of study

Course Outcome

CO1: Identify case-studies suited to the approaches learnt and to apply a relevant theoretical lexicon to their analysis of literary and cinematic texts or other objects of study.

CO2: Write a clear well ?structured essay providing sound argumentation and reliable evidence.

CO3: Generate ideas or proposals independently or in collaboration in response to challenges posed through self-directed research activities.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Decoloniality
 

·         A view from the gallery: Perspective of a colonized on post-imperial memories - Partha S Ghosh

·         Decolonizing History: Technology and culture in India, China and the west 1492 to the present day- Claude Alvares. Foreword by Rajni Kothari

·         India that is Bharat: The discovery of coloniality and the birth of decoloniality - J Sai Deepak

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Theories of Decolonisation
 

                              

The epistemic decolonial turn -Ramón Grosfoguel

Interview on decolonialiy - Walter D. Mignolo

1.https://www.e-ir.info/2017/06/01/interview-walter-d-mignolo/

2.https://www.e-ir.info/2017/01/21/interview-walter-mignolopart-2-key-concepts/

Coloniality of Power, Eurocentrism, and Latin America - Anibal Quijano

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Indian Decolonisation
 

 A virtual cosmopolis: Partha Mitter in conversation  with Keith Moxey  (JSTOR)

  India that is Bharat:  Christian colonial consciousness, the Hindu Religion, Caste, Tribe and Education -J Sai Deepak

 Rebel Sultans - Introduction- Manu S. Pillai

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Asia commons- a New perspective
 

                  

·         Memories of Post-Imperial Nations- Post-imperial Japan in translational perspective - Takashi Fujitani

·         Reviews of the Nay Science by Viswa Adluri and Joydeep Bagchi - Edward P Butler

https://internationaljournaldharmastudies.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s40613-016-0033-9

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Analysis of Texts
 

·         Analysis of texts (Facilitator identified)

(The units are indicative. The suggested essays could be changed on facilitator discretion)

Text Books And Reference Books:

·         A view from the gallery: Perspective of a colonized on post-imperial memories - Partha S Ghosh

·         Decolonizing History: Technology and culture in India, China and the west 1492 to the present day- Claude Alvares. Foreword by Rajni Kothari

·         India that is Bharat: The discovery of coloniality and the birth of decoloniality - J Sai Deepak

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

·         A view from the gallery: Perspective of a colonized on post-imperial memories - Partha S Ghosh

·         Decolonizing History: Technology and culture in India, China and the west 1492 to the present day- Claude Alvares. Foreword by Rajni Kothari

·         India that is Bharat: The discovery of coloniality and the birth of decoloniality - J Sai Deepak

 

Evaluation Pattern

Response paper (1 each, 2 pp.). This is a two-page paper due on the first week that discusses some aspect of the course’s themes based on the readings.

Analytical papers (1 each, 4 pp.). The focus of this paper will be on a close reading of a particular scene or passage from one of the readings.

The final paper (1 each) will be a paper of 12-15 pages; Graduate students will be required to use secondary sources in their papers; The paper can take various forms. It might compare two or more texts covered in class, delineating a common theme; or it might elaborate or expand on the analytical paper, drawing on further research and engagement with scholarship; or it might track more broadly how representations of the postmodern have developed across time.  The facilitator will work with students individually to help them select their topics.  Due on the final day of class.

MEL343 - LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE: TEACHING METHODS AND APPROACHES (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course focuses on helping the learners understand the ways in which English language and literature needs to be taught across various levels and in different curriculum contexts. The purpose of this course is to establish the need for a proper planning and execution system in the teaching and learning context.

Course Objectives

       Introduce the teaching learning contexts of language and literature

       Expose the students to various educational philosophies

       Aquaint learners with the skills essential for English language teaching

       Initiate teaching of English language in a classroom setting

Course Outcome

CO1: Distinguish between language and literature teaching

CO2: Develop strategies for language and literature teaching

CO3: Demonstrate an understanding of different models of curriculum

CO4: Differentiate between learning outcomes and objectives

CO5: Design learning outcomes and objectives at different levels

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
English language and literature teaching and learning contexts
 

This module will cover the scope of an English teacher across various levels and in different contexts. This module will allow learners to identify and choose a teaching career based on the skill sets they are strong in. The unit will include components on curriculum, syllabus and objectives and outcomes that one should be aware of as teachers.

 

       Purpose of teaching English language and literature

       English Curriculum and syllabus (different boards)

       Taba-Tyler models

       Bloom’s Taxonomy and Anderson’s taxonomy

       How to write objectives and learning outcomes for language and literature teaching

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Approaches and Methods
 

This module will expose the learners to various educational philosophies. It will introduce the learners to various methods and approaches in teaching both literature and language. This is the main component of the course and would include a practical component. The learners will be exposed to tools and techniques to handle various teaching and learning contexts.

 

Part 1

Approaches

 

       Behaviorism (Skinner and Pavlov) , Cognitivesm ( Chomsky), positivism , constructivism ( Krashen, Piaget and Vygotsky), humanism ( Carl Rogers, Del Hymes’ communicative competence, Theory of Multiple Intelligences, Gardner) progressivism

       Waldorf method of education

       Jiddu Krishnamurti philosophy of Education

       Structuralism ( Saussure), Post structuralism (, Modernism, Postmodernism

 

 

 

Part 2

Methods

       Grammar Translation

       Direct Method

       Total Physical Response

       Suggestopedia

       Audio- Lingual Method

       Oral- Situational Method

       Task based language teaching

       Content Based Instruction

       Communicative Language Teaching

       CLIL

       Multiple intelligence

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Skills for English teachers
 

This module will help the learners understand the skills required in order to be an English teacher. The module will focus on helping the learners hone their skills in order to be better equipped in both the language and literature classrooms. In addition this module will introduce the learners to some classroom skills required in the teaching profession.

 

       LSRW skills

       Vocabulary

       Grammar

       Classroom management strategies

       Classroom instructional strategies

       Peer collaboration

       Critical thinking and problem solving skills

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:30
Practice Teaching
 

This unit will help learners put theory into practice. They will have the opportunity to teach actual classes. The actual classroom teaching should be for 5 to 6 hours.

 

       Designing a lesson plan

       Designing language tasks

       Self- Evaluation and Peer- Evaluation reports

       Strategies for classroom management

       Peer- teaching

       Classroom based teaching

Text Books And Reference Books:

Bailey, Richard W. 1991. Images of English. A Cultural History of the Language.

Cambridge. CUP.

Bayer, Jennifer. Language and social identity. In: Multilingualism in India. Clevedon:

Multilingual Matters Ltd: 101-111. 1990.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bailey, Richard W. 1991. Images of English. A Cultural History of the Language.

Cambridge. CUP.

Bayer, Jennifer. Language and social identity. In: Multilingualism in India. Clevedon:

Multilingual Matters Ltd: 101-111. 1990.

 

Durairajan, G. (2015). Assessing Learners. A Pedagogic Resource. India:

Cambridge University Press.

Gabriel, S.L and Smithson, I. 1990. Gender in the Classroom. Urbana: University of

Illinois Press.

Richards, J.C. and Rogers,T. 2001. Approaches and Methods in Language

Teaching. Cambridge: CUP

Richards, J.C. 2001. Curriculum Development in Language Teaching. Cambridge:

CUP

Sadker, D.S. (Ed.) and Silber, E.S. (Ed). 2006. Gender in the Classroom:

Foundations, Skills, Methods and Strategies Across Currciulum. Routledge:

NewYork.

Ur, P. 1996. A Course in Language Teaching: Practice and Theory. Cambridge: CUP

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 - 20 marks - An assignment based on Units 1 and 2.

CIA 2 - 50 marks - Written test based on units 1, 2 and 3

CIA 3- 20 marks- independent submissions of lesson plan, material generated and evaluation reports with rubric for their teaching is to be submitted.

ESE - 100 marks- a portfolio of their practise teaching

MEL344 - LANGAUAGE AND SOCIETY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course focuses on the function of language in sociocultural contexts and aims at providing a comprehensive understanding of sociolinguistic theories which would help the learners to identify the  linguistic variations corresponding to caste, class, gender, ethnicity, identity and power. The course will also focus on the analysis of various indegenous languages that are endangered and the implementation of language policies for revitalization.

Course Objectives

       To introduce the core concepts of Sociolinguistics

       To describe the process of language contact, variation and change

       To assess the role of language in the formation of societal and individual values and concepts

 

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate and understand the core concepts of Sociolinguistics.

CO2: Analyze the power relations in speech communities

CO3: Establish a relationship between language and social factors

CO4: Analyze conversation/linguistic data based on several sociolinguistic parameter

CO5: Conduct quantitative sociolinguistic studies

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Introduction to Sociolinguistics
 

This module will introduce Sociolinguistics as a branch of Linguistics.

       Knowledge of Language

       Language and Society

       Sociolinguistics and the sociology of language

       Role of language in society

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Language and Communication
 

This unit introduces to the core concepts of the societal use of language, especially in a bi/multilingual context.

       Dialect and Variety; Standardization

       Regional dialects, social dialects, Styles, Register

       Pidgins and Creoles

       Speech Communities; Diglossia

       Bilingualism and Multilingualism

       Code Switching and Code mixing

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Language and Power
 

This unit will discuss the role of language in maintaining social relationships and identity. Analysis of case studies will help the learners understand language as a tool of power.

       Power

       Linguistic Variation, Social Class, Identity

       Race, ethnicity, Gender

       Case studies (political speeches; media)

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Language Contact and Change
 

Linguistic exchanges and contact induced changes are byproducts of multilingualism. This unit will give a comprehensive overview of contact-induced language change: how languages come into contact, reasons for linguistic borrowing/change and death of one of the languages in contact.

       Contact and borrowing: Types, Reasons and Results

       Transfer of linguistics features

       Variation, shift, change

       Lexical and grammatical change

       Contact induced language change: Mechanisms

       Language Death

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Indigenous and Endangered Languages
 

This unit will look at the current linguistic situation and extent of language contact in various endangered and minority languages across the world and India.

       Endangered languages of the world

       Endangered and minority languages of India

       Case Study and field work

 

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Language Revitalization and Language Policy
 

Constitution and implementation of language policies are crucial in the maintenance and revitalization of endangered/minority languages. This unit deliberates on the need and steps for planning. This unit will also look at the existing policies at global and local levels.

       Language maintenance, Language documentation

       Language revitalization

       Language planning and policy

       Language- in- education planning

       Status Planning, Corpus planning, Acquisition planning

       Planning and Policies:  European and American languages

       Planning and Policies:  Indian languages

Text Books And Reference Books:

Deckert, S. K., & Vickers, C. H. (2011). An introduction to sociolinguistics: Society and identity. A&C Black.

Downes, W., & Downes, S. F. W. (1998). Language and society (Vol. 10). Cambridge university press.

Fairclough, N. (2001). Language and power. Pearson Education.

Holmes, J., & Wilson, N. (2017). An introduction to sociolinguistics. Routledge.

Norton, B. (2010). Language and identity. Sociolinguistics and language education, 23(3), 349-369.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Deckert, S. K., & Vickers, C. H. (2011). An introduction to sociolinguistics: Society and identity. A&C Black.

Downes, W., & Downes, S. F. W. (1998). Language and society (Vol. 10). Cambridge university press.

Fairclough, N. (2001). Language and power. Pearson Education.

Holmes, J., & Wilson, N. (2017). An introduction to sociolinguistics. Routledge.

Norton, B. (2010). Language and identity. Sociolinguistics and language education, 23(3), 349-369.

Romaine, S. (2000). Language in society: An introduction to sociolinguistics. Oxford University Press.

Spolsky, Bernard (2004). Language Policy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

Thomas, L., & Wareing, S. (2004). Language, society and power: An introduction. Routledge.

Trudgill, P. (2000). Sociolinguistics: An introduction to language and society. Penguin UK.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 - 20 marks - A written assignment based on Units 1 and 2.

CIA 2 - 50 marks - Written test based on units 1, 2 and 3

CIA 3- 20 marks- Group presentation of case study: Students will be divided into groups to conduct case studies on any topics from units 3-5. They should also present their findings.

ESE - 100 marks- Research paper submission based on the field work

MEL345 - SOCIAL, POLITICAL AND OTHER ARENAS OF DEBATE ON CULTURE (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

In the past few years, a new and powerful interest in studying culture has emerged, a claim that has produced important work throughout the humanities and social sciences. This course will examine how power, ideology, and discourse manifest themselves in the social and political debates on culture, globally and in the Indian context. This course will familiarize the students with emerging fields and cutting-edge research in the discipline.

 

Course Objectives

 

·         To introduce students to cultural studies as an academic discipline.

·         To introduce theoretical debates and interventions in studying culture and power from within culturalstudies.

·         To help students analyze various areas of social and political debates on culture.

Course Outcome

CO1: Analyze major social, political, and other arenas of debates that have shaped Cultural Studies as a field of inquiry.

CO2: Utilize interdisciplinary perspectives and tools to examine the diverse and contradictory meanings and functions of cultural objects, practices, events, and processes.

CO3: Conduct critical analyses of ideas and theoretical debates within the discipline of cultural studies.

CO4: Investigate cultural phenomena and artefacts with empirical and analytical rigour.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Culture and Society: Contemporary Debates
 

This unit introduces the various forms of debates problematizing the social values and systems defined by the society globally and in India.

 

·         Arjun Appadurai, Carol A. Breckenridge- "Why Public Culture?"

·         Pierre Bourdieu- "Social Space and Symbolic Power"

·         M. Srimannarayana Murti -"Cultural Discourse: Desi and Marga"

·         K. Ramanujan- "Is there an Indian Way of Thinking?"

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Socialization and Identity Formation in Changeable Society
 

This unit provides a critical evaluation of socialization and cultural identity construction concerning personal characteristics and societal perspectives.

 

·         Sewell W. H. – "Beyond the Cultural Turn: New Directions in the Study of Society and Culture"

·         Edgell, P. - Religion and Family in a Changing Society. pp. 1-26.

·         Zoya Hassan -"The Changing Political Orientation of the Middle Classes in India"

·         Sharankumar Limbale -"Dalit Literature: Form and Purpose"

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Culture and Power
 

This unit introduces the students to various forms of power structure present in the society that constructs the cultural consciousness.           

 

·         Henri Lefebvre- "Toward a Leftist Cultural Politics: Remarks Occasioned by the Centenary of Marx's Death"

·         Barrett, M. et al. (eds.)- "Representation and Cultural Production"

·         Perry Anderson- "The heirs of Gramsci."

·         Rabindranath Tagore- "Nationalism in India"

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Language and Literature as a Medium of Cultural Discourse
 

This unit introduces students to the issues of how language and literature exist as a representation of the cultural expression of a society. 

 

·         CCCS English Studies Group- "Thinking the thirties."

·         Antony Easthope- "Constructing The Literary Object"

·         Pierre Macherey-"Problems of Reflection"

·         U.R.Ananthamurthy- "Towards the Concept of a New Nationhood: Languages and Literatures in India"

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Art and Culture
 

This unit locates the study of culture within the discourse of popular and traditional art traversing across the forms of music, painting, performing arts etc.

 

·         James Clifford- "On  Collecting Art and  Culture"

·         Peter Burger- "On the Problem of Autonomy of Art in Bourgeois Society"

·         T M Krishna- "Caste in Music"

·         Amlan Das Gupta- “Plates and Bangles: Early Recorded Music in India”

Text Books And Reference Books:

·         Simon During Cultural Studies Reader Routledge,2001.

·         Cultural Theory and Popular Culture: A Reader. Ed. John Storey. Routledge, 2018.

·         Cultural Theory and Popular Culture: An Introduction. John Storey. Routledge,1993.

·         Culture and society: Contemporary debates Edited by Jeffrey C. Alexander and Steven Seidman. Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, 1990.

·         K N Panikkar and Sukumar Muralidharan (eds.). Communalism and the State: Reflection on a Decade of Turbulence, Sahmat, Delhi, 2002.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

·         Simon During Cultural Studies Reader Routledge,2001.

·         Cultural Theory and Popular Culture: A Reader. Ed. John Storey. Routledge, 2018.

·         Cultural Theory and Popular Culture: An Introduction. John Storey. Routledge,1993.

·         Culture and society: Contemporary debates Edited by Jeffrey C. Alexander and Steven Seidman. Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, 1990.

·         K N Panikkar and Sukumar Muralidharan (eds.). Communalism and the State: Reflection on a Decade of Turbulence, Sahmat, Delhi, 2002.

·         Cary Nelson and Lawrence Grossberg (Eds.) Marxism and the Interpretation of Culture University of Illinois Press, 1988.

·         Sukumar Periwal (ed.) Notions of Nationalism Central European University Press, Budapest,1995.

·         T M Krishna- Reshaping Art  Aleph Book Company, 2018.

·         Supriya Chaudhuri, Josephine McDonagh, Brian H. Murray, Rajeswari Sunder Rajan (eds.) Commodities and Culture in the Colonial World, London: Routledge, 2017.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Students are required to submit a term paperadetailedunderstanding,review,analysis,production (e.g., a documentary (short) written, shot, edited by the individual or an exhibition, designed, curatedbytheindividual)ofanyoftheculturaltexts.Theywillbegivenaframeworkinwhich they should submit the paper. It'sanindividualsubmission.Thestudent will be evaluated on the selection of theme, the rationale of the study, an argument to justify why the question should be handled in Cultural Studies, provides a review of literature with a critical approach wherein the ideas should be shown as contested, and the student's attempt to negotiate the constructedness with an argument of their own. The paper should be bound and submitted two days before thedeadline.

 

CIA I: For CIA 1, the student will be asked to submit the proposal for the paper. It will be evaluated on the selection of theme, the study's rationale, and an argument to justify why the question should be handled in Culture Studies. Academic format should be followed and will be an aspect of evaluation. (20 marks, 5 marks each for each criterion)

 

CIA II - Mid Semester Examination: Section A (10X5=50 marks) – Centralized

 

CIA III: The student is required to provide a review of literature with a critical approach wherein the ideas should be shown as debated and the student's attempt to negotiate the constructed frame with an argument of their own. Academic format should be followed and will be an aspect of evaluation. (20 marks, 5 marks each for each criterion)

 

End Semester Examination: Submission of a project for 100 marks.

 

 

 

MEL346 - GENDER STUDIES (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 The course examines the idea of Gender as a social construct narrativised through cultural texts and practices, through a close examination of texts and contexts from literature, popular culture, critical gender theories and movements. There is an attempt to answer questions pertaining to how major social constructs of race, class, caste, age and ability intersect with gender. The theoretical framework for discussion of gender studies will be based on theories of the body, major movements in gender studies, femininity, masculinity and queer studies. Students will integrate readings and theoretical frameworks of gender to real life contexts through assignments based on experiential learning in the form of case studies, interviews and production of material for further reading and research. The course will involve interface with NGOs and public organizations working for individuals marginalized on the basis of gender.

 

Course Objectives



·         Help students understand biological, social and cultural dimensions of sex and gender and popular discourses of the body

·         Enable approaches to concerns of gender through intersectional and interdisciplinary perspectives through a close reading of literary and visual texts

·         Explore significant concepts, theories, movements and contexts in Gender Studies

·         Contextualize gender issues in experiential domains through research, content creation and application oriented assignments

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Basic understanding of concepts, theories, movements and contexts of Gender Studies

CO2: Display a sensitivity towards experiential aspects and contemporary issues of gender in real life contexts through assignments and projects which address grassroot level gender issues

CO3: Ability to apply concepts and frameworks from gender studies to individual research papers/ projects in interdisciplinary fields with an intersectional understanding of gender concerns

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Doing Gender
 

The unit introduces students to primary concepts of sex and gender through the critical lens of ‘Biological Determinism’ and ‘Social Constructivism’, underlining the difference between the two. It will also introduce the body as an ideological construct and enable students to comprehend how the body is narrativised in various popular discourses to uphold normative constructions of binaries of sex and gender

 

 Theoretical Framework:

·         Dani Cavallaro: “Why the Body?”

·         Anne Fausto Sterling: “The Five Sexes: Why Male and Female are not Enough” (SL B)

·         Michel Foucault: Excerpts from History of Sexuality

 

Literary Texts:

·         Excerpts from Vachanas of Devara Dasimmaiah and Akka Mahadevi

·         Kalki Subramaniam: “Phallus I Cut”

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
From Equity to Identity Politics: Feminist Trajectories, Women?s Writing and Contemporary Femininities
 

This unit will give a historical overview of feminist concerns, movements and women’s writing apart from sensitizing students to the intersectional and inclusive nature of contemporary feminisms

 

 Theoretical Framework: Introduction to major feminist movements, intersectionality and contemporary approaches to feminism

·         Introducing Feminism: A Graphic Guide

·         Simone de Beauvoir: Chapter 1, The Second Sex

·         Helene Cixous: “The Laugh of the Medusa”

·         Geetanjali Gangoli: Indian Feminisms: Law, Patriarchies and Feminisms in India

·         Bell hooks: Excerpts – Feminist Theory: From Margin to Centre

·         Vandana Shiva: Videos on Eco-feminism (Youtube) ( self reading/ viewing)

·         Donna Haraway: Excerpts from The Cyborg Manifesto

·         Kim Toffoletti: Cyborgs and Barbie Dolls: Feminism, Pop Culture and the Posthuman Body ( self reading)

 

 Literary Texts

·         Ismat Chugtai: “Lihaaf”

·         Imtiaz Dharker: Purdah 2