CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH AND CULTURAL STUDIES

School of Arts and Humanities

Syllabus for
Master of Arts (English and Cultural Studies)
Academic Year  (2022)

 
1 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BMEC131 INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL STUDIES Core Courses 4 4 100
BMEC132 NARRATIVES Core Courses 4 4 100
BMEC133 RESEARCH & WRITING Core Courses 4 4 100
BMEC141A MEMORY, HISTORY, NARRATIVES Core Courses 4 4 100
BMEC141B CULTURE AND MYTHOLOGIES Core Courses 4 4 100
BMEC141C LANGUAGE AND PERFORMATIVITY Core Courses 4 4 100
BMEC141D CURRICULUM, PEDAGOGY, ASSESSMENT Core Courses 4 4 100
BMEC141E FILMING THE NATION Core Courses 4 4 100
2 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BMEC231 GENDER AND INTERSECTIONALITY - 4 4 100
BMEC232 CULTURE AND TECHNOLOGY - 4 4 100
BMEC233 POSTCOLONIAL SPATIALITIES - 4 4 100
BMEC241A MATERIAL CULTURE STUDIES - 4 4 100
BMEC241B CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY - 4 4 100
BMEC241C VISUAL CULTURE - 4 4 100
BMEC241D PRACTICE TEACHING - 4 4 100
      

    

Department Overview:

Thedepartment’sacademicworkbeganattheBannerghattaRoadCampusinMay2016.Withacademicprogramsthathavebeen designed to provide a comprehensive learning environment through faculty members trained in institutions of variousnational and international repute, the department provides a holistic approach to engaging with language, literature andculture. The department promotes an intellectual climate of critical and creative ideation that aims to inculcate among itsstudents a critical reading of the word and the world alike. It has geared its academic engagements towards mouldingstudentsintoresponsibleandsociallysensitivecitizensthroughprogramsthataredesignedtofacilitateholisticdevelopment.The academic programs seek to build academic, social and professional competencies along with an ethical outlook. Theacademic programs offered by the department are aligned with the University’s vision and mission. Offering programs attheundergraduate,postgraduate,andresearchlevels,thecoreareasofenquiryrangefromdomaininlanguageandliterature,tothoseinandaroundculture.ProgramscurrentlyofferedincludeBAEnglish(Hons);BA(LiberalArts);MA(EnglishandCultural Studies), and PhD (Cultural Studies). The Department of Engli

Mission Statement:

Vision

Toenablecriticalandcreativereflection oftheselfandtheworld.

Mission

The

Introduction to Program:

The Master of Arts programme in English and Cultural Studies aims to provide an interdisciplinary grounding in Cultural Studies and allied disciplines,including literature. The courses offered provide a range of perspectives for understanding ‘culture’ and ‘cultural practices’ in all their nuances through relevanttheoretical frameworks as well as through a practice-based component that includes field-work, internships, and other forms of engaging with contexts beyond‘texts’ alone. They curriculum aims to create discursive spaces within as well as outside the classroom, encouraging learners to actively engage with the socialworld. The programme places an emphasis on rigorous scholarly work as well as with more creative forms of shaping research outputs. In keeping with ChristUniversity’semphasison academicexcellence,theprogrammeisup-to-datewithcontemporary pedagogiesas wellas curricularcontent.

Program Objective:
PO1: Display domain expertise in English and Cultural Studies through independent study, completion of coursework, and execution of research projects.

PO2: Generate research outputs that reflect a comprehensive understanding of research methodologies, approaches, and skills through the execution of research projects and formulation of research papers, critical essays, etc.

PO3: Apply critical thinking skills through analysis of texts and immediate socio-cultural contexts by applying interdisciplinary approaches and perspectives in research papers, presentations, class discussions, and debates.

PO4: Exhibit the ability to build upon qualities of enterprise, critical, and creative imagination to engage with the contemporary contexts by undertaking MOOC courses and internships.

PO5: Practice interpersonal and effective communication skills in both personal and professional domains through collaborative or external projects related to writing, content creation, service learning, teaching, policy development, publishing, translation, and other areas.

PO6: Develop an awareness of diversities (cultural, linguistic, racial, gendered, caste-based, dis/abilities, etc) and know how to engage with these productively through assignments, coursework, and independent projects.

PO7: Demonstrate the ability to spearhead individual and collaborative projects to effectively contribute towards building a sustainable and egalitarian society through various participatory engagements.

PO8: Evaluate and engage with qualities of effective citizenship to act with an informed awareness of issues to engage with the community using expertise drawn from the discipline and undertake initiatives that encourage equity and growth for all through independent, collaborative, and creative works.

Assesment Pattern

Continuous internal assessments and submissions are course specific

Examination And Assesments

The assessment methods developed by the course instructor (sometimes in consultation with the students) include three internal assessments, a mid-semester examination and an end-semester examination. Some papers also provide for flexibility in the structure and the mode of administering these assessments. Details of such testing patterns will be available through the respective course instructors as well as the syllabus for the papers. Feedback would be provided to students on their internal assessment which will enable them to build on their knowledge of the specific papers.

BMEC131 - INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL STUDIES (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course provides an introduction to basic concepts and theoretical developments within Cultural Studies, with the aim of imparting critical perspectives, and encouraging students to engage with their own cultural landscapes. It provides a foundational introduction to some of the key ideas, issues, and theories that have influenced Cultural Studies, and attempts to especially interrogate these debates from our own contexts in contemporary India.

Course Objectives:

1.Introduce students to significant debates and theorists within Cultural Studies

2.Enable students to engage with these debates from their own immediate vantage points

3.Encourage independent research and critical analysis.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Apply Cultural Studies methods to reflect upon our own immediate contexts throughassignmentsandclassexercises.

CO2: Demonstrate adequate understanding of and familiarity with core debates within thedisciplinethroughwrittensubmissionsandclasspresentations

CO3: Developindependent and collaborative learning skills through participation in researchprojects and group activities.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Culture and Cultural Studies
 

This unit looks at the various meanings associated with the word ‘culture' and explores ways of understanding the relationship between culture and society. It will also explore the emergence of Cultural Studies in India, with some reference to its development in the UK and North America, while focusing specifically on narratives of Cultural Studies in the Indian context.

Indicative Readings:

Williams, R. Keywords: A Vocabulary of Culture and Society.

Niranjana, T., Sudhir, P., & Dhareshwar, V. Interrogating Modernity: Culture and Colonialism in India.

Niranjana, T., Wang, X., Vasudevan, N., & Prasad, M. M. Cultural Studies in India - Reasons and a History.

Sawhney, R. Decolonising Cultural Studies.

Spivak, G. C. Scattered Speculations on the Question of Culture Studies.

McCabe, C. Cultural Studies and English.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Nationalism, Post Colonialism and Globalization
 

This module introduces key debates surrounding the idea of the nation. An important discussion the unit will deal with is the contested nature of nation and nationalism.

 

Indicative Readings:

Chatterjee, P. Whose Imagined Community?

Thapar, R., Majeed, N. A. G. A., & Menon, S. Reflections on Nationalism.

Rajadhyaksha, A. The 'Bollywoodization' of the Indian Cinema: Cultural Nationalism in a Global Arena.

Appadurai, A. Disjuncture and Difference in the Global Cultural Economy.

Bhabha, H. K. The Postcolonial and the Postmodern: The Question of Agency.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
The Politics of Identity: Caste, Race, Masculinities
 

This module shall introduce students to debates around ‘identity’ as an important factor in shaping ideas of cultural production and consumption, with a focus on the peculiar notion of caste in India.

 

Indicative Readings:

Ambedkar, B. R. A Reply to the Mahatma.

Guru, G. Liberal Democracy in India and the Dalit Critique.

Gilroy, P. The Black Atlantic as a Counterculture of Modernity.

West, C. The New Cultural Politics of Difference.

Nandy, A. Pramathesh Chandra Barua and the Origins of the Terribly Effeminate, Maudlin, Self-destructive Heroes of Indian Cinema.

Article 15 (dir. Anubhav Sinha, 2018)

Mary Kom (Omung Kumar, 2014, Hindi)

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Language, Culture and Subjectivity
 

This module shall introduce students to debates around ‘identity’ as an important factor in shaping ideas of cultural production and consumption, with a focus on the peculiar notion of caste in India.

Indicative Readings:

Devy, G. N. The Being of Basha: A general introduction.

Chatterjee, P., Ghosh, A., & Prasad, M. M. The Republic of Babel: Language and Political Subjectivity in Free India.

Pai, Sajith. Indo-Anglican: The Newest and fastest-growing caste in India.

Aneesh, A. Bloody Language: Clashes and Constructions of Linguistic Nationalism in India.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Ambedkar, B. R. (2021). Annihilation of Caste with a reply to Mahatma Gandhi. Maven Books.

Aneesh, A. (2010). Bloody Language: Clashes and Constructions of Linguistic Nationalism in India. Sociological Forum, 25(1), 86–109. http://www.jstor.org/stable/40542542.

Appadurai, A. (1990). Disjuncture and Difference in the Global Cultural Economy. Theory, Culture & Society, 7(2–3), 295–310. https://doi.org/10.1177/026327690007002017.

Bhabha, H. K., & Bhabha, H. K. (2012). The Postcolonial and the Postmodern: The Question of Agency. In The location of culture. essay, Taylor and Francis.

Chatterjee, P. (1991). Whose Imagined Community? Millennium, 20(3), 521–525. https://doi.org/10.1177/03058298910200030601.

Chatterjee, P., Ghosh, A., & Prasad, M. M.(n.d.). The Republic of Babel: Language and Political Subjectivity in Free India. Scribd.

Devy, G. N. (2014). The being of basha: A general introduction. Orient Blackswan Private Limited.

Gilroy, P. (1993). The Black Atlantic as a Counterculture of Modernity. Princeton UP.

Guru, G. (2011). Liberal Democracy in India and the Dalit Critique. Social Research, 78(1), 99–122. http://www.jstor.org/stable/23347205.

Kumar, Umang. (Director). (2014). Mary Kom [Movie]. Aanna Films.

Nandy, A. (2007). An ambiguous journey to the city the village and other odd ruins of the self in the indian imagination. Oxford University Press.

Niranjana, T., Sudhir, P., & Dhareshwar, V. (1993). Interrogating modernity: Culture and colonialism in India. Seagull.

Pai, S. (2018, December 10). Indo-Anglians: The newest and fastest-growing caste in India. Scroll.in. Retrieved April 8, 2022, from https://scroll.in/magazine/867130/indo-anglians-the-newest-and-fastest-growing-caste-in-india.

Rajadhyaksha, A. (2003). The 'bollywoodization' of the Indian cinema: Cultural nationalism in a global arena. Inter-Asia Cultural Studies, 4(1), 25–39. https://doi.org/10.1080/1464937032000060195.

Sawhney, R. (2019). Decolonising Cultural Studies. Artha - Journal of Social Sciences, 18(3), 25–42. https://doi.org/10.12724/ajss.50.2

Sinha, Anubhav (Director). (2019). Article 15 [Movie]. Zee Studios.

Spivak, G. C. (2005). Scattered speculations on the subaltern and the popular. Postcolonial Studies, 8(4), 475–486. https://doi.org/10.1080/13688790500375132.

Thapar, R., Majeed, N. A. G. A., & Menon, S. (2016). On nationalism. Aleph.

West, C. (1990). The New Cultural Politics of Difference. October, 53, 93–109. https://doi.org/10.2307/778917.

Williams, R. (2014). Keywords: A vocabulary of culture and society. Oxford University Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Ashraf, A. (2013, August). The untold story of Dalit journalists. http://asu.thehoot.org/. Retrieved April 8, 2022, from http://www.thehoot.org/media-watch/media-practice/the-untold-story-of-dalit-journalists-6956

Ashraf, A. (2013, August). Caste on the campus. http://asu.thehoot.org/. Retrieved April 8, 2022, from http://asu.thehoot.org/media-watch/media-practice/caste-on-the-campus-6959

Ashraf, A. (2013, August). Farewell to media dreams. http://asu.thehoot.org/. Retrieved April 8, 2022, from http://www.thehoot.org/media-watch/media-practice/farewell-to-media-dreams-6962

Ashraf, A. (2013, August). The untold story of dalit journalists. http://asu.thehoot.org/. Retrieved April 8, 2022, from http://asu.thehoot.org/media-watch/media-practice/the-untold-story-of-dalit-journalists-6956

Aloysius, G. (2010). Nationalism without a nation in India. Oxford University Press.

Chibber, V. (2014). Revisiting Subaltern Studies. Economic and Political Weekly, 49(9), 82-85.

Sawhney, R. (2014, September 26). The race for Mary Kom. DNA India. Retrieved April 8, 2022, from https://www.dnaindia.com/analysis/column-the-race-for-mary-kom-2021820.

Thapar, R., Majeed, N. A. G. A., & Menon, S. (2016). On nationalism. Aleph.

Prem, N. (2019, July 12). A Critique on Article 15: Unravelling the Brahmin Saviour Complex. Round Table India. Retrieved April 8, 2022, from https://roundtableindia.co.in/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=9680%3Aa-critique-on-article-15-unravelling-the-brahmin-saviour-complex&catid=119%3Afeature&Itemid=132.

Evaluation Pattern

70% of the coursework will be through continuous assessment and 30% in the form of a final submission. CIA I, II and II will be in the form of individual written submissions or presentations.

The End Semester Exam will either be a research paper or portfolio presentation.

BMEC132 - NARRATIVES (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course introduces students to foundational concepts in Narratology, extending them to a variety of narrative forms across literature, photography, cinema, visual arts, and video games. The course aims to familiarize students with methods and approaches to reading, understanding and experiencing aspects of narrative and narratology in a wide range of mediums, in order to emphasise the inter-dependencies as well as the distinctiveness of narrative construction across mediums and cultural contexts.

The course will introduce learners to:

  •  The fundamentals of Narratology.
  •  The rise of the novel in Europe and India and impingent socio-cultural transformations.
  • The commonalities and distinctiveness of narrative forms across literature, cinema and video games/interactive media.
  • Apply the basic frameworks of narrative analysis across mediums/forms/genres.

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate the ability to identify the fundamentals of story-telling and meaning-construction across a variety of narrative forms and media through assignments and class exercises.

CO2: Demonstrate adequate understanding of and familiarity with core debates within the discipline through written submissions and class presentations.

CO3: Develop independent and collaborative learning skills through participation in research projects and group activities.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Fundamentals of Narratives
 

This unit will introduce students to the fundamentals of Narratives focusing on elements that remain consistent across mediums, cultural regions and historical periods. These will include rudimentary aspects of Narratology, while drawing attention to the limitations of this theory in the context of new and emerging interactive mediums such as video games.

 

Indicative Readings:

M, Bal. Narratology: Introduction to the Theory of Narrative.

Laure Ryan et. al. Story Worlds Across Media

Verstraten and Van der Lecq. Film Narratology.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Literary Narratives
 

This unit will focus on the novel as a form of modern narrative, exploring the social and technological contexts that give rise to this literary form. The texts and contexts explored will include writings on the novel by novelists as well as texts engaging with the rise of modern societies and ‘reading publics. The explorations will consider the novel in Europe as well as its rise in various South Asian languages.

 

Indicative Readings:

Borges, J. L. Funes the Memorious.

Kundera, M. The Deprecated Legacy of Cervantes

Watt, I. Realism and the Novel

Watt, I. The Reading Public

Mukherjee, M. Early Novels in India

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Visual Narratives
 

This unit will look into a variety of visual forms including cinema, visual arts and new media to understand how narratives get constructed through a combination of sound, image, movement, and interactivity. The unit will introduce students to elementary frameworks to analyse visual narratives. A rudimentary engagement with the history of specific mediums will be facilitated. By the end of this unit, students should be equipped to explain the distinct ways in which narratives work across textual/literary and visual mediums.

 

Indicative Readings:

Kapur, G. “Representational Dilemmas of a Nineteenth-Century Painter: Raja Ravi Varma” in When Was Modernism?

Berger, J. Ways of Seeing

Bordwell, D. “Three Dimensions of Film Narrative” in Poetics of Cinema.

Mulvey, L. Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema

Nandy, A. An Ambiguous Journey to the City

Mazumdar, R. Bombay Cinema

Gallaway, A. Introduction from Gaming: Essays on Algorithmic Culture.

Lowood & Nitsche (Ed.). The Machinima Reader (selected chapters)

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Narrative Analysis
 

This unit will be primarily based on student-led seminars, in-class discussions, and independent research and will involve an active analysis of narratives across various mediums. Questions around identity and aesthetics and form will be introduced to explore how various ‘identity communities’ have developed new narrative techniques to represent their lived experiences and politics. Examples will be drawn from across the world, and from different historical periods. The objective of this unit is to enable students to sharpen their textual analysis skills.

 

Indicative Readings/Screenings:

Fire (dir. Deepa Mehta, 1996) - the many controversies: Sohini Ghosh; Geeta Patel; Rustom Bharucha

Tendulkar, V. Ghashiram Kotwal – the play and the film

Excerpts from William Mazarella’s Censorium

The Battle of Algiers (dir. Gillo Pontecarvo, 1966)

The Third Cinema Manifesto

John Akomfrah interview with Anand Patwardhan - http://patwardhan.com/?page_id=1915

Ram ke Naam/In the Name of God (dir. Anand Patwardhan, 1992, doc)

Text Books And Reference Books:

Bal, M. (1997). Introduction to the Theory of Narrative (2nd ed.). University of Toronto Press.

Berger, J. (1972). Ways of seeing, based on the Bbc television series with John Berger: A book. BBC.

Bordwell, D. (2007). Three Dimensions of Film Narrative. In D. Bordwell (Ed.), Poetics of Cinema. essay, Routledge.

Borges, J. L. (1954). Funes the Memorious. (A. Kerrigan, Trans.). Alphascript Publishing.

Kapur, G. (Ed.). (2000). When was Modernism? Essays in Contemporary Cultural Practice in India. New Delhi: Tulika Books.

Gallaway, A.: Introduction from Gaming : Essays on Algorithmic Culture.

Kundera, M. (2003). The Art of the Novel. Harper Perennial Modern Classics. {Excerpts from the novel & interviews of Kundera}

Laure Ryan and Noel Thon (Eds.) (2014) Storyworlds across Media: Towards a media-conscious narratology. Gutenberg University Press.

Lowood, H., & Nitsche, M. (2011). The machinima reader. MIT Press.

Mazumdar, R. (2007). Bombay Cinema: An Archive of the City (NED-New edition). University of Minnesota Press. http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.ctttt34b

Mukherjee, M. (1985). Selected Chapters. In Realism and Reality: The Novel and Society in India. Oxford University Press.

Mulvey, L. (1989). Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema. In: Visual and Other Pleasures. Language, Discourse, Society. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-349-19798-9_3.

Nandy, A. (2007). An ambiguous journey to the city the village and other odd ruins of the self in the indian imagination. Oxford University Press.

Verstraten and Van der Lecq (2009) Film Narratology. University of Toronto Press.

Watt, Ian. (1957). The Rise of the Novel. Penguin.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Abbot, H. Porter. (2002). The Cambridge Introduction to Narrative. Cambridge University Press.

Baudelaire, C. (1964). The Painter of Modern Life and Other Essays. Phaidon.

Cobley, Paul. (2001). Narrative. Routledge.

Crary, J. (1990). Techniques of the Observer. MIT Press.

Derrida, J. (1995). Archive Fever. (E. Prenowitz, Trans.). Chicago University Press.

Flaubert, G. (1869). Sentimental Education. Penguin Classics. {Introduction}

Fludernik, M.. (2009). An Introduction to Narratology. Routledge.

Lukács, G. (1974). The Theory of the Novel. (A. Bostock, Trans.). MIT Press.

Phelan, J. (2005). Shards of a History of Performance Art: Pollock and Namuth, Through a Glass, Darkly. In J. Phelan & P. J. Rabinowitz (Eds.), A Companion to Narrative Theory (pp. 499–512). essay, Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Sawhney, R. (2018). Shadowing the Image Archive: Inside Nalini Malani’s Shadow Plays. MIRAJ, 7(2), 324–334.

Sheikh, G. M. (1993). Viewer’s View: Looking at Pictures. In T. Niranjana, P. Sudhir, & V. Dhareshwar (Eds.), Interrogating Modernity: Culture and Colonialism in India (pp. 143–154). essay, Springer.

Simmel, G. (1903). The Metropolis and Mental Life. BlackWell Publishing.

Srivatsan (1993). Imaging Truth and Desire: Photography and the Visual Field in India. In T. Niranjana, P. Sudhir, & V. Dhareshwar (Eds.), Interrogating Modernity: Culture and Colonialism in India (pp. 155–198). essay, Springer.

Evaluation Pattern

70% of the marks will be collected through the semester through class assignments, presentations, written tests, student-led seminars, and group projects.

 

30% of the marks will be a 3000-word research paper on a topic decided in consultation with faculty OR a portfolio submission.

BMEC133 - RESEARCH & WRITING (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the various theoretical frameworks in literary and cultural studies that they may use to enhance their readings of texts and, eventually, to formulate their own research questions and to discover areas of inquiry that they are interested in specializing in. It also introduces students to research methods and methodologies relevant to the disciplines, approaches to writing abstracts, formulating a research inquiry, articulating research questions, carrying out the research, and presenting it in appropriate academic forms using prescribed citation formats. This course will also engage the students is practices of professional and academic integrity.

The course aims to help students to:

  • Demonstrate a sound understanding of a range of theoretical frameworks.
  • Carry out close reading and annotation.
  • Conceptualize a research inquiry and articulate research questions with clarity.
  • Develop suitable methodological strategies to execute the research.
  • Present their research in the form of a scholarly essay, using appropriate modes of citation. 

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate Literary and Cultural Studies knowledge of relevant theoretical framework and methods through written work, annotations, abstract writing, literature review etc.

CO2: Display an adequate understanding of and familiarity with core debates and critical concepts within the discipline through developing research questions, identifying research gaps, conducting literature review and application of relevant methodologies

CO3: Develop academic integrity in practices of research and publication while fostering independent and collaborative learning skills through participation in group activities (blogs, journals) conference presentations, and other academic endeavors.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Basics of Research
 

This unit will introduce the basics of research writing using sample research papers and examples. Main topics that will be covered in this unit are the following:

  • How to choose a research topic
  •  Abstract writing
  •  Literature Review
  •  Research Questions
  • Research Gaps and rational
  • Thesis statement
  • Bibliography and citations
  • MLA style sheet and Mendeley
  • Plagiarism
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Research Methods
 

This unit will introduce the key research methods in the field of English and Cultural Studies. Main topics that will be covered in this unit are the following:

  •  Pink, S. Analysing Visual Experience.
  •   Nightingale, V. Why Observing Matters.
  • Pickering, Michael. Engaging with History.
  •  Auto/biographical Methods
  •   Oral History
  •  Visual Methodologies
  •   Discourse Analysis
  • Textual Analysis
  •   Archival Methods
  •  English Research Methods and Digital Humanities 
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Theoretical Frameworks
 

The unit will introduce the key theories in the field of English and Cultural Studies. Select theories will be covered in this unit:

McGowan, K. Structuralism and Semiotics.

Barthes, R. The Death of the Author.

Marx, K. Preface to a Contribution to the Critique of Political Economy.

Deleuze, G., Guattari, F., & Brinkley, R. What is a Minor Literature?

Freud, S. A Note on the Unconscious in Psychoanalysis.

Mulvey, L. Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema.

Haraway, D. A manifesto for cyborgs: Science, technology, and socialist feminism in the 1980s.

Butler, J. Imitation and Gender Insubordination'in Diana Fuss (ed.).

Fanon, F. The fact of blackness.

 Mohanty, C. T. Under Western Eyes: Feminist Scholarship and Colonial Discourses.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Practice
 

This unit will be a hands-on unit to develop the skills of writing a research paper.

Main topics that will be covered in this unit are the following:

  •  Structuring a paper
  • Title and sub headings
  •   Introduction
  •  Main body and analysis
  •  Synthesising literature review and analysis
  • Conclusion
  • Citations and credible sources 
Text Books And Reference Books:

Badmington, N., & Thomas, J. (2008). The Routledge Critical and Cultural Theory Reader. Routledge.

Barthes, R. (1992). The Death of the Author, 1968.

Butler, J. (1991). Imitation and Gender Insubordination'in Diana Fuss (ed.), Inside. Out: Lesbian Theories, Gay Theories., Chicago.

Deleuze, G., Guattari, F., & Brinkley, R. (1983). What is a Minor Literature? Mississippi Review, 11(3), 13-33., Chicago.

Fanon, F. (1952). The fact of blackness. Postcolonial Studies: An Anthology, 15-32.

Freud, S. (1984). A Note on the Unconscious in Psychoanalysis'(1912), PFL Vol. 11.

Haraway, D. (1990). A manifesto for cyborgs: Science, technology, and socialist feminism in the 1980s. Feminism/postmodernism, 190-233.

Malpas, S., & Wake, P. (Eds.). (2013). The Routledge Companion to Critical and Cultural Theory. New York: Routledge.

Marx, K. (1859). Preface to a Contribution to the Critique of Political Economy. The Marx-Engels Reader, 2: 3-6.

McDonough, J., & McDonough, S. (2014). Research Methods for English Studies. Routledge.

McGowan, K. (2013). Structuralism and semiotics. In The Routledge Companion to Critical and Cultural Theory. Routledge, pp. 28-38

Mohanty, C. (1988). Under Western Eyes: Feminist Scholarship and Colonial Discourses. Feminist Review, 30(1), 61–88. https://doi.org/10.1057/fr.1988.42.

Mulvey, L. (1989). Visual pleasure and narrative cinema. In Visual and other pleasures. London: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 14-26.

Pickering, M. (Ed.). (2008). Research Methods for Cultural Studies. Edinburgh University Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bailey, Stephen. (2006). Academic Writing: A Handbook for International Students. Routledge.

Bain, Carl. E, Jerome Beaty and J. Paul Hunter. (1995). The Norton Introduction to Literature. 6th ed. W.W. Norton Company.

Griffith, Kelley. (2002). Writing Essays about Literature: A Guide and Style Sheet. 6th ed. Harcourt College Publishers.

Harvey, Michael. (2003). The Nuts & Bolts of College Writing. Hackett Publishing.

Kennedy, X.J., and Dana Gioia. (1999). Literature: An Introduction to Fiction, Poetry, and Drama. 7th ed., Longman.

Lipson, Charles. (2005). How to Write a BA Thesis: A Practical Guide from Your First Ideas to Your Finished Paper. University of Chicago Press.

Madden, Frank. (2007). Exploring Literature: Writing and Arguing about Fiction, Poetry, Drama and the Essay. Pearson Longman.

Montgomery, Martin, et al. (2007). Ways of Reading: Advanced Reading Skills for Students of English Literature. Routledge.

Pirie, David B. (1985). How to Write Critical Essays: A Guide for Students of Literature. Routledge.

Whitla, William. (2010). The English Handbook: A Guide to Literary Studies. Blackwell.

Woolf, Judith. (2005). Writing about Literature. Routledge.

Evaluation Pattern

70% marks will be through continuous assessment and 30% for the final research paper submission.

CIA I, II and III: Will be a compilation of portfolios which will include all the writing assignments the students have done in the course of the paper including the abstract, literature review and methodology, the scores will be entered out of 65 cumulatively at the end of CIA III. End semester exam is to be a research submission where each student will choose a literary genre or a cultural studies topic and examine it along the parameters of a research and submit a working paper along the argumentation and critical and analytical frameworks.

BMEC141A - MEMORY, HISTORY, NARRATIVES (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is to introduce students to methodologies that are required for understanding identity and history as a multiple, layered, and often a contested set of representations. The course is built as an in-depth series of case studies, with the aim of bringing together three distinct areas of analytical questions that are implied by its title’s key terms – ‘history’, ‘memory’ and ‘identity’. Questions like – what are main approaches to social and cultural memory? What, and whose history is being remembered and narrated? And in this quagmire, how should identity be understood? – would be the prime focus of the course.

This course will give a thorough grounding in the classical works on memory from Durkheimean, psychoanalytic and Marxist perspectives, including Maurice Halbwachs and Pierre Nora, and contrasting it with the studies that draw on post-structuralist and cognitive approaches, as well as theories of affect and subjectivity. Then it will proceed to asking what can be learned about societies from ways in which they are concerned with history. What are some of the types of historical consciousness and cultural notions of history, of lack thereof? How one can productively compare imperial and universalist notions of history as progress with ideas about historical and cultural uniqueness and exceptionalism, including nationalism, as well as with conceptualizations of history as justice, as trauma, and as objects of consumption. What are practices of production, exchange and consumption of historical narratives in education, tourism and politics? And finally, where does Identity – one of the key categories in historical and social analysis, fit in? One of the goals of the course is to ask what identity is, and what approaches to identity are useful for understanding historical memory.

At the end of the course, students will be:

  • Introduced to basic ideas in historical research.
  • Able to undertake independent research.
  • Analyse historical narratives through examples from their own immediate contexts.
  • Explore the construction of varying identities and approaches useful for understanding historical memory.

Course Outcome

CO1: Apply concepts and theoretical models, and test new methods and tools for professional and research-based activities.

CO2: Demonstrate critical engagement with representations of the past in the present and use the evidence in interrogating historical accounts and memory through assignments, class debates and presentations.

CO3: Develop independent and collaborative learning skills through participation in research projects and group activities.

CO4: Analyse how historical memory and identity are shaped by states, organizations, and individuals.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Shapes of Memory: A Place in History
 

a)  Performance of the Past: Theories of History, Memory and Identity, and Cultural Histories

b)  Framing and Reframing Identity: Mapping the Terrain of Memory – Individual to Collective

c)  Unstuck in Time: The Sudden Presence of the Past – The Politics of Submersion

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Leaders, Legacies and Memory: The Many After-lives
 

a) The Contested Place of Memory: The Chairman Mao Memorial Hall, Sabarmati Ashram, Lincoln Memorial, Mustafa Kemal Ataturk Mausoleum.

b) The Ubiquitous Past-Present and Lost: Politics of Display within and without; Marine Corps War Memorial, Jewish Museum in Berlin, Hiroshima Peace Memorial, Taj Mahal.

 c)  Making History: Narratives and Counter-narratives; Opium Wars, The Ayodhya Debate and the Ram Janmabhoomi Issue, Genghis Khan and the Mongol Horde.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Memory and Identity: Haunted by History
 

a) Tracing the Ghost and the Geographies of Violence: The Kashmir Issue, Israeli-Palestinian Conflict, China-Japan rivalry.

b) Irrevocable Futures: The Dynamics of Conflict – the Aryan Debate, Hindutva Ideology and Neo-Nazis.

c) Suppressing the Text: State Secrets and Declassification – Wikileaks and the Netaji Files.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
The Performative Identity: Indelible Memories
 

a)  Memory and Incongruous Images: Political Lives of Dead Bodies; Burials, Mass Graves, Exhumations, Bodies of Great People.

b) Identity and the Politics of Remembrance: Engendered Memories; Culinary Discourses and Politics of Food; Folktales and Folklore.

c)  The Economy of Memory: Consumption of/and Heritage, Heritage Tourism, Cultural Property and Identity.

d) Ethics and Limits of Representation: Can Culture Belong to any One Group? Can Culture be Copyrighted?

Text Books And Reference Books:

Baum, Bruce. (2006). The Rise and Fall of the Caucasian Race: A Political History of Racial Identity, New York:   New York University Press.

McGrattan, Cillian. (2012). Memory, Politics and Identity: Haunted by History, London: Palgrave Macmillan.

Sen, Amartya. (2005). The Argumentative Indian: Writings on Indian History, Culture and Identity, New Delhi: Penguin Books Ltd.

Thapar, Romila. (2000). History and Beyond, New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

Thapar, Romila. (2013). The Past Before Us: Historical Traditions of Early North India, New Delhi: Permanent Black.

Thapar, Romila. (2019). Time as a Metaphor of History: Early India, The Krishna Bharadwaj Memorial Lecture. New Delhi: Oxford.

Tilmans, Karin, Frank van Vree, Jay Winter (eds). (2010). Performing the Past: Memory, History, and Identity in Modern Europe, Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press.

Venner, Dominique. (2015). The Shock of History: Religion, Memory, Identity, Arktos Media Ltd.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Alam, Muzaffar. (2014). The Languages of Political Islam in India c. 1200-1800. Ranikhet: Permanent Black.

Ballinger, Pamela. (2002). History in Exile: Memory and Identity at the Borders of the Balkans, Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Banerjee, Sumanta. (2003). Ayodhya: A Future Bound by the Past, Economic and Political Weekly, Vol. 38, No. 27, pp. 2795-2796.

Chassot, Joanne. (2018). Ghosts of the African Diaspora: Re-Visioning History, Memory, and Identity, Re-Mapping the Transnational – A Dartmouth Series in American Studies Dartmouth: Dartmouth College Press.

Chatterjee, Partha. (1993). The Nation and its Fragments: Colonial and Postcolonial Histories. Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press.

Chatterjee, Partha. (2012). The Black Hole of Empire: History of a Global Practice of Power, Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press.

Counihan, Carole, and Steven L. Kaplan. (1998). Food and Gender: Identity and Power, Food and Nutrition in History and Culture Series, Amsterdam: Harwood Academic Publishers.

Dorn, Sherman, Barbara J. Shircliffe, Deirdre Cobb-Roberts (eds). (2006). Schools as Imagined Communities: The Creation of Identity, Meaning, and Conflict in U.S. History, New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Finney, Patrick. (2010). Remembering the Road to World War Two: International History, National Identity, Collective Memory, New York: Routledge.

Friedman, Kajsa Ekholm. (1994). Consumption and Identity, Studies in Anthropology & History Series, Amsterdam: Harwood Academic Publishers.

Genova, Ann, and Toyin Falola. (2006). Yoruba Identity and Power Politics, Rochester Studies in African History and the Diaspora, Rochester: University of Rochester Press.

Kumar, Ravinder. (1989). The Past and the Present: An Indian Dialogue, Daedalus, Vol. 118, No.4, pp. 27-49.

Leiden Series in Modern East Asian Politics and History, London and New York: Routledge.

Liulevicius, Vejas Gabriel. (2004). War Land on the Eastern Front: Culture, National Identity, and German Occupation, Studies in the Social and Cultural History of Modern Warfare (English Edition), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Matten, Marc Andre. (2011). Places of Memory in Modern China: History, Politics, and Identity, Leiden Series in Comparative Historiography, Leiden and Boston: BRILL.

Shrimali, K.M. (1998). A Future for the Past? Social Scientist, Vol. 26, No. 9, pp. 26-51.

Sikes, Alan. (2007). Representation and Identity from Versailles to the Present: The Performing Subject, Palgrave Studies in Theatre and Performance History Series, New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Stevens, Maurice E. (2003). Troubling Beginnings: Trans(per)forming African American History and Identity, Studies in African American History and Culture Series.  London: Routledge.

Thapar, Romila, Harbans Mukhia, Bipan Chandra. (1969). Communalism and the Writing of Indian History, New Delhi: People's Publishing House.

Thapar, Romila. (1979). Dissent in the Early Indian Tradition, Volume 7 of M.N. Roy memorial lecture, New Delhi: Indian Renaissance Institute.

Wangler, Alexandra. (2012). Rethinking History, Reframing Identity: Memory, Generations, and the Dynamics of National Identity in Poland, Bremen: Springer.

Webster, Wendy. (1998). Imagining Home: Gender, Race and National Identity, 1945-1964, Women's History Series, London: University College London Press.

White, Geoffrey M., (1991). Identity through History: Living Stories in a Solomon Islands Society, Cambridge Studies in Social and Cultural Anthropology Series, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

 

Zachmann, Urs Matthias. (2009). China and Japan in the Late Meiji Period: China Policy and the Japanese Discourse on National Identity, 1895-1904, Routledge.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I, II and II will be in the form of individual written submissions or presentations.

The End Semester Exam will either be a research paper or portfolio presentation.

BMEC141B - CULTURE AND MYTHOLOGIES (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

As mythologies continue to shape and define the world around, it is imperative to discern what makes myths meaningful expressions across cultures. The course attempts to introduce students to various mythologies across the globe and their contemporary relevance. What makes myths windows to various cultures? How have the stories of Zeus, Odin, Vishnu, et al., shaped the literary, dramatic, and other artistic traditions of their respective cultures and what currency do they hold in the contemporary world? How does the idea of the monomyth influence the modern perception of a hero? How far have the cultural appropriations affected the modern perceptions of myths? By examining the specific mythic narratives, their time, place, and meaning, this course will ask how the narrative functions, not simply with respect to some known or unknown ritual, but in the broad cultural life of the mythmakers and their audience. The topics will demonstrate how myths reflect the social and cultural structures and have played a crucial role in shaping the history. The course, therefore, is aimed at encouraging an interdisciplinary scholarship.

 

This course aims to help students:

  1. Understand the cultural and historical significance of myths.
  2. Identify universal mythic patterns.
  3. Develop a cross-cultural perspective on myths.

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of mythologies from different cultural contexts in their discussions and debates.

CO2: Identify and critique the role of myths in the growth and development of civilisations through classroom discussions and library engagements.

CO3: Critique the social and cultural changes in various spatio-temporal paradigms and the role of myths in those changes through research assignments.

CO4: Write clear, concise, and well-structured essays demonstrating the contemporary relevance and implications of mythologies by researching, identifying, and critiquing various texts related to the field.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Myth and its Relevance
 

The unit will introduce the key concepts and theorists in the field. The purpose of this unit is to equip the students with a set of methods and methodologies which they shall use to analyse the topics in the subsequent units.

 

Note: The topic of ‘Comparative Mythology’ maybe dealt based on any one of the texts from Konstan, Csapo, or Thompson. Four out of the six topics must be covered in a semester.

 

Indicative Readings:

Campbell, J., & Moyers, B. Myth and the Modern World.

Csapo, E. Theories of Mythology.

Thompson, T., & Schrempp, G. A. The Truth of Myth: World Mythologies in Theory and Everyday Life.

Fiske, J. The Origins of Folk-Lore.

Eliade, M. Archetypes and Repetition.

Konstan, D. Comparative Methods in Mythology.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Mythologies of the World
 

The unit will introduce the basics of the major mythologies from around the globe. The course instructor may choose any three mythologies from the list.

 

Indicative Readings:

Buxton, R. G. A. The Olympians: Power, Honour, Sexuality.

Miles, P. Norse Mythology: A Guide to Norse Mythology and Its Everlasting Effects on Culture.

Livy. Book 1. The History of Rome.

Ramen, F. Indian Mythology.

Wilkinson, R. H. The Complete Gods and Goddesses of Ancient Egypt.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Mythology and Civilizations
 

The unit will focus on the impact of the mythology in the shaping of various civilisations. Any three civilizations will be chosen based on the chosen texts from the previous unit.

 

Indicative Reading:

Smith, W. L. Ramayana Textual Traditions in Eastern India.

Davidson, H. R. E. Holy Places.

Assmann, J. Case Studies: Egypt in Cultural Memory and Early Civilisation: Writing, Remembrance, and Political Imagination.

Stuttard, D. Roman Mythology: A Traveller’s Guide from Troy to Trivoli.

Zajko, V. Women and Greek Myth.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Myth and Art
 

The unit focuses on the continuing influence of mythology on literature and movies across ages. Young’s text is for compulsory reading. The rest of the texts should align with the topics chosen from units 2 & 3. Four to six texts maybe taken up depending on the genre and time constraints.

 

Young, J. O. “Profound Offense and Cultural Appropriation.”

Duffy, C. A. The World's Wife: Poems.

Haynes, N. Pandora's Jar: Women in the Greek Myths.

Kané, K. Menaka's Choice.

Karnad, G. Yayati.

Shamsie, K. Home Fire: A. Novel.

Ratnam, M. Thalapthi.

Gaiman, N. American Gods.

Gornichec, G. The Witch’s Heart

Riordan, R. The Kane Chronicles: The Complete Series (Books 1, 2, 3).

Cocteau, Jean. Orpheus.

Loki [TV series].

Ragnarok [TV series].

Text Books And Reference Books:

Campbell, J., & Moyers, B. (2011). Myth and the Modern World. In The Power of Myth. Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group.

Konstan, D. (1986). Comparative Methods in Mythology. Arethusa, 19(1), 87-99. http://www.jstor.org/stable/44578389.

Csapo, E. (2005). Theories of Mythology. Wiley. (Chapter 2, 3, or 6) .

Thompson, T., & Schrempp, G. A. (2020). The Truth of Myth: World Mythologies in Theory and Everyday Life. Oxford University Press. (Chapter 2 or 3).

Fiske, J. (1889). The Origins of Folk-Lore In Myths and Myths-makers: Old Tales and Superstitions Interpreted by Comparative Mythology (pp. 1-36). Houghton, Mifflin.

Eliade, M. (1959). Archetypes and Repetition. In Cosmos and History: The Myth of the Eternal Return (pp. 1-48). Harper & Brothers.

Buxton, R. G. A. (2004). The Olympians: Power, Honour, Sexuality. In The Complete World of Greek Mythology (pp. 68-103). Thames & Hudson.

Miles, P. (2016). Norse Mythology: A Guide to Norse Mythology and Its Everlasting Effects on Culture. CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform.

Livy. (2006). Book 1 (V. M. Warrior, Trans.). In The History of Rome, Books 1-5 (pp. 5-83). Hackett Publishing Company.

Ramen, F. (2008). Indian Mythology. Rosen Publishing Group.

Wilkinson, R. H. (2017). The Complete Gods and Goddesses of Ancient Egypt. Thames & Hudson. (chapter1, 2, & 3).

Smith, W. L. (2004). Ramayana Textual Traditions in Eastern India. In M. Bose (Ed.), The Ramayana Revisited. Oxford University Press, pp. 87-106

Davidson, H. R. E. (1988). Holy Places. In Myths and Symbols in Pagan Europe: Early Scandinavian and Celtic Religions. Syracuse University Press, pp. 13-35.

Assmann, J. (1992). Case Studies: Egypt in Cultural Memory and Early Civilisation: Writing, Remembrance, and Political Imagination. Cambridge University Press, pp. 147-175.

Stuttard, D. (2019). Roman Mythology: A Traveller’s Guide from Troy to Trivoli

Zajko, V. (2007). Women and Greek Myth. In R. D. Woodard (Ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Greek Mythology . Cambridge University Press, pp. 387-406.

Young, J. O. (2005). Profound Offense and Cultural Appropriation. The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, 63(2), 135-146. http://www.jstor.org/stable/3700467 

Duffy, C. A. (2000). The World's Wife: Poems. Pan Macmillan. 

Haynes, N. (2020). Pandora's Jar: Women in the Greek Myths. Picador. 

Kané, K. (2015). Menaka's Choice. Rupa. 

Karnad, G.(2007). Yayati. Oxford India Press.

Shamsie, K. (2018). Home Fire: A Novel. Riverhead Books.

Ratnam, M.  (1991). Thalapthi. GV Films.

Gaiman, N. (2001). American Gods. William Morrow. 

Gornichec, G. (2021). The Witch’s Heart. Penguin Publishing Group.

Riordan, R. (2013). The Kane Chronicles: The Complete Series (Books 1, 2, 3). Penguin Random House Children's UK. 

Cocteau, Jean. (1950). Orpheus. Andre Paulve.

Feige, K., D’Esposito, L., et.al. (Executive Producers). (2021- present). Loki [TV series]. Marvel Studios.

Price, A., Sorensen, M.L.F.(Executive Producers). (2020-present). Ragnarok [TV series]. SAM Reproductions.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bulfinch, T. (2014). Bulfinch's Mythology: The Classic Introduction to Myth and Legend. Penguin.

Morales, H. (2007). Classical Mythology: A Very Short Introduction. OUP Oxford.

Spence, L. (2004). An Introduction to Mythology. Cosimo, Inc.

Thury, E. M., Devinney, M. K., & Devinney, M. K. (2005). Introduction to Mythology: Contemporary Approaches to Classical and World Myths. Oxford University Press. 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I, II, III: 70% of the marks will be collected through the semester through class assignments, presentations, written tests, student-led seminars, and group projects.

End Semester Exam (Submission): 30% of the marks will be a research paper on a topic decided in consultation with faculty OR another suitable form of written submission.

BMEC141C - LANGUAGE AND PERFORMATIVITY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course engages with performativity and performance-based texts to examine notions of how language constructs ontological categories. Focusing on the aesthetic and the political dimensions of performance, it introduces learners to theoretical frameworks in terms of culture as performance and enables them to locate their readings and viewings of performance-based texts within the broader context of language in cultural studies. The course will enable students to acquaint themselves with key dramatic texts from different sub-genres and understand the role that language plays in acts of performativity. It will establish a basic foundation for further research for students interested in theatre, as well as ever-day performativity.

On completion of the course, the learner will be able to:

  • Read and understand works of performance in terms of verbal as well as nonverbal communication.
  • Describe and engage with the notion of culture as performance.
  • Examine the broader contexts within which performance and performativity are driving forces of human experiences.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Read and understand works of performance in terms of verbal as well as nonverbal communication through class presentations and discussions.

CO2: Describe and engage with the notion of culture as performance through written assignments.

CO3: Examine the broader contexts within which performance and performativity are driving forces of human experiences through written assignments.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Language, Performance and Cultural Studies
 

This unit examines key areas in which language is an intrinsic aspect of cultural performativity:

Indicative readings include:

Erika Fichte, “Culture and Performance

Fortier, Chapter on Theatre and Semiotics

Rustom Bharucha, Terror and Performance

Pertinent examples from literary, visual, and cultural texts to be selected by the course facilitator.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Language and Experimentation
 

Rosaldo, Michelle. The Things We Do with Words: Ilongot Speech Acts and Speech Act Theory in Philosophy.

Martin Esslin, “The Theatre of the Absurd

Tambiah, Stanley. “Form and Meaning of Magical Acts”.

Bharath Divakar, “Expecto Patronum” and other poems

Hindustan Times article: “Kabir Kala Manch: A cultural outfit ever in the cross hairs of law and order”

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Language and Race
 

Fortier, Chapters on Race and Post-structuralism

Amanda Montell, Wordslut: A Feminist Guide to Taking Back the English Language

Klausen, Jytte. The Cartoons that Shook the World. Publisher’s Statement (p. vi), Introduction (pp. 1-12), Chronology (pp. 185- 199), “Muslim Iconoclasm and Christian Blasphemy” (pp. 131-146)

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Language and Gender
 

Fortier, Chapter on Gender

Butler, Judith. Excitable Speech.

Mahesh Dattani, Dance Like a Man

Kiesling, Scott. Playing the Straight Man: Displaying and Maintaining Male Heterosexuality in Discourse.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Butler, J. (2021). Excitable speech: A politics of the performative. Routledge.

Rosaldo, Michelle. (1982). The Things We Do with Words: Ilongot Speech Acts and Speech Act Theory in Philosophy. Language in Society 11(2):203-237.

Esslin, M. (1960). The Theatre of the Absurd. The Tulane Drama Review, 4(4), 3–15. https://doi.org/10.2307/1124873

Tambiah, S.J. (2017). Form and meaning of magical acts: A point of View. HAU: Journal of Ethnographic Theory, 7(3), pp.451–473.

Correspondent, P. (2020, September 9). Kabir Kala Manch: A cultural outfit ever in the cross hairs of law and order. Hindustan Times. Retrieved April 8, 2022, from https://www.hindustantimes.com/pune-news/kabir-kala-manch-a-cultural-outfit-ever-in-the-cross-hairs-of-law-and-order/story-Ikx2ufyyFDNnbPTst1cTKP.html

Montell, A. (2019). Wordslut: A feminist guide to taking back the English language. Harper Wave.

Klausen, J. (2009). The cartoons that shook the world. Yale University Press.

Kiesling, Scott F. (2006). Playing the Straight Man: Displaying and Maintaining Male Heterosexuality in Discourse. In The Language and Sexuality Reader. Routledge.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Aristotle. (1967). Aristotle: The Poetics. (G. Else, Trans.). University of Michigan.

Artaud, A. (1992). The Theater of Cruelty. In S. Sontag (Ed.), Antonin Artaud: Selected Writings (pp. 242–251). essay, ‎ University of California Press.

Balme, Christopher B. (2010). Cambridge Introduction to Theatre Studies. Cambridge University Press.

Bloom, Harold. (1998). Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human. Riverhead Books.

Brandt, George W. (1998). Modern Theories of Drama: A Selection of Writings on Drama and Theatre 1850-1990. Oxford University Press.

Chambers, Colin. (2002). The Continuum Companion to Twentieth Century Theatre. Continuum.

Esslin, Martin. (1960). The Theatre of the Absurd. The Tulane Drama Review 4.4 (1960): 3-15.

Fortier, Mark. (1997). Theory/Theatre: An Introduction. Routledge.

Kott, Jan. (1964). Shakespeare Our Contemporary. Trans. Boleslaw Taborski. Methuen.

Montell, A. (2019). Wordslut: A Feminist Guide to Taking Back the English Language. Harper Wave.

Williams, A., Coupland, N., & Garrett, P. (2003). Investigating Language Attitudes: Social Meanings of Dialect, Ethnicity and Performance. University of Wales Press.

Butler, J. (1988). Performative Acts and Gender Constitution: An Essay in Phenomenology and Feminist Theory. Theatre Journal, 40(4), 519–531. Retrieved March 21, 2022, from http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0192-2882%28198812%2940%3A4%3C519%3APAAGCA%3E2.0.CO%3B2-C.

Bigger, S. (2009). Victor Turner, liminality, and cultural performance. Journal of Beliefs & Values, 30(2), 209–212. https://doi.org/10.1080/13617670903175238.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I, II and II will be in the form of individual written submissions or presentations.

The End Semester Exam will either be a research paper or portfolio presentation.

BMEC141D - CURRICULUM, PEDAGOGY, ASSESSMENT (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course has been conceptualized in order to introduce the learners to multiple curriculum frameworks, associated range of pedagogies involved in the process of teaching and learning, and several assessment tools pertaining to teaching English in particular, and Humanities in general. The course is designed to promote an in-depth understanding of the components leading to successful pedagogic practices and to foster an understanding of the construction of pedagogic spaces. This course is a mixture of theoretical and practical approaches, incorporating a theoretical understanding of multiple curriculum frameworks and pedagogic practices along with providing hands-on training for developing content for teaching, framing course plans, and identifying teaching and learning strategies that can be applied to specific classroom contexts.

The course has been designed with the following objectives:

  • To create awareness of multiple curriculum frameworks, pedagogic practices, and, assessment techniques.
  • To equip the learners with practical knowledge of various teaching methods.
  • To develop an understanding of various socio-political factors that affect the construction of curriculum.
  • To provide the learners with knowledge in the domain of teaching and curriculum development which will lead towards content creation as well as better teaching approaches.
  • To foster innovation, professionalism, collegiality, and ethical and equitable practice in all students

Course Outcome

CO1: Describe, discuss, and plan pedagogical tools through writing assignments.

CO2: Analyse and implement various teaching methods through micro-teaching lesson plans.

CO3: Describe, discuss, and plan various skill and discipline specific courses academic engagement and presentations.

CO4: Analyse and implement various assessment techniques by conducting different tests.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Understanding Education: Issues and Concerns
 

This unit critically examines the main issues and concerns in India in the field of education in general and English education in particular. Besides trying to understand the gaps and challenges in the field of higher education in India, this unit also engages with innovations in the field of education, which can mitigate the gaps thereby paving way for more inclusive teaching practices. Topics covered include:

  • The Structure of Indian Education: Both longitudinal and cross-sectional analysis of the structure of Indian Education should be conducted in order to promote a better understanding of the same.
  • The Innovations in the field of Education: ICT, AV aids, Google Classrooms, Gamification, etc. to be discussed in detail.
  • Reflective and Inclusive Teaching Practices: The concepts of learner-centred pedagogy, heutagogy, mixed-ability learning groups etc. should be discussed.
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Language Learning and Teaching
 

This unit focuses on understanding the prominent theories in the field of language education and tries to situate the popular methods of language teaching through the ages across the various paradigms. Topics covered include:

  • The Grammar Translation Method
  • Behaviourism and Audio-visual Teaching Method · Input Hypothesis and the Natural Method
  • Cognitivism and Communicative Teaching Method · Skill Based Instruction
  • The Post Method Approach
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Curriculum Development, Course Design and Assessment Practices
 

The main objective of this unit is to develop a clear understanding of the various theories of curriculum and analyse the technical aspects involved in construction of curriculum. This unit will not only lead to a theoretical understanding of various aspects of curriculum but application of these theories to generate content for teaching. Topics covered include:

  • Understanding curriculum: Various Curriculum Theories can be discussed to understand the process of development of curriculum. The politics behind construction of curriculum will also be addressed.
  • Writing Course Plans: The main emphasis is not only to learn how to write a course plan but how to incorporate knowledge, skills, and attitudes in the course outcomes. Bloom’s Taxonomy should be discussed in great detail in this context.
  • Accountability, assessment policy, international assessment and vocational assessment to be discussed in detail.
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Development of teaching modules/ courses
 

The main objective of this unit is to apply the theoretical knowledge gained over the previous units and develop skill-specific (e)content/ courses for target learners. The learners may actively seek the help of their respective mentors to identify the area in which content has to be developed and co-create the teaching modules. Topics covered include:

  • Register Analysis, Error Analysis, and Need Analysis: Basic overview of these fields is to be developed in order to create a learner centric module.
  • Learning Styles oriented teaching modules: Comprehensive understanding of learning styles to develop to construct effective teaching modules catering to all types of learners.
  • Content Creation: Hands-on exercises to develop the respective teaching modules to be conducted. The creation of the modules will follow the following steps:

           A. Analysing important situational Factors 

           B. Identification of Learning Outcomes

           C. Formulating Feedback and Assessment

           D. Selecting Teaching and Learning Activities

           E. Selecting effective teaching and learning strategies 

           F. Developing an effective grading system

           G. Developing effective rubrics for grading

Text Books And Reference Books:

Brookfield, S. D. (2017). Becoming a Critically Reflective Teacher. John Wiley & Sons.

Brown, J. D. (1995). The Elements of Language Curriculum: A Systematic Approach to Program Development. Heinle & Heinle Publishers.

Canagarajah, A. S. (2002). Globalization, methods, and practice in periphery classrooms. Globalization and language teaching. 134-150.

Chauhan, C. P. S. (2004). Modern Indian Education. Aligarh Muslim University.

Chomsky, N. (1959). Review of Verbal Behaviour by B. Skinner. Language 35: P. 26-58.

Krashen, S. D. (1987). Principles and practice in second language acquisition. Second language pedagogy, 20. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Richards, J. C.,Theodore S. R. (2014). Approaches and methods in language teaching. Cambridge University press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bates, T. (2015). Teaching in a digital age: Guidelines for designing teaching and learning for a digital age. Retrieved from https://opentextbc.ca/teachinginadigitalage/

Bhatia, V. K. (2008). Genre analysis, ESP and professional practice. English for specific purposes 27(2), 161-174.

Corder, S. P. (1974). Error analysis. The Edinburgh course in applied linguistics 3. 122-131.

Farrell, T. (2015). International perspectives on English language teacher education: innovations from the field. Springer Nature.

Fulcher, G., Fred D. (2007). Language testing and assessment. Routledge.

Richards, J. C. (2001). Curriculum development in language teaching. Ernst Klett Sprachen.

Slattery, P. (2012). Curriculum development in the postmodern era: Teaching and learning in an age of accountability. Routledge.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1: Group-based assignment on themes related to the course

CIA 2: Individual Micro-teaching assignment

CIA 3: Submission of proposal for a new course

End Semester Submission: Submission of New Course designed in the field

BMEC141E - FILMING THE NATION (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course provides a foundational introduction to film studies, with a focus on popular Indian cinema.  It traces the development of cinemas in India in terms of form as well as industry.  It particularly emphasises the representation of diverse identities (religion, gender, caste, language etc) and looks at the aesthetic frameworks through which these are constructed.

This course aims to enable students to:

  • Understand constructions of nations and nationhood as represented in cinema;
  • Understand key theories in cinema studies and their critical applications.
  • Develop a vocabulary to read and write critically about cinema.
  •  Gain familiarity with diverse genres, historical periods and movements in film history.
  • Understand the cultural and infrastructural contexts peculiar to India and Indian cinema.                                                                                           

Course Outcome

CO1: Exhibit a nuanced critical engagement with key concepts and theories in the area through writing assignments and presentations.

CO2: Construct analytical and interpretive frameworks and debates around the subject through class debates and discussions.

CO3: Identify, analyse and interpret the dissemination of various individual and collective identities through artistic expressions for academic engagements and assignments.

CO4: Critically analyse the politics of identity in various texts and contexts peculiar to India through class presentations and written assignments.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction: Indian Cinema and Key Theoretical Frameworks
 

This unit will introduce key texts and theories on Indian cinema as a way to open out discussions on cinema and the nation through multiple frameworks, including the idea of a ‘pan Indian cinema’, citizens as spectators, mode of production, the cinema-effect, film and psychoanalysis, new media and post-cinema, trans-national, queer and diasporic film cultures.

 

Indicative Readings:

Prasad, M. M. Ideology of the Hindi film: A Historical Construction.

Rajadhyaksha, A. The 'Bollywoodization' of the Indian Cinema: Cultural Nationalism in a Global Arena.

Nandy, A. (Ed.). The Secret Politics of our Desires: Innocence, Culpability and Indian Popular Cinema.

Basu, A. Bollywood in the Age of New Media: The Geo-televisual Aesthetic

Gopinath, G. Impossible Desires: Queer Diasporas and South Asian Public Cultures.

Films:

Fire (Deepa Mehta, 1996)

Deewar (Yash Chopra, 1975)

My Name is Khan (Karan Johar, 2010)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Filming the Nation: Rural and Urban India
 

This unit focuses on the evolving relationship between rural, urban, semi-urban and sub-urban India as depicted through film culture from the early 20th C up to the present.

 

Indicative Readings:

Nandy, A. An Ambiguous Journey to the City the Village and Other Odd Ruins of the Self in the Indian Imagination.

Dass, Manishita. Outside The Lettered City: Cinema, Modernity, and the Public Sphere in Late Colonial India.

Pandian, M. S. S. Tamil Cultural Elites and Cinema: Outline of an Argument. Economic and Political Weekly.

Mazumdar, R. Bombay Cinema: An Archive of the City.

Films:

Supermen of Malegaon (dir. Faiza Ahmed Khan, 2012)

Khosla ka Ghosla (dir. Dibakar Banerjee, 2006)

Gangs of Wasseypur (dir. Anurag Kashyap, 2012)

Satya (dir. Ram Gopal Varma, 1998)

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Filming the Nation: Secular and the Religious
 

After the release of Mani Rathnam’s film Roja, a heated debate was played out in the Economic and Political Weekly. This unit focuses on this debate as its starting point, to explore wider issues around communalism, secularism, and the representation of religious identities in cinema. It looks at both fiction as well as documentary films.

 

Indicative Readings:

Bharucha, R. On the Border of Fascism: Manufacture of Consent in Roja.

Niranjana, T. Integrating Whose Nation? Tourists and terrorists in 'Roja'.

Dirks, N. B. The Home and the Nation: Consuming Culture and Politics in Roja.

Bharucha, R. In the Name of the Secular: Contemporary Cultural Activism in India.

Bharat, M. Shooting Terror: Terrorism in Hindi Films.

Films:

Ram Ke Naam (dir. Anand Patwardhan, 1992, doc)

Jashn-e-Azadi (dir. Sanjay Kak, 2007, doc)

Roja (dir. Mani Rathnam, 1998)

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Filming Gender and Caste
 

Majumdar, N. Wanted Cultured Ladies Only!

Mazumdar, R. Dialectic of Public and Private: Representation of Women in Bhoomika and Mirch Masala.

Chakravarty, Sumita. “Woman and the Burden of Post Coloniality: The Courtesan Film Genre”.

Chakravarty, Sumita. “The National-Heroic Image: Masculinity and Masquerade”.

Hubel, T. From Tawa'if to Wife? Making Sense of Bollywood's Courtesan Genre.

Chaterji, Soma. The evolution of female sexuality in Hindi Cinema.

Srinivasan, Rama. Queer time in Bollywood.

Films:

Super Deluxe (dir. Thiagarajan Kumararaja, 2019),

Kumbalangi Nights (cir. Madhu C. Narayanan, 2019).

Text Books And Reference Books:

Basu, A. (2010). Bollywood in the Age of New Media: The Geo-televisual Aesthetic. Edinburgh University Press.

Bharucha, R. (1994). On the Border of Fascism: Manufacture of Consent in Roja. Economic and Political Weekly, 1389-1395.

Bharucha, R. (1998). In the name of the Secular: Contemporary Cultural Activism in India. Oxford University Press.

Bharat, M. (2020). Shooting Terror: Terrorism in Hindi Films. Routledge India.

Chakravarty, Sumita. (1993). Woman and the Burden of Post coloniality: The Courtesan Film Genre. In National identity in Indian popular cinema, 1947-1987, University of Texas Press. Pg 269-305

Chakravarty, Sumita. (1993). “The National-Heroic Image: Masculinity and Masquerade”. In National Identity in Indian popular cinema, 1947-1987, University of Texas Press. pg 199-234

Chaterji, Soma. (2013). The evolution of female sexuality in Hindi Cinema Gokulsing. In The Routledge Handbook of Indian Cinemas. K. Moti Gokulsing, Wimal Dissanayake (eds). Routledge.

Gopinath, Gayatri (2006). Impossible Desires: Queer Diasporas and South Asian Public Cultures. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.

Dass, Manishita. (2015). Outside The Lettered City: Cinema, Modernity, and the Public Sphere in Late Colonial India. Oxford University Press.

Dirks, N. B. (2001). The home and the nation: consuming culture and politics in Roja. In Rachel Dwyer and Christopher PInney (eds.) Pleasure and the Nation: The history, politics and consumption of public culture in India. New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 161-85.

Hubel, T. (2012). From Tawa'if to Wife? Making Sense of Bollywood's Courtesan Genre. Chicago UP.

 Hubel, Teresa, "From Tawa'if to Wife? Making Sense of Bollywood's Courtesan Genre" (2012). Department of English Publications. 137. https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/englishpub/137

Majumdar, N. (2010). Wanted Cultured Ladies Only: Female Stardom and Cinema in India, 1930s-1950s. University of Illinois Press.

Mazumdar, R. (2007). Bombay Cinema: An Archive of the City. University of Minnesota Press.

Mazumdar, R. (1991). Dialectic of Public and Private: Representation of Women in Bhoomika and Mirch Masala. Economic and Political Weekly, WS81-WS84.

Nandy, A. (Ed.). (1998). The Secret Politics of our Desires: Innocence, Culpability and Indian popular Cinema. London: Zed Books.

Nandy, A. (2001). An Ambiguous Journey to the City the Village and Other Odd Ruins of the Self in the Indian Imagination. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

Niranjana, T. (1994). Integrating whose nation? Tourists and terrorists in 'Roja'. Economic and Political Weekly, 79-82.

Pandian, M. S. S. (1996). Tamil Cultural Elites and Cinema: Outline of an Argument. Economic and Political Weekly, 950-955.

Prasad, M. M. (2000). Ideology of the Hindi film: A Historical Construction. Oxford University Press.

Rajadhyaksha, A. (2003). The 'Bollywoodization' of the Indian cinema: cultural nationalism in a global arena. Inter-Asia cultural Studies, 4(1), 25-39.

Srinivasan, Rama. (2013). Queer time in Bollywood. In The Routledge Handbook of Indian Cinemas, K. Moti Gokulsing, Wimal Dissanayake (eds). Routledge.

Vasudevan, R. (Ed.). (2000). Making Meaning in Indian Cinema. Oxford University Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Cinema Cinema (dir. Krishna Shah, 1979, doc)

Virdi, J. (2003). The Cinematic ImagiNation: Indian Popular Films as Social History. Rutgers University Press.

Evaluation Pattern

70% of assignments will be through continuous assessment and 30% through a final submission which may take the form of a research paper, portfolio or creative output.

BMEC231 - GENDER AND INTERSECTIONALITY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Our lived experiences are shaped by the ways in which varying systems of privileges and oppressions work.  Every individual act in the world based on the influences of identities that they adopt or are imposed by the social systems. Each identity – whether it’s, class, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, religion, caste - exists along a hierarchy that determines how visible and valued that person’s experiences are in their particular social context. These identities and hierarchies intersect with each other in ways that shape how a person is able to move and advance within their society.

 

The course aims to:

  • Provide a critical understanding of the concepts and theories in Gender Studies by contextualising them within the framework of intersectionality.
  • Acquire a basic knowledge of the various socio-political and historical factors that informed multiple theoretical frameworks within the field of Gender Studies
  • Familiarise learners with various narratives that highlight the experience of oppression and privilege as informed by the intersections with different focal points like class, caste, religions, nationality, virtuality, migration etc.,
  • Promote non-binary engagement with gender by highlighting the problematics of a normative understanding of gender.
  • Enable learners to engage and negotiate with their own identities and reflect on social constructed-ness of identities.

Course Outcome

CO1: Apply theoretical frameworks within gender studies by reflecting upon the various intersections of identities emerging from immediate contexts through assignments and class exercises.

CO2: Critically evaluate and problematize the normative understanding of gender in immediate spaces of engagements - like home, city, community etc. through written submissions and class presentations.

CO3: Curate and compile knowledge around gendered experiences by engaging with specific areas of enquiry in urban space, virtual spaces, travel, sports which are integral parts of everyday lives through participation in research projects and group activities.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Understanding Gender: Intersectional Approach
 

The unit engages in a discussion on the ideas of intersectionality and asserts that there is a necessity to understand gender in intersection with various other identities to understand the mode in which power structures and oppression works.

 

Indicative Texts:

“Subject of Sex/ Gender/ Desire” in Judith Butler’s Gender Trouble.

Kimberle, Crenshaw. On Intersectionality.

Taylor, Tate. The Help (2011).

Friedan, Betty. Feminine Mystique.

Faqir, Fadia. In the House of Silence (excerpts).

Anzaldua, Gloria. Selections from Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza (excerpts).

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Power and Construction of Normativity
 

The unit brings into discussion the various modes in which normativity is constructed by various institutions and in the process validates and normalizes few identities that exert power on identities that exist in margins.

 

Indicative Texts:

Priscilla Franks’ photo series The fragile Complexities of Masculinity.

Connell, R W. History of Masculinity.

Guadagnino, Luca. Call Me by Your Name (2017).

Sedgwick, Eve Kosovsky. The Beast in the Closet: James and The Writing of Homosexual Panic.

Case Study on Caste Based Murders in India

Lorde, Audre. Cancer Journal.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
The Politics of Privilege, Rights and Visibility
 

The unit considers how the various identities help in asserting and occupying different power position in the society that impacts the mode in which one asserts basic human rights, access to legal rights and visibility of lived experiences.

 

Indicative Texts:

Newell, Stephanie. Postcolonial Masculinity and the Politics of Visibility.

Harvard, Sarah A. Beauty Parlour and Women.

Kikon, Dolly and Milan Kang. Migrant Labourers in Metropolitan City. 

Kapur, Shekhar. Bandit Queen.

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Virtual Bodies and Post Genderism
 

The unit brings into discussion the impact of technological innovations on constructed identities, gender role in the world. It also deals with the mode in which these identities in the human world are negotiated in the virtual world.

 

Indicative Texts:

Haraway, D. A Cyborg Manifesto.

Avatar, Warcraft and Virtual Identities.

Excerpts from Hayles, Katherine. How we Became Posthuman: Virtual Bodies in Cybernetics, Literature, and Informatics.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Crenshaw, Kimberle. (1991). Mapping the margins: Intersectionality, Identity politics, and violence against women of colour. Stanford Law Review, 43(6). JSTOR.

Haraway, D. (2006). A Cyborg Manifesto: Science, Technology, and Socialist-Feminism in the Late 20th Century. In: Weiss, J., Nolan, J., Hunsinger, J., Trifonas, P. (eds) The International Handbook of Virtual Learning Environments. Springer, Dordrecht. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-3803-7_4.

Hayles, Katherine. (1999).  How We Became Posthuman: Virtual Bodies in Cybernetics, Literature, and Informatics. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Kikon, D Waynding. (2017). Indigenous Migrants in the Service Sector of Metropolitan India, South Asia. Journal of South Asian Studies

Kang, Milan. (1996). Manicuring Race, Gender and Class: Service Intersection in New York City Korean Owned Nail Salons. Race, Gender and Class Journal, 4(3). JSTOR.

R. W Connell (1995). History of Masculinity. In Masculinities. University of California Press. 

Chakravarti, U. (1993). Conceptualising Brahmanical Patriarchy in Early India: Gender, Caste, Class and State. Economic and Political Weekly, 28(14), 579–585. http://www.jstor.org/stable/4399556.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Ahmed, Leila. (1992). Women and Gender in Islam Historical Roots of a Modern Debate. Yale University Press.

Christina, Barbara. (1998). Race for Theory. Feminist Studies, 14(1), Feminist Studies Inc.

Friedman, Susan Stanford. (1998). Locational Feminism: Gender, Cultural Geographies and Geopolitical Literacy. In Mapping, Feminism and Cultural Geographies of Encounter. Princeton University Press.

Spivak, Gayathri. (1985). Three women’s Text and A critique of Imperialism. In Race, Writing and Difference. University of Chicago Press.

Halberstam, Judith and David L Hang. (2005). What is Queer About Queer Studies Now. Social Text, 23(83), Duke University Press.

Halberstam, Judith. (2011). The Queer Art of Failure. California: Duke University Press.

Kannabiran, Vasanth and Kalpana Kannabiran. (1991). Caste and gender: Understanding dynamics of power and violence. Economic and Political Weekly, 26(37).

Kumar, Anant. (2016). Menstruation, Purity and Right to Worship. Economic and Political Weekly, 41(9).

Lorde, Audre. (1984). Age, Race and Sex: Women Redefining Difference. In Sister Outsiders: Essays and Speech. Freedom CA: Crossing Press.

Paik, P. C.-ho, & Shi, C.-K. (2013). Playful gender swapping: User attitudes toward gender in MMORPG avatar customisation. Digital Creativity, 24(4), 310–326. https://doi.org/10.1080/14626268.2013.767275.

Evaluation Pattern

70% of assignments will be through continuous assessment and 30% through a final submission which may take the form of a research paper, portfolio or creative output.

BMEC232 - CULTURE AND TECHNOLOGY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course explores the varied ways in which culture and technology are intermingled, to the extent that they both co-produce each other. Thus, culture is often determined by technology, and technology usually always has cultural dimensions. The course addresses the ideas of seminal theorists while attempting to relate their arguments to one’s own immediate socio-political context. It covers issues such as biopolitics, surveillance, networks, cyborgs, AI etc. It also introduces interventions by writers and artists who leverage technology for creative interventions and social activism. Modes of instruction will include lectures, screenings, seminars, discussions, student-led presentations, invited guest lectures, visits to relevant institutions/exhibitions in Bangalore, readings, group-based project work etc.

At the end of the course, learners will be able to:

  • Understand the inter-relationship between culture and technology in its many nuances.
  • Acquire a basic introduction to the field of Digital Humanities.
  • Understand the manner in which artists and writers have engaged with questions of technology and culture, beyond a representational context.
  • Understand how new developments in the field that are impacting the very ontology of human beings.
  • Develop the ability to undertake independent research.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Apply Literary and Cultural Studies methods to understand the discourses related to culture, technology, governance and surveillance in both global and Indian contexts through assignments, discussions and class activities.

CO2: Demonstrate adequate understanding of and familiarity with core debates within the discipline, displaying a critical grasp of the ways in which technological culture poses philosophical questions about human ontology. This to be executed through class presentations, research projects, digital engagement.

CO3: Develop independent and collaborative learning skills by exploring creative engagements of writers and artists in technology and technological modernity through projects, case studies, paper presentations, reading groups etc.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Culture and Technology: Theoretical Frameworks
 

An introduction to some of the significant theoretical frameworks through which philosophers and social scientists have understood the intersections between technology and culture in a cultural context.

Indicative Readings:

Murphie, A., & Potts, J. Theoretical Frameworks.

Benjamin, W. The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction.

Haraway, D. A Cyborg Manifesto: Science, Technology, and Socialist-Feminism in the Late 20th Century.

Heidegger, M. The Question Concerning Technology.

Hard, M., & Jamison, A. Hubris and Hybrids: A Cultural History of Technology and Science.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Artificial Intelligence
 

An exploration of some of the debates w.r.t how technological interfaces and interventions are transforming human minds, relationships, senses and their possibilities.

Indicative Readings:

Donahoe, E., & Metzger, M. M. Artificial intelligence and human rights.

Gupta, S., & Tu, P. H. What is Artificial Intelligence?: A Conversation Between an AI Engineer and a Humanities Researcher.

Badmington, N. Posthumanism.

Padmanabhan, M. Harvest.

Shilling, C. Technological Bodies

Balsamo, A. M. The Role of the Body in Feminist Cultural Studies of Science and Technology.

Lazzarato, M. Immaterial Labor.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Technologies of Surveillance
 

This unit focuses on surveillance, tracing its manifestations and conceptual implications from the 20th C to the present post-digital moment.

Indicative Readings:

Foucault, M. Panopticism.

Ball, K. Elements of surveillance: A new framework and future directions.

Haggerty, K. D., & Samatas, M. Surveillance and Democracy.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Approaches to Digital Humanities
 

This unit provides students with a hands-on approach to the Digital Humanities, including an introduction to simple tools and platforms for data visualisation, digital archiving, and methods to generate and analyse large quantum of data.

Indicative Readings:

Gardiner, E., & Musto, R. G. The Digital Humanities: A Primer for Students and Scholars.

Spiro, L. This Is Why We Fight: Defining the Values of the Digital Humanities.

Crompton, C., Lane, R. J., & Siemens, R. Doing Digital Humanities: Practice, Training, Research.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Badmington, N. (2010). Posthumanism. In The Routledge companion to literature and science. Routledge. pp. 392-402.

Ball, K. (2002). Elements of surveillance: A new framework and future directions. Information, Communication & Society, 5(4), 573-590. https://doi.org/10.1080/13691180208538807

Balsamo, A. M. (1996). The Role of the Body in Feminist Cultural Studies of Science and Technology. In Technologies of the Gendered Body: Reading Cyborg Women. Duke University Press. pp. 157-164.

Baudrillard (2008) Simulacra and Simulation, Trans. Sheila Faria Glaset, University of Michigan Press.

Benjamin, W. (2008). The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction. Penguin UK.

Crompton, C., Lane, R. J., & Siemens, R. (2016). Doing Digital Humanities: Practice, Training, Research. Taylor & Francis.

Donahoe, E., & Metzger, M. M. (2019). Artificial intelligence and human rights. Journal of Democracy, 30(2), 115-126.

Foucault, M. (2008). "Panopticism" from "Discipline & Punish: The Birth of the Prison". Race/Ethnicity: Multidisciplinary Global Contexts, 2(1), 1-12.http://www.jstor.org/stable/25594995.

Gardiner, E., & Musto, R. G. (2015). The Digital Humanities: A Primer for Students and Scholars. Cambridge University Press.

Gupta, S., & Tu, P. H. (2020). What is Artificial Intelligence? A Conversation Between an AI Engineer and a Humanities Researcher. World Scientific.

Haggerty, K. D., & Samatas, M. (2010). Surveillance and Democracy. Routledge.

Haraway, D. (2006). A Cyborg Manifesto: Science, Technology, and Socialist-Feminism in the Late 20th Century. In The international handbook of virtual learning environments. Springer. pp. 117-158.

Hard, M., & Jamison, A. (2013). Hubris and Hybrids: A Cultural History of Technology and Science. Routledge.

Heidegger, M. (2010). The Question Concerning Technology. In C. Hanks (Ed.), Technology and values: Essential readings (pp. 99-113). Wiley.

Lazzarato, M. (1996). Immaterial labor. In P. Virno & M. Hardt (Eds.), Radical Thought in Italy: A Potential Politics (pp. 133-147).

Murphie, A., & Potts, J. (2017). Introduction. In Culture and technology. Macmillan International Higher Education.

Padmanabhan, M. (2017). Harvest. Hachette UK.

S. Schreibman, R. Siemens, & J. Unsworth (Eds.). (2004). A Companion to Digital Studies. Blackwell Publishing.

Shilling, C. (2004). Technological Bodies. In The Body in Culture, Technology and Society (pp. 173-197). Sage.

Spiro, L. (2012). This Is Why We Fight: Defining the Values of the Digital Humanities. University of Minnesota.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Achuthan, A. (2009, July 29). Re:wiring bodies. Centre for Internet & Society. Retrieved March 22, 2022, from https://cis-india.org/about/raw/histories-of-the-internet/blogs/rewiring-bodies/rewiring-bodies-blog?Subject=women%2Band%2Binternet.

Arun, C. (2014). PAPER-THIN SAFEGUARDS AND MASS SURVEILLANCE IN INDIA. Bangalore; NLSIR.

Correspondent, P. (2022). State of Cyber Security and Surveillance in India: A Review of the Legal Landscape. Centre for Internet & Society. Retrieved March 22, 2022, from https://cis-india.org/internet-governance/blog/state-of-cyber-security-and-surveillance-in-india.pdf/view.

Krishnan, S. (2015). The Radia Tapes - This or That Particular Person. PSBT.

Evaluation Pattern

70% of the course assessment will be through ongoing continuous assessment and 30% will be in the form of a final project which uses some technological interface such as podcasts, blogs, social media or others.

BMEC233 - POSTCOLONIAL SPATIALITIES (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is built around the premise of negotiating power through spatialities in the context of postcoloniality. While studies in postcolonialism often foreground the temporal vectors, increasingly, postcolonial studies is being reconfigured in new and emerging contemporary contexts through a critical reading of spaces. Illustrative texts and readings would be undertaken for discussion in the course in an attempt to create new directions in engaging with the postcolonial geographies.

The course is aimed at providing the students with:

  • A critical understanding of the role of space in historical and contemporary contexts.
  • Understanding divergent aspects of spatial interventions during colonisation in regional and national spaces.
  • Understanding the shifts in approaches to space with socio-economic changes and technological advancement.
  • Theoretical tools to assess the ideological implications of spatial interventions.
  • Skills to map the dimensions of spatial shifts in literature, art and cinema.

Course Outcome

CO1: Analyse the aspects of space in the postcolonial and postmodern contexts through the application of postcolonial theories and approaches in various assignments and class activities.

CO2: Identify and assess how the latest spatial changes have impacted literature and culture in local and global contexts through comprehensive written assignments and presentations.

CO3: Develop an awareness for environmental issues caused by the redefining and reconstructing of the city spaces through field visits, activity reports etc.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Foundational Concepts
 

This unit introduces selected conceptual frameworks that are central to understanding what has come to be described as the ‘spatial turn’ in the study of literature, culture and society.

Indicative Texts:

Massey, Doreen. City Worlds.

Soja, Edward. Postmodern Geographies.

Lefebvre, Henri. State, Space, World.

Foucault, Michael. Of Other Spaces: Utopias and Heterotopias.

Mackay, David. Agents of the Empire. David Philip Miller and Peter Hanns Reill.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Globalisation and Spatiality
 

The concept of space and time has changed with the borderless flow of culture and capital and time-space compression has become a reality. The unit aims at having an understanding of this new reality in the socio-cultural spaces.

Indicative Texts:

Appadurai, Arjun. Modernity At Large: Cultural Dimensions of Globalization.

Upadhya, C., Rutten, M., & Koskimaki, L. Provincial Globalization in India: Transregional Mobilities and Development Politics.

Bhagat, Chetan. One Night @ the Call Center.

Warf, Barney. Time-Space Compression: Historical Geographies.

Shaw, Annapurna. Indian Cities in Transition.

Friedman, Thomas L. The World is Flat: The Globalized World in the Twenty-First Century.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
The Shadow City
 

Nair, Janaki. (2005). The Promise of the Metropolis: Bangalore’s Twentieth Century.OUP.

Sundaram, Ravi. (2010) Pirate Modernity: Delhi’s Media Urbanism. Routledge.

Sundaram, Ravi. (2013) No Limits: Media Studies From India. OUP.

Sarai Reader 01: The Public Domain

Sarai Reader 02: The Cities of Everyday Life

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Space in Film and Literature
 

Bala, Sharon. The Boat People.

Swaroop, Shubhangi. Latitudes of Longing.

Ghosh, Amitav. Gun Island.

Kipling, Rudyard. The Bridge-Builders.

Kincaid, Jamaica. A Small Place.

Jaikumar, Priya. Where Histories Reside: India as a Filmed Space.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Appadurai, Arjun. (2006). Modernity At Large: Cultural Dimensions of Globalization. University of Minnesota Press.

Bala, Sharon. (2018). The Boat People. Doubleday.

Bhagat, Chetan. (2005). One Night @ the Call Center. Rupa Publications.

Foucault, M. (1984). Of Other Spaces: Utopias and Heterotopias. In M. Foucault (Ed.), Architecture /Mouvement/ Continuité. essay, World Cat.

Friedman, Thomas L. (2005). The World is Flat: The Globalized World in the Twenty-First Century. Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

Ghosh, Amitav. (2019). Gun Island. Penguin India.

Jaikumar, Priya. (2019). Where Histories Reside: India as Filmed Space. Duke University Press.

Kincaid, Jamaica.(2000). A Small Place. Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

Kipling, Rudyard. (2009). The Bridge-Builders. Book Jungle.

Lefebvre, Henri. (2009). State, Space, World. In Selected Essays. University of Minnesota Press.

Mackay, David. (2010). Agents of the Empire. David Philip Miller and Peter Hanns Reill (Eds). In Visions of Empire: Voyages, Botany, and Representations of Nature. pp. 21-37. Cambridge University Press.

Massey, Doreen., John Allen and Steve Pile. Eds. (2005). City Worlds: Understanding Cities. Routledge.

Nair, Janaki. (2005). The Promise of the Metropolis: Bangalore’s Twentieth Century. OUP.

Nayar, Pramod K. (2008). Postcolonial Literature: An Introduction. Pearson Education India.

Swaroop, Shubhangi. (2018). Latitudes of Longing. Harper Collins India.

Shaw, Annapurna (2007). Indian Cities in Transition. Orient BlackSwan.

Soja, Edward. (1989). Postmodern Geographies: The Reassertion of Space in Critical Social Theory. Verso.

Tarkovsky, Andrei. (Director). (1979). Stalker [Film]. Mosfilms.

Tarkovsky, Andrei. (Director). (1972). Solaris [Film]. Vyacheslav Tarasov.

Upadhya, C., Rutten, M., & Koskimaki, L. (Eds.). (2020). Provincial Globalization in India: Transregional Mobilities and Development Politics. Routledge.

Warf, Barney. (2008). Time-Space Compression: Historical Geographies. Routledge.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Featherstone, David and Joe Painter. Eds. (2013). Spatial Politics: Essays for Doreen Massey. Wiley Blackwell. 

Mathur, Saloni. (2005). India by Design: Colonial History and Cultural Display. University of California Press.

McLeod, John. (2000). Beginning Postcolonialism. Manchester UP.

Tally, Robert T. (2013). Spatiality: The New Critical Idiom Series. Routledge.

Evaluation Pattern

70% of the assessment will be on a continuous basis in the form of CIA I, II & III. The final submission will be for 30% of the total marks.

BMEC241A - MATERIAL CULTURE STUDIES (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The influence and presence of the past is felt everywhere and every day in our lives. Movies, newspapers or the internet bombard us and expose us to the past – both familiar and unfamiliar. However, the barrage of information and the forces of globalization have led to increasing questions on the relevance and the value of the past – indeed a denial even. And what are these vestiges of the past, if not material culture? Material Culture is less a subject of study and more a way of encountering the world. We are social beings, but our social relations are mediated and activated by and through things. We use objects to build our identities, our relationships and our means of survival and pleasure. This course will engage the students with the myriad ways in which the past, though no longer present – is a presence in our lives today – through Material Culture. If we have to investigate the human past and understand history – we cannot hope to even try without grasping material culture.

It will introduce the students to think materially, relate to their memories of their own past, and make them aware of the multiple perspectives which will enable them to read, write and reflect on the past; or in other words, make history. Hence, we will examine anthropological approaches to material culture and consumption: the practices, relations, and rituals through which things -- from food and clothing to shell valuables or money – become meaningful. Readings will include classic works of anthropology and social theory as well as recent ethnographies of western capitalist, colonial/postcolonial, and post-socialist settings. Some questions we will explore include: how is the value or significance of objects created in different social contexts, from ritualized gift exchange to shopping malls? Should we understand commodities and other items of material culture as fulfilments of human needs, or perhaps as symbols that ‘say’ something about their users (and if so, what)? What kind of light can they shed on matters of social structure and inequality, national or class identity, values, and morality, or processes of change at particular historical moments?

The course aims to

  • Engage with the importance of materiality in the production and shaping of culture.
  • Identify the complex and multiple ways that objects and people relate in both the past and in the present using trans-disciplinary perspectives.
  • Apply and otherwise make meaning from objects using methods and theories from multiple disciplines including but not limited to art history, archaeology, anthropology, design, folklore/folklife studies, geography, history, literary studies, landscape history, and science studies.

Course Outcome

CO1: Display research skills to conduct research using qualitative approaches required for humanities and social sciences through course assignments.

CO2: Demonstrate interdisciplinary thinking skills and the ability to apply relevant theoretical ideas to examine material culture through class presentations.

CO3: Critically evaluate representations of the past in the present through material remains, which will enable them to analyse and use evidence in interrogating historical accounts, and be able to critically reflect and engage with the interface between the past and the present, fostering a healthy appreciation for history and its imprint on our present world through group task, case studies, and project work.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Why Study Things?
 

This unit defines the key terms in material culture studies, explores the significance of material objects in studying culture, and the approaches of different disciplines such as history, anthropology, and cultural studies towards studying material objects and materiality.

a)    Mind in Matter – Theories of Things, History from Things

b)    Why We Need Things: Interrogating Evidence and Material Culture Studies

c)     Why Collect Things: Archaeology, Anthropology and Material Culture Studies

 

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Ideology and Material Culture: The Use and Abuse of History
 

This unit explores the relations between ideology, power and material objects, and the role of existing power hierarchies in influencing material objects and how they are used and perceived. In particular, the focus is on exploring Marxist and postcolonial perspectives on consumption, ownership, and exchange.

a)  Voice and the Subject: Consumerism in a Material World – Commodifying Things and the Politics of Display.

b)  Narratives and Counter-narratives: Material Empires and the Other’s Object.

c)  Colonizing Knowledges: Racializing the ‘Other’; Latent and Manifest Orientalism

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Making Things Mean
 

This unit explores the role of ideologies in attaching certain meanings to material objects, and focuses on methodologies that can be used to study how things are accorded meaning among certain groups and communities.

a)  Engendering Things: Sexism, Patriarchy, and the codification of material cultural practice

b)  Contemptible Collectibles: Materialism; Museums and Collections

c)  The Public Life of Things: Politicization of Material Culture.

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Weaving Identities: Material Culture and Social Self
 

The final unit focuses on the role of material objects in fashioning identity, tracing the afterlife of material objects, and how their status at the end of their life cycle affects memory, identity and meaning.

a)  Memory and the Production of Self – Bodily Adornment, Theorizing Taste and the Class Experience

b) Comedy of Values: Advertising and Consumer Society – Objects Recontextualized; The Dialectics of Shopping

c) The Unequal Lives of Persons and Things: Waste and Want; Things as Extensions of Persons

d) The Death of Things: Dilemmas of Classification and the Problem of Agency and Ownership

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Appadurai, Arjun. (1986). The Social Life of Things. Cambridge University Press.

Barthes, Roland. (1957). Mythologies. Noonday Press.
Dant, Tim. (2005). Materiality and Society. Open University Press.

Douglas, Mary and Baron Isherwood. (2002). The World of Goods: Towards an Anthropology of Consumption. Routledge.

Gerritsen, Anne and Giorgio Riello (2015). Writing Material Culture History, London: Bloomsbury.

Jones, Andrew (2007). Memory and Material Culture, Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press.

Schiffer, Michael B. and Richard A. Gould (1981). Modern Material Culture: The Archaeology of Us, New York: Academic Press.

Tilley, Christopher et.al. (2006). Handbook of Material Culture, London: Sage Publications.

Woodward, Ian. (2007). Understanding Material Culture, Los Angeles: Sage Publications.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Batchelor, Jennie and Cora Kaplan. (2007). Women and Material Culture, 1660–1830, London: Palgrave Macmillan.

Chakrabarti, D K. (2006). The Oxford Companion to Indian Archaeology: The Archaeological Foundations of Ancient India, Stone Age to AD 13th century. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

Fritsch, Juliette. (2004). Museum Gallery Interpretation and Material Culture, New York and London: Routledge.

Gosden, Chris and Chantal Knowles (2001). Collecting Colonialism: Material Culture and Colonial Change, Oxford, New York: Berg.

Hallam, Elizabeth and Jenny Hockey. (2001). Death, Memory and Material Culture, Oxford and New York: Berg.

Hurcombe, Linda M. (2007). Archaeological Artefacts as Material, New York: Routledge.

Jamir, T and M Hazarika (2014). Fifty Years After Daojali-Hading: Emerging Perspectives in the Archaeology of Northeast India, New Delhi: Research India Press.

Jones, Andrew. (2007). Memory and Material Culture, Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press.

Knappett, Carl, (2009). An Archaeology of Interaction: Network Perspectives on Material Culture and Society, Oxford: Berg.

Korasick, John E. (2005). Collecting Africa: African Material Culture Displays and the American Image of Africa, 1885-1930, PhD Thesis submitted to Saint Louis University.

Miller, Daniel. (2001). Anthropology and the Individual: A Material Culture Perspective, Routledge.

Pratap, A. (2014). Indian Archaeology and Postmodernism: Fashion or Necessity? Ancient Asia, 5: 2, pp. 1-4.

Ratnagar, S. (2016). Harappan Archaeology: Early State Perspectives, Delhi: Primus.

Riggs, E P and Z R Jat. (2016). The 1947 Partition of India and Pakistan: Migration, Material Landscapes, and the Making of Nations, Journal of Contemporary Archaeology 3 (2).

Thapar, Romila. (2005). Somanatha: The Many Voices of History, New Delhi: Verso.

Thapar, Romila. (2014). The Past as Present: Forging Contemporary Identities Through History, New Delhi: Aleph.

Varma, Supriya. (2003). Ayodhya: Archaeology, History and Politics. Ababhash, July-Sept., Kolkata, pp. 53-63.

Evaluation Pattern

70% of assignments will be through continuous assessment and 30% through a final submission which may take the form of a research paper, portfolio or creative output.

BMEC241B - CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Cultural Anthropology is the study of human social life in the broadest possible way. Traditionally, Anthropologists have studied "tribes" to understand how contemporary humans create what is known as "culture" to give meaning to and make sense of the world they live in. The modern-day tribe can be an online group of bike enthusiasts, gourmet food chefs, a saree group, or cat lovers who dress their cats. Anthropologists are interested in all types of societies, and the whole range of human experiences. We study social norms, values, practices to understand diversity and unity - the uniqueness that sets us apart and the commonality that binds us together.

This course provides an active introduction to anthropological practice with a “hands-on” ethnographic exercise where students will be creating their accounts of a specific topic. By learning about the ethnographic methods, students will acquire the critical tools necessary for researching the social and cultural aspects of their society in an anthropological way.

The course aims to help students:

  • Read and critique seminal ethnographic works by prominent anthropologists
  • Compare and contrast basic theoretical orientations among the various schools of thought in Anthropology.
  • Describe how Anthropology differs from and is similar to other social sciences, and give examples of these differences.
  • Narrate the historical/cultural context in which theories were developed.
  • Define culture in its own terms, while describing its role in building human societies

Course Outcome

CO1: Display domain expertise in Anthropology by applying basic theories or theoretical approaches in at least one area of social reality through the completion of coursework, research projects, and research papers.

CO2: Conceptualize, design, and execute their mini ethnographic research project and in doing so, engage with the community effectively using expertise drawn from the discipline.

CO3: Identify basic methodological approaches and describe the general role of methods in building knowledge about human culture through research projects.

CO4: Analyse and engage with their social surroundings with a ?hands-on? ethnographic exercise through pilot studies.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Studying Communities
 

This unit will focus on core anthropological questions such as:

What is Anthropology?

What is Culture?

The Historical Evolution of Anthropology and various Schools of Thought.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Rites of Passage, Rituals, Religion
 

This unit will focus on central concepts regarding rites and rituals, including in the context of religious practices. It will explore:

What is a "rite of passage"?

Why do rituals become such an essential part of everyday human life, especially during times of change or transition?

What role does religion play in human society?

Can Atheism, Veganism, or Minimalism can be considered a religion?

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Kinship, Marriage, and Family
 

Marriage extends our circle of kin; the institution of family plays a pivotal role in sustaining these extended networks of kin. 

What kind of cultural values and norms honour kinship in that society?

How do the institutions of kinship, marriage and family fulfil the particular society’s cultural needs?

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
The Anthropology of Deviance
 

What are norms?

How does deviance help in clarifying the collective cultural values and cultural morality of a society? Does deviance unify society?

Exploring the structuralist (Durkheim) and functionalist (Merton) perspective on deviance.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Methods of Ethnography
 

What is ethnography?

How to be an ethnographer in one’s own society?

Exploring the process and methods of fieldwork; Cultural-relativism and other guiding ethical principles of anthropology; Taking Field notes; Reflexivity.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Appadurai, A. (1988). Introduction: Place and voice in anthropological theory. Cultural Anthropology, 3(1), 16-20.

Bernard, H. R. (1988). Research methods in cultural anthropology (p. 117). Newbury Park, CA: Sage.

Bowie, F. (2006). The anthropology of religion. The Blackwell companion to the study of religion, 3-24.

Clifford, J. (1994). Diasporas. Cultural anthropology, 9 (3), 302-338.

Crang, M., & Cook, I. (2007). Doing ethnographies. Sage.

Fabian, J. (2014). Time and the other: How anthropology makes its object. Columbia University Press.

Fife, W. (2005). Doing fieldwork: Ethnographic methods for research in developing countries and beyond. Springer.

Fox, R. (1983). Kinship and marriage: An anthropological perspective (Vol. 50). Cambridge university press.

Freilich, M., Raybeck, D., & Savishinsky, J. S. (Eds.). (1991). Deviance: anthropological perspectives. Bergin & Garvey.

Friedman, J. (2002). From roots to routes: Tropes for trippers. Anthropological Theory, 2(1), 21-36.

Gupta, A., & Ferguson, J. (1992). Beyond “culture”: Space, identity, and the politics of difference. Cultural anthropology, 7(1), 6-23.

Hall, S. (2017). Cultural Studies 1983: A Theoretical History. Noida: Orient Blackswan Private Limited.

Marcus, G. E. (2008). The end (s) of ethnography: Social/cultural anthropology's signature form of producing knowledge in transition. Cultural Anthropology, 23(1), 1-14.

Rosaldo, R. (1988). Ideology, place, and people without culture. Cultural Anthropology, 3(1), 77-87.

Spiro, M. E. (1986). Cultural relativism and the future of anthropology. Cultural Anthropology, 1(3), 259-286.

Turner, T. (1993). Anthropology and multiculturalism: what is anthropology that multiculturalists should be mindful of it?. Cultural anthropology, 8(4), 411-429.

Walton, D. (2012). Doing Cultural Theory. Sage Publications.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Barnard, A. (2016). Social Anthropology Investigating Human Social Life. United Kingdom: Studymates Limited.

Bernard, H. R., & Gravlee, C. C. (Eds.). (2014). Handbook of methods in cultural anthropology. Rowman & Littlefield.

Clifford, J., & Marcus, G. E. (Eds.). (1986). Writing culture: The poetics and politics of ethnography. Univ of California Press.

Jha, M. (1995). An Introduction to Anthropological Thought. New Delhi: Vikas Publishing House Pvt. Ltd.

Rapport, N. (2014). Social and cultural anthropology: The key concepts. Routledge.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1: Pair and Share Exercise – Thinking Anthropologically

Find a pair, and then share your thoughts and reflections on whether studying other humans is a valuable endeavour? Focusing on the discussions we have had in class so far, ask each other in what way(s), if at all, has it made you rethink (i.e. question/change/expand/narrow down) your understanding of the need to study other human beings and their culture? For this, you will also have to have some discussions on your notion of what is culture. Provide citations and examples from different authors to make your points. Jot down the points from the pair and share activity and collaboratively work on a mini-reflection paper of about 1500 words.

Mid-Semester Examination: The students are expected to engage with the research on various aspects of contemporary culture. For this, they will submit a 1500 word research proposal on one area that they intend to work on later for their end semester submission. The discussion paper will elaborate on their chosen area of research, the rationale for studying that, the theoretical framework they intend to use, brief methodology, and the expected timeframe. Students may incorporate this submission into their final ESE submission.

Tracing Kinship - CIA 3 – Pair Share Activity
In a detailed interview with your family, trace your clan, lineage and create a kinship diagram for your family that includes at least three generations. In doing so, analyse how resource sharing works in your culture (hypergamy, hypergyny/hypogyny or Isogyny; exogamy/endogamy; inheritance patterns; primary childcare responsibilities shared among which circle, etc), how and why cultures create kinship (using structural-functionalist school of thought)? Use the symbols given below to create the kinship diagram and the link (on lucidchart) to understand how it is drawn. Ego is you.

Then discuss this with your pair. The Pair has to present just one document with both family diagrams (1500-2000 words). The discussion has to be around how the resource sharing is similar or different in their respective cultures.

End-Semester Examination: Design a research study in an area of choice and explain why various decisions were made, and chronicle the methods they used to undertake the study. The students will develop a detailed report (3000 words) based on their in-depth understanding of one aspect of their contemporary culture through an ethnographic exercise.

BMEC241C - VISUAL CULTURE (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course introduces students to a range of theoretical apparatus to understand visuality and visual culture. The approaches draw upon a mix of cultural studies, philosophy, anthropology, sociology, film studies and popular culture. It provides a broad overview of visual culture and problematizes ways of seeing and being seen. It engages with the visual as a site of power, politics and resistance, for example, as in the case of surveillance in the hyper- technological societies we inhabit. The larger objective of the course is to enable students to grapple with complex ideas on their own, and to tussle with concepts, to produce primary research that is insightful. This research will take the form of student-managed and designed publications.

The course aims to help students

  • Understand how visuals operate in contemporary society
  • Read visuals in everyday life
  • Engage and problematize ways of seeing and being seen
  • Critically examine issues of race, ethnicity, gender, class, in visual culture

Course Outcome

CO1: Develop a nuanced understanding of reading images through course assignments and reading exercises.

CO2: Apply theories of visual culture and visual arts in understanding of the power and mediation of images in their everyday life in the contexts of gender, caste, ethnicity, class, race through presentations and group task.

CO3: Demonstrate an understanding of surveillance, dataveillance and voyeurism and engage with the politics of seeing and being seen through research projects and critical academic essays.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
What is Visual Culture?
 

Mirzoeff, Nicholas. What is Visual Culture?

Rogoff, Irit. Studying Visual Culture.

Sturken, Marita and Lisa Cartwright. Images, Power and Politics.

E. Shohat & R Stam. Narrativizing Visual Culture.

Dewey, John. Art as Experience (Selected chapters).

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Image and Knowledge
 

Berger, Susana. The Art of Philosophy: Visual Thinking in Europe from the Late Renaissance to Early Enlightenment.

Crary, Jonathan. Suspensions of Perception: Attention, Spectacle and Modern Culture.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Image and Technology
 

Papastergiadis et al. Screen Cultures and Public Spaces.

Punathambekar & Mohan. Global Digital Cultures: Perspectives from South Asia (Selected chapters).

Fiske, John. Videotech. The VCR.

Friedberg, Anne. The Mobilized and Virtual Gaze.

Chapters from Part I ‘Global/Digital’ in The Visual Culture Reader.

Koten, Hamid Van. The Digital Image and the Pleasure Principle: The Consumption of Realism in The Age of Simulation

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Media, Modernity and Visual Culture
 

Darley, Andrew. Visual Digital Culture.

Rajagopal, Aravind. The Indian Public Sphere: Readings in Media History.

Ohm, Britta, Vibodh Parthasarathi and Per Ståhlberg. Introduction: Critical Explorations of Media Modernity in India.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Bentkowska-Kafel, A., Cashen, T., & Gardiner, H. (2009). Digital Visual Culture: Theory and Practice. The University of Chicago Press.

Berger, S. (2017). The Art of Philosophy: Visual Thinking in Europe from the Late Renaissance to the Early Enlightenment. Princeton University Press.

Darley, A. (2000). Visual Digital Culture: Surface Play and Spectacle in New Media Genres. Routledge.

Dewey, J. (2005). Art as Experience. Penguin USA.

Mirzoeff, N. (2006). Visual Culture Studies. Routledge.

Mirzoeff, N. (2009). An Introduction to Visual Culture. Routledge.

Ohm, B., Parthasarathi, V., & Ståhlberg, P. (2019). Introduction: Critical explorations of media modernity in India. Culture Unbound, 10(3), 322–331. https://doi.org/10.3384/cu.2000.1525.2018103322.

Rajagopal, A. (2009). The Indian Public Sphere: Readings in Media History (Themes in Politics). OUP India.

Sturken, M., & Cartwright, L. (2009). Practices of Looking: An Introduction to Visual Culture. OUP USA.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bansky. (Director). (2010). Exit Through a Gift Shop [Documentary]. Revolver Entertainment.

Clifford, J. (1988). On Collecting Art and Culture. In J. Clifford (Ed.), The Predicament of Culture (pp. 215–251). essay, Harvard University Press.

Diepeveen, L., & Laar, T. V. (2001). Art Museums: Organizers of Culture. In Art With a Difference : Looking at Difficult and Unfamiliar Art. essay, Mayfield Publications.

Fuery, P., & Fuery, K. (2010). Visual Cultures and Critical Theory. Bloomsbury Academic.

Gruber, C., & Haugbolle, S. (Eds.). (2013). Visual Culture in the Modern Middle East: Rhetoric of the Image. Indiana University Press. http://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt16gh950.

Guha-Thakurta, T. (2015). In the Name of the Goddess: The Durga Pujas of Contemporary Kolkata. Primus Books.

Jain, K. (2000). Reconfiguring India's Nationalism: One Grand Statue at a Time. In F. Carson & C. Pajaczkowska (Eds.), Feminist Visual Culture. essay, Edinburg University Press.

Pinney, C., & Thomas, N. (2001). Beyond Aesthetics: Art and the Technologies of Enchantment. Routledge.

Pinney, Christopher. (2011). Photography and Anthropology. Reaktion Books.

Pinney, C. (2004). “Photos of the Gods”: The Printed Image and Political Struggle in India. The University of Chicago Press.

Rampley, Matthew, ed. (2005). Exploring Visual Culture: Definitions, Concepts, Contexts. Edinburgh UP.

Smith, Marquard. (2008). Visual Culture Studies. Sage Publications.

Siddiqui, Sameena. (Director). Civic Archives: Beedi Product Labels [Documentary].

Selected visual essays from http://www.tasveergharindia.net.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1: Individual Assignment

Mid semester: Submission (Practical Project)

CIA III: Group Assignment

End semester: Submission 

BMEC241D - PRACTICE TEACHING (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course has been conceptualized in order to provide the learners with hands-on experience in teaching and research writing. Each student is assigned a mentor from the faculty of English and Cultural Studies, with whom the student will receive training in teaching selected undergraduate classes as well as guidance on conducting research and publishing academic papers. The learners are expected to deliver the teaching modules created as a part of the course titled Curriculum, Pedagogy, and Assessment (whenever applicable) in the respective classes that would be assigned to them as a part of this course.

The programme is aimed at enabling postgraduate students to:

  1. Engage in practice teaching for skill-based as well as discipline-specific undergraduate courses.
  2. Work with a faculty member on closely conducting and administering a course.

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate teaching and classroom management abilities through classroom teaching, e-content, including tutorial videos, conference recordings, and blogs/websites.

CO2: Display the abilities to conduct teaching and research in the field of their choice through internship and community-based projects.

CO3: Create and design materials related to teaching and learning.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Development of Lesson Plans
 

The learners will be instructed by their respective mentors to develop lesson plans for the skill-based teaching modules they plan to deliver in the classes assigned to them. Under the guidance of their mentors, the learners will develop the lesson plan which will elaborately the following as stated. 

  • Module details.
  • Module objectives and outcomes. 
  • Time of delivery. 
  • Methodology of delivery.
  • Assessment patterns.
  • Assessment objectives and outcomes, assessment rubrics etc.
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Teaching and Assessment Practices
 

The learners will be given hands-on teaching practices under this unit. They will take the skill-specific teaching modules to the classes assigned to them and will be accompanied by their mentors who will not only support them but also provide them feedback based on their performance. As a part of this unit, the student-teachers would be required to do the following as stated.

  • Assess the needs of the learners in the class they are going to.
  • Design need-specific content.
  • Incorporate class engagement activities in the content.
  • Engage in direct teaching activities.
  • Engage in assessment and feedback activities.
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Review and Reflection
 

The learners will be expected to reflect on the designing, teaching, and implementing practices. The learners would engage in peer group discussions and share their individual learning experiences emerging from their teaching endeavours. As a part of this unit, the student-teachers would be expected to do the following as stated.

  • Individual reflections
  • Peer discussions
  • Group activities
  • Peer mentoring and support
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Feedback
 

The learners will be provided feedback by their respective mentors on their teaching styles and classroom management strategies. The constructive feedback sessions will be a reflective exercise where the learners will contemplate on and analyse their classroom interactions with the help of their respective mentors. As a part of this unit, the student-teachers would be expected to do the following as stated.

  • Maintain a journal/portfolio of their teaching experiences.
  • Gain feedback from their mentors.
  • Reflect on key areas of classroom interaction with the mentors.
Text Books And Reference Books:

Ball, D. T, M. Phelps, G. (2008). Content Knowledge for Teaching: What Makes It Special? Journal of Teacher Education. 59(5), 389-407.

Berger, R. (2003). An Ethic of Excellence: Building a Culture of Craftsmanship with Students. Heinemann.

Coe, R., Aloisi, C., Higgins, S., & Major, L. E. (2014). What Makes Great Teaching? Review of the Underpinning Research.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Grossman, P., Compton, C., Igra, D., Ronfeldt, M., Shahan, E., & Williamson, P. (2009). Teaching practice: A Cross-Professional Perspective. Teachers College Record, 111(9), 2055-2100.

Willingham, D. (2009). Why Don’t Students Like School? A Cognitive Scientist Answers Questions About How the Mind Works and What It Means or the Classroom. Jossey-Bass.

Evaluation Pattern

This course is a practical course, with marks collected at the end of the course/semester for a total of 100. Students would be assessed consistently by their academic mentors for 50 marks. At the end of the course, each student is to submit a 2000-word report on their experience of teaching practice. This report would be assessed with a viva-voce for the remaining 50% of marks.