CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH AND CULTURAL STUDIES

School of Arts and Humanities

Syllabus for
Bachelor of Arts (Communication and Media, English, Psychology)
Academic Year  (2022)

 
1 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN121 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
CNM111 CRITICAL THINKING Skill Enhancement Course 4 4 100
CNM131 MASS COMMUNICATION Core Courses 4 4 100
ENG122 DEVELOPING ACADEMIC SKILLS - I Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 2 50
EST131 BRITISH LITERATURE: ANGLO SAXON TO EARLY VICTORIAN Core Courses 5 4 100
FRN121 FRENCH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
HIN121 HINDI Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
KAN121 KANNADA Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 03 100
PSY131 BASIC PSYCHOLOGICAL PROCESSES - I Core Courses 5 5 100
SAN121 SANSKRIT Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
TAM121 TAMIL Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
2 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN221 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH - 3 3 100
CNM211 STRATEGIC STORYTELLING - 3 3 50
CNM251 SOFTWARE FOR MEDIA - 4 4 100
ENG222 DEVELOPING ACADEMIC SKILLS - II - 3 3 100
EST231 BRITISH LITERATURE: LATE VICTORIAN TO THE PRESENT - 5 4 100
FRN221 FRENCH - 3 3 100
HIN221 HINDI - 3 3 100
KAN221 KANNADA - 3 03 100
PSY231 BASIC PSYCHOLOGICAL PROCESSES - II - 5 5 100
SAN221 SANSKRIT - 3 3 100
TAM221 TAMIL - 3 3 100
3 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN321 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
CNM051 SERVICE LEARNING Skill Enhancement Course 2 2 50
CNM331 PRINT MEDIA Core Courses 4 4 100
CNM351 PHOTOGRAPHY Skill Enhancement Course 4 4 100
ENG322 PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION - I Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 2 100
EST331 AMERICAN LITERATURES Core Courses 5 4 100
FRN321 FRENCH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
HIN321 HINDI Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
KAN321 KANNADA Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 03 100
PSY331 LIFE SPAN DEVELOPMENT Core Courses 5 5 100
PSY351 PSYCHOLOGICAL STATISTICS AND EXPERIMENTS - I Core Courses 2 2 100
SAN321 SANSKRIT Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
TAM321 TAMIL Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
4 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN421 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH - 3 3 100
CNM051 SERVICE LEARNING - 2 2 50
CNM431 MEDIA RESEARCH - 4 4 100
CNM441A SOCIAL MEDIA - 4 4 100
CNM441B BROADCAST MEDIA - 4 4 100
ENG422 PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION - II - 3 2 100
EST431 INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY THEORY - 5 4 100
FRN421 FRENCH - 3 3 100
HIN421 HINDI - 3 3 100
KAN421 KANNADA - 3 03 100
PSY431 BASIC SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY - 5 5 100
PSY451 PSYCHOLOGICAL STATISTICS AND EXPERIMENTS - II - 2 2 100
SAN421 SANSKRIT - 3 3 100
TAM421 TAMIL - 3 3 100
5 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
CNM531 READING FILMS Core Courses 4 4 100
CNM541A ADVERTISING Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 50
CNM541B PUBLIC RELATIONS AND CORPORATE COMMUNICATIONS Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
CNM581 MEDIA INTERNSHIP Core Courses 0 2 50
EST531 POSTCOLONIAL LITERATURES Core Courses 4 04 100
EST532 INDIAN LITERATURES: THEMES AND CONCERNS Core Courses 5 4 100
PSY531 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY Core Courses 4 4 100
PSY541B SCHOOL AND EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
PSY541C SPORTS PSYCHOLOGY Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
PSY541D CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
PSY541E INTRODUCTION OF NEUROPSYCHOLOGY Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
PSY551 PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH METHODS AND ASSESSMENT-I Core Courses 2 2 100
6 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
CNM631 MEDIA RESEARCH - 4 4 100
CNM641A MASS COMMUNICATION, CULTURE AND ETHICS - 4 4 100
CNM641B MASS COMMUNICATION AND RIGHTS - 4 4 100
EST631 INTRODUCTION TO WORLD LITERATURES - 5 4 100
EST641A CULTURAL STUDIES - 4 04 100
EST641B INTRODUCTION TO ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING - 4 04 100
EST641C INTRODUCTION TO SHORT STORY - 4 04 100
EST641D INTRODUCTION TO FILM STUDIES - 4 04 100
EST641E ECOLOGICAL DISCOURSES AND PRACTICES - 4 4 100
EST641F REVISITING INDIAN EPICS - 4 4 100
PSY631 INDUSTRIAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY - 4 4 100
PSY641A POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY - 4 4 100
PSY641B MEDIA PSYCHOLOGY - 4 4 100
PSY641C ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND HUMAN-MACHINE INTERFACE - 4 4 100
PSY641D CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR - 4 4 100
PSY641E INTRODUCTION TO FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY - 4 4 100
PSY641F HEALTH AND WELLBEING - 4 4 100
PSY641G COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY - 4 4 100
PSY651 PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH METHODS AND ASSESSMENT-II - 2 2 100
    

    

Introduction to Program:

The Communication and Media programme is a three-year rigorous orientation aimed at equipping students with skills, knowledge, and attitude that enable them to aspire for leadership roles in the domain of media and communication. In the first semester, ?Introduction to Mass Communication? has been designed to help students understand the varied conceptions, practices, problems and possibilities of mass communication. ?Critical Thinking? is aimed at introducing the students to different aspects of critical thinking, its methods and processes and go on to provide a platform for practice. In the second semester, the core course on ?Print Media Production? will introduce students to the basic computer skills needed for page layout, graphic design and web design. The other key aim is to enable the student to pick up effective reporting, interviewing and editing skills meant for the print media. The skill enhancement course for the second semester - Strategic Storytelling - hopes to enable the students to move beyond automated execution of media roles and responsibilities and creatively make an effective difference. Broadcast Media is a core course in the third semester, which will provide students with hands-on training in producing and editing broadcast programmes. The skill enhancement course for the semester Software for Media - will teach them the varied audio, video software and production techniques. ?Social Media? will introduce the students to the fast-emerging domain and equip them to understand the medium, its dynamics and produce media content for varied audience groups. Understanding Films is a course where the domain of cinema as an important media of communication would be analysed. At the end of the second year, students will be required to do an internship in either print/radio/television/cinema/ social media and provide a detailed report. In the fifth semester, students would be doing an elective course either on ?Advertising? or Public Relations. In the sixth semester, Media Research is introduced as a core course. For the discipline specific-electives, this semester offers Mass Communication, Culture and Ethics as one choice and Mass Communication and Rights as the other choice. The electives are aimed at strengthening the theoretical base of the students in the domain of media and communication.

Programme Outcome/Programme Learning Goals/Programme Learning Outcome:

PO1: Demonstrate foundational knowledge in the domains of print media, visual media, digital media and advertising and public relations

PO2: Apply different media and communication skills like reporting, editing, designing, producing multimedia content that are informed by critical thinking and storytelling approaches

PO3: Practice media with a social outlook that is driven by the ethical, legal, professional and cultural sensibilities of the time and spaces we inherit

PO4: Apply basic theoretical and research-driven approaches in the domains of Media and Communication, English Literature and Psychology

PO5: Utilize the acquired knowledge and skills from the domains of Media and Communication, English Literature and Psychology to pursue higher education

PO6: Demonstrate a coherent understanding and comprehensive knowledge of the fundamental process underlying human behavior in the multidisciplinary learning context.

PO7: Demonstrate scientific inquiry and sensitivity to diversity while applying psychological concepts to everyday life and real-world situations.

PO8: Use the knowledge of psychology to enhance self-awareness, well-being, interpersonal relationships, career-decision making, and social responsibility in personal and professional domains.

PO9: Demonstrate an understanding of literatures in English and translation and appreciate the role that historical context plays in the creation and interpretation of literary works.

PO10: Develop critical thinking and imagination through fiction and nonfiction and to familiarize students with cultural diversity.

PO11: Analyze the role that intersections among race, gender, class, sexuality, and/or national or global history play in literary studies.

PO12: Design, conduct and communicate basic psychological research following fundamental methods and ethical standards.

PO13: Apply critical and theoretical approaches to the reading and analysis of literary and cultural texts in multiple genres

Assesment Pattern

Most of the assessments are formative, building on the learning contexts enabled by the curriculum. Feedback is ensured in most of the contexts. Assessment models are chosen to assess and ensure the learning outcomes.

Examination And Assesments

Continuous assessments would be carried out for all courses. Considering the learning requirements of the students, a variety of evaluation practices will be put to use. Assessments like regular written exams, viva voce, online submissions, demonstration-based assessments, etc. would be used.  

AEN121 - ADDITIONAL ENGLISH (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The Additional English course is offered as a second language course and seeks to introduce the students to the nuances of English literature in its varied forms and genres. The students who choose Additional English are generally proficient in the English language. Hence, instead of focusing on introducing them to language, challenging texts in terms of ideas, form, and technique are chosen. Additional English as a course is designed for students in place of a regional language. Non-Resident Indians (NRIs), foreign nationals and students who have not taken Hindi, Kannada, Tamil or French at the Plus 2 or Class XII levels are eligible to choose Additional English. The course is taught for students from different streams, namely, BA, BSc, BCom, and BBA in the first year and for BA, BSc and BCom (Regular) in the second year.

The first year syllabus is an attempt by the Department of English, Christ University to recognize and bring together the polyphonic Indian and Indian sub-continental voices in English in English translation for the Additional English students of the first year. This effort aims to familiarize the students with regional literatures in translation, Indian Writing in English (IWE) and literatures from Pakistan, Nepal and Srilanka, thereby, enabling the students to learn more about Indian culture and ethos through writings from different regions of the country. We have tried to represent in some way or the other the corners of India and the Indian sub-continent in this microcosmic world of short stories, poems and essays

 

There is a prescribed text bookfor the first year students, compiled by the Department of English, Christ University and intended for private circulation.

The first semester has a variety of writing from India, Pakistan and Nepal. The various essays, short stories and poems deal with various socio-economic, cultural and political issues that are relevant to modern day India and the Indian sub-continent and will enable students to comprehend issues of identity-politics, caste, religion, class, and gender. All of the selections either in the manner of their writing, the themes they deal with or the ideologies that govern them are contemporary in relevance and sensibility, whether written by contemporary writers or earlier writers. An important addition to this syllabus is the preponderance of North-Eastern writing which was hitherto not well represented. Excerpts from interviews, autobiographical writings, sports and city narratives are added to this section to introduce students to the varied genres of literature.

The objectives of this course are

to expose students to the rich literary and cultural diversity of  Indian literatures

to sensitise students on the social, political, historical and cultural ethos that has shaped the nation- INDIA

to enable to grasp and appreciate the variety and abundance of Indian writing, of which this compilation is just a passing glance

to learn and appreciate India through association of ideas in the texts and the external contexts (BhashaUtsav will be an intrinsic help in this endeavour)

  

 

Course Outcome

CO1 CO 2: iv) Understand the cultural, social, religious and ethnic diversities of India v) it will be able to be analytical and critical of the pluralistic society they live in through the activities and assignments conducted vi) be aware of the dynamics of gender, identity, communalism and politics of this vast nation through its literature.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Poetry
 

1.      Keki N Daruwala     “Migrations”

 

2.      Kamala Das            “Forest Fire”

 

3.      Agha Shahid Ali      “Snow on the Desert”

 

4.      Eunice D Souza       “Marriages are Made”

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Short Stories
 

1.      Rabindranath Tagore    “Babus of Nayanjore”

 

2.      Ruskin Bond  “He said it with Arsenic”

 

3.      Bhisham Sahni       “The Boss Came to Dinner”

 

4.      N. Kunjamohan Singh    “The Taste of Hilsa”

 

5.      Mohan Thakuri                “Post Script”

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Essays
 

1.      Mahatma Gandhi       “What is True Civilization?” (Excerpts from Hind Swaraj)

 

2.      Ela Bhatt                    “Organising for Change”

 

3.      Sitakant Mahapatra     “Beyond the Ego: New Values for a Global Neighborhood

 

4.      B R Ambedkar             “Waiting for A Visa”

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Contemporary knowledge of the soci-political situation in the sub-continent

The text book copy "Reading Diversity"

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

On-line resources to appreciate the text through the Comprehension Questions

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1:  Classroom assignment for 20 marks keeping in mind the objectives and learning outcomes of the course.

CIA 2: Mid-semester written exam for 50 marks

CIA 3: Collage, tableaus, skits, talk shows, documentaries, Quizzes or any proactive            creative assignments that might help students engage with India as a cultural space. This is to be done keeping in mind the objectives and learning outcomes of the course.

Question Paper Pattern

Mid Semester Exam: 2 hrs

Section A: 4x5= 20

Section B: 2x15=30

Total                  50

 

End Semester Exam: 2 hrs

Section A: 4 x 5 = 20

Section B: 2 x 15= 30

Total                   50

CNM111 - CRITICAL THINKING (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course on Critical Thinking will enable the student to see through fallacies in an argument. It provides conceptual clarity, necessary tools, and opportunities to critically decode complex issues. The course aims to empower the student to logically analyse and arrive at a critically and ethically sound decision in diverse communication contexts.

The facilitator plans to train students

      to reason well, improve analytical abilities and make logical decisions

      to build their arguments based on a premise

to take a logical stand on contemporary issues, belief systems, and ethical options

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate their knowledge about the components of arguments.

CO2: Construct complex arguments both in verbal and written forms.

CO3: Recognise, analyse and evaluate arguments in real life.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Introduction
 

 

  1. What, Why, and How of Critical Thinking.

  2. Difference between Thinking and Feeling

  3. Different types of Thinking (convergent & divergent)

  4. Values, Value assumptions

  5. Ethics, Ethics in Argumentation, Ethical Decision-Making.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Critical Thinking - Methods and Processes
 

 

  1. Logic and Reasoning- Deductive and Inductive Reasoning, Premise of Contention, Validity and Truth.

  2. Statistics - Statistical Evidence, Problems with Statistics and Surveys; Evidence - Verifying Source, Context and Desired Outcomes.

  3. Reasoning Errors - Reasoning by Analogy, Cause-Effect Reasoning, False Cause, Slippery Slope, Attacking the Person Instead of the Argument, Appealing to Tradition, Stereotyping, Generalizing.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
The Idea of India (Introductory lectures)
 

 

  1. History 

  2. Economy

  3. Politics

  4. Identity and Culture

  5.  Inter-sectionality

  6.  Ecology

  7.  Class

  8.  Caste

  9.  Religion

  10.  Nation and Nationalism

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:20
Classroom Practice - Debate
 

 

  1. Constructing the arguments.

  2. Selecting evidence.

  3. Organizing Evidence.

  4.  Addressing counter arguments

Text Books And Reference Books:
  • Fisher, A. (2017). Critical Thinking: An Introduction. Cambridge University Press,
  • Ruth,M& Jo, L (2010). The Thinking Teacher’s Toolkit. Continuum International Publishing Group.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Merrilee H S. (2007). Introduction to Logic and Critical Thinking. New York Brooks/Cole Publishing Company.
  • Hurley, P J. (2006). Concise Introduction to Logic.
  • Ramage JD, Bean J C, & Johnson J (2001). Writing Arguments: A Rhetoric With Readings. Allyn and Bacon.
Evaluation Pattern
Assessment Outline:

Course Code

Course Title

Assessment details

CNM111

Critical Thinking

CIA: Students ought to build a portfolio over the first two months of the course and submit it for evaluation


END SEMESTER: Topics based on III unit will be given to the students on a random basis, at least a week in advance. Students will be evaluated on the basis of a debate. The academic facilitator(s) will share the instructions.

Guidelines for academic progression (Promotion criteria): The students will be promoted to the second year if they exhibit logic, application of critical thinking methods, clarity, coherence and conviction in arguments, subject depth, and supply of evidence, awareness and response to counter-arguments.

CNM131 - MASS COMMUNICATION (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course covers both the historical evolution of media as well as contemporary developments and issues. Students will be encouraged to participate in discussions where key theories will be analyzed and possible applications discussed. Course work will include weekly chapter readings from the course text, quizzes, and regular participation in on-line discussion forums which will require writing and reflection.

Course Outcome

CO1: Relate to the meaning, need and process of communication through definitions, concepts, terms imbibed in class

CO2: Demonstrate an understanding of the various models and theories of communication and mass communication.

CO3: Apply communication theories to real life situations.

CO4: Analyse the influence of communication and mass communication on society.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Communication evolutions, concepts and models
 

Definitions, Concept and Elements of communication process.

Evolution of Communication-Different milestones in communication from smoke signals to smartphones.

Variables of Communication-Emotional and Cultural. Different forms of communication Verbal, nonverbal, written communication. Levels of communication - Intrapersonal, interpersonal, group, mass media communication.

Models: Aristotle- SMR, SMCR, Shannon and Weaver, Lasswell, Osgood, Dance, Schramm, Gerbner, Newcomb, convergent and gatekeeping, communication and socialization.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Communication Theories
 

Powerful effects Theory-Magic Bullet Theory, Two-step flow- opinion leaders, Limited Effects theory into effects theory all over again. Press theories- Authoritarian, Libertarian, Soviet Communist and Social Responsibility. New press theories- Democratic and participatory press theory, and Developmental press theory.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Functions of Communication
 

Surveillance Function, Correlation Function, Entertainment Function, Cultural Transmission, Status Conferral/ Conferment of Status, Enforcement of Norms, Dysfunctions of Mass Communication.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Mass Communication and Contemporary Debates
 

Nature and process of mass communication, characteristics, typology of audiences, Ownership patterns of mass media.

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

  • Baran, S.J. (2002).Introduction to Mass Communication. New York: McGraw Hill.
  • Kumar, K. J. (2020). Mass communication in India. Jaico publishing house.
  • Peters, J. D. (2012). Speaking into the Air: A History of the Idea of Communication. University of chicago Press.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Bitner, R. (1989). Mass Communication: An Introduction. New Jersey: Prentice Hall.
  • Defleur, M.L. & Dennis E (1994).Understanding Mass Communication. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.
  • Hybels, S. & Weaver I. (2001). Communicating Effectively. Boston: McGraw Hill.
  • Rayadu, C.S. (2010). Communication, Himalaya Publishing House, Mumbai.
Evaluation Pattern

The course shall not have a regular CIA- MSE -ESE model. Instead, the student will be given a series of assignments spread across the semester, leading to a final portfolio/article/content collective on submission model. The teaching facilitator will consider the level of intelligibility in the class and the learning needs of the students and decide what assignment to be given on a regular basis.

Sample Assignment:

Encouraging students to develop communication models and organizing exhibitions of those models at the end of the semester.

 

*Rubrics for each activity will be provided by the concerned faculty offering the course.

ENG122 - DEVELOPING ACADEMIC SKILLS - I (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Academic Skills are a blend of theoretical ability to recognize the nuances of language aspects and hands-on training to exercise the acquired knowledge in reasoning, reading and writing. Academic Skills focus on developing research skills through careful reading and critical writing that are considered foundational and crucial in textual scholarship and knowledge production. The participants of this course will determine their areas of interest in conceptualizing their seminal work and constructing a reasoned argument. This course prompts the participants to take their learning-receptive skills and productive skills in a purpose-driven and practice-oriented mode on a contextual basis.

The course deals with receptive skills (reading) and productive skills (writing). In fact listening and speaking skills are not directly involved but act as a higher cognitive process. This course facilitates the participants with varied practices, tasks, exemplars, sample papers to practice with context-driven reading material. It runs for one full academic year with specific learning outcomes which are two-fold – conceptual grasp and textual application. The whole course and its structure involve Bloom’s taxonomy of knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis, evaluation and synthesis.

Objectives

To enable the learner

       acquire higher order receptive and productive skills

       develop reading skills at the higher education level

       be aware of functional grammar to improve research writing skills

       grasp and apply the mechanics in academic writing skills

       use study skills for research-based knowledge dissemination (writing a paper or presentation)

 

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Awareness of different approaches to knowledge, a critical and creative bent of mind that leads to a content-based investigation.

CO2: Working knowledge of different purposes of writing, especially persuasive (argumentative), analytical, and informative writings paves the way for research-based reading and writing.

CO3: Application of functional grammar and mechanics that enhance conceptual clarity, communicative style, and style of writing

CO4: Hands-on experience in a research culture which is discipline-specific in nature

CO5: Experiential learning through participatory learning and service learning

CO6: Awareness of problem-based learning and need-based learning

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Basic skills
 

To enable learners to fine tune their expressions through better choice of words and sentence structures with clarity of idea.

       Expanding vocabulary, spelling nuances, refreshing grammar, avoiding common errors and pitfalls, learning sentence structures, and use of punctuation (mechanics).

       Use of dictionary

       Use of Word document tools

       Use of Library resources

       Concept mapping- mind mapping

 

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Reading skills
 

To enable students to develop appropriate reading comprehension skills through nuanced understanding of reading techniques.

       Previewing

       Reading for Main Ideas

       Using Contexts for Vocabulary

       Skimming/Scanning for Details

       Making Inferences

       Restating

       Phrasing

                                                                       

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Study Skills
 

To enable students to use basic study skills to organize knowledge received and to streamline their ideas into appropriate academic discourse.

 

       Understanding the text

       Critical thinking

       Mnemonics

o   Introduction to the need for mnemonics?

o   Memory organisation through pegging practices

o    Word, acronym, models, note cards, images, etc

 

 

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Language skills
 

to enable students to understand and appreciate different kinds of literature and express their understanding in the form of short paragraphs or essays

       Language focus

       Literary appreciation- language devices-literary devices

       Grammar-university grammar (functional grammar)

       Sentence structure

       Vocabulary

       Use of Formal and informal language

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Listening Skills
 

To enable students to listen to lectures and take notes and organize these to discuss or write about concepts or show application of knowledge

       Listening Skills

       Concept Building

       Approaches to LS

       Features of LS

       Function

       Importance of LS at university level education

       Practical sessions

 

 

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:7
Critical Reading
 

To enable students to develop the art of critical reading through close reading formulas

 

       Pre-reading

       Annotating

       Outlining

       Summarizing

       Finding oppositions

       Inventoring

       Identifying thesis and related arguments

 

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:4
portfolio organisation
 

Set of hours for application

Exemplars

(Self Study Learning, Portfolio Building, teaching on Formative and Summative assessment mode, Problem Based Learning modules and project Submission)

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      Langan, J. (1995). English Skills With Reading (3rd Ed.). McGraw Hill. New York.

2.      Osmond, A. (2013). Academic Writing and Grammar for Students. Sage. Los Angeles.

3.      Robitaille, J. and Connelly, R. (2002).  Writer’s Resource: From Paragraph to Essay. Thomson Heinle. Australia.

Please note that the teacher in charge will also be bringing in authentic material to the class apart from the books mentioned in the reference.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Please note that the teacher in charge will also be bringing in authentic material to the class apart from the books mentioned in the reference. (through google classroom) 

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA (weightage) = 50 marks

 

ESE (weight) = 50 marks

 

 

CIA I – 20 MARKS- Tasks done in the portfolio based on Unit I

CIA II- 50 Marks- Tasks done in the portfolio based on Unit I and II

CIA III- 20 Marks- Tasks done in the portfolio based on Unit III

Internal Assessment Breakup:

CIA I -10 Marks

CIA II- 25 Marks

CIA III- 10 Marks

Attendance- 5 Marks

End Sem- 50 Marks Portfolio Submission

 

EST131 - BRITISH LITERATURE: ANGLO SAXON TO EARLY VICTORIAN (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

This course will serve as an introductory course for British Literature. The course will locate the texts in their respective socio-political and historical contexts. The selection aims to introduce different genres of British literature.

 

Course Objectives

 

  • To introduce  students to the socio-political, religious, cultural, and linguistic aspects of the UK through English literary texts
  • To help students understand texts as products of a historical, political and cultural processes
  • To enable students to identify different forms, genres and subgenres in literature
  • To sensitize students to human values through an exposure to socio-historical concerns of subjectivity, identity, community and nationhood.
  • To sharpen critical appreciation and analytical writing skills through an introduction to models of literary criticism

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will be able to discern the socio-political, religious, cultural, and linguistic aspects of the UK through English literary texts

CO2: Students will be able to analyse and critique texts as products of a historical, political and cultural processes

CO3: Students will be able to identify different forms, genres and subgenres in literature

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
The Anglo-Saxon Period and The Medieval Period
 

Emergence of English language, History of England from 42 BC to Norman Conquest- salient features

 Impact of Norman rule on English social structure, English language in the medieval period,mystery, morality plays and miracle plays, feudalism 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
The Renaissance Period and after
 

Protestantism, Bible translation, religious literature, humanism, English Renaissance, Baroque and Rococo Styles

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:25
Reformation, Restoration and after
 

Metaphysical Poetry, Epic conventions, Mock epic, Puritanism, Restoration, Rise of the novel, the English novel in the eighteenth century, Gunpowder plot, Oliver Cromwell,

 

Dissolving the parliament, Periodical essays, empiricism, Influence of French culture through restoration, the enlightenment 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:25
Romantic and early Victorian Age
 

Romanticism, notion of literary creation and poets, closet drama, the French Revolution, Victorian morality, industrial revolution, utilitarianism, rise of nation-states, impact of colonialism on England, emergence of universal education in England 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Chaucer: The Prioress from Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

William Shakespeare:          

Sonnet 116

‘O that this too solid flesh would melt” Soliloquy by Hamlet in Hamlet Act 1 Scene 2

‘To Be or Not To Be’ Soliloquy by Hamlet in Hamlet Act 3 Scene 1

 

Francis Bacon: “Of Truth”

John Donne: “Canonization”

 

John Milton: Excerpt from Satan’s speech in Book 1, Paradise Lost

John Dryden:  First three stanzas of “Mac Flecknoe”

Alexander Pope: Belinda’s Boudoir from The Rape of the Lock

Addison and Steele: “Character of Will Wimble”

Oliver Goldsmith: “Beau Tibbs”

 

Oliver Goldsmith: She Stoops to Conquer / Christopher Marlowe: Dr. Faustus 

William Wordsworth: “Lines Written in Early Spring”

S.T. Coleridge: “Christabel”

Shelley: “Ode to the Westwind”

Keats: “La Belle Dame Sans Merci”

Charles Lamb: “Dream Children”

Mary Shelley: Frankenstein

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Abrams, M.H. A Glossary of Literary Terms. 8th Ed. New York: Wardworth, 2005. Print.

Ferguson, Margaret, Mary Jo Salter and Jon Stallworthy. Eds. The Norton Anthology of Poetry. 4th Ed. New York: WW Norton, 1996. Print

Gordden, Malcom, and Michael Lapidge. The Cambridge Companion to Old English Literature. Rpt Cambridge: CUP, 2006. Print.

Gupta, Ambika Sen. Selected College Poems. Rpt. Hyderabad: Orient Longman,   1999.

Herman, Daniel. The Cambridge Companion to Narrative. Cambridge: CUP, 2007. Print.

John, Eileen, and Dominic McIver Lopes. Philosophy of Literature: Contemporary and Classic Readings. Oxford: Blackwell, 2004. Print

Maxwell, Richard, and Katie Trumpener. The Cambridge Companion to Fiction in the Romantic Period. Cambridge: CUP, 2008. Print

Sampson, George.The Concise Cambridge History of English Literature, 3rd Ed. Cambridge: CUP, 2005. Print

Ramarao, Vimala. Ed.Explorations. Vol I. Bangalore: Prasaranga, Bangalore University, 2004. Print

 

Shingle, Michael. Daniel Defoe Robinson Crusoe. New York: WW Norton, 1994. Print

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I

  1. group presentations on topics relevant to British literature/Art and literary movements
  2. an exhibition/display based on different eras, movements and literary and non-literary genres

 

CIA III will be a moddle test on the Novel

 

These are suggested examples of CIAs. However, during the course of teaching, there could be other suggestions, and CIAs could be slightly modified based on class dynamics and calibre of students.

 

Selected Texts chosen to be taught may be revised / used as extended reading which may be tested in CIA 1, 2 or 3. Example : only 1 soliloquy may be taught.

 

Mid Semester Examination CIA II: 2 Hours

 

Section A: Short Notes – 5x3 marks= 15 (5 questions out of 7)

Section B: Essay Questions – 2x10 marks = 20 (2 questions out of 3)

Section C: Long Essay Questions – 1x15 marks = 15 (1 question out of 2)

 

Total: 50 Marks

 

End Semester Examination: 3 Hours

 

Section A: Short Notes – 10x3 marks = 30 (10 questions out of 12)

Section B: Essay Questions – 4x10 marks = 40 (4 questions out of 6)

Section C: Long Essay Questions – 2x15 marks = 30 (2 questions out of 4)

 

 

Total: 100 Marks

FRN121 - FRENCH (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

French as a second language in the UG program. The method Génération A1 consists of a student's book and an activity book, both included in the digital manual. It consists of 6 units preceded by an initial section of 'Welcome'. The structure of each unit marks a real learning journey.

 

Course Objectives

·       To develop linguistic competencies and sharpen oral and written communicative skills

·       To familiarize learners to certain aspects of francophone civilization.

·       To enable learners to engage in simple everyday situations

Course Outcome

CO1: To train the students in correct pronunciation of French.

CO2: To enable students to write correct sentences with appropriate grammar structure and vocabulary.

CO3: To familiarise students with the culture and expressions in French.

CO4: To enhance oral and written comprehension in French.

CO5: To make them proficient in reading, writing, listening and speaking skills in French.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
I discover
 

Lesson 1: Good Morning, how are you?

 Lexicon – Countries and nationalities, domestic animals, days of the week

 Grammar -Subject pronouns, verbs ‘to be’ and ‘to have’, definite and indefinite articles

 Speech acts – Greeting, asking how one is

 

Lesson 2: Hello, my name is Agnes.

Lexicon – Months of the year, numbers 0-69, the family

Grammar – Formation of the feminine / plural, possessive adjectives

Speech acts -Introducing oneself and others, asking and saying dates

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Les fables de la Fontaine
 

La cigale et la fourmis (The grasshopper and the ant)

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Culture: Physical and Political France
 

 

Lesson 1: Who is it?

Lexicon - Professions

Grammar – Formation of the feminine, interrogative /negative phrases, it is

Speech acts – Asking and answering politely

   
 

Lesson 2: In my bag, I have......

Lexicon – Some objects, identity card

Grammar – First group verbs, verbs ‘to go’ and ‘to come’

Speech acts – Asking personal information

 

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Les fables de la Fontaine
 

Le renard et le corbeau (The fox and the crow)

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Video Workshop: How cute he is!
 

 

Lesson 1: How is he?

Lexicon – The physical aspect, character

Grammar – The formation of the feminine, contracted articles, tonique pronouns, there

                    is/are, interrogative adverbs

Speech acts – Describing the physical aspects and the character

   
 

Lesson 2: Hello?

Lexicon – Prepositions of place, numbers from 70

Grammar – Numbers, prepositions of place, second group verbs, verb ‘to do’

Speech acts – Speaking on the phone                                                                              

 

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
Visual text
 

A French movie

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Cocton, Marie-Noelle. Génération A1. Paris : Didier, 2016 

      2.  De Lafontaine, Jean. Les Fables de la Fontaine.

           Paris, 1668

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

French websites like Bonjour de France, Fluent U French, Learn French Lab, Point du FLE etc

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Pattern

CIA (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

CIA 1 – Assignments / Letter writing / Film review

10%

 

CIA 2 –Mid Sem Exam

25%

 

CIA 3 – Quiz / Role Play / Theatre / Creative projects 

10%

 

Attendance

05%

 

End Sem Exam

 

50%

Total

50%

50%

HIN121 - HINDI (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

The detailed text book “Samakaleen Hindi Kavitha” edited by Dr.N Mohanan is an anthology of contemporary Hindi Poems written by representative poets of Hindi Literature. From the medieval poetry ' Kabir Ke Dohe and Sur ke pad 'is also included.  The poets reflect on the social, cultural and political issues which are prevalent in our society since the medieval period. Hindusthani sangeeth-parampara eva kalakar is one of the module. Since translation is a significant area in language and literature, emphasis is being given on it in the syllabus.Bharath ki pramukh sanskruthik kalayein  Yakshagana,Kathakali,Ram Leela,Krishna Leela etc. included in the syllabus to enrich cultural values among students.

Course Objectves: 

Students will be exposed to read, analyse and appreciate poems by learning poetry. Through translation, students will be able to develop translation skills while translating from other language articles. Students will be able to analyses critically the different cultural art forms by learning about the Famous cultural art forms of India.

Course Outcome

CO1 : Improve the analytical skills through critical analysis of the poems.

CO2: Analyze the different aspects of Hindustani musical traditions and musicians.

CO3: Enhance the translation skills.

CO4: Improve the basic research skills while doing the CIAs.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Samakaleen Hindi Kavitha (Collection of contemporary Hindi Poems),Kabir Ke Dohe and Sur Ke Pad.
 

’  Samakaleen Hindi Kavitha (Collection ofcontemporary Poems)  Edited By: Mahendra Kulashreshta Rajpal and Son’s, New Delhi

 

Level of knowledge: Analytical

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Translation-Theory and Practice
 

                                                                                            

                                      

                                          

                                           

         

Translation-Practice                English to Hindi and vice- versa.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Bharath ki pramukh sanskruthic kalayen-
 

Ramleela,Krishnaleela,Yakshagaana,kathakali.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Hindusthani Sangeeth-parampara evam pramukh kalakar
 

Utbhav,Vikas aur paramparaein

Pramukh Sangeethkar-1.Bhimsen Joshi 2.Gulam Ali 3.Pandit Ravishankar 4. Bismillah Khan.

Text Books And Reference Books:

  1. 'Samakaleen Hindi Kavitha’ (Collection of Poems) Edited By: Dr.N Mohanan,  Rajpal and Son’s,New Delhi.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. A Hand Book of Translation Studies         By: Das Bijay Kumar.               

2. Saral Subodh Hindi Vyakaran,                 By: Motilal Chaturvedi. Vinod pustak mandir, Agra-2

3. Anuvad Evam Sanchar –                         Dr Pooranchand Tantan, Rajpal and Son’s, Kashmiri

4. Anuvad Vignan                                       By: Bholanath Tiwar

5. Anuvad Kala                                           By: N.E Vishwanath Iyer.

                                                                 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-1(Digital learning-Editing of Hindi article in Hindi Wikipedia )-20 marks

CIA-2(Mid semester examination)-50 marks

CIA-3(Digital learning-article creation in Hindi Wikipedia)-20 marks

End sem examination-50 marks

KAN121 - KANNADA (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:03

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course is taught in the  I Semester for BA/B.Sc. students. The selected Poems (Vachanas & Keerthanas ) from Medieval Literature  & Modern Kannada ( Navodaya)  literature are prescribed.  Texts will help students to understand the writings of  Poets as well as  story writers. Short stories of Sara Abubakar, Ravindranath Tagore, and K.P. Poornachandra Tejaswi  & Folk tales are prescribed. The syllabus will extend the concerns of family, family relationship, social justice and marginalization. Students should be able to comprehend and respond with grammatical accuracy to spoken and written Kannada as well as to demonstrate cultural awareness.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: to understand the values in Medieval Kannada Literature.

CO2: to appreciate the aesthetic aspects of music in Keerthana

CO3 : to understand the art of developing short stories

CO4: to imbibe the cultural aspects in Modern Kannada Stories

CO5 : improves reading, writing and speaking skills

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Kannada Sahitya Samakshama
 

1.      Vachanagalu

(a) Devaradasimayya

(b) Basavanna

(c) Allamaprabhu

(d) Akkamahadvi

(e) Gajesha Masaniyya

(f) Aydakki Lakkamma

2.      Keerthanegalu

(a)    Purandaradasa

(b)   Kanakadasa

3.      B.M.Srikantiah- Kariheggadeya Magalu 

4.      Mumbai Jataka- G.S. Shivarudrappa

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Selected Short Stories
 

1. Chappaligalu- Sa Ra Abubakar

2. Mandannana Marriage- Poornachandra Tejaswi

3. Giliya Kathe- Ravindranatha Tagore

4. Dheerakumara- Janapada Kathe

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Language Skills
 

1.      Translation ( Passages from English to Kannada & Kannada to English) 

2.      Usage of alphabets in different contexts:  

3.      l & L

4.      a  & H

5.      n & N

6.      Hrasva and Deergha  alphabets

7.    Ottaksharas

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

1.      Basavannanavara vachanagalu: L. Basavarjaju
2.      Akkana vachanagalu: L. Basavarajau
3.      Allamana Vachanagalu; L . Basavaraju
4.      Purandara Sahitya Darshana: (Volume 1-2-3-4) S.K. Ramachandra Rao
5.      Kanaka Sahitya Darshana-. D. Javaregowda
6.      Kannada Sanna Kathegala Olavu- Giraddi Govindaraja

 

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.      A comparative study of Sarana and Dasa literature, P. S Srinivasa,University of Madras (1981)

2.      Sharanara Anubhava Sahitya- H. Thipperudraswamy

3.      Vachana Kammata: (Ed)  K. Marulasiddappa and K. R. Nagaraj

4.      Basavanna: M. Chidananda Murthy

5.      Kanaka Kirana: Ka.Ta. Chikkanna

6.      Kannada Sanna Kathegalu: G.H. Nayak

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-1 Wikipedia - Knowledge of regional language - Typing skills (20 Marks) 

CIA-2 Mid Semester Exams (50 Marks)

CIA-3 Texting Self introduction in Sand box  (20 Marks) 

End Semester Exams ( 50 Marks) 

PSY131 - BASIC PSYCHOLOGICAL PROCESSES - I (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is an introduction to the study of basic psychological processes offered to the first-semester undergraduate students of psychology. It is an introductory paper that gives an understanding of the field of psychology, scope, and multiple perspectives and disciplines that provide a holistic picture of human behaviour. Students will learn the key concepts, classic examples, and modern and practical applications of fundamental psychological theories, methods, and tools. Emphasis is on the basic psychological processes of personality, learning, consciousness, motivation and emotion. This course allows them to learn the basics and demonstrate the skills that a student needs to move on to the more specific and in-depth psychology courses that follow. 

Course Outcome

CO1: Explain fundamental concepts, principles, theoretical perspectives, and arguments from across a range of psychology content domains like learning, personality, motivation and emotion to various situations and contexts.

CO2: Critically evaluate the different schools of thought in psychology

CO3: Define the basic biological process that influences behavior

CO4: Analyze methods of scientific inquiry, evidence-based thinking, and critical thinking skills to psychological phenomena and examples of psychological science

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
History and Schools of Thought
 

In this unit, we will examine the history of Western psychological theorizing from its beginnings in ancient Greece, through to the schools and perspectives of psychology including Structuralism, Functionalism, Psychodynamic, Biological, Behavioristic, Gestalt, Cognitive, Cross-cultural, Humanistic and Evolutionary. The aim is both to build a familiarity with psychology’s intellectual origins and to foster an awareness of its many false steps, dead-ends, and alternative pathways to gain a better appreciation of the social, cultural, and, above all, psychological influences on the theorizing of psychologists. Students will be able to define psychology and understand what psychologists do and identify the major fields of study and theoretical perspectives within psychology and know their similarities and differences. In the end, students will be ale to gain a better appreciation of why contemporary psychology takes the shape it does, describe the evolution of psychology and the major pioneers in the field, identify the various approaches, fields, and subfields of psychology along with their major concepts and important figures and describe the value of psychology and possible careers paths for those who study psychology

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Biological basis of behaviour
 

Explain the biological perspective of psychology as it applies to the role of the nervous system and endocrine system in regard to behaviour and mental processes. Identify and describe the important structures of these systems. It is an introductory survey of the relationship between human behaviour and brain function. Discuss the interaction between biological factors and experience, methods and issues related to biological advances, develop an understanding of the influence of behaviour, cognition, and the environment on the bodily systems, and develop an appreciation of the neurobiological basis of psychological function and dysfunction. 

Laboratory Demonstration: Biofeedback/ EEG/ Eye-tracking

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Learning
 
This unit introduces students to the principles of learning and how those principles can be used to modify human behaviour. Explain the behavioural perspective of psychology and relate classical and operant conditioning concepts to student-generated scenarios. The course emphasizes the application of learning theories and principles. Topics include reinforcement, extinction, punishment, schedules of reinforcement, stimulus discrimination, prompting and fading, stimulus-response chaining, generalization, modelling, rule-governed behaviour, problem-solving, latent learning, observational learning, insight learning, concept learning, general case instruction, and stimulus equivalence.  
 
Laboratory Demonstration: Trial and Error learning, Habit Interference, Maze Learning 
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Personality
 

This unit is an introduction to the psychological study of human personality, broadly speaking and more specifically in terms of how we may understand individual differences in personality and the personalities of individual persons. Personality psychologists use empirical methods of behavioural and clinical science to understand people in biological, social, and cultural contexts. Students will learn the strengths and weaknesses of the major personality theories, as well as how to assess, research and apply these theories. As much as possible, application to real-life situations will be discussed. Students would be able to identify the various perspectives that are common in the area of personality psychology and critically evaluate each in terms of its explanatory and predictive power, discuss theories and perspectives of personality development: psychoanalytic, humanistic, trait, and social-cognitive, understand classic and current empirical measurement tools and approaches to investigation for personality assessment in psychological and clinical science and develop an understanding of the concept of individual differences with the goal to promote self-reflection and understanding of self and others.

 Laboratory Demonstration: Sentence completion test, NEO-PI, Type A/B

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Motivation and Emotion
 

The unit will explain how behaviour is energized and directed by the complex mixture of motives and emotions and describe the various theories that have been developed to explain motivation and emotion. Unit aims to explain motivation, how it is influenced, and major theories about motivation. We will describe hunger and eating in relation to motivation, obesity, anorexia, and bulimia; sexual behaviour and research about sexuality; and explain theories of emotion and how we express and recognise emotion

Laboratory Demonstration: Level of motivation, Achievement motivation, 

Text Books And Reference Books:

 Weiten, W. (2014). Psychology: Themes and Variations (Briefer Version, 9th edition). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/Cengage Learning.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

King, L. A. (2010). Experience Psychology. McGraw-Hill.

Gazzaniga, Heatherton, Halpern (2015). Psychological Science, 5th Edition, Norton.

Feldman.S.R.(2009).Essentials of understanding psychology ( 7th Ed.) Tata Mc Graw Hill.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA       CIA (Continuous Internal Assessment)-Total Marks- 50 

CIA-1: Activity-based Individual Assignment- 10 Marks 
CIA-2: Mid sem Exam-Case/Scenario-based Question- 25 Marks; Department level 
CIA-3: Individual Assignment- 10 Marks 
Attendance- 5 Marks 

ESE Pattern      ESE (End Semester Examination) Total Marks- 50 , 02 HOURS

Question paper pattern
Section A- (Short Answers) 02 marks x5Qs =10 Marks
Section B- (Essay Type) 10 marks x 3Qs = 30 Marks
Section C-(Compulsory: Case Study) 10 marks x 1Q =10 Marks

SAN121 - SANSKRIT (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Janakiharana of Kumaradasa is the first Sanskrit mahakavya, so far as the extant literature goes, to deal solely with the whole of the Ramayana story. Its further interest is that it was produced in Ceylon, showing thereby the wider world over which Sanskrit had its sway. After manuscripts of the full text of the poem in twenty cantos had to come to light in South India, what is now presented was the first systematc and critical study to be undertaken to the author and the text and its position vis-a-vis other Mahakavyas. In addition to the above study and the critical edition of the cantos which were at that time unpublished the examination of the large number of extra-verses found in some MSS of the text and showing them as interpolations.

Course Outcome

CO1: To understand the theme of epics

CO2: To develop new perspectives..

CO3: To appreciate the styles and thoughts of individual poets.

CO4: To focus on the poetical, artistic, cultural and historical aspects of the poetic works.

CO5: To enhance translation and interpretation skills.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:35
Janaki Haranam
 

Selected shlokas 1-60 shlokas

Janakiharana of Kumaradasa is the first Sanskrit mahakavya, so far as the extant literature goes, to deal solely with the whole of the Ramayana story. Its further interest is that it was produced in Ceylon, showing thereby the wider world over which Sanskrit had its sway. After manuscripts of the full text of the poem in twenty cantos had to come to light in South India, what is now presented was the first systematc and critical study to be undertaken to the author and the text and its position vis-a-vis other Mahakavyas. In addition to the above study and the critical edition of the cantos which were at that time unpublished the examination of the large number of extra-verses found in some MSS of the text and showing them as interpolations.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Grammar
 

Sandhi prakaranam Swarsandhi and vyajanasandhi

lakara´s 

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Language skills
 

Translate the given passage from english to sanskrit 

write an aritcle in sanskrit on the topic given 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Books for References: -

1)      Janakiharanam of Kumaradasa edited by  C K Swaminathan

2)      Janakiharanam edited by G.R. Nandargikar

3)      Sanskrit Grammar Translation from English to Sanskrit by M.R. Kale

Sanskrit Grammar Kannada version by Satish Hegde.                                   

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Ramayana of Valmiki

Champu Ramayana of Bhoja 

Evaluation Pattern

 

 

CIA 1 Wikipedia assignments

 

CIA 2 Mid semester examinations

 

CIA 3 Wikipedia assignments

 

TAM121 - TAMIL (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Poems of Bharatiyar and Bharatidasan and poems by women poets with feminine sensibilities  will initiate the students into the modern period with all its complexities. The short stories by Ambai offers a matured vision of life through a varied characters and situatins. A new concept, Cultural Studies, will take the students beyond prescribed syllabus to include music, theatre, painting and films out of whcih the art form of music is taken up for the first semester.

Course Outcome

CO1: To make the students experience the impact made by Bharathiyar and Bharathidasan during the 20th century and to bring them to the realities of 21st century.

CO2: They will also learn, on their own, about the nuances of music and a unique aesthetic experience it offers

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Modern Poetry- Bharathiyar
 

1. Kannan yen sevagan

2. Kannan yen kozhandhai

3. Kannan yen vilayatu pillai

4. Kannan yen kadhalan

5. Kannan yen kadhali

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Bharathi dasan
 

1. Kadal

2. Kundram

3. Nyaairu

4. Aal

5. Chittrur

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Contemporary Cultural Issues
 

Prose including reference to contemporary literary issues

1. Oru karupu silanthi udan oru iravu- Ambai

Cultural studies, Indian festivals

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Penniya kavithaigal
 

1.Ottadai -Thamarai

2. Kapinaani thozhudhal- Ponmani vairamutu

3. Yendhan tozha- Subhathra

4. Kadal konda pen puram- Andal priya dharshini

5. Pen- P. Kalpana '

 

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:2
Grammer- Language skills
 

Pira mozhi chorkal

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:3
Common topic
 

Isai

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

Malliga, R et al (ed).Thamilppathirattu I.Bangalore: Prasaranga,2011

     ‘Oru Karuppuchilanthiyudan Or Iravu’ by Ambai,

 

      published by Kalachuvadu Publications, Nagercoil, 2014

 

 

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 Varadarajan, Mu.  Thamil Ilakkia Varalaru . New Delhi:Sahitya Akademi, 2008

 Sivathambi, Ka.Thamil Sirukathaiyin Thorramum Valarchiyum.Coimbatore: NCBH, 2009

 Ragunathan,C.Bharathi: Kalamum Karuthum, Chennai:NCBH, 1971

 

Ramakrishnan S 100 Sirantha Sirukathaigal, Chennai: Discovery Books, 2013

 

Evaluation Pattern

With a total of 100 marks, 50 marks will come from Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the remaining 50 marks will come from end semester exanination. While the end semester examination will be fully theory based the CIA will consist of  assignments, theatre production, book review and other activities

AEN221 - ADDITIONAL ENGLISH (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The second semester has a variety of writing from India, Pakistan and Srilanka. The various essays, short stories and poems deal with various socio-economic, cultural and political issues that are relevant to modern day India and the Indian sub-continent and will enable students to comprehend issues of identity-politics, caste, religion, class, and gender. All of the selections either in the manner of their writing, the themes they deal with or the ideologies that govern them are contemporary in relevance and sensibility, whether written by contemporary writers or earlier writers. Excerpts from interviews, autobiographical writings, sports and city narratives are added to this section to introduce students to the varied genres of literature.

The objectives of this course are

to expose students to the rich literary and cultural diversity of  Indian literatures

to sensitise students on the social, political, historical and cultural ethos that has shaped the nation- INDIA

to enable to grasp and appreciate the variety and abundance of Indian writing, of which this compilation is just a passing glance

 

to learn and appreciate India through association of ideas in the texts and the external contexts (BhashaUtsav will be an intrinsic help in this endeavour)

 

Course Outcome

CO1 CO 2: iv) Understand the cultural, social, religious and ethnic diversities of India v) it will be able to be analytical and critical of the pluralistic society they live in through the activities and assignments conducted vi) be aware of the dynamics of gender, identity, communalism and politics of this vast nation through its literature.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Poetry
 

1.      Jayanta Mahapatra    “Grandfather”

 

2.      Meena Alexander    “Rites of Sense”

 

3.      K.Satchidanandan      “Cactus”

 

4.      Jean Arasanayagam   “Nallur”

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Short Stories
 

1.      Temsula Ao             “The Journey”

 

2.      A. K Ramanujan       “Annaya’s Anthropology”

 

3.      Sundara Ramswamy   “Waves”

 

4.      Ashfaq Ahmed            “Mohsin Mohalla”

 

5.      T.S Pillai                      “In the Floods”

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Essays
 

1.      Salman Rushdie        “Gandhi Now”

 

2.      Amartya Sen             “Sharing the World”

 

3.      Suketu Mehta            “Country of the No”

 

4.      Rahul Bhattacharya     “Pundits From Pakistan” (An Excerpt)

Text Books And Reference Books:

The textbook "Reading Diversity"

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Online references for Comprehension Questions in the textbook

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1: Classroom assignment/test for 20 marks keeping in tune with the course objectives and learning outcomes.

CIA 2: Mid-semester written exam for 50 marks

CIA 3: Collage, tableaus, skits, talk shows, documentaries, Quizzes or any proactive            creative assignments that might help students engage with India as a cultural space. This is to be done keeping in tune with the course objectives and learning outcomes.


Question Paper Pattern        

Mid Semester Exam: 2 Hrs

Section A: 4x5= 20

Section B: 2x15=30

Total                  50

End Semester Exam: 2 hrs

Section A: 5 x 5 = 25

Section B: 5 x 15= 75

Total                   100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CNM211 - STRATEGIC STORYTELLING (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course has been conceptualized in order to help students understand that stories are universal and all around us. From the personal to the political domain, stories work upon us, even telling us who we are for us and others. Storytelling tools can be strategically employed deftly depending upon the concern, context and the target audience to create an impact. However, it is a nuanced art which requires specialised and rigorous orientation. This course attempts to provide such an understanding to the communication professionals of tomorrow.

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate what a story is and the rudimentary elements that make a story

CO2: Decode how storytelling is strategically used in media contexts

CO3: Employ storytelling tools in different forms of media

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Storytelling
 

       Universality of Storytelling

       Elements of a story – Characters, Plot, Conflict, Setting

       Building a character sketch and creating character interrelationship; introducing, building and resolving conflict; Types of Story Conflicts

       Narrators: Omniscient narrator, unreliable narrator, multiple narrators, first person narrative, second person narrative, third person narrative, focalisation

       Narrative and Time - Differentiating Fabula and Suzjet, Narrative time as against historical time, Order, Frequency, Duration

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Storytelling as Performance
 

       Introduction to Theatre, Oral Narration-approaches and styles

       Storytelling and Performance - Structure, Visualisation, Voice, Gestures, Eye contact, Facial expressions, Body Movement, Owning the Stage, Emotional Connection

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Storytelling and the Media
 

       Storytelling in Journalism, Advertising Narratives, Storytelling and Reputation Management,

       Visual Storytelling -Using the camera to tell a story, working out a narrative sequence, using sound and light to tell stories, combining audio, video and the story ,

       Challenges and Opportunities of Stories in Digital Media. 

       Drafting Short stories. Case Studies.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Kobre, Kenneth. Videojournalism: Multimedia Storytelling. Focal Press: China, 2012. Print. Abbott, H Porter.                                                                                                    

2. The Cambridge Introduction to Narrative. Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, 2002. Print.
3. Maslen, Andy. Persuasive Copywriting: Using Psychology to Influence, Engage and Sell. Kogan Page: New Delhi, 2015. Print.                                                                                     

4. Field, Syd. The Screenwriter’s Workbook. Random House Inc.: New York, 2006. Print.        

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Rand, Ayn. The Art of Fiction. Plume: England, 2000. Print. 

2. Olson, Randy. Why Science Needs Story: Houston, We Have a Narrative. The University of Chicago Press: London. 2015. Print.

Evaluation Pattern

There will be a series of assignments leading to the submission of a portfolio:

       Identifying Conflicts

       Creating Conflicts

       Employing Narrative Techniques

       Building a Character

       Pictorial Writing

       Short Story writing

       Oral Storytelling

  • Pecha Kucha Presentation

CNM251 - SOFTWARE FOR MEDIA (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course offers an outline of the concept of graphic design  and the immense professional opportunities it provides. Students will be taken on a journey through the great works of past and present iconic graphic designers. Students will be introduced to the most popular designer sites encompassing work within the various industries that designers work in and trained to produce content using media software.

Course Outcome

CO1: Define and trace the development of Graphic Design

CO2: Identify the numerous design careers which are available

CO3: Evaluate designs (your work and others) for audience, meaning and effectiveness

CO4: Identify and use the Elements and Principles of Design in a decisive fashion

CO5: Distinguish between the types of graphic images used

CO6: Understand and use color to communicate ideas to others

CO7: Understand the principles of graphic placement

CO8: Use typography effectively in a design

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Graphic design fundamentals
 

The distinction between art and design – Elements and Principles of Graphic design. Geometrical and organic shapes, Texture, value, tone, negative space etc. Basics of Raster and vector graphics - its advantage and application areas, various vector/Bitmap graphic software, different file types used in graphic design. Studying the importance of UI/UX. Discovering the UI area.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Study of tools
 

 Image editing theory, Bitmap/Vector, drawing tools, Shape and transform tools, Layers in Illustrator, Pen tool, Bezier curves, Pathfinder, Coloring, Gradients. Image mode, Image size, canvas size, Image resolution, size and resolution, Cropping, Levels, Curves, Contrast adjustment, filters, Effects.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Layout Design and Formatting Text
 

Working with text, advanced options of text, Organizing illustrations with layers. Working with Symbols, icons, and customised fonts, working with transparency and blending modes, Gradient Tool. Formatting texts. Importance of space, colour, texture, pattern in the design layout. Colour Psychology- How space affects visual aesthetics.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Application-oriented designs
 

Designing a simple report cover, Creating a greeting card.Using photographs in a motivational poster, Letterhead and data merge, Creating a three-panel brochure for a student business, Slideshow presentation, Business card design.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Application-oriented designs 2
 

Preparing icons with meaning for mobile/desktop –  – Principles of web design – types of websites – Tools used to create memes for social media apps/sites. Ethics to be followed by graphic designers.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Gary David Bouton, CorelDRAW X7, McGraw Hill Education

2. Adobe Photoshop CS6 Bible, Wiley Publication

3. http://product.corel.com/help/CorelDRAW/540229932/Main/EN/User-Guide/CorelDRAW-X7.pdf

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. ·Photoshop Bible McLeland Willey Publication
  2. ·   Corel Draw Practical Learning: BPB Publication
  3. ·   Quark Express-9 : Prepress Know-How Noble Desktop Teachers
  4. ·  Desktop Publishing with Quark 10 Kindle version
  5. ·  Digital Music and Sound Forge BPB Publications
Evaluation Pattern
Evaluation pattern: Submission-based Department level.
Over all CIA - 50 Marks.
●  End Semester Presentation, Viva Voce - 50 Marks.

 Assignment Details : 

  • Creating your own business card using a QR code
  • Frontpage of a news magazine.
  •  Creative Image manipulation assignment.
  • Designing Word cloud for a campaign.
  • Illustrated Icons for applications (or) creating a Landscape illustration.
  •  Designing a public awareness poster   (or) Designing a Poster for an Event.
  • Creating Logo and brochure design.
  • Creating Marketing collateral Design 

 

 

ENG222 - DEVELOPING ACADEMIC SKILLS - II (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description