CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH AND CULTURAL STUDIES

School of Arts and Humanities

Syllabus for
Bachelor of Arts (Liberal Arts)
Academic Year  (2023)

 
3 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBLA331D PSYCHOLOGICAL PROCESSES Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
BBLA332D DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
BPSY542B SPORTS PSYCHOLOGY Allied Core Courses 4 4 100
ENG121-3B INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS Minor Core Courses 5 5 100
LIB201-3B GENDER AND INTERSECTIONALITY Allied Core Courses 4 4 100
LIB261-3B SKILL DEVELOPMENT Skill Enhancement Courses 2 0 50
LIB281-3B MEDIA LITERACY AND CYBER COMMUNICATION Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses 4 2 100
LIB282-3B IMMERSIVE PROJECTS Skill Enhancement Courses 0 2 100
LIBE201-3B MARKET STRUCTURE AND INNOVATION Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
LIBE202-3B CIRCULAR FLOW OF MONEY Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
LIBE203-3B ENGINEERING ECONOMICS Allied Core Courses 4 4 100
LIBE221-3B INSTITUTIONS AND INFORMAL ECONOMY Minor Core Courses 3 3 100
LIBE222-3B FINANCE IN THE GLOBAL MARKET Minor Core Courses 3 3 100
LIBF201-3B INTRODUCTION TO PEACE AND CONFLICT STUDIES Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
LIBF202-3B PATTERNS OF MASS VIOLENCE: EMPIRES, PEOPLE AND GENOCIDE Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
LIBF203-3B DISRUPTIVE STRATEGIES IN VUCA WORLD Allied Core Courses 4 4 100
LIBF221-3B INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN RIGHTS Minor Core Courses 3 3 100
LIBG201-3B INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNICATION STUDIES Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
LIBG202-3B INTRODUCTION TO MEDIA AND CULTURE Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
LIBG203-3B INTRODUCTION TO MEDIA WRITING Allied Core Courses 4 4 100
LIBG221-3B ALTERNATIVE NARRATIVES IN COMMUNICATION Minor Core Courses 3 3 100
4 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBLA431D THEORIES OF PERSONALITY - 4 4 100
BBLA432D SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY - 4 2 100
BPSY431 CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY - 5 5 100
LIB202-4B POST-COLONIAL STUDIES Allied Core Courses 4 4 100
LIB241-4B FOUNDATIONS OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses 3 3 100
LIB262-4B SKILL DEVELOPMENT (LOCAL HISTORY_FAMILY HISTORY_HERITAGE PROJECT) Skill Enhancement Courses 2 2 50
LIBE204-4B ACCOUNTING SYSTEMS & BUSINESS ANALYTICS Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
LIBE205-4B CONSUMER ATTITUDES AND COMMUNICATION PROCESS Major Core Courses-II 4 4 100
LIBE206-4B EDUCATION, EQUITY AND INCOME DISTRIBUTION Allied Core Courses 4 4 100
LIBE223-4B LABOUR MARKET ANALYSIS Minor Core Courses 3 3 100
LIBE224-4B FUNDAMENTALS OF ECONOMETRICS Minor Core Courses 3 3 100
LIBF204-4B CONFLICT RESOLUTION: TOOLS OF DIPLOMACY, MEDIATION AND NEGOTIATION Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
LIBF205-4B POST-COLONIAL SOUTH ASIA Major Core Courses-II 4 4 100
LIBF206-4B DECONSTRUCTING THE FENCES: MIGRATION AND GLOBAL GOVERNANCE Allied Core Courses 4 4 100
LIBF223-4B INTRODUCTION TO POLICY STUDIES Minor Core Courses 3 3 100
LIBF224-4B PUBLIC HEALTH, CONFLICT AND VIOLENCE Minor Core Courses 4 4 100
LIBG205-4B GLOBAL MEDIA AND POLITICS Major Core Courses-II 4 4 100
LIBG206-4B SCIENCE COMMUNICATION Allied Core Courses 4 4 100
LIBG223-4B THE ART OF STORYTELLING Minor Core Courses 3 3 100
LIBG224-4B POLITICAL COMMUNICATION Minor Core Courses 3 3 100
5 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBA531 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 4 100
BBLA511 CAPSTONE PROJECTS-I Skill Enhancement Courses 5 5 100
BBLA531A POSTCOLONIAL LITERATURES Core Courses 5 5 100
BBLA531B HUMANIZING MULTIMEDIA Core Courses 5 4 100
BBLA531C INEQUALITY THROUGH THE AGES: TALES OF HIERARCHIES Core Courses 5 5 100
BBLA531D COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY Core Courses 5 5 100
BBLA531E SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS AND INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTIONS Core Courses 5 5 100
BBLA531F FUNDAMENTALS OF ECONOMIC GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT Core Courses 5 5 100
BBLA531G FINANCE IN THE GLOBAL MARKET Core Courses 5 5 100
BBLA532A FOOD POLITICS IN THE GLOBAL SOUTH Core Courses 5 5 100
BBLA532B CONNECTING HUMANS: NETWORK AND VIRTUAL COMMUNITIES Core Courses 5 5 100
BBLA532C ECOLOGICAL CONCERNS, RIGHTS AND ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES Core Courses 5 5 100
BBLA532D PSYCHOPATHOLOGY Core Courses 5 5 100
BBLA532E PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION AND MANAGEMENT Core Courses 5 5 100
BBLA532F BASIC STATISTICS FOR ECONOMIC ANALYSIS Core Courses 4 4 100
BBLA532G NEW VENTURE PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT Core Courses 5 5 100
BBLA561 RESEARCH METHODS Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 4 50
BBLA581 INTERNSHIP Skill Enhancement Courses 2 2 100
BECH341A HEALTH ECONOMICS: THEORY AND APPLICATION Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 4 100
BECH341B FOUNDATIONS OF BEHAVIOURAL ECONOMICS Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 4 100
BECH361A INDIAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 3 100
BECH361B ESSENTIALS OF ACCOUNTING Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 4 100
BECH362A CONSUMER PSYCHOLOGY Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 4 100
BECH362B EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 4 100
BECH541A FOUNDATIONS OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 4 100
BECH541B ADVANCED ECONOMETRICS Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 4 100
BECH542A ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS: THEORY AND APPLICATION Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 4 100
BECH542B INDUSTRIAL ECONOMICS Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 4 100
BENG541A INDIAN LITERATURES: PROBLEMS AND PERSPECTIVES - 15 4 100
BENG541B REVISITING INDIAN EPICS - 4 4 100
BENG541C REVISITING EUROPEAN MYTHOLOGY - 4 4 100
BENG542A TRANSLATION STUDIES - 15 4 100
BENG542B ENGLISH, INDIA AND ITS DISCONTENTS - 4 4 100
BENG543A READING GRAPHIC NARRATIVES - 15 4 100
BENG543B READING SCIENCE FICTION - 4 4 100
BENG543C CULTURAL STUDIES - 4 4 100
BHIS541A MILITARY HISTORIES Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 4 100
BHIS541B SPORTS HISTORIES Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 4 100
BHIS541C POST-COLONIAL ASIA Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 4 100
BJOH531 MARKETING COMMUNICATION Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 4 100
BJOH551 SHORT FILM MAKING Core Courses 4 4 100
BPOL541A WESTERN POLITICAL THOUGHT Generic Elective Courses 4 4 100
BPOL541B CONCEPTS AND THEORIES IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 4 100
BPSY541A HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY Discipline Specific Elective Courses 5 5 100
BPSY541B AVIATION PSYCHOLOGY Discipline Specific Elective Courses 5 5 100
BPSY542A NEUROPSYCHOLOGY Discipline Specific Elective Courses 5 5 100
BPSY542B SPORTS PSYCHOLOGY Discipline Specific Elective Courses 5 5 100
SDEN511 KNOWLEDGE APPLICATION SKILLS Discipline Specific Elective Courses 2 2 50
6 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBA632 BUSINESS LAWS - 4 4 100
BBLA611 CAPSTONE PROJECTS-II - 4 4 100
BBLA631A LITERARY DISABILITY STUDIES - 5 5 100
BBLA631B CASTE, GENDER AND MEDIA - 5 5 100
BBLA631C STATE, POWER AND THE SOVEREIGN - 5 5 100
BBLA631D ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR - 4 4 100
BBLA631E POPULAR CULTURE AND WORLD POLITICS - 5 5 100
BBLA631F INDIAN POLITICAL ECONOMY - 4 4 100
BBLA631G ENTREPRENEURSHIP DEVELOPMENT - 5 5 100
BBLA632A DALIT STUDIES - 5 5 100
BBLA632B MEDIA AND POPULAR CULTURE - 5 5 100
BBLA632C SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND MEDICAL TRADITIONS - 5 5 100
BBLA632D COUNSELLING PSYCHOLOGY - 4 4 100
BBLA632E POLICY ADVOCACY AND DELIVERY - 5 5 100
BBLA632F PUBLIC ECONOMICS - 5 5 100
BBLA632G PRODUCTION AND OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT - 5 5 100
BBLA661 RESEARCH ANALYSIS - 4 4 100
BBLA681 DISSERTATION - 0 4 100
BECH441A ECONOMIC SOCIOLOGY - 4 4 100
BECH441B LABOUR ECONOMICS - 4 4 100
BECH461A INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS - 4 4 100
BECH461B CORPORATE FINANCE - 4 4 100
BECH462A INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY - 4 4 100
BECH462B URBAN PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT - 4 4 100
BECH641A ECONOMICS OF LAW - 4 4 100
BECH642A MONEY AND BANKING - 4 4 60
BECH642B GAME THEORY - 4 4 100
BECO641 FINANCIAL ECONOMICS - 4 4 100
BENG641A CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN NOVEL - 4 4 100
BENG641B ROMANTIC POETRY - 4 4 100
BENG641C NARRATIVE APPROACHES TO TRAUMA - 4 4 100
BENG643A POPULAR CULTURE - 4 4 100
BENG643B FILM STUDIES - 4 4 100
BENG643C HORROR NARRATIVES - 4 4 100
BHIS631 ARCHAEOLOGY:AN INTRODUCTION - 4 4 50
BHIS641A POST WAR DISCOURSES - 4 4 100
BHIS641C ART AND ARCHITECTURAL IDENTITIES - 4 4 100
BJOH452 DOCUMENTARY PRODUCTION - 5 5 100
BJOH631 COMMUNICATING SCIENCE: UNPACKING POLITICS, HISTORY, AND PROGRESS - 4 4 100
BPOL631 ISSUES IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS - 4 4 100
BPSY641A COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY - 5 5 100
BPSY641B SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY - 5 5 100
BPSY642A FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY - 5 5 100
BPSY642B HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT - 5 5 100
BPSY642C ENVIRONMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY - 5 5 100

BBLA331D - PSYCHOLOGICAL PROCESSES (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is about the study of basic psychological processes. It is an introductory paper that gives an overall understanding about the field of Psychology. It will provide students with an introduction to the key concepts, perspectives, theories, and subfields in psychology. It focuses on various basic processes underlying human behavior.

Course Outcome

CO1: Explain various perspectives in psychology and take positions based on their understanding.

CO2: Demonstrate fundamental processes underlying human behavior through experiments, role play, etc.

CO3: Apply their understanding in coming up with new ideas, concepts, etc.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Introduction to Psychology
 

Definition and goals of Psychology; Psychology as a science;

Historical foundations of Psychology; Contemporary perspectives in psychology;

Methods of research; Ethics in psychological research.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Consciousness, Sensation and Perception
 

Consciousness – Definition; Sleep and dreams;

Altering consciousness – hypnosis, meditation, biofeedback and drugs;

Definitions; Absolute and difference threshold; Signal detection theory;

Sensory adaptation;

Perception: Understanding perception, Gestalt laws of organization, Perceptual constancy - depth perception, size perception, perception of movement;

Various sensory modalities; Extrasensory perception.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Learning
 

– Definitions;Classical conditioning – experiments, extinction, spontaneous recovery, generalization, discrimination, higher order conditioning;

Operant conditioning – Thorndike’s law of effect, basics of operant conditioning, Reinforcement and Punishment, Schedules of reinforcement;

Cognitive learning: Latent learning, Observational learning and Insight learning.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
: Motivation and Emotion
 

Meaning, Approaches: instinct, drive reduction, arousal, incentive, cognitive, humanistic;

Types of motivation - physiological Motivation (Hunger, Thirst, Sex)and psychological motivation (Achievement, Affiliation and Power)

Emotion: Meaning, Physiological basis of emotions;

Theories – James-Lange Theory, Cannon-Bard theory, Cognitive theory;

Emotional expression, facial feedback hypothesis, facial-affect programme

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Psychology of Individual Differences
 

   Concepts and nature of Individual differences; Nature vs. nurture;

Gender Difference in cognitive processes and social behavior;

Intelligence – Definition, Contemporary theories of intelligence; Tests of intelligence;

Emotional, Social and Spiritual intelligence                                                                                                               

Text Books And Reference Books:

Baron, R. A. (2001). Psychology. New Delhi: Pearson Education India.

Rathus, S. A. (2017). Introductory Psychology, 5thEd. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.

Nolen-Hoeksema, S., Fredrickson, B.L. & Loftus, G.R. (2014). Atkinson & Hilgard's Introduction to Psychology. 16th Ed. United Kingdom: Cengage Learning.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Feldman, R. S. (2011). Understanding Psychology. New Delhi: Tata McGraw Hill.

Morgan, C. T., King, R. A., & Schopler, J. (2004). Introduction to Psychology. New Delhi: Tata McGraw Hill.

Kalat, J. W. (2016). Understanding Psychology. New York: Cengage Learning.

Evaluation Pattern

Course Code and Title


Assessment Details

 

CIA

20 Marks

MSE

50 Marks

CIAII

20 Marks

ESE

50 Marks

 

Group

Assignment

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

Individual

Assignment

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

BBLA332D - DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Lifespan Development focuses on processes of change in individuals and groups across lifespan.

Topics of interest include: developmental theories, patterns of development in physical, motor, cognitive and psychosocial

domains within.

Course Outcome

CO1: Ability to evaluate various developmental perspectives.

CO2: Ability to take a stand on controversial issues in developmental psychology with empirical justification.

CO3: Ability to identify developmental milestones/tasks at various stages of life.

CO4: Ability to design activities and interventions based on developmental needs of individuals, groups and communities.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Developmental Psychology
 

Concept of human development – domains and periods of lifespan development.

Principles of human development;

Historical foundations; Mid-Twentieth century theories; Recent theoretical perspectives. Overview of theories of

development;

Research in developmental psychology – methods and designs.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Physical Development
 

Genetic foundations; Prenatal development; Prenatal environment; Childbirth, approaches; Heredity, environment and

behavior;

Infancy – motor and perceptual development;

Physical growth – the course of growth, brain development, puberty and its psychological impact

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Cognitive and Language Development
 

Piaget’s cognitive-developmental theory – four stages;

Vygotsky’s Sociocultural theory;

Information processing theory – developmental approaches;

Language development – components of language, various stages, metalinguistic awareness and bilingualism.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Emotional, Social and Moral Development
 

Emotional development – functions of emotions, emotional expression, temperament, attachment;

Identity and Social development – self-concept, self-esteem, identity, sexuality, understanding others, social problem-

solving;

Moral development – psychoanalytic theory, social learning theory, Piaget’s theory, Kohlberg’s theory.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Development in Adulthood
 

Early adulthood - Physical, Cognitive and Psychosocial development;

Middle adulthood - Physical, Cognitive and Psychosocial development;

Late adulthood- Physical, Cognitive and Psychosocial development;Bereavement and death.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Berk, L.C. (2008). Child Development. New Delhi: Prentice Hall of India (Pvt) Ltd.

Rathus, S. A. (2017). Human Development - HDEV, 3rd ed. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Papalia, D.E., Olds S.W., & Feldman, R.D. (2004). Human Development. New Delhi: Tata McGraw Hill.

Feldman, R.S. (2016). Development across the Lifespan. 8 th Ed, New Delhi: Pearson.

Rathus, S. A. (2014). Child and Adolescent Development - CDEV, 2nd ed. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.

Evaluation Pattern

Course

Code 

 

Course Title Assessment Details

 

Semester III

 

BPSY Developmental CIA MSE CIAII Attendance ESE 

 

Psychology 20 Marks  25 Marks 20 Marks  05 marks 30 Marks

 

Individual

Assignment 

 

Written Exam

Section A:

2x10=20

Section B

2x15=30

(Marks will be

converted to

25)

 

Group

Assignment 

 

Written Exam

Section A: 2x10=20

Section B 2x15=30

(Marks will be converted to 30)

BPSY542B - SPORTS PSYCHOLOGY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course in sports psychology aims at apprising students about the basic concepts related to applying psychological principles in sports. This course will also help students to develop an in-depth understanding about sports person’s situations, demands, and problems and will enable them to design intervention programs for them. 

Course Objectives: This course aims to 

  • Understand the scope and perspectives of sports psychology.
  • Understand the cognitive and social psychological dimensions in sports.
  • Understand the effect of arousal, anxiety and stress on performance.
  • Create interventions for sports persons.

Course Outcome

CO1: Describe the various approaches to counselling.

CO2: Demonstrate the knowledge of the dynamics of counselling relationship and engagement in the counselling process.

CO3: Discuss the significance of developing good counselling skills and choosing suitable therapeutic approach for clients

CO4: Demonstrate understanding of major counselling strategies and psychotherapeutic techniques.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Sports Psychology
 

History, Nature, and Scope of sports psychology; Recent perspectives - Issues of race, gender and sexual orientation in sports; Role of a sports psychologist

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Cognitive and Social Psychological Dimensions in Sports
 

Trait theories; Resilience and mental toughness; Social learning theory; Nature of Attitudes; Measures; Theories of motivation; Intrinsic and extrinsic motivation; Self-efficacy; Counterfactual thinking.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Group Dynamics
 

Groups and teams; Social facilitation; Negative effects of team leadership; Leadership; 

Aggression; Theories of aggression; Reduction of Aggression; Aggression, injury, and addictive behaviors.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Arousal, Anxiety, Stress and Sporting Performance
 

Definitions of arousal, anxiety and stress; Factors inducing anxiety and stress; Relationship between arousal and performance; Burnout, overtraining & overreaching; Retirement; Drug abuse in sport and exercise.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Psychological Interventions in Sports
 

Cognitive and behavioral interventions: Relaxation, Self- talk, Hypnosis, Imagery; Psychological Skills Training; Classifying skills; Stages of skill acquisition.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Jarvis, Matt (2006) Sports psychology: A student’s handbook. Routledge.

      Horn, T. S (Ed) (1992). Advances in sports psychology. Herman Kinetics.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Lynch, J. (2001). Creative coaching. Human Kinetics.

Mohan, J. (1996) Recent Advances in sports psychology. Friends

Murphy, E. (1995) Advances in sports psychology. Human Kinetics.

Murphy, S. M. (1995) Sports psychological interventions. Herman Kinetics.

Richard H. Cox. (2007) Sport psychology. McGraw Hill.

Weinberg, R. S. & Gould, D. (2007) Foundations of sport and exercise psychology. Humans Kinetics.

Evaluation Pattern

 

 

Course Code and Title


Assessment Details

 

CIA

20 Marks

MSE

50 Marks

CIAII

20 Marks

ESE

50 Marks

 

Group

Assignment

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

Individual

Assignment

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

ENG121-3B - INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course has been conceptualized in order to expose students to research enterprises that seek to discover the underlying structure of language and cognition. The traditional approach towards the rules of language is both problematic and on many fronts are inadequate when it comes to the application of the explanatory adequacy approach towards the language. Linguistics is the study of human language, its nature, structure, re, origin and its uses. Linguists (those who study language) have devised various methodologies which can be used to study the language, not as a set of rules of the system but as the rules which unravel human cognition. In this course, the approach towards the linguistic system would be to ask the question ‘why’ rather than just describing the phenomenon. This course will give students an overview of the field of modern linguistics and will enable them with the basic tools, methodologies, rules, etc. Introduction to Linguistics develops an understanding of the various subsystems of languages including Phonology, Morphology, Syntax, semantics, and sociolinguistics. As language is involved in a number of human activities, discipline, directly and indirectly, contributes to many other fields of enquiry like philosophy, anthropology, psychology, neurology, computation, etc. The course aims to provide enough basics/working knowledge of the discipline which can be further enhanced in order to develop skills like data analysis, POS tagging, corpus understanding, etc. for the students wishing to have a career in language data analysis in Google, Amazon, Facebook, etc

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate knowledge of key concepts, theoretical frameworks, and discourses in the field of Linguistics through classroom discussions and presentations

CO2: Employ the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) to transcribe English and other languages phonetically through class practice sessions and assignments

CO3: Apply phonemic and morphological analysis to identify the phonemes/allophones and morphemes/allomorphs of any given language through workshop, class practice sessions and assignments

CO4: Demonstrate the understanding between the differences of abilities of the human brain and computer to process language through workshops and written assignments

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Language and Linguistics
 

In this section, a proper introduction of the discipline will be given along with historical and contemporary traces of the study of language. In this section, we are going to engage with the various definitions of languages, its origin, development and its location in the brain or outside of it. How human language is different from animals and in which sense they are similar to the use of language in society. 

What is language? (Human –Animal)

What is Linguistics?

What we do when we do linguistics?

 

Language learning-language acquisition (Behaviourist – rationalist approach)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Phonetics and Phonology: Grammar of Sounds
 

Phonology is the scientific study of the sound system in a language. Phonetics is the study of the physical properties of the sound in a particular language. This unit tries to provide basic working knowledge in the field. Students would be familiarized with IPA (International Phonetic Association) symbols. A detailed discussion with practice would be provided on the organs of speech (speech production, transmission and reception). The section tries to uphold the point that languages have a systematic rule pattern which allows the (im)/possibility of certain sound combination in a language. 

Articulatory, Acoustic and Auditory phonetics

Speech formation, organ of speech/ airstream mechanism

Consonants and Vowels

 

Phone, phoneme and allophones

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Morphology: Grammar of Words
 

Morphology is the study of the internal structure of the word. As the term suggests, the section is devoted to studying the forms and functions of words. The goal would be to identify the underlying system of a certain pattern through the surface realization of the forms. The study of morphology was central in the reconstruction of Indo-European (language family), particularly when structuralism was in the prime between 1940 and 1960. Various scholars like Bloomfield (1933), Harris (1942, 46, 51), Hockett (1952, 58), Nida (1949) among others have worked extensively in the field. Though there are many theories and modals to be explored in morphology, in this introductory course, we shall only be dealing with some of the basic and important understanding of field. 

What are word, lexeme and word forms?

Different kinds of words – lexical, functional and grammatical.

 

Types of morphemes: Morph, allomorph and morpheme

Inflectional vs derivational morpheme.

Word formation process and productivity

Parts of speech

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:20
Syntax: Grammar of Sentence
 

Syntax is the study of the structure of a sentence. In this unit, we have tried to explore the various concerns with the domain of syntax. In modern linguistics, syntax has occupied the central position in the study of language. Moreover, its direct application in understanding human cognition and machines made it both popular and appealing. In this unit, it has been tried to make students understand how phrases are put together and make meaning. 

Reintroducing Parts of speech

Phrase, clause and sentence

Nominal phrase: Determiner, number and gender

Verbal phrase: types of verbs, Tense, aspect and valency

Constituent Structure

 

Introduction to tree structure

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Semantics: Grammar of Meaning
 

Semantics of the study of meaning. In this section, we have tried to introduce a few concepts which are fundamentals to study the meaning of words and sentences. The study of semantics concerns the relation of linguistic forms to non-linguistic concepts and mental representation of things in order to explain the possibility of successful communication. In this section, we will not only engage with the relation within the linguistic system like synonym, antonym, hyponym, etc. but also see the relation between the word and the thing it refers to. 

What is semantics?

Lexical meaning

Sentence meaning and Utterance meaning

 

Language and Thought

Text Books And Reference Books:

All prescribed texts

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Fromkin, Victoria, et al. An Introduction to Language. Centage Learning, 2018. 

Kim, Jong-Bok, and Peter Sells. English Syntax: An Introduction. Stanford University Center for the Study, 2008. 

Lieber, Rochelle. Introducing Morphology. Cambridge University Press, 2021. 

Loebner, Sebastian. Understanding Semantics, Second Edition. Routledge, 2013. 

Evaluation Pattern

Total: 100 Marks

CIAs: 70%

ESE: 30%

CIA 1: 20 marks

The students can be tested through the writing of argumentative essays, critical analysis of essays, class presentations, group discussions, creative writing, creative visualizations either as individual or group work.

CIA 2: MSE – 50 Marks

Pattern

Section A: 2x10=20

Section B: 1x15=15

Section C: 1x15=15

Students will be tested on their conceptual clarity, theoretical engagements, application and analysis of given texts and contexts

CIA 3: 20 marks

The students can be evaluated through exhibitions, visual essays or visual stories, mini-documentaries, performances, creating social media content and promotions, cumulative portfolios, docudramas, and other modes of creative evaluation suitable for the course’s objectives.

ESE: 50 marks

Pattern

Section A: 2x10=20

Section B: 1x15=15

Section C: 1x15=15

 

Students will be tested on their conceptual clarity, theoretical engagements, application and analysis of given texts and contexts

 

LIB201-3B - GENDER AND INTERSECTIONALITY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

The course seeks to understand gender through a multi-disciplinary perspective, refracting multiple historical and social phenomena through the lens of gender to understand its present shape and form. It will engage the students in forming ideas about the historical evolution of gender as a cultural phenomenon and attempt the students to probe the interaction of gender with other cultural artefacts such as the state, religion and tradition.

Gender is often a much-misunderstood concept and is yet to be fully recognized as an academic discipline. This course aims to develop an understanding of gender through a multi-disciplinary perspective, refracting multiple historical, political and social phenomena through the lens of gender to comprehend its present shape and form. The course addresses the evolution of gender as a cultural phenomenon and probes the interaction of gender with other cultural artefacts such as the state, religion and tradition. While examining the journey of gender through ages to the modern-day case studies, the students are encouraged to question existing notions regarding gender and examine its relevance in present day context.

Course Outcome

CO1: Critically engage with the construct of gendered social roles in society.

CO2: Trace the evolution of different genders as biological & social entities

CO3: Analyze and engage with issues pertaining to social discrimination and propose/practice relevant correctives for the same.

CO4: Develop the ability to use gender as a tool of analysis in social sciences. Develop analytical skills to weigh how the many protest movements for rights of women, and queer communities

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Gender and Sexuality
 

a)    Sex and Gender - Discourse and Praxis

b)   Gendered Hierarchies - Sexuality, Patriarchy and Social reproduction

c)    Towards a Theoretical framework: Conceptualizing engendered narratives and its empirical challenges

 

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Gender and Intersectionality through the Ages
 

a)   Appropriations and Expectations: From Apes to Women – Sexual Dimorphism; Experiencing Gender – Where are the Cavewomen?

b)  Clans and the circulation of women - Women as private property

c)   Performing the Past: Wives, Daughters and Daughters–in laws and the Husbands, Fathers, Sons - Gendered Expectations and Symbolism: Women as the Other and Woman as Mother

d)  Locating Gender: Eunuchs, Effeminate men and Masculine Women, Transgender

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Interrogating Stereotypes of Gender
 

a)         Gendering religion: Devotion and Dissent

b)         The Burden of culture: Queens and Courtesans– Subversion and Rebellion

c)          Intersections, Interventions and Interstices – Inequality and Discrimination through time

 

d)         The Question of Agency in Historiography – An Engendered View

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Contesting Norms: Case Studies
 

Gender (re)shaping politics

b)         Finding the space in ‘law’ – Crime and sexuality

c)          (Re)claiming social spaces – LGBTQ+ rights and movements

 

d)         Representation in culture – art, music and films

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

  • Yearning, Bell Hooks. 2014. Race, Gender, and Cultural Politics. London: Routledge.

  • Beauvoir, Simone de. 2011. The Second Sex. London: Random House. Butler, Judith. 2011. Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity. London: Routledge.

  • Chakraborty, Uma. 2003. Gendering Caste Through a Feminist Lens. Kolkata: Sthree.

  • Fausto-Sterling, Anne. 2000. The Five Sexes: Why Male and Female Are Not Enough from Sexing the Body. New York: Basic Books.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

  • Adkins, Lisa and Skeggs, Beverley. 2005. Feminism After Bourdieu. New Jersey: Wiley.

  • Alcoff, Linda. 1995. Cultural Feminism Vs Post Structuralism: The Identity Crisis in Feminist Theory in N B Dirks, N.B., Aley G. and Ortner S.B. (ed.). Nature/Culture/Power, Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Evaluation Pattern

 

Assessment Details

 

CIA

20 Marks

MSE

50 Marks

CIAII

20 Marks

ESE

50 Marks

 

Group

Assignment

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

Individual

Assignment

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

 

LIB261-3B - SKILL DEVELOPMENT (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:0

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

This course has been designed taking into consideration the need to nurture and enhance some of the skills which are necessary for a society to function and individuals to interact with their immediate spaces and society at large. This course is an amalgamation of both personal and professional aspects and therefore would engage with questions of personal and professional integrity, social interactions and harmonious living so on and so forth.

 

Course Objectives

The course is designed to:

1.      Enhance social interaction skills

2.      Develop social awareness and sensitivity

3.      Nurture best academic, professional and personal practices

Course Outcome

CO1: At the completion of the course, the students would be able to: Display cross-cultural interaction abilities

CO2: Conduct several activities which have a positive social impact

CO3: Construct arguments, activities, and exercises which display a thorough understanding of the best practices in multiple domains

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
Skill Development
 

Today’s generation is confronted with manifold challenges as a result of the rapidly changing economy and socio-political environment. As an educational institution, CHRIST (Deemed to be University) owns up to the responsibility to prepare graduates with skills which will not only make them efficient at their workplace but also nurture them as individuals who would make an effective contribution to the society. Aligning with the Christite Graduate Attributes, the department of political science and history has drawn out an extensive series of skills that would enable them to hone their personal and professional abilities. This has been done keeping in mind the paradigm shift from knowledge-oriented-approach to learning to skill-oriented-approach that the contemporary era necessitates. The skills and the modules aligning to it have been identified reckoning the following:

1.      The nature of  the discipline;

2.      The current trends in the field;

3.      The prospective employment opportunities ;

4.      The needs of the immediate spaces of engagement and nation at large, and

5.      The global skill ecosystem.

 

Mode of Facilitation

All the clubs associated with Political Science, will be responsible for skill development sessions across all semesters.

The student-instructors would be responsible for conducting the classes as well as evaluation in consultation with the academic mentors of the cluster. They are required to send across the scores obtained after conducting and evaluating each of the assignments as a google spreadsheet to the faculty-in-charge of the Skill Development Program. The faculty-in-charge is responsible for maintaining a continuous record of the scores thereby making the task of collation and consolidation easier at the end of the semester.

The student-instructors would be further accompanied in the classes by a faculty from the Political Science from whom they can seek help and support as and when required. 

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

-

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

-

Evaluation Pattern

The evaluation will be based on the assessments formulated by the student-instructors who facilitate each unit in the class. A continuous evaluation pattern will be followed whereby after the completion of each unit, an assignment will follow. The assessment will be done based on predefined rubrics and the score sheet needs to be tabulated. The cumulative score sheet is to be prepared at the end of the semester and the final Skill Development Score is to be computed.

LIB281-3B - MEDIA LITERACY AND CYBER COMMUNICATION (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

We engage with the media everyday. The growth of technology equips people with various tools of communication. This course is designed to teach students how to critically and effectively access, analyze, evaluate and create various media messages. It provides theoretical and practical knowledge to empower students to be active learners in our media-rich environment and to think critically about how media shapes and influences culture. It exposes the students to the essential new media production skills and knowledge needed to create digital media messages for their studies and research, photo manipulation, video/audio production, blogging and podcasting.

Course Objectives

The course aims to help students to:

 

  • Provide an understanding of writing for the cyber media

  • Effectively access, analyse and evaluate online information and digital media

  • Understand the intricate things about writing for web based newspapers, radio and television

  • Detect and examine misinformation and fake news in the media

Course Outcome

CO1: To communicate and collaborate in digital environments using various digital media

CO2: Develop critical media literacy and skills to analyse media content

CO3: Use a variety of apps and Web 2.0 tools to create original, innovative digital products

CO4: Assess the credibility of information found online

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Media Literacy
 

 

  • Understanding media literacy: evolution and development

  •  Definition and Key Concepts of Media Literacy

  • Media Literacy: Nature, Scope and Importance 

  • Sub fields: Digital Literacy and Visual literacy

  • The Media Triangle

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Online story construction
 

 

  • Basics of online story writing

  • Story idea development and updates

  • Feature Writing for Online Media

  • Writing news and non-news contents

  • Developing online project reports with hyperlinks based source quotes

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Content Creation for Social Media
 

 

  • Content Writing for Twitter

  • Content Writing for Facebook 

  • Content Writing for Instagram 

  • Content Writing for Linkedin

  • Content Writing for Digital activism-gender, environment, climate change, sustainable world, human rights

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Fact Checking and verification
 

 

  • Identifying misinformation and Disinformation across the world

  • Misinformation ecosystem in India

  • Misleading Content, Imposter Content,Fabricated Content

  • Fact checking visuals-photos and videos

  • Searching images on other search engines like Baidu and Yandex- Tineye, Reveye

  • Satire and misinformation

  • Google Reverse Image Search

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

  • Mackey, M. Literacies Across Media: Playing the Text (Taylor and Francis, 2004)

  • Hugh Mackay & Tim O’ Sullivan (1999), The Media Reader. London, New York: Sage Publications

  • Baehr, C. M., & Schaller, B. (2009). Writing for the Internet: A guide to real communication in virtual space. ABC-CLIO.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

  • Lasica, J. D. (2003). Blogs and journalism need each other. Nieman reports, 57(3), 70-74.

  • Cross, M. (2011). Bloggerati, Twitterati: How Blogs and Twitter are Transforming Popular Culture: How Blogs and Twitter are Transforming Popular Culture. ABC-CLIO.

  • Meyer, Robinson. „Why It‟s Okay to Call It “Fake News”‟. The Atlantic, 9 March 2018. https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2018/03/why-its-okay-to-say- fake-news/555215/.

  •  Posetti, Julie, and Alice Matthews. „A Short Guide to the History of ‟fake News‟ and Disinformation‟, n.d., 20.

Evaluation Pattern

Course Code and Title


Assessment Details

LIBG281-3B Media Literacy and Cyber Communication

CIA

20 Marks

MSE

50 Marks

CIAII

20 Marks

ESE

50 Marks

 

Group

Assignment

Submission

(Assignment will be
Research based)

Individual

Assignment


Submission

(Assignment will be
Research based)

LIB282-3B - IMMERSIVE PROJECTS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:0
No of Lecture Hours/Week:0
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

All the first year BALIB students are expected to complete 1Immersive Project at the end of their First year. The first year students are encouraged to go for immersive experience which is generic in nature, so that they are able to better understand their interests and strengths as well as weaknesses. The student must complete 12 working days of the same.This will be done through an established immersive program organized by Liberal Arts department in collaboration with the organization. Students must complete a minimum of 12 working days, and submit a weekly report, final report, presentation and viva to get the credits.

Ojectives:

 

    1. To expose the students to an industrial environment (viz. various materials, processes, products and their applications along with relevant aspects of quality control which cannot be simulated in the classroom) for application of existing knowledge in industrial situations, rural communities, ecological care.

    2. To provide possible opportunities to learn and sharpen the real time technical, soft skills, interpersonal skills  and managerial skills required for a professional career.

    3. Understand the social, environmental, economic and administrative considerations that influence the working environment [PO 6, 7]

    4. To expose students to the professional’s responsibilities and ethics [PO 8]

    5. To get acquainted with the working styles of industries at different hierarchy and learn to work in a team [PO 9]

    6. To gain experience in all types of professional communications (viz. Pre-project applications, during work, people skills and documentation skills and post project reports/projects writing skills ) [PO 10]

    7. To demonstrate the impact of the project on their lifelong learning and professional development [PO 12]

    8. To provide the linkages of future job/research opportunities to students in the organisation [PO 12]

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Critically reflect on the valuable life skills gained, by learning the importance of feedback, both positive and constructive.

CO2: Learn to understand the world uniquely, preparing them to navigate the challenges in the society and working towards the solution .

CO3: Develop the ability to learn, and use communication skills, as students learn to use verbal and non-verbal techniques in new ways to deliver their message.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:0
Organization 1 : Grampari ( subject to change )
 

The students of the BA Liberal Arts are required to undertake an immersive experience of not less than 12 days at any of the organizations that focuses on upliftment of society and envioirnment offered by the department.

 

Grampariis the rural development/outreach program of IofC India. The major thrust areas of Grampari are Water, Sanitation, Organic Farming, Governance, Youth, Livelihood, School hand washing with soap programme and training on values-based leadership and character building. All the work carried out in the villages is done with complete transparency with all stakeholders and our approach is of ‘rural development inspired by personal inner change in people’. The activities of Grampari are designed and conducted in partnership with the village aimed at addressing the specific needs of the village and with special focus on creating low-cost sustainable solutions.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:0
Organization 2: Bandhavgarh (subject to change)
 

 

The students of the BA Liberal Arts are required to undertake an immersive experience of not less than 12 days at any of the organizations that focuses on upliftment of society and envioirnment offered by the department.

Bandhavgarh national park is a biodiverse park, in the central Indian state of Madhya Pradesh. It is known for its large population of royal Bengal tigers, especially in the central Tala zone. Other animals include white tigers, leopards and deer. The mix of tropical forest, Sal trees and grassland is home to scores of bird species, including eagles. This place is a good example of being close to nature, understanding biodiversity and sustainable tourism.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:0
Organization 3 : India Hikes ( subject to change)
 

 

The students of the BA Liberal Arts are required to undertake an immersive experience of not less than 12 days at any of the organizations that focuses on upliftment of society and envioirnment offered by the department.

 India Hikes is India's largest trekking organization and has brought modern trekking to India. It focuses on the ecosystem, importance of fitness, coming close to nature and its importance. It emphasizes on collecting waste and disposing it at the correct place, leaving the trails cleaner than before.  

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:0
organization 4 : Rajeev Gandhi foundation (Subject to change)
 

Rajiv Gandhi foundation for immersive experience focuse on developing the following skills :

 

  1. Students will be introduced to the organization's work as per the option selected by the students. 

  2. Students will be given opportunity directly with people to help and uplift them

  3. Students will be given workshop on Rajiv Gandhi Foundation Projects 

  4. Students will be given exposure to experience life of the people for whom the organization is working. 

  5. Students will indulge in Dialogue and Hands on Experience

  6. Provide a space for students to work in for the duration of twelve days of immersive experience

  7. Engage students with supervised field experience

  8. Provide students with supervision and mentorship for the duration of the project

Text Books And Reference Books:

Not Applicable

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Not Applicable

Evaluation Pattern

Students have to submit weekly report till the duration of their immersive experience, final report, presentation and viva. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assessment Requirement

Assessment Task

Weightage

Completing the duration of Immersive Experience

35% 

Weekly Report

10%

Final Report (individual)

25%

Presentation and Viva (individual)

25%

Punctuality 

5%

 

LIBE201-3B - MARKET STRUCTURE AND INNOVATION (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

This course begins by establishing fundamental ways in which ideas differ from other goods. The course then uses these concepts to evaluate the origins of economic growth, the role of science and science institutions, innovation incentives (through market structure, intellectual property, and organizational practices), the diffusion of innovations and their implications for inequality, and the geography of innovation. Though squarely anchored in the economics discipline, the course will also draw on the sociology of science, particularly classic Mertonian frameworks for understanding the scientific incentive system, scientific labor markets, and scientific norms. The course will introduce both macroeconomic and microeconomic approaches for assessing the “ideas production function. Altogether, in tandem with theoretical approaches, this course substantially reviews core empirical literature, including a modern array of methods and data sets that are suited to studying ideas and innovation, and aims to provide students with an extensive toolkit to undertake innovation research.

Course Outcome

CO1: understand how decisions related to allocation of scarce resources and trade-offs are made.

CO2: interpret the mainstream approaches to the study of macroeconomics.

CO3: analyze the market forces and equilibrium determination.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit1: Course Overview and Macroeconomic Foundations
 

 

Nature and scope of macroeconomics; meaning and definition of key macroeconomic variables; Central questions in Macroeconomics; National Income Accounts: GDP – National Income – Personal and Disposable Personal Income; National Income Accounting Identities, Issues in National Income Accounting; Cost of Living Index: GDP deflator, WPI, CPI, Core Inflation; Measures of Cyclical Variation in Output.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
unit2:Labor Markets and the Supply of Innovators
 

 

The Classical Revolution; Wage, Employment and Production; Equilibrium Output and Employment; Quantity Theory of Money; The Classical Theory of the Interest Rate; Policy Implications of Classical Equilibrium Model.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 3: Supply and Demand: How Markets Work
 

Markets and competition; determinants of individual demand/supply; demand/supply schedule and demand/supply curve; market versus individual demand/supply; shifts in the demand/supply curve, demand and supply together; how prices allocate resources.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 4 : The theory of consumer behavior
 

Utility – Meaning and Types, Cardinal Approach: Law of Diminishing Marginal Utility, Law of Equi Marginal Utility, Consumer’s Equilibrium, the consumption decision - budget constraint, consumption and income/price changes, demand for all other goods and price changes; description of preferences (representing preferences with indifference curves); properties of indifference curves; consumer‘s optimum choice; income and substitution effects;  Slutsky equation: Substitution effect, income Effect; Change in demand, rates of change, law of demand; Compensated demand curves.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Dornbusch, R., Fischer, S., & Startz, R. (2015). Macroeconomics. (11th ed.). McGraw Hill Education.

Froyen, R. (2014). Macroeconomics: Theories and Policies (10th ed.). Pearson Education.

 

Mankiw, N. G. (2015). Macroeconomics (9th ed.). USA: Worth Publishers.

McConnell, C. R., & Brue, S. L. (2011). Macroeconomics, Principles, Problems and Policies.  New York: McGraw Hill Inc.

 

Snowden, B. & Vane, H. R. (2005). Modern Macroeconomics: Its Origins, Development and Current State. United Kingdom: Edward Elgar Publishing.

Case, K. E., Fair, R. C., & Oster, S. M. (2013). Principles of Microeconomics (11th ed.). London: Pearson Education Inc. 

 

Stiglitz, J. E., & Walsh, C. E. (2006). Principles of Microeconomics (4th ed.). New York: W.W. Norton & Company Inc., International Student Edition.

 

Pindyck, R. S., & Rubinfeld, D. L. (2013). Microeconomics (8th ed.). New York: Pearson Education.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

McConnell, C. R., & Brue, S. L. (2011). Macroeconomics, Principles, Problems and Policies.  New York: McGraw Hill Inc.

 

Snowden, B. & Vane, H. R. (2005). Modern Macroeconomics: Its Origins, Development and Current State. United Kingdom: Edward Elgar Publishing.

Lipsey, R. G., & Chrystal, K. A. (1999). Principles of Economics (9th ed.). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Pindyck, R. S., & Rubinfeld, D. L. (2013). Microeconomics (8th ed.). New York: Pearson Education.

Ray, N.C. (1975). An Introduction to Microeconomics. New Delhi: Macmillan Company of India Ltd.

Salvatore, D. (2011). Managerial Economics in a Global Economy (7th ed.). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

 

Samuelson, P. A., & Nordhaus, W.D. (2010). Economics (19th ed.). New Delhi:  McGraw-Hill Companies.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA

20 Marks

MSE

50 Marks

CIAII

20 Marks

ESE

50 Marks

Group

Assignment

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

 

Individual

Assignment

 

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

 

LIBE202-3B - CIRCULAR FLOW OF MONEY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

The course aims at providing a systematic introduction to mainstream approaches to the study of circular flow of Money in the current century. It has been designed in such a way that it stimulates awareness on Monetary Policy and policy management in progressive nations. It also aims at developing the ability for objective reasoning about macroeconomic issues.

 Course Objectives

This course aims to help students to:

  • outline the concept of macro economics through some of the major theoretical constructs.
  • summarize and illustrate the various mechanisms of circular flow of income.
  • summarise how heterodox economist see the mechanism of circular flow of income;
  • train students to hone their writing and presentation skills to effectively discuss these complex ideas.

Course Outcome

CO1: Identify the fundamental circular flow of money.

CO2: to illustrate and interpret trends of major macroeconomic variables.

CO3: to create models for testing the macroeconomic theories, estimate the dynamic interactions between macroeconomic variables and predict their impact on the macroeconomy.

CO4: Demonstrate the understanding of concepts related to Unemployment and market.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit1: Course Overview and Macroeconomic Foundations
 

1. The birth of Macroeconomics; Nature and scope of Macroeconomics; 

2.Objectives and instruments of Macroeconomics: Measuring economic success, Tools of Macroeconomic policy; 

 

3. The central questions in Macroeconomics.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
UNIT II: The Monetary System
 

 

  1. Meaning of money: Functions of money, Definitions of Money; 

  2. Classical and Keynesian views on Demand and Supply of Money; Neutrality of Money; Money multiplier; 

  3. The restatement of the Quantity theory of Money; RBI’s approach towards Money Supply in India: 

  4. The tools of monetary control, Policy of monetary targeting.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
UNIT III: Unemployment, Inflation and Economic Policy
 
  1. CPI and Core Inflation, 

  2. Types of Inflation: Demand-pull and Cost-push; Economic impact of Inflation: Short-run and Long-run Phillips curve, NAIRU, 

  3. Backward-bending Phillips curve, Threshold inflation; Taylor rule and policy of inflation targeting.  

  4. The tools of monetary control, Policy of monetary targeting.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Unit IV: Open Economy
 

1. The international flow of goods: Exports, Imports and Net Exports; 

2. Flow of financial resources: Net Capital Outflow; Saving, Investment and International flows; 

3. Influence of policies on trade balance; Prices of International transactions: Real and nominal exchange rate; 

 

4.Real exchange rate and trade balance; Determinants of Real exchange rate; Floating vs Fixed exchange rate; the Impossible trinity

Text Books And Reference Books:

Dornbusch, R., Fischer, S., & Startz, R. (2015). Macroeconomics. (11th ed.). McGraw Hill Education.

Froyen, R. (2014). Macroeconomics: Theories and Policies (10th ed.). Pearson Education.

Mankiw, N. G. (2015). Macroeconomics (9th ed.). USA: Worth Publishers.

Thomas, A. M. (2021). Macroeconomics: an introduction. Cambridge University Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

McConnell, C. R., & Brue, S. L. (2011). Macroeconomics, Principles, Problems and Policies.  New York: McGraw Hill Inc.

Snowden, B. & Vane, H. R. (2005). Modern Macroeconomics: Its Origins, Development and Current State. United Kingdom: Edward Elgar Publishing.

 

Evaluation Pattern

 

Assessment Details

CIA

20 Marks

MSE

50 Marks

CIAII

20 Marks

ESE

50 Marks

Group

Assignment

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

Individual

Assignment

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

LIBE203-3B - ENGINEERING ECONOMICS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

The purpose of this course is to help students gain an understanding of the economic factors inherent in engineering design and decision-making. Any engineering project must be not only physically realizable but also economically feasible. The principal aim of this subject is to provide students with some basic techniques of economic analysis to understand the economic process.

The objectives of the course are to make students:

 

  • Become acquainted with basic economic concepts such as demand and supply, price, competition, interest, taxes, profit, inflation, etc.

  • Develop a significant understanding of the time value of money

  • Develop the ability to apply various methods for economic analysis of alternatives

  • Increase student’s knowledge of the impact that interest, taxes, inflation have on economic and engineering decisions.

  • Develop the ability to estimate project cash flows for design alternatives including tax implications.

  • Understand the fundamentals of profit and loss analysis and benefit-cost analysis.

  • Become familiar with basic accounting statements and concepts such as balance sheets, income statements, depreciation methods, etc.

  • Develop the ability to make replacement decisions.

  • Basic understanding of project risk and uncertainty using sensitivity and break-even analysis.

Course Outcome

CO1: with basic economic concepts such as demand and supply, price, competition, interest, taxes, profit, inflation, etc.

CO2: Develop a significant understanding of the time value of money.

CO3: Develop the ability to estimate project cash flows for design alternatives including tax implication.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit1:Methods of economic analysis in Engineering
 

 

  1. Including time value of money, equivalence, Interest calculations. Bases for comparison of alternatives- Present worth, Annual equivalent, 

  2. Future worth, Internal rate of return, Capitalized equivalent, Capital recovery with return. Selection among alternatives, Break-even analysis.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit2:Description (Include Employability, and Cross-cutting issues)
 

 

  1. Replacement analysis, the economic life of an asset, Retirement or abandonment decisions. Evaluating public activities: 

  2.  The nature of public activities, Benefit-cost analysis, Cost-effectiveness analysis.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit3: Depreciation accounting
 

1.Basic depreciation methods. Basic terminology for Income taxes, Depreciation and Income taxes. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Unit IV: Estimating economic elements
 

 

  1. Cost estimation methods, adjustment of cost data, , Analysis of construction and production operation. Economic aspects of location, Economic aspects of Equipment 

  2. Estimates and decision-making, allowances for uncertainty in estimates  

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

  1. Sullivan W.G., Bontadelli J.A. and Wicks E.M., “Engineering Economy “, 11th ed., Pearson Education Asia, New Delhi, 2001

  2. Leland Blank P.E. and Anthony Tarquin P.E., “Engineering Economy”, 4th ed., McGraw Hill, Singapore, 1998.

  3. Newnan Donald G., Eschenbach Ted G., Lavelle Jerome P., Engineering Economic Analysis, Oxford University Press, 2004.

  4. N.Gregory Mankiw, Principles of Economics, Thomson, 2002.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

  1. Thuesen G.J. and Fabrycky W.J., “Engineering Economy “, 9th ed., Prentice Hall of India, New Delhi, 2002.

Evaluation Pattern

 

Assessment Details

CIA

20 Marks

MSE

50 Marks

CIAII

20 Marks

ESE

50 Marks

Group

Assignment

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

Individual

Assignment

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

LIBE221-3B - INSTITUTIONS AND INFORMAL ECONOMY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The primary aim of this course is to introduce students to the concept of institutions and the informal economy in a global context. The discourse examines the informal economy through the lens of institutional economics. The aim is to acquaint students with significant discourses and issues in policy design and intervention.

This course aims to help students to:

  • outline the concept of institutions and institutional change through some of the major theoretical constructs in institutional economics.
  • summarize and illustrate the various mechanisms of the informal economy connecting the theoretical concept to issues of measurement.
  • examine the linkages of formal and informal economy;
  • train students to hone their writing and presentation skills to effectively discuss these complex ideas.

Course Outcome

CO1: illustrate the major concepts and explain some of the theoretical discourses in the study of institutional change and the informal economy.

CO2: examine how the formal and informal economies are no longer separate watertight compartments but function together as an interactive system.

CO3: apply these complex ideas of property rights and transaction costs to their own research.

CO4: demonstrate their research findings through written and oral presentation.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 1 Institutions and why it matters
 

 

Concept of institutions, Formal and informal institutions, Coordination, cooperation and redistribution problem, The relations of Institutions, Politics and Culture. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 2 Elements of Institutional Economics
 

Contracts and Property Rights: the concepts of exchange and property, a critique of the utilitarian calculus; Transaction Costs, Bargaining Power; Markets as Institutions; Firms and Markets.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Unit 3 Informality: Concepts, Theory and Measurement
 

Informal Economy: An introduction; The Relevance of the Concepts of Formality and Informality: A Theoretical Appraisal; Formal and Informal Enterprises: Concepts, Definition, and Measurement Issues in India; Informality and decent work conditions; How institutions shape the informal economy

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Unit 4 Empirical Studies in Institutional Change and Informality
 

The Impact of Regulation on Growth and Informality: Cross-Country Evidence; Blocking Human Potential: How Formal Policies Block the Economy in the Maputo Corridor; Enforcement and Compliance in Lima’s Street Markets: The Origins and Consequences of Policy Incoherence towards Informal Traders, Social Institutions help the survival of informal sector: the case of small household enterprises in India

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

  1. Smith, Adam, The Theory of the Moral Sentiments, Edinburgh (1759) Available at   http://www.adamsmith.org/smith/tms-intro.htm

  2. Commons, John R. (1931). 'Institutional Economics', American Economic Review, Vol. 21, pp. 648-657.  

  3. Williamson, Oliver, 2000, 'The New Institutional Economics: Taking Stock, Looking Ahead', Journal of Economic Literature, 38: 595-61 3.

  4. Alston, L. J., Eggertsson, P., Eggertsson, T., & North, D. C. (Eds.). (1996). Empirical Studies in Institutional Change. Cambridge University Press.

  5. Misztal, B. (2002). Informality: Social theory and Contemporary Practice. Routledge.

  6. North, D. (1990). Institutions, Economic Theory and Economic Performance. Institutions, Institutional Change and Economic Performance. New York: Cambridge University Press.

  7. Guiso, L., Sapienza, P., & Zingales, L. (2006). Does Culture Affect Economic Outcomes? Journal of Economic Perspectives, 20(2), 23–48. https://doi.org/10.1257/jep.20.2.23

  8. Harriss-White, B. (2004). India’s socially regulated economy. Indian Journal of Labour Economics, 47(1).

  9. Guha-Khasnobis, B., Kanbur, R., & Ostrom, E. (Eds.). (2006). Linking the Formal and Informal Economy: Concepts and Policies. Oxford University Press.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Arias, O., Fajnzylber, P., Maloney, W., Mason, A., Perry, G., & Saavedra - Chanduvi, J. (2007). Informality: Exit and Exclusion. Washington: The World Bank.

Harriss, J. (2008). Explaining economic change: The relations of Institutions, Politics and Culture. The Institutions of the Market: Organizations, Social Systems, and Governance, 309-327. New York: Oxford University Press

Mehta, P. B., & Kapur, D. (2005). Public Institutions in India: Performance and Design.

 

Nayyar, D. (Ed.). (2002). Governing Globalization: Issues and Institutions. Oxford University Press on Demand.

Harriss, J. (2008). Explaining economic change: The relations of Institutions, Politics and Culture.

Das, A., & Mishra, D. K. (2021). Reproduction of Informal Enterprises in India. Economic & Political Weekly, 56(37), 53.

 

Harriss-White, B. (2010). Globalization, the financial crisis and petty commodity production in India’s socially regulated informal economy. Globalization and Labour in China and India: Impacts and Responses, 131-150.

Evaluation Pattern

 

Assessment Details(Submission paper)

CIA

20 Marks

MSE

50 Marks

CIAII

20 Marks

ESE

50 Marks

Group

Assignment

Submission

(Assignment will be
Research based)

Individual

Assignment

Submission

(Assignment will be
Research based)

LIBE222-3B - FINANCE IN THE GLOBAL MARKET (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The players in the foreign market are increasing in numbers with the presence of the much more liberalized policies and regulations. Students need to acquire knowledge on the functioning of trade globally and its financial implications. The course imparts knowledge of foreign exchange activities and the hedging of foreign exchange exposures and other related aspects of risk coverage while doing international business.

Objectives of the caurse

1. To introduce the complexities of internatinalisation of finance

2. To understand the effects of international flow capital

3. To develop analystic skills of students

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate an understanding of the objectives and scope of MNCs and the purpose of foreign exchange market.

CO2: Exhibit conceptual understanding of the effects of economic variables on the foreign exchange and knowledge of the evolution of the global exchange rate system.

CO3: Analyze the causes behind major financial crisis that took place in the different economies of the world.

CO4: Summarize the knowledge on techniques methods of hedging risk for Foreign Exchange Exposure Management.

CO5: Propose international corporate strategies in diversified financial markets.

CO6: Justify different global financial instruments and their functioning and also purpose of recognized world financial institutions

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
UNIT 1 Introduction
 

Internationalization of Financial Markets. The evolution of Multinational Corporation, Role and Functions   of multinational financial manager, Issues and Challenges of Global Business Finance. Theory of Multinational Corporation, Designing a global expansion strategy.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
UNIT II International Monetary System
 

Evolution- Bimetallism, Classical Gold standard (1821-1914), Interwar period, Bretton woods

system (1946-1971), the post Bretton woods (1971 – Present), IMF, The current exchange rate

agreements, Fixed Versus Flexible Exchange Rate regime, European Monetary system,

Emerging Market Currency Crisis- Mexican Peso Crisis (1994-1995), Asian Crisis (1997),

 

Russian Crisis (1998), Brazilian Crisis (1998-1999The currency Crisis of September 1992.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
UNIT III Foreign exchange markets
 

The structure of the FOREX markets, Functions of Foreign exchange markets, The foreign

exchange rates, Quotations, Bid-ask spreads, Arbitrage, Covered Interest Rate Arbitrage, The

Spot Rate, Cross Rates – Spot Market, Forward Market- Currency Derivatives. Parity

Conditions- Purchasing Power Parity, Interest Parity Theory, International Fisher Effect

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
UNIT IV International Financial Institutions and Instruments
 

Basic Concepts: Meaning, Importance and Development. World Bank, International

Monetary Fund, Asian Development Bank. Global Depository Receipts, American

Depository Receipts, External Commercial Borrowings, Foreign Currency Convertible

Bonds.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Södersten, B. (Ed.). (2004). Globalization and the welfare state. Houndmills, Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Abor, J. (2004). Internationalisation and financing options of Ghanaian SMEs. Acta Commercii4(1), 60-72.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Krugman, P. R. (2018). International trade: Theory and policy. Pearson.

Evaluation Pattern

 

Assessment Details

CIA

20 Marks

MSE

50 Marks

CIAII

20 Marks

ESE

50 Marks

Group

Assignment

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

Individual

Assignment

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

LIBF201-3B - INTRODUCTION TO PEACE AND CONFLICT STUDIES (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course DescriptionThis course introduces students to a broad range of issues, concepts, and approaches integral to the study of peace and conflict. Aspects of war system and war prevention, conflict resolution and nonviolence, human rights and social justice, development and environmental sustainability will be discussed. 

Course Objectives: To provide students with  the theoretical empirical perspectives of peace and conflict issues, and apply those to the causes and consequences of conflicts–from the onset to the resolution. It will enable students to understand the multifaceted nature of contemporary conflicts.  

Course Outcome

CO 1: Appreciate Peace and Conflict Studies as an applied social science

CO 2: Identify key terminology, concepts, and theories associated with peace, conflict, and security studies

CO 3: Critically reflect on human evolution of thinking about peace and different approaches to the questions of peace

CO 4: Examine global efforts to restrain war and conflict through collective and common security, ethical and legal restraints on war, and institutions.

CO 5: Critically evaluate the ethics and laws of war, delivery of humanitarian aid, environmental consequences through studying various armed conflicts

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Lineage of Peace and Conflict Studies
 
  1. Evolution of Peace and Conflict Studies
  2. The Philosophical and Ideological Background of Peace and Conflict 
  3. Basic Concepts and Theories: Understanding Peace, conflict, security, and Justice
  4. Levels of analysis in understanding conflict: Individual, Group level, National level

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:13
Understanding sources of War, Conflict, and Violence
 

 

  1. Understanding the Sources of Conflicts: Territory, Resources, Identity, and economy 

  2. Understanding security from military and non-military perspectives

  3. Analyzing interstate violence: democratic peace, power and conflict

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Issues in Peace and Conflict
 

 

  1. Issues of displacement, migration, and 

  2. Refugee in Peace Processes  

  3. Environmental issues and ethics of war  

  4. Gender issues

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:20
People and Institutions in Peace Processes
 

 

  1. Humanitarianism and Conflict Response

  2.  Politics of International Intervention- Conflict, and Peace

  3. Peace Movements : Western and Eastern Perspective (Case studies- Gandhi, Mandela) 

  4. Peace Journalism and Conflict Resolution

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

  • Brown, Michael E, Owen R. Cote, Sean M. Lynn-Jones & Steven E. Miller, eds. Theories of War and Peace. An International Security Reader. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1998

  • Srdja Popovic and Matthew Miller. Blueprint for Revolution: How to Use Rice Pudding, Lego Men, and Other Nonviolent Techniques to Galvanize Communities, Overthrow Dictators, or Simply Change the World. First Edition. New York: Spiegel & Grau, 2015

  • Katz, Neil H. 1989. “Conflict resolution and peace studies.” Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 504:14-21. 

  • Jeong, Ho-Won (2001), Peace and Conflict Studies: An Introduction, Ashgate

  • Lischer, Sarah Kenyon. ‘Collateral Damage: Humanitarian Assistance as a Cause of Conflict’, International Security 28:1 (2003): 79-109.
  • Barnett, M (2011) Empire of Humanity: A History of Humanitarianism

  •  Magone, Claire, Michaël Neuman, and Fabrice Weissman (eds). Humanitarian Negotiations Revealed: The MSF Experience (London, Hurst: 2011)

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Horowitz, David. 2004. “One Man’s Terrorist is Another Man’s Freedom Fighter.” Students for Academic Freedom
  • Bhatia, Michael V. ‘Fighting Words: Naming Terrorists, Bandits, Rebels and Other Violent Actors’, Third World Quarterly 26:1 (2005): 5-22.
  • Abramowitz, S. & Panter-Brick, C. (2015) Medical Humanitarianism: Ethnographies of Practice 
  • Terry, F. (2002). Condemned to Repeat?: The Paradox of Humanitarian Action. The Sphere Handbook: Humanitarian Charter and Minimum Standards in Humanitarian Response (Humanitarian Standards) 2018
  • Abramowitz, S. & Panter-Brick, C. (2015) Medical Humanitarianism: Ethnographies of Practice 
  • Terry, F. (2002). Condemned to Repeat?: The Paradox of Humanitarian Action. The Sphere Handbook: Humanitarian Charter and Minimum Standards in Humanitarian Response (Humanitarian Standards) 2018
Evaluation Pattern

 

Course Code and Title


Assessment Details

 

CIA

20 Marks

MSE

50 Marks

CIAII

20 Marks

ESE

50 Marks

 

Group

Assignment

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

Individual

Assignment

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

LIBF202-3B - PATTERNS OF MASS VIOLENCE: EMPIRES, PEOPLE AND GENOCIDE (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course will look at Genocide – trace its ideological foundations and historical evolution from antiquity to the late 20th century. Genocide is a topic of enormous contemporary relevance, with implications for the construction of national identity and the responsibilities of the international community. While the focus will be on the Shoah (or Holocaust) due to its centrality within Genocide Studies, the course will also look at American, Asian and African cases. The analysis will be focused on the historical, cultural and social contexts alongwith the spatial, cultural and political memories they engender. The course will look at the phenomena of genocide through history. It will explore the causes and course of various episodes of genocide throughout world history, using a comparative approach. The core case studies are Armenia, the Jewish Holocaust, Cambodia and Rwanda, as well as pre-1900 genocides (particularly Native Americans and Africans). The students will analyse how the memory of genocide has been used and abused for political and other ends. This course is designed to challenge and enhance students pre-existing historiographical skills and encourage interdisciplinary awareness. The course concludes by asking students whether historical understanding can help us to prevent genocide in the future.

 

 

 

 

Course Outcome

CO 1: This course is designed to teach students both the importance and limitations of history as an academic discipline, and the dangers of history when misused in the construction of national and other group identities.

CO 2: This course will enable the students to identify the nature of ethnic cleansing and genocide and to discover the common historical, political and sociological threads that unite these tragedies.

CO 3: The discussion and analysis of a series of case studies including, among others: the near extermination of First Nations people by colonisers of the New World, the Armenian genocide, the man-made famines, the Holocaust, the displacement of peoples in the aftermath of the Second World War in Europe and Africa, and the case of ethnic cleansing and genocide during the wars ? will expose the students to the multiple narratives and memories of what constitutes Genocide.

CO 4: Students are forced to confront core disciplinary issues related to the construction of political memory through their study of the makings of Genocide vis-à-vis the attempt to annihilate people because of their membership of a real or perceived group.

CO 5: The students will be made aware of the adequacies and shortcomings in the historians? tools to address this phenomenon, compare episodes of genocide, relate to the disagreements over the fundamental definition of genocide, how societies have constructed ?us and them? dichotomies of difference and how these been mobilized in genocidal projects.

CO 6: It is unlikely that students will enjoy studying the history of genocide. On the other hand, it is almost certain that each student will finish the course with a different perspective on world history and human society.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Theory of Genocide and Mass Killing
 

 

  1. Origins of Genocide: Is it Modern? – Why study Genocide?

  2. Approaches to Genocide: From definition to Process; Genocide and Gendercide.

  3. Antiquity of Genocide: Carthage, Albigensian Crusade, Genghis Khan and the Mongol Hordes – Were these Episodes of Genocide? 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Empires and the Great Game: Complicity with Evil
 

 

  1. Empire Building and the Roots of Mass Murder: Spanish Colonization of Americas; Congo ‘rubber terror’; Armenian Genocide.

  2. Ordinary Murderers and a Genocidal Mind: Nazism, Stalinism, Maoism, Taliban

  3. The Economics of Mass Atrocities: Colonization of Australia and Tasmania; French Conquest of Algeria; Namibian Herero 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Politics of Memory: History of Forgetting
 

 

  1.  Genocide and Morality – Great Irish Famine and famines in British India; Crisis of East Pakistan; Civil War in Sri Lanka

  2.  Meager Reckoning: Soviets in Afghanistan; The Japanese in East and South-East Asia; USA in Indochina

  3.  Meager Reckoning: Soviets in Afghanistan; The Japanese in East and South-East Asia; USA in Indochina

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Collective Memory: Perpetrators and Collaborators
 

 

  1. The Strategic Logic of Mass Killing: Struggle over Historical Memory

  2. The (Im)Balance of Justice: Leipzig, Constantinople, Nuremberg, Tokyo; International Criminal Tribunals – Yugoslavia and Rwanda 

  3. The Labyrinthine Road Map: Standing ‘Peace’ Army; Living with the Ghost, Challenge of Acceptance and Redressals

Text Books And Reference Books:
      • Adam Jones, Genocide: A Comprehensive Introduction, Routledge, 2006.

    • Donald Bloxham and A. Dirk Moses (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Genocide Studies, Oxford University Press, 2010. 
    • Adam LeBor, “Complicity with Evil”: The United Nations in the Age of Modern Genocide, Yale University Press,2006

    •  Alan S. Rosenbaum (ed) Is the Holocaust Unique? Perspectives on Comparative Genocide (Third Edition), Westview,2008.

    •  Dinah L. Shelton (ed) Encyclopedia of Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity, Vol. 1-3, MacMillan LibraryReference, 2004

    • Edward S. Herman and David Peterson, The Politics of Genocide, Monthly Review Press, 2011.

    • Graham C. Kinloch and Raj P. Mohan (eds) Genocide: Approaches, Case Studies, and Responses, Algora Publishing,

2005.

    • Dinah L. Shelton (ed) Encyclopedia of Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity, Vol. 1-3, MacMillan Library Reference, 2004.
    • Donald Bloxham, Genocide on Trial: War Crimes Trials and the Formation of Holocaust History and Memory, Oxford University Press, 2001.
      • Robert Gellately and Ben Kiernan (eds.), The Specter of Genocide: Mass Murder in Historical Perspective, Cambridge

University Press, 2003.

 

 

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

    • Adam LeBor, “Complicity with Evil”: The United Nations in the Age of Modern Genocide, Yale University Press,2006

    •  Alan S. Rosenbaum (ed) Is the Holocaust Unique? Perspectives on Comparative Genocide (Third Edition), Westview,2008.

    •  Dinah L. Shelton (ed) Encyclopedia of Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity, Vol. 1-3, MacMillan LibraryReference, 2004

    • Dinah L. Shelton (ed) Encyclopedia of Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity, Vol. 1-3, MacMillan Library Reference, 2004. ● Donald Bloxham, Genocide on Trial: War Crimes Trials and the Formation of Holocaust History and Memory, Oxford University Press, 2001.
    • Dinah L. Shelton (ed) Encyclopedia of Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity, Vol. 1-3, MacMillan Library Reference, 2004. ● Donald Bloxham, Genocide on Trial: War Crimes Trials and the Formation of Holocaust History and Memory, Oxford University Press, 2001.
    • Robert Gellately and Ben Kiernan (eds.), The Specter of Genocide: Mass Murder in Historical Perspective, Cambridge

University Press, 2003.

 

Evaluation Pattern

 

Course Code and Title


Assessment Details

 

CIA I

20 Marks

MSE

50 Marks

CIAIII

20 Marks

ESE

50 Marks

 

Group

Assignment

Submission

(Assignment will be

Research based)

Individual

Assignment

Submission

(Assignment will be

Research based)

LIBF203-3B - DISRUPTIVE STRATEGIES IN VUCA WORLD (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Many large organizations are having to cede their market dominance to new disruptive players. Well-oiled organizations are hitting roadblocks due to unanticipated problems that are slowing down operations. VUCA is affecting organizations like never before -impacting schedules, delaying deliverables, and causing cost overruns. Managing projects has become a nightmare with the uncertainties and ambiguities of business, delaying integration of allied activities, making the project a non-starter even before it gets off the ground. In this VUCA world, it is imperative to confront the volatile, embrace theunknown, conquer the complex, and understand the ambiguous to be able to predict what lies ahead. This course helps students to understand the tensions in a given situation and how they need to think through a problem from multiple dimensions. The course aims to give students an insight into the mega trends and forces that are impacting their world. Ask what are some of the causes of these trends and their business implications? What can future managers like themselves do about understanding these changing trends, and why they need to address, appreciate, adapt and attempt to manage these changes in their ecosystem? The course aims to introduce some basic VUCA concepts, in order to broaden their world view of management and nature of managing complex problems.

 

Course Outcome

CO 1: Describe and interpret some of the trends impacting our world and explore their ramifications for the world of business.

CO 2: Explain the factors that underlie these increasingly complex problems.

CO 3: Understand the larger context of a problem, while examining some of the details in a more focused way.

CO 4: Learn the ability to identify and analyse a problem from various perspectives and develop a mind-set to appreciate the complex, uncertain and ambiguous nature of problems.

CO 5: Develop own problem-solving mind-set and building future oriented capabilities

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to VUCA World
 

 

  1.  Introduction to Volatility, Uncertainty, Complexity, Ambiguity (VUCA) –Significance –

  2. Challenges in Business - digitalization, globalization, and social inclusion-Benefits &

  3. Barriers in Managing a VUCA World- Millennials in a VUCA & TGIF world-Bridging the generation gap.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Leading in Disruptive VUCA world
 
  1. Leading in a VUCA World: Demystifying the characteristics of the VUCA World

  2. Leadership Challenges of a VUCA World: Understanding and meeting the managerial

  3. Challenges in leading in new business environment- Disruptive Technologies

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Globalization in VUCA World
 

 

  1. Meaning- Definition and Features

  2. Globalization-Advantages and Disadvantages

  3. Socio–Cultural, Political,Legal and Economic Implications of Business in VUCA world

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
VUCA Challenges in Infrastructure Sector
 

 

  1.   Cement Industry, Real Estate, Electricity, Steel, Natural gas, Crude Oil, Coal, etc.

  2. International Markets and its impact on local demand and supply.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
VUCA Challenges in Agricultural Sector
 

 

  1. Horticulture, Cereals, Pulses, Food Processing, Fisheries, Forestry, Export and Import.

  2. Quantity versus Quality issues. Organic Farming.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Challenges in Technology and Economy Sector
 

 

  1. Information Technology Services, Business Process Management, Software Products

  2. Hardware, Artificial Intelligence, Big Data, Privacy concepts. Aadhar, Facebook,WhatsApp and Data Privacy.

  3. Independent contractors, online platform workers, contract firm workers

  4. On-call workers and temporary workers, Association Contracts, The UBER story.

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Bennett, Nathan & Lemoine, G. James. (2014). What VUCA really means for you. Harvard business review. 92.

2. Sattar Bawany (2016). Leading in a Disruptive VUCA World. Accessed from:

http://www.cee-global.com/E-Book_Leading_VUCA.pdf

 

3. Rakesh Mohan Joshi (2016). International Business. Oxford Publications

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

  • https://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/managing-vuca-world.htm

  • 2. Bennett, Nathan & Lemoine, G. James. (2014). What VUCA really means for

  • you. Harvard business review. 92.

  • 3. Mack, O. (2016). Managing in a VUCA world. (Managing in a VUCA World.)

  • Cham: Springer.

  • 4. In Kok, J. K., & In Heuvel, S. C. (2019). Leading in a VUCA world: Integrating leadership, discernment and spirituality

Evaluation Pattern

Course Code and Title


Assessment Details

 

CIA

20 Marks

MSE

50 Marks

CIAII

20 Marks

ESE

50 Marks

 

Group

Assignment

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

Individual

Assignment

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

LIBF221-3B - INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN RIGHTS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course will provide the students a basic introduction to the concept and nature  of human rights, their conceptual and historical foundations.  It will give an overview of human rights philosophy, principles, instruments and institutions, and also an overview of current issues and debates in India and across the world. It aims to explore some aspects of the diverse and increasingly complex body of international law of human rights that has both national and international application. The course also seeks to analyze the ways in which human rights violations occur with a concrete case studies

  • To introduce the students to the basic concepts, elements, and preoccupations of the human rights

  • To engage in philosophical discussion and discourse, and relate it to human rights

  • To acquaint the student with development of human rights

  • To critically examine the human rights issue in the contemporary society

 

Course Outcome

CO 1: Explain the concept of a right, and to analyze the contemporary challenges and trends in human rights theory and practice

CO 2: Demonstrate an understanding of universal values and relativistic values that are culturally determined.

CO 3: Display a good understanding of the nature and scope of special legislations dealing with protection of human rights of marginalised and vulnerable sections

CO 4: Use analytical tools to examine pertinent case studies and relevant global trends.

CO 5: Assess and examine the human rights issues concerning the citizens of India

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Human Rights: An Introduction
 

 

  1. Human Rights: meaning, nature and definition

  2. Development of human rights: Ancient human rights, Modern human rights

  3. World War and the internationalization of human rights

  4. International Bill of Human Rights: Civil and Political Rights, Social, Economic and Cultural Rights Cultural Relativism and Universalisation

  5. Human Rights Treaties

  6. Fundamental Rights and freedom

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Issues of Human Rights
 

 

  • Right to Move

  • Right to freedom of speech and expression

  • Women's right

  • Children's Right

  • Torture and Custodial violence

  • Human sufferings and humanitarian intervention

  • Global human rights movement

  • Rights in relation to environmental justice

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Human Rights in India
 

 

  • Case Study: Journalism, Activism, Right to information, digital rights, citizenship, minority rights, NHRC, Right to Education, Poverty, Health and well-being, Abortion Rights, AFSPA, UAPA law, environment
  • Monitoring techniques: complaint mechanism, information system, right to inspect on the spot, complaining, procedure examination of reports.
  • Future trends of Human rights in India
Text Books And Reference Books:
  • Baxi, U. (1986). From Human Rights to the right to be Human: Some heresies. India International Centre Quarterly, 13(3/4), 185-200.
  • Desai, A. R. (Ed.). (1986). Violation of democratic rights in India. Popular Prakashan.
  • Sharma Subhash. (2018). Human Rights Text and Context. Jaipur: Rawat Publications.
  • Nomani, Z. M. (2000). The human right to environment in India: Legal precepts and judicial doctrines in critical perspective. Asia Pac. J. Envtl. L., 5, 113.
  •  Chatterjee, D. (2011). Dalits rights / human rights. Jaipur: Rawat Publications..
  • Jha, M. (2016). Unveiling the Armed Forces Special Powers Act. Indian Journal of Public Administration, 62(3), 522-532.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Peetush, A., & Drydyk, J. (2015). Human rights: India and the West (First edition.). New Delhi: Oxford University Press.
  • Pollis Adamantia. (2017). Human Rights: New Perspectives,New Realities. New Delhi: Viva Books.
  • Simmons, B. A. (2009). Mobilizing for human rights: International law in domestic politics. Cambridge ; New York: Cambridge University Press..
Evaluation Pattern

Course Code and Title


Assessment Details

LIBF221-3B Introduction to Human Rights

CIA

20 Marks

MSE

50 Marks

CIAII

20 Marks

ESE

50 Marks

 

Group

Assignment

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

Individual

Assignment

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

LIBG201-3B - INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNICATION STUDIES (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Communication Studies addresses critical thinking, communicative concepts and skills, and relational and participatory effectiveness in personal, public, and professional spheres. This is a Communication Studies course and as such, this course will give you the tools needed to dissect your experiences in our communicative world. Specifically, this course introduces you to major issues and perspectives in communication studies while helping you think about and analyze communication in a systematic way. This course will provide an introduction to the study of Communication. It aims to understand how and why we communicate and what impacts communication has on who we are and what we do. Topics include the functions, foundations, models, and modes of communication.  An overview of concepts and processes related to the functions of communication will be examined through current theoretical and empirical research. Emphasis is placed on communication theories and techniques used in interpersonal, group, public, intercultural and mass communication situations.  It focuses specifically on the relevance of communication study today and how different situations and technologies demand the evaluation and application of appropriate communication techniques. Students in the course will apply communication studies to developing applications of communication including business presentations, public speaking, organizational communication, and small group communication.

Course Objectives: 

 

  • To critically analyze written and visual communication texts

  • To Explore communication in different cultural contexts using case studies and personal experience.

  • Analyze the trends and issues in modern society that impact communication.

  • Identify and apply communication theory to adapt to your audience

Course Outcome

CO1: Identify how communication processes shape human thoughts and actions.

CO2: Demonstrate an evidence-based perspective on the structures, processes, and effects of communication.

CO3: Identify and apply theoretical perspectives to understand and ask communication-related research questions.

CO4: Evaluate the strengths and limitations of communication theories.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to the world of Communication
 

 

  • Historical development of communication studies

  • Communication: Definitions, meaning

  • Communication Models and functions

  • Elements of Communication

  • The Semiotics of communication

  • Human Communication- Verbal and non-verbal communication

  • Types of Communication

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Communication Theories-I
 

 

  • Theories of Interpersonal Communication: Expectancy Violation Theory, Social penetration theory, Uncertainty reduction theory, Relational dialectics, Privacy management theory, Social Judgement theory

  • Theories of Influence: Elaboration Likelihood Model, Cognitive Dissonance Theory

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Communication Theories-II
 

 

  • Theories of Mass Communication: McLuhan ‘Ecology’, Barthes ‘Semiotics’, Hall, “Cultural Studies” & “Encoding/decoding”, Katz, “Uses and Gratifications”, Gerbner, “Cultivation Theory”, McCombs & Shaw, “Agenda-setting Theory” Entman, “Framing”, 

  • Theories of Intercultural Communication: Giles, “Communication Accommodation Theory”, Ting-Toomey, “Face-Negotiation Theory”, Tannen, “Genderlect Styles”, Harding & Wood, “Standpoint Theory”, Kramarae, “Muted Group Theory”

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Communication in Practice: Case Studies
 

 

  • Information and Communication Technology

  • Artificial intelligence and human communication

  • Fake news and misinformation

  • Bad News and Good News

  • Communication and Consumerism: Who is the producer and who is the consumer?

  • Global and local currents in Communication

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

 

  • Fiske, J. (2010). Introduction to communication studies. Routledge.
  • Denis Mc Quail (2009), Mc Quail's Mass Communication Theory. London, Los Angeles, New Delhi: Sage publications.

  • Anderson, R., & Ross, V. (2001). Questions of communication: A practical introduction to theory.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

  • Peyton Paxson. Mass Communications and Media Studies: An Introduction. New York. London: Continuum.

  • Melvin De Fluer (1988),Understanding Mass Communication. Boston, Massachusetts: Houghton Mifflin.

Evaluation Pattern

Course Code and Title


Assessment Details

 LIBG201-3B

Introduction to Communication Studies

CIA

20 Marks

MSE

50 Marks

CIAII

20 Marks

ESE

50 Marks

 

Group

Assignment

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

Individual

Assignment

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

 

LIBG202-3B - INTRODUCTION TO MEDIA AND CULTURE (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The synergy between media and culture will be explored in this course. Theoretical perspectives introduced through the syllabus lead to informed critique of media as well as to mindful practice.The course combines cultural studies with media and sociology and explores processes and activities, from local to global levels. This course will introduce the students to the very latest research and theory in the study of our contemporary culture and the digital realm, and how our world is portrayed in the media

Course Objectives: 

The course aims to help students to:

 

  • Understand the role of the media in society.

  • Explain key concepts and debates in media and cultural studies

  • Analyse how media informs and contributes to the formation of identity for individuals and groups in various cultural contexts

  • Enable the students to become more effective media watchers, consumers, and practitioners.

  • Understand the impact and implications of media content.

Course Outcome

CO1: Articulate concepts, concerns, critical debates in Media and Cultural Studies

CO2: Demonstrate an ability to critically perceive and engage with production, signification and negotiation of meanings in media

CO3: Analyse different type of media content through a range of critical lenses

CO4: Examine the representation of different communities and cultures in the media

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Culture
 
  • Culture and society

  • Cultural values, cultural norms and cultural diversity

  • Culture: High culture, low culture and popular culture

  • Mediation of Social Relations

  • Idea of nationhood: Nationhood and gender

  • Composite culture versus puritanical culture


Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Theories of Media and Culture
 
  • Marxist theory of media

  • Frankfurt school of thought

  • Concept of Hegemony, ideology and false consciousness

  • Birmingham school of thought

  • Political economy of media

  • Reasons and Implications


Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Globalisation, Technology and Culture
 

 

  • Technology and culture: an instrument for control and domination

  • McLuhan and theories of technological determinism

  • Globalisation of media culture

  • Global audience- Local culture

  • Global culture: Cultural diffusion

  • Culture in the age of networked society

  • Digital culture

  • Media and Mediation

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
The Politics of Representation
 

 

  • Audience as cultural product

  • Race and Ethnicity

  • Gender and sexuality

  • Media Reception Theory

  • Media and public sphere

  • Orientalism

  • Pop Culture: Film, music, books, comics

  • Indian Cinema: Cultural imperialism, regional cinema

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

  • Hartley, J. (2019). Communication, cultural and media studies: The key concepts.  Routledge.

  • Carey, J. W. (2007). A cultural approach to communication. Theorizing communication. Readings across traditions, Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications, 37-50.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

  • Martin, J. N., & Nakayama, T. K. (1999). Thinking dialectically about culture and communication. Communication theory, 9(1), 1-25. 

  • Kellner, D. M., & Durham, M. G. (2001). Adventures in media and cultural studies: Introducing the keyworks. Media and cultural studies: Keyworks, 1-30.

Evaluation Pattern

Course Code and Title


Assessment Details

LIBG202-3B Introduction to Media and Culture

CIA

20 Marks

MSE

50 Marks

CIAII

20 Marks

ESE

50 Marks

 

Group

Assignment

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

Individual

Assignment

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

LIBG203-3B - INTRODUCTION TO MEDIA WRITING (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is designed to provide basic instruction in writing for print, broadcast and online media platforms. The course would allow students to explore the role of mass media in today’s world and its impact on our daily lives will be included in the course curriculum. It is designed to work on the necessary skills for writing for various media platforms. In the interest of the subject experiences with media professionals and hands-on learning will be provided. Instructional Methods: lecture, discussion, student-directed learning, hands-on production, observation, peer evaluation and guest speakers.

Course Objectives

The course aims to help students to:

  • To analyze how technological and other trends in mass media are transforming traditional concepts of writing. 

  • To examine aspects of content creation across multiple media platforms. 

  • To analyze the media environment. 

  • To apply the numerous styles of writing for mass media.

  • Be able to critically review and modify mass media content.

  • Identify and apply communication theory to adapt to your audience

Course Outcome

CO1: To develop one's personal skills in writing for the media

CO2: To develop interviewing and researching skills that will enable them to gather accurate information

CO3: To demonstrate how media messages could be designed for media consumers

CO4: To experiment with the different styles and to adapt them into gaining knowledge on writing

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Basics of Media Reporting
 

 

  • News Definitions: Concept, 

  • Types of news; Elements, News values; 

  • News sources: Cultivating sources; Brief introduction to newspapers; Kinds of newspapers and magazines; Contemporary changes and problems in the field of Journalism

  • News writing structures: Inverted pyramid, 5Ws and 1H; 

  • Body of the story: Pyramid style, Hourglass style, Focus style; 

  • Writing news stories: Chronology, Balancing stories; 

  • Writing the news lead: Types of leads; 

  • Headline writing: Principles of writing headlines, Different types of headlines; 

  • Reporter: Qualification, Functions and responsibilities.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Writing for Print Media
 

 

  • Writing in the print media; Beat reporting: Crime, Environment, Gender, Weather, City, Lifestyle, Disaster, Election

  • Creative journalistic writing: Features, Interviews profiles, Columns, Human interest stories, Opinion writing, Letters to the editor

  • Editorials: Types of editorials; Reviews: (Book, Movie, Music, Plays)

  • Ethical concerns in writing for media

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Writing for Broadcast Media
 

 

  • Scripting for radio programs: Talk show, Interview techniques, Discussions

  • Promos and radio jingles

  • Characteristics of radio news: Writing radio news

  • Scripting for television; Structure of a news bulletin, News packages, Piece to camera and voice over, Interview techniques, News presentation

  • Writing teasers and promos. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Writing for New Media
 

 

  • Content creation for new media platforms

  • Avenues for online writing

  • Writing for social media: Introduction to blog, Types of blog; Writing for blog

  • Writing for news portal

  • Citizen journalism, Public participation in online media

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

 

  • Kuehn, S. A., & Lingwall, A. (2016). The Basics of Media Writing: A Strategic Approach. CQ Press.
  • Hugh Mackay & Tim O’ Sullivan (1999), The Media Reader. London, New York: Sage Publications

  • Itule, B. D., Anderson, D., & Simon, J. (2006). News writing and reporting for today's media. Simon, James..

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Wysocki, A. (2007). Writing new media: Theory and applications for expanding the teaching of composition. University Press of Colorado.

  • Yopp, J. J., McAdams, K. C., & Thornburg, R. (2007). Reaching audiences: A guide to media writing. Pearson Allyn and Bacon.
  • Friedmann, A. (2014). Writing for visual media. CRC Press.
Evaluation Pattern

Course Code and Title


Assessment Details

LIBG203-3B

Introduction to Media Writing

CIA

20 Marks

MSE

50 Marks

CIAII

20 Marks

ESE

50 Marks

 

Group

Assignment

Submission

(Assignment will be
Research based)

Individual

Assignment


Submission

(Assignment will be
Research based)

LIBG221-3B - ALTERNATIVE NARRATIVES IN COMMUNICATION (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

Alternative narratives are positive, pluralist or progressive narratives based on the intercultural principles and respect for human rights. In the time of fake news, polarisation of debates, hate speech and dividing discourses, they are powerful tools to help the Intercultural populations to speak up and tell their story. These stories should be communicated in an inclusive manner, using language that includes and reaches everyone, regardless of their differences. This is the backdrop on which this course has been designed and developed.

The course attempts to construct communication as an object of intellectual concern and enquiry. It seeks to offer a selected survey of critical humanistic and social scientific theories on human communication. The course is designed to provide students with basic theoretical and conceptual aspects that are necessary to understand mass media’s relation to individuals, society, economy and culture. An attempt will be made to place these discussions in the Indian context.

Course Outcome

CO1: To have a deeper connection to the power of story and its creative attractiveness in terms of one?s own lives and work - how stories continue to have meaning in the present day in new forms like transmedia and webisodes, in older forms like oral storytelling, and in advertisements, marketing and messaging in both the profit and non-profit sectors.

CO2: To identify and articulate some of the most prevalent theories that help us to comprehend why narratives and storytelling is so important in all cultures worldwide.

CO3: To understand how culture affects stories globally, from the fates and gods of the Greek dramas, to religious stories in all cultures, to the community-based frame in many societies, to the individual agency of a single protagonist in much of Western storytelling.

CO4: To cultivate skills in how stories can strengthen strategies for social change and to apply those skills to your specific interests and passions.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Why Stories?
 

Level of Knowledge: Theory/Basic

a)    Stories and Narratives - How stories make us human; structure and theory of Narrativization

b)   Narratives and their beginnings - Origin Stories, Myths, Folktales, Heroes and Villains (in different timelines)

c)    Towards a Theoretical framework: Conceptualizing storytelling and narrativization and its empirical challenges

 

Teaching learning strategies (list all that would be appropriate for the unit in alignment with the COS):

 

Essential readings:

  • Gottschall, J. (2012). The storytelling animal: How stories make us human. New York, NY: Houghton Mifflin, pp. 1-67. 

  • Haven, K. F. (2007). Story proof: The science behind the startling power of story. Santa Barbara, CA: Greenwood Publishing Group. Chapter 1-2, pp. 1-20.

Recommended readings:

 

  • Kaplan, J. T., Gimbel, S. I., Dehghani, M., Immordino-Yang, M. H., Sagae, K., Wong, J. D., Tipper, C. M., Damasio, H., Gordon, A. S., & Damasio, A. (2017). Processing narratives concerning protected values: A cross-cultural investigation of neural correlates. Cerebral Cortex, 27(2), pp. 1428-1438. 

  • Vogler, C. (2007). The Writer’s Journey. Book 1, A practical guide, pp. 3- 23

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Narratives and Methods through the Ages
 

Level of Knowledge: Theory/Analytical

a)   Stories set in Stone - Cave Paintings, Petroglyphs, Sculptures and Inscriptions

b)  Narratives from Currencies across time

c)   Narratives from Material Culture - Buildings, Roads, Everyday items, Clothes, etc

 

Teaching learning strategies (list all that would be appropriate for the unit in alignment with the COS):

 

Essential readings:

  Cole, J. (Ed.). (1983). Best-loved folktales of the world. Anchor.

  • Gopnik, A. (2009). The Philosophical Baby. New York, NY: Picador. Chapter 1-2, pp. 19-73.

Recommended readings:

 

  • Haven, K. F. (2007). Story proof: The science behind the startling power of story. Greenwood Publishing Group. Chapter 6-7, pp. 66-80.

  • Lambert, J. (2013). Digital storytelling: Capturing lives, creating community. New York, NY: Routledge. Chapter 2, pp. 15-24. 

  • Simmons, A. (2006). The story factor: Secrets of influence from the art of storytelling. New York, NY: Basic books. Chapter 1, pp. 1-26. & Chapter 9, pp. 199-218.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Interrogating Narratives and Social Change
 

Level of Knowledge: Conceptual/Interpretative

 

a)         How Narratives Make Us Human?

b)         The Burden of Narratives: Subversion and Rebellion, Social Justice (Case Studies)

c)          Intersections, Interventions and Interstices – Inequality and Discrimination through time

d)         The Question of Agency in Narratives

 

Teaching learning strategies (list all that would be appropriate for the unit in alignment with the COS):

 

  Gottschall, J. (2012). The storytelling animal: How stories make us human. New York, NY: Houghton Mifflin, Chap. 8 pp. 156-176.

  • Boal, A. (1995). Theater of the Oppressed, Rainbow – My three theatrical encounters. 

  • McKee, R. (1999). Story: Substance, structure, style, and the principles of screenwriting. London: Methuen. Chapter 2, pp. 31-66 & Chapter 4, pp. 79-99.

 

Recommended readings:

 

  • Howard, D., & Mabley, E. (1993). The tools of screenwriting: A writer's guide to the craft and elements of a screenplay. New York, NY: St. Martin's Press, pp. 3-94

  • Haven, K. F. (2007). Story proof: The science behind the startling power of story. Greenwood Publishing Group. Chapter 8-9, pp. 81-122.

  • Goodman, A. (2015). Storytelling as Best Practice: How stories strengthen your organization, engage your audience, and advance your mission. Goodman Center, pp. 1-65

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Contesting Norms: Case Studies
 

Level of Knowledge: Theory/Conceptual/Interpretative

a)         Narratives and (re)shaping politics

b)         Finding the space in ‘law’ – Crime and sexuality

c)          (Re)claiming social spaces and Representation in culture – art, music and films

 

Teaching learning strategies (list all that would be appropriate for the unit in alignment with the COS):

 

Essential readings:

  • Jenkins, H. (2006). Convergence culture: Where old and new media collide. NYU press. Chapter 3, pp. 93- 130. (eBook available at USC Libraries) 

  • Reed, T.V. (2005). The Art of Protest: Culture and activism from the civil rights movement to the streets of Seattle. (Murals) Chapter 4, pp. 103-128.

  • Haven, K. F. (2007). Story proof: The science behind the startling power of story. Greenwood Publishing Group. Chapter 10, pp. 123-128. 

  • Tolan, S. (2015) The Flute at the Checkpoint: (Tom Dispatch/Huffpost)

 

Recommended readings:

  Ganz, M., (2011) Accountability through Public Opinion, Washington DC, World Bank Publications, Public narrative, Collective action, and Power, pp 273-289. 

 

  • Singhal, A., Wang, H., & Rogers, E. M. (2012). The rising tide of entertainment-education in communication campaigns. Public communication campaigns, 321-333.

  • Berger, R.J., & Quinney, R. (Eds) (2005) Storytelling Sociology: Narrative as Social Inquiry. Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner Publishers. Chapter 1, pp1-11

  • Murphy, S. T., Frank, L. B., Chatterjee, J. S., & Baezconde-Garbanati, L. (2013). Narrative versus Nonnarrative: The role of identification, transportation, and emotion in reducing health disparities. Journal of Communication, 63(1), 116-137.

  • Wilson, T. D. (2011). Redirect: The surprising new science of psychological change. New York, NY: Little, Brown and Company. Chapter 1-3, pp. 3-74.

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

  • Gottschall, J. (2012). The storytelling animal: How stories make us human. New York, NY: Houghton Mifflin, pp. 1-67. 

  • Haven, K. F. (2007). Story proof: The science behind the startling power of story. Santa Barbara, CA: Greenwood Publishing Group. Chapter 1-2, pp. 1-20.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

  • Kaplan, J. T., Gimbel, S. I., Dehghani, M., Immordino-Yang, M. H., Sagae, K., Wong, J. D., Tipper, C. M., Damasio, H., Gordon, A. S., & Damasio, A. (2017). Processing narratives concerning protected values: A cross-cultural investigation of neural correlates. Cerebral Cortex, 27(2), pp. 1428-1438. 

  • Vogler, C. (2007). The Writer’s Journey. Book 1, A practical guide, pp. 3- 23

Evaluation Pattern

Course Code 

Course Title

Assessment Details 

LIBG221-3B

Alternative Narratives in Communication

CIA

20 Marks 

MSE

50 Marks

CIAII

20 Marks 

ESE 

50 Marks

Individual Assignment 

Submission

(The Assignment will have 2 components related to each other.)

Group

Assignment 

Submission

(Research based)

BBLA431D - THEORIES OF PERSONALITY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course introduces students to the prominent theories of personality within the field of psychology. Students will review various theoretical models, the historical context in which they were developed, and how empirical research has been formed by these theories. The course also aims to introduce students to various indigenous understanding about personality.

 

Course Objectives: This course aims to

      Understand the various theories of personality.

      Gain exposure to various personality tests.

Knowledge on how culture and history have shaped personality

Course Outcome

CO1: ● Compare and contrast various theories of personality.

CO2: ● Critically evaluate different theories in the background of the empirical evidence.

CO3: ● Administer various personality tests and generate reports.

C04: ● Discuss how culture and history has shaped personality

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Introduction to personality psychology
 

Introduction to personality; Definition and concepts;

Early theories- Hippocrates, Sheldon,

Factors influencing personality- Nature-nurture debate;

Assessment and methods of research in personality.

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Introduction to psychological theories
 

Classical psychoanalysis: Freud;

Neo-Freudians: Jung, Adler, Erickson and Horney

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Behavioral and trait theories
 

Behaviorism: Skinner;

Social Learning: Bandura;

Trait theories:Allport and Cattell;

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Humanistic and existential theories
 

Humanistic theories: Abraham Maslow and Carl Rogers;

Existential theories: Rollo May and Victor Frankl

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Theories exploring specific facets of personality
 

Rotter: Locus of Control; Rotter’s Locus of control test;

Seligman: Learned helplessness, explanatory style; 

Zukerman: Sensation-seeking

Text Books And Reference Books:

Schultz, D.P. & Schultz, S.E. (2013). Theories of Personality (10 Ed.). New Delhi: Cengage Learning.

Hall, C.S., Lindzey, G. & Camobell, J.B. (2002). Theory of personality(4th ed.).New York: John Wiley and Sons.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Carpara, G., & Cereone, D. (2000). Determinants, dynamics and potentials. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Friedman, H., & Schustack, M. (2004). Personality (2nd ed.). New Delhi: Pearson Education Pvt. Ltd.

Hergenhann, B. &. (1999). An Introduction to Theories of Personality (5th ed.). New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

Evaluation Pattern

 

Assessment Details

 

CIA

20 Marks

MSE

50 Marks

CIAII

20 Marks

ESE

50 Marks

 

Group

Assignment

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

Individual

Assignment

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

 

BBLA432D - SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course will enable students to understand how people's thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are influenced by the social context consisting of actual, imagined, or implied presence of others. The course introduces students to the existing theory and research in the past and contemporary social settings comprising viz, the intraindividual, interindividual, social factors that influence individual and group behavior.

Course Objectives: To enable students:

      Understand the historical and scientific origin and development of the field in the western and Indian context.

      Understand the development of the self and the dynamics of interpersonal attraction, prosocial behavior, aggression, prejudice, group processes and attitude formation and change in a social context.

Comprehend the nature of scientific methods employed to study behavior in the social context and developing a critical outlook.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: ● Explain the scientific nature of the field and analyze the evolution of the field in various cultural contexts.

CO2: ● Illustrate the role of various factors in the development of the self as well as in dynamics of interpersonal attraction, prosocial behavior, aggression, prejudice, group processes and attitude formation and change in a social context.

CO3: ● Translate and analyze the scientific findings in understanding the social behavior.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Introduction to social psyhcology
 

Definition; History- Origin and Development, Overview, Basic Principles, Advances at the Boundaries;

Theories - Sociocultural, social constructionism, social representations;

Social Cognition - Heuristics, Schemas, Automatic & Controlled Processing, Affect & Cognition.

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Social perception
 

Self-concept – Beginning & Formation, Non-Verbal Communication, Emotions & Social Perception, Multicultural perspective;

Self- presentation - False modesty, Self-handicapping, Impression management;

Self-esteem Development and Consequences;

Perceiving persons- Attribution theories and biases, Integration, Confirmation bias.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Positive social relations
 

Prosocial behavior – Helping influences - Personal, Interpersonal and Situational, Receiving help. Interpersonal attraction and affiliation – Characteristics of the individual, others and situational influences.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Negative social relations
 

Stereotypes – Cognitive foundations, how stereotypes distort perceptions; why stereotypes persist ; Prejudices- Individual differences ;  Types of prejudices – Sexism and Racism ; Reducing prejudice, classism, casteism, racism, identity politics, Aggression, Violence.

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Social influences
 

Attitudes – Definition; Theories – Cognitive Dissonance and Dual Processing; Attitude and Behaviour ; Attitude change.

Group - Basic features; Group performance – Types of tasks, Brainstorming; Group decision making – Biases in information, Group polarization, Groupthink. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Branscombe, N. R., Baron, R.A. & Kapur, P. (2017). Social psychology. Pearson.

Baumeister, R.F. & Bushman, B.J. (2016). Social psychology and human nature. Cengage learning.

Myers, D.G, Sahajpal, P. & Behera, P. (2017) Social psychology. McGraw Hill Education.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Tuffin, K. (2005). Understanding critical social psychology. Sage Publications.

Taylor, S .E., Peplau, L.A & Sears, D.O. (2006). Social psychology. Pearson Prentice-Hall of India.

Brehm, S.S. & Kassin, SN. (1996). Social psychology. Houghton Mifflin Company.

Crisp, R.J. & Turner, R.N. (2007). Essential social psychology. Sage Publications India Pvt., Ltd.

Dalal, A.K. & Misra, G. (Eds.). (2002). New directions in Indian psychology. Sage Publications

Evaluation Pattern

 

Assessment Details

 

CIA

20 Marks

MSE

50 Marks

CIAII

20 Marks

ESE

50 Marks

 

Group

Assignment

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

Individual

Assignment

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

 

BPSY431 - CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is an introduction to the field of Clinical Psychology. The course will provide students an understanding of the nature and scope of the field and assist students in getting a clear idea about the different mental health professions. The course will include an overview of assessment, psycho-diagnosis and research in clinical settings and would also enable students to become sensitive towards ethical, legal and socio-cultural issues in the practice of Clinical Psychology.

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate understanding of the nature of work done by clinical psychologists and other mental health professionals.

CO2: Analyse clinical cases by using multidimensional models.

CO3: Administer various assessment and psycho-diagnostic methods such as MSE, risk assessment and diagnostic formulation.

CO4: Critically evaluate various practice-oriented issues related to the scientific, ethical, legal, and cultural aspects of Clinical Psychology

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Foundations of Clinical Psychology
 

Mental health law in India: Historical & Philosophical background; Nature of discipline: Theory and research; Towards a Clinical Identity: Education & training, professional activities and employment settings, differences/similarities with other mental health professions; Diagnosis and Classification: evolution of classification systems: Overview to DSM and ICD, classification issues; Statistical versus clinical significance.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Models of Psychopathology
 

One dimensional versus multidimensional models: Biological: genetic contributions and neuroscience; Psychological: psychoanalytic, behavioral, cognitive and humanistic approaches; cultural, social and interpersonal factors; lifespan development. The role of an integrative approach. 4P model & Bio-psycho-social models of diagnostic formulation.

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Clinical diagnosis and research
 

Assessing psychological disorders: key concepts in assessment, severity assessment, risk assessment, clinical interview: case history taking, mental status examination; behavioural assessment, psychological testing, physical examination, neuropsychological testing, neuroimaging, psychophysiological assessment.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:20
Critical Issues in Clinical Psychology
 

Professional Regulation and Ethics-legal issues, Cultural issues, Current scenario and future prospect: Problems and promise.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Hecker, J. E., & Thorpe,G.L. (2005). Introduction to clinical psychology: Science, practice, and ethics. New Delhi: Pearson Education.

Pomerantz, A.M. (2008). Clinical Psychology: Science, practice, and culture. New Delhi: Sage Publications.

Trull,T.J., & Phares,E.J. (2001). Clinical psychology: Concepts, methods, and profession

(6th ed.). Belmont,CA: Wadsworth/Thomson Learning.

Barlow, D. H. & Durand, V. M. (2015). Abnormal Psychology: An Integrated Approach (7th ed.). Stanford, CT: Cengage Learning. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Aiken, L.R. (2000). Psychological testing and assessment (10thed.). Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

Anastasi, A., & Urbina, S.(1997). Psychological Testing. (7thed.). Delhi: Pearson Education.

Fernandes-Ballesteros, R. (ed.). (2003). Encyclopedia of psychological assessment. Vol. I & II. New Delhi: Sage.

Freeman,F.S.(1965).Theory and practice in psychological testing. (3rded.). New Delhi:  Oxford and IBH.

Gregory, R.J. (2000). Psychological testing: History, principles, and applications. (3rd    Ed.). Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

Hersen, M., Kazdin, A.E., &Bellack, A.S. (eds.). (1991). The clinical psychology handbook (2nd ed.). New York: Pergamon Press.

Holt, R.R. (ed.). (1984). Diagnostic psychological testing. New York: International Universities Press.

Kaplan, R.M., Saccuzzo, D.P. (2001). Psychological testing: Principles, applications, and issues (5thed.). New Delhi: Asian Books Pvt. Ltd. 

World Health Organization. (1993). The ICD-10 classification of mental and behavioural disorders: diagnostic criteria for research (Vol. 2). World Health Organization.

Evaluation Pattern

 

CIA 1

CIA 2

CIA 3

Attd

ESE

20

25

20

05

30

 

CIA 1: Individual Assignments (Reflective essays, Scrap books, Report Writings, etc.)

 

CIA 2: Mid-Semester Examination(Written Examination)

Pattern:  Section A    5 x 02 = 10 marks (out of 6)

                Section B    4 x 05 = 20 marks (out of 5)

                Section C   1 x 10 = 10 marks (out of 2)

                Section D   1 x 10 = 10 marks (Compulsory)

 

CIA 3: Group Assignments (Research proposals,Surveys, Field Studies, Interventions,Exhibitions, etc.)

 

ESE: End Semester Examination (Written Examination)

Pattern:  Section A    5 x 02 = 10 marks (out of 6)

                Section B    4 x 05 = 20 marks (out of 5)

                Section C   1 x 10 = 10 marks (out of 2)

                Section D   1 x 10 = 10 marks (Compulsory)

LIB202-4B - POST-COLONIAL STUDIES (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

How (and when) was the world divided into two (East/West, Orient/Occident, and later, North/South), and when (and how) did this division assume the form of domination? This course intends to search the roots of this division (and later, a unilateral, cultural, political and economic domination) from the fundamental characteristics of ancient civilisations throughout the globe, to the more recent establishment of capitalism and its gradual ascension to a world order. The concepts of ‘Colonialism’, ‘Imperialism’, ‘Postcolonialism’ and ‘Orientalism’, as well as ‘Westernisation’, ‘Modernisation’ and ‘Development’ will be discussed, expanded and problematized, from historical, sociological, anthropological, cultural, political and psychoanalytic perspectives.The focus will also be on literary responses to colonialism and imperialism and to post- and neo-colonial contexts characteristic of more recent times. In the process – combining the close reading and analysis of literary case studies with the study of theoretical texts

 

  1. Introduction of the concepts of ‘Civilisation’ and ‘Culture’, suggesting different outlooks in Cultural Studies and Social and Human Sciences.

  2. Application of the basic concepts of ‘Colonialism’, ‘Imperialism’, ‘Postcolonialism’ and ‘Orientalism’, to Cultural Studies and Social and Human Sciences as well as the current international political situation.

  3. Recognition of the major encounters between Postcolonial Studies and other transdisciplinary world-outlooks

 

 

Course Outcome

CO 1: Apply basic concepts of ?Colonialism?, ?Imperialism?, ?Postcolonialism? and ?Orientalism?, to Cultural Studies and Social and Human Sciences

CO 2: Recognize the major encounters between Post-/De-colonial Studies and other transdisciplinary world-outlooks, such as Marxism and feminism

CO 3: Apply these concepts to current international political situation, as well as to the domestic clashes within ?Western Democracies? and ?Developing Countries?

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Understanding Postcolonialism
 

 

  1. Postcolonial Studies- Key Concepts

  2. Evolution of Post colonial studies

  3. What is a ‘Colony’? Importing Biological Terminology to History, Political Economy and Sociology

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Typologies of Colonisation
 

India and China (One Civilisation Takes Over another)

 South Africa, Oceania, North America and most South America (One Civilisation ‘Civilises’ PreAgrarian Cultures or Declining Civilisations

 Central Africa and the Amazon Basin (One Civilisation Plunders a ‘Non-Habitable’ [that is, for itself] Area from Afar)

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Stages of Colonialism and Postcolonialism
 

Centralisation, the State, Slavery, Leisure Time and Different Paths of ‘Development’

Colonisation and Capitalism: Colonialism—Primitive Accumulation, Plundering Resources , Hierarchy of Races

The Empire and Capitalism: Imperialism—Capital Exportation, ‘Modernisation’ and SelfDetermination of Nations

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Post Colonial Narrative
 

 

  1. Is East East and West West?: Orientalism—Mimicry, Cultural Transvestitism, Hybridisation and Liminality

  2. Case of the Non-Colonised ‘Orient’: Russia, Iran and the Ottoman Empire

  3. Colonialism: Can the Orient and the Occident (or Global North and the Global South) coexist, peacefully or otherwise?

  4. The End of Modernisation and Developmentalism: The Three-Body (or Three-Worlds) Problem

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Post Colonial Narratives
 

Decolonising the Mind: The Politics of Language in African Literature

Language of Asian countries

West Asian narratives

Readings of Literary Case Studies from these regions will be taken in class

Text Books And Reference Books:

Hamid Dabashi ‘Can Non-Europeans Think?’ in Can Non-Europeans Think?

*Franz Fanon ‘Introduction’ and ‘The Negro and Language’ in Black Skin, White Masks

M. I. Finley ‘Between Slavery and Freedom’ in Comparative Studies in Society and History

Edward Said ‘Knowing the Oriental’ in Orientalism

Bülent Somay ‘Is East East and West West?’ and ‘The First Triangulation: Desire,

Mimicry, Revolt’ in The Psychopolitics of the Oriental Father

Karl Vittfogel ‘Total Terror-Total Submission-Total Loneliness’ in Oriental Despotism

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

  • Homi Bhabha ‘Of Mimicry and Man’ in Location of Culture

  • Franz Fanon ‘Concerning Violence’ in The Wretched of the Earth

  • Nurdan Gürbilek ‘Dandies and Originals’ in The South Atlantic Quarterly, 102:2/3

  • Karl Marx ‘British Rule in India’ in Collected Works, XII

  • Joan Wallach Scott ‘Introduction’ to Politics of the Veil

  • Gayatri Spivak ‘Can the Subaltern Speak?’ in Marxism and the Interpretation of Culture

  •  Meyda Yeğenoğlu ‘Veiled Fantasies’ in Colonial Fantasies

Evaluation Pattern

Submission Paper

LIB241-4B - FOUNDATIONS OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is a comprehensive study of International Relations. It provides a foundational understanding of the theories and concepts of international relations. It will aid the students to analyze the major themes in international affairs and world politics.

Course Objectives

The course aims to help students to:

      demonstrate an understanding of different schools of thought in International Relations.

      develop an ability to integrate the theories and contextualize contemporary global events.

outline the behaviour of nation-states in the international arena.

Course Outcome

CO 1: compare and contrast major schools of thought in International Relations

CO 2: identify various historical events that led to the development of contemporary international affairs.

CO 3: develop an overview of the major contemporary challenges and issues in global politics

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Fundamentals of International Relations
 
  1. International Relations: Meaning, nature, scope and importance
  2. Concepts and Theories of International Relations –Idealism Realism and Neo – Realism
  3. Liberalism and Constructivism.
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Traditional and Non-Traditional Security Threats
 
  1. National Power: Meaning, elements, evaluation of national power.
  2. National Security: Traditional Non-Traditional concept security
  3.   Human    Security: Meaning and Importance
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:14
Approaches to International Peace
 
  1. Concepts and Approaches to Pacific Settlement of International Disputes

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:14
Instruments of Foreign Policy
 
  1. Nature, Objectives, Determinants, Instruments of Foreign Policy.
  2. Diplomacy – Nature, Functions, Privileges and Immunities
  3. Types of Diplomacy. 
Text Books And Reference Books:

Baylis, J. and Smith, S. (eds.)

(2011), The Globalization of World Politics. An Introduction to International Relations,

London: OUP.

Heywood, A (2014), Global

Politics,                      Palgrave

Foundation.

Martin Griffiths and Terry O

Callaghan                     (2002)

International    Relations:         The Key Concepts’.       Routledge London and New York.

Hans J Morgenthau(1948)‘

Politics among Nations: The

Struggle for Power and Peace’, Alfred A Knopf, New York.

Kenneth Waltz(1979) ‘Theory of International Politics’. Addison-Wesley Publications

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Baylis, J. and Smith, S. (eds.)

(2011), The Globalization of World Politics. An Introduction to International Relations,

London: OUP.

Heywood, A (2014), Global

  Politics,                      Palgrave

Foundation.

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

Question Bank

LIB262-4B - SKILL DEVELOPMENT (LOCAL HISTORY_FAMILY HISTORY_HERITAGE PROJECT) (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Today’s generation is confronted with manifold challenges as a result of the rapidly changing economy and socio-political environment. The primarly goal of Liberal arts edcuation is to make students informed and responsible citizen. This coure aims to prepare graduates with skills which will not only make them efficient at their workplace but also nurture them as individuals who would make an effective contribution to the society. This has been done keeping in mind the paradigm shift from knowledge-oriented-approach to learning to skill-oriented-approach that the contemporary era necessitates.

Course Outcome

CO1: Display cross-cultural interactional abilities.

CO2: Conduct several activities which have a positive social impact.

CO3: Construct arguments, activities, and exercises which display a thorough understanding of the best practices in multiple domains.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:4
Adaptability and Flexibility Skills for success
 

 

The unit emphasises on the emerging trends in the field of education and profession with the rapid changes owing to structural/ institutional, technological and infrastructural evolution. Therefore, there is an inevitability to change, either disruptive or productive leading to a point of the situation at “thrive or dive.” The students will be exposed to the contextual 'thrive' or 'dive' that could be better understood with the enhanced self-regulated attitudes/ approaches with the adaptability and flexibility skills either requiring appropriate cognitive, behavioural and emotional adjustments.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:4
Academic Honesty: On Research
 

The unit will focus on the ethical aspects of academic research.  The unit highlights the Academic integrity as the foundation of the learning process and provides discussions on principles of honesty, academic standards, mutual trust, responsibility and respect for knowledge.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:4
Academic Honesty: On Plagiarism
 

The unit is designed to help students understand the importance of academic integrity and to introduce them to the many ways of achieving and safeguarding academic integrity. The unit will also help address issues pertaining to correct citations, plagiarism, and meeting the correct standards of academic honesty.  

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:4
The Virtue of Right Act: Law and Civics
 

 

This unit differentiates (in definitions and practices) 'rights by law' and 'civics by virtue' which are required to form a positive force to building a salubrious society. This is possible by developing reverence towards the state's constitution and ability to critically reflect over individuals civic role in society as a citizen of the same state, acting within its legal framework.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:4
The Ethics of Research: Interviews, focus groups
 

 

This unit will equip students to understand some important principles, methods and guidelines that can help avoid or resolve ethical dilemmas that might occur when conducting research through methods such as focus groups, interviews and surveys. The unit will emphasize on the data analysis, data collection, social responsibility, accountability and mutual respect among researchers, plagiarism, introduction to MLA and APA formatting, integrity and transparency.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:2
Respecting Diversity: Languages in India
 

 

The unit will focus on the cultural diversity that the presence of multiple languages brings to a nation like India. The unit will emphasize on the role of language in shaping both individual and national identity as well as on the need for respecting linguistic differences.

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:4
Respecting Diversity: Communal Harmony
 

 

This unit will equip students to understand the significance of cultural heterogeneity and communal harmony. The unit will focus on concepts such as the multi-ethnicity, cultural reciprocity and religious fundamentalism in Indian context.

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:4
Environmental Sensitivity
 

 

This unit will equip students to understand the current concern about our impact on the environment. The unit will emphasize on the things that they do and how it affects the environment, promote green practices at college and home, sustainable environment practices, knowledge and understanding of the environment and environmental challenges. Apart from giving a global perspective the course intents to sensitize about the current situation and scenario around them.

Text Books And Reference Books:

As may be suggested by the course instructors

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

--

Evaluation Pattern

General Evaluation Pattern: Unit-Wise Continuous Evaluation

 

The evaluation will be based on the assessments formulated by the PTC student-instructors who facilitate each unit in the class. A continuous evaluation pattern will be followed whereby after the completion of each unit, an assignment will follow. The assessment will be done based on predefined rubrics and the score sheet needs to be tabulated. The cumulative score sheet is to be prepared at the end of the semester and the final Skill Development Score is to be computed.

LIBE204-4B - ACCOUNTING SYSTEMS & BUSINESS ANALYTICS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is intended to provide knowledge on accounting practices in sole and partnership firms of the 21st century and equip students with concepts, processes and reporting of financial statements in modern organizations.

CourseObjectives:

The course aims to:

 

  • educate the students about the accounting principles and practices

  • help the students to understand the accounting cycle and the steps involved in the preparation of financial statements.

  • make the students learn the practices of accounting in different forms of business except limited liability companies.

Course Outcome

CO1: demonstrate thorough knowledge on accounting principles and practices

CO2: prepare financial statements of sole proprietorship business

CO3: apply accounting in different forms of business except limited liability companies.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Accounting
 

1. Meaning, Need for accounting, Internal and External users of accounting information, 

2. limitations of accounting, accounting Concepts and Conventions, 

 

3. Accounting Practices, Generally Accepted Accounting Principles, IFRS (concept only).

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Analytics
 

 

Introduction to business analytics, Types of Business Analytics solution, Examples, Components of Business Analytics, Business Analytics Process, Types Analytics problems, Supervised learning, Unsupervised learning

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Descriptive Statistics, Data Preprocessing, Data Visualization
 

Statistics, analytics, data set, measures of central tendency, Measure of Variation or Spread, graph-pie, bar, histogram, box plot, graph by groups, Missing value replenishment, merging data files, Appending the data files, Transformation or normalization, Random Sampling, data visualization, pair plot.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Test of Hypothesis, Normality Test, Analysis of Variance, Cross Tabulation & Chi-Square Test, Correlation
 

 

Basic concepts of hypothesis testing, one-sample t-test, To Test Two Means are Equal, two-sample t-test, Paired t-test, Normality test- 1. Quantile – Quantile (Q- Q) plot, 2. Shapiro – Wilk test, ANOVA, Cross Tabulation, Chi-Square Test, Correlation.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Jain S P & Narang K L. (2014). Basic Financial Accounting, New Delhi: Kalyani Publishers.

 

William McKinney (2017). Python for Data Analysis: Data Wrangling with Pandas, NumPy, and IPython, 2nd Edition.

 

Wooldridge, J. M. (2015). Introductory econometrics: A modern approach. Cengage learning.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Arora M. N. (2013). Accounting For Management. New Delhi: Himalaya Publishing House.

Bhattacharya. (2014). Essentials of Financial Accounting (Based on IFRS) (2nd ed.), Prentice Hall India. 

Gupta, A. (2013). Financial Accounting for Management: An Analytical Perspective (1st ed.), Noida: Pearson Education.

Maheshwari, S.N., & Maheshwari, S.K. (2014). Advanced Accountancy (10th ed.), 1, New Delhi: Jain Book Agency.

Porter, G.A., & Norton, C.L. (2014). Financial Accounting (IFRS update) (6th ed.), Cengage Learning.

Radhaswamy, M & Gupta, R.L. (2014). Advanced Accountancy. 2, New Delhi: Sultan Chand & Sons.

Raman, B. S. (2013). Financial Accounting (1stedi). I & II, New Delhi: UNITED Publishers.

Reddy, A. (2013). Fundamentals of Accounting. New Delhi: Himalaya Publishing House

Shukla, M. (2014). Advanced Accounts, New Delhi:  S Chand Group 

 

Vasudeva, S. (2013). Accounting For Business Managers. New Delhi: Himalaya Publishing House.

Evaluation Pattern

 

Assessment Details

CIA

20 Marks

MSE

50 Marks

CIAII

20 Marks

ESE

50 Marks

Group

Assignment

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

Individual

Assignment

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

LIBE205-4B - CONSUMER ATTITUDES AND COMMUNICATION PROCESS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

This paper is introduced to equip the students with modern trends and courses in the field of consumer behaviour. This paper provides a broad overview of the very interesting phenomena of the behaviour of consumers.

The course aims to help students to:

 

  • Understand the importance of interdisciplinary perspective.

  • Emphasize the role of psychological factors on people’s economic activity.

  • Understand the process of decision-making involved in consumer behaviour.

Course Outcome

CO1: Explain the role of psychological factors in predicting people's economic activity.

CO2: Analyze the role of psychological and social factors in predicting consumers' decision-making process.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction and overview
 

 

Definition of Consumer Behaviour, scope, marketing concepts, customer value, customer satisfaction, and retention; Market segmentation: meaning of market segmentation, bases for segmentation; Product positioning: meaning and types.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Factors Influencing Consumer Behaviour
 

 

Consumer motivation: needs, goals, arousal, applications, and evaluation; Consumer perception; Consumer learning:elements and measures of consumer learning theory.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Consumer Attitudes and Communication Process
 

 

Attitudes: meaning, attitude formation, strategies of attitude change; Marketing communication: components of communication,communication process, designing, and persuasive communication.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Consumer in their social and cultural settings
 

Reference Groups: meaning and power of reference group, types of reference groups, family, life-cycle, consumption rules; Social class: nature, social class categories: affluent consumer, middle class, techno class, and applications of social class; Culture: influence of consumer behaviour, geographic and regional cultures.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Schiffman. L., G. & Wisenblit. J. (2015). Consumer Behaviour (11th Ed)., Pearson Publication. USA.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

Foxall, G, & Ronald, G, E. (1997) Consumer Psychology for Marketing, International Thomson Business Press, London.

Evaluation Pattern

 

Assessment Details

CIA

20 Marks

MSE

50 Marks

CIAII

20 Marks

ESE

50 Marks

Group

Assignment

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

Individual

Assignment

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

LIBE206-4B - EDUCATION, EQUITY AND INCOME DISTRIBUTION (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

As education in every sense is one of the fundamental factors of development, this course is designed to understand the various nuances of education and development. No country can achieve sustainable economic development without substantial investment in human capital. Education enriches people’s understanding of themselves and the world. It improves the quality of their lives and leads to broad social benefits to individuals and society. Education raises people’s productivity and creativity and promotes entrepreneurship and technological advances. In addition, it plays a very crucial role in securing economic and social progress and improving income distribution. So, this course serves as a foundation course for carrying out research on education and development.

Course Objectives:

The course aims to help students to:

 

  • develop an understanding of the link between education and economic development. 

  • comprehend the role of education in bringing about equity and social welfare.

  • relate the main political, economic, and social processes that influence education.

  • developing an insight of the educational policies in India.

Course Outcome

CO1: comprehend the relationship between education and economic development.

CO2: outline the role of education in bringing about equity and social welfare.

CO3: examine the market for teachers and its contribution to economic development.

CO4: demonstrate critical understanding of the educational policies in India.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction and overview
 

1. Introduction; role of education in economic development: access to education and purpose of Education – 

2. A comparison across countries, education outcomes and their relationship with macroeconomic performance, 

 

3. Education as consumption and Education as individual, social and national investment; Education as an industry

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Return on education: A theoretical approach
 

 

  1. Concept of Returns to education - Non-pecuniary benefits; social returns of education; Scientific management and education; 

  2. Cost Effectiveness Analysis in Education. Difference between Cost-benefit and Cost –Effectiveness Analysis; 

  3. Theories: Human capital and job signalling theories; returns due to job signalling versus returns due to human capital- a comparison.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Education, Equity and Income Distribution
 
  1. Educational equity measures (a) the equal opportunity criterion (b) the cost – benefit criterion, and (c) the ability to pay criterion; 

 

  1. Education as a determinant of income variance, and the relevant contribution of different levels of education.  

  2. Spill-over and inter-generational effects of education; Discrimination and diversity. (Caste, Gender, Ethnic); Equity and Social justice.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Market for teachers
 

 

  1. Meaning and purpose of Economics of Teacher provision, changing labour market in India- Demand and supply aspects for teachers and problems associated with the estimation; 

  2. Choice of profession -gender perspective, relationship between teacher quality and teachers’ salaries. 

  3. Significance of teachers in promoting national economic development. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Krueger, A. and Lindahl, M. Education for Growth: Why and For Whom? Journal of Economic Literature, 39(4) 2001.

Bowels S and Gintis H, 1975, “The problem with Human Capital Theory- A Marxian Critique”, American Economic Review 65(May).

Boyd, D., et al. (2013). Analyzing the determinants of the matching of public-school teachers to jobs: Disentangling the preferences of teachers and employers. Journal of Labor Economics, 31(1): 83-117.

Chalam K.S, “Modernisation and Dalit Education: Ambedkar’s vision”, Rivat Publications, Jaipur, 2008.

Clark, D. and Martorell, P. (2014). The signaling value of a high school diploma. Journal of Political Economy 122(2): 282-318.

 

Cohn and Geske (1990), “The Economics of Education”, Butterworth-Heinemann; Subsequent edition. Ch.1.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Dolton, P. (2006). Teacher supply. In Handbook of the Economics of Education. Vol. 2, edited by Eric Hanushek and Finis Welch, 1051–78. Amsterdam: Elsevier: Amsterdam.

Ehrenberg, R., Pieper, P., and Willis, R. (1998). Do economics departments with lower tenure probabilities pay higher faculty salaries? Review of Economics and Statistics, 80(4): 503-512.

Figlio, D. 2002. Can public schools buy better-qualified teachers? Industrial and Labor Relations Review, 55 (4): 686–99.

Flyer, F., and Rosen, S. (1997). The new economics of teachers and education. Journal of Labor Economics, 15 (1): S104–39.

Foster P, “ The Contribution of Economic to Development”   Ed by Psacharopoulos . G. (1987).

 

Friedman Milton - The role of Government in Education in Economics and the Public Interest, ed. Robert A. Solo (1955).

Gary S. Becker, 1964, “Human Capital: A theoretical and Empirical Analysis with Special Reference to Education “,  the University of Chicago Press, third edition.

Greenberg, D. and McCall, J. (1974). Teacher mobility and allocation. Journal of

Hanushek, E., and Rivkin, S. (2006). Teacher quality. In Handbook of the Economics of Education. Vol. 2, edited by Eric Hanushek and Finis Welch, 1051–78. Amsterdam.

Harry Cleaver, “Against Speedup: Some Materials offered as a Contribution to the Discussion of the Application of an Industrial Management Technique to Higher Education”,(1996).

Hicks N L, “ Education and Economic growth in Economics of Education” Ed by Psacharopoulos . G. (1987).

Hoxby, C. (2000). Does competition among public schools benefit students and
taxpayers? American Economic Review, 90(5):1209–1238.

Human Resources, 9(4): 480-502.

McPherson, M. and Winston, G. (1983). The economics of academic tenure: A relational perspective. Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, 4(2-3): 163-184.

National Education Policy- 1986, Govt. of India.

Nietzsche, “ The Future of Our Educational Institutions” (1872), critical excerpts on “efficient” state management of education.

Patnaik Prabhat, 2005: “Education and Globalisation”, Social Scientist, 33, September- October.

Sadgopal Anil : Common School System: “Do we have an option” Janata Magazine, 63, june 2008, Mumbai.

Spence, M. (1973). Job market signaling. Quarterly Journal of Economics, 87(3): 355-374.

 

Stiglitz, J. (1975). The theory of ‘screening,’ education and the distribution of income.
American Economic Review, 65(3): 283-300.

Evaluation Pattern

 

Assessment Details

CIA

20 Marks

MSE

50 Marks

CIAII

20 Marks

ESE

50 Marks

Group

Assignment

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

Individual

Assignment

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

LIBE223-4B - LABOUR MARKET ANALYSIS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course aims at providing the students with a basic understanding of the microeconomic aspect of labour theories and labour market situations of the country. The students have to understand the labour market structure, wage determination, unemployment, the growth pattern and the changes that have taken place in the labour regulations of the country. The course also aims to introduce the various data available in the field of labour and employment, such as NSS data on employment and unemployment, that will enable the students to associate real situations with theories.

Course Objectives:

The course aims to help students to:

• apply microeconomic analysis to important labour market processes and outcomes.

• expose the students to a wide range of empirical issues in the Indian labour market.

 

• sensitize the students to the role of the government in the labour market.

Course Outcome

CO1: To understand the basic concept and theories used in labour economics.

CO2: The students will have knowledge of the microeconomic aspect of the labour market and a broad picture of the labour market of the country.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Labour Economics
 

Unique features of the labour market; Participants in the labour market; Labour market terminologies; Labour in classical, neo-classical and Keynesian analysis; Evolution of labour economics as a discipline post 1945; Classification of labour markets; Positive and normative economics in the context of labour markets; Labour markets and Pareto efficiency; Causes of labour market failure.

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Wage and Labour Market Discrimination
 

 

Wage concept and Definitions; minimum wage, living and fair wages; Methods of wage payment: time and piece wage; Wage policy; Objective and importance; Evolving wage structure and differentials in India, productivity-wage relationship in India; Labour market discrimination; Economic analysis of labour market discrimination; Employer and Employee discrimination, Statistical discrimination; measuring discrimination- the Blinder-Oaxaca model.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Employment, Unemployment and Labour Mobility
 

Determinants of employment and unemployment, Measurement issues; the human capital model, modified human capital model; the added worker and discouraged worker hypothesis; segmented labour market; job search and vacancy analysis; Gender and employment; Unemployment, causes and consequences – technology and employment – Recent trends of employment and unemployment in India; Determinants of labour mobility and migration, Offshoring-Onshoring trends and Visa policies in India.

 

Role of regulations in labour markets, Economic case for labour market regulations- Labour regulations in India-its impact and their enforcement-Trade unions in India-Factors affecting their growth and measures to help maintain union relevance- ILO Core Labour Standards and its impact on Indian Labour Policy- Recent trends in Working conditions- Social security and Insurance- Welfare Funds-Employment Exchanges-Vocational education and training.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Borjas, G. J., (2005) Labor Economics. (3rd ed). Boston, MA: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.

Ehrenberg, R. G., & Smith, R.S. (2012). Modern Labour Economics: Theory and public Policy. (11th ed.). New York: Prentice Hall.

 McConnell, C. R; Stanley, L.B & MacPherson., (2017). Contemporary Labor Economics, (11th ed), New York: McGraw-Hill.

Reynolds, Lloyd. G., & Masters, S. H. (1997). Labour Economics and Labour Relations (11th ed), New York: Pearson.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Ashenfelter, O., & Card, R. (2011). The Hand book in Labor Economics. (Vol. 4A), New York: North-Holland.

Ashenfelter, O., & Layard. R. (1986). The Hand book in Labor Economics. (Vol.1) New York: North-Holland.

Ashenfelter, O., & Layard. R. (1999). The Hand book in Labor Economics. (Vol.3A, 3B, & 3C). New York: North-Holland.

Becker, G. S., (1992). Human Capital: Theoretical and Empirical Analysis with Special Reference to Education (3rd ed.). Chicago:

University of Chicago Press.

Cahuc, P. &Zilberberg, A. (2004). Labour Economics, MIT: MIT Press.

Helfgott, R. B. (1974). Labour Economics, New York: Random House.

Khasnobis, G. B., Kanbur. R., & Ostrom, E. (2006). Linking the Formal and Informal Economy. Oxford University Press.

Prasad, B. (2015). Labour Economics, New Delhi: Anmol Publications Pvt Ltd.

Ramaswamy, K. V. (2015). Labour, Employment and Economic Growth in India, New Delhi: Cambridge University Press.

Schneider, F., &Enste., D. H., (2004). The Shadow Economy: An International Survey. Cambridge University Press.

 

Smith, S. (1994). Labour Economics, Routledge, London.

Evaluation Pattern

 

Assessment Details

CIA

20 Marks

MSE

50 Marks

CIAII

20 Marks

ESE

50 Marks

Group

Assignment

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

Individual

Assignment

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

LIBE224-4B - FUNDAMENTALS OF ECONOMETRICS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to basic econometric concepts and techniques of econometric analysis through a step-by-step approach. The course begins with an introduction to the definitions and scope of econometrics. Then students will be introduced to simple as well as multiple linear regression models and the fundamental assumptions of Classical Linear Regression Modelling. The causes, consequences and remedies for the assumption violations viz. Heteroskedasticity, Autocorrelation and Multicollinearity are then discussed. There is a separate unit to introduce students to the use of dummy variables in econometric analysis. The course also covers the consequences of and tests for misspecification of regression models.

CourseObjectives

This course has been conceptualised in order to provide learners with:

 

  • a comprehensive introduction to basic econometric concepts and techniques. 

  • an in-depth understanding of simple as well as multiple linear regression models.

  • the knowledge and skillset to understand and examine the CLRM assumption violations and specification errors.

  • an introduction to dummy variables and its use in econometric modelling. 

Course Outcome

CO1: define and explain the fundamental econometric concepts.

CO2: construct and estimate simple as well as multiple linear regression models.

CO3: examine the assumption violations and specification errors, and formulate ways to overcome the same.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction- Simple Linear Regression
 

 

  1. Definition and scope of econometrics; Methodology of econometric research; Historical origin of the term regression and its modern interpretation; Statistical vs. deterministic relationship; regression vs. causation, regression vs. correlation; 

  2. Terminology and notation; The nature and sources of data for econometric analysis.

  3. Two Variable Case Estimation of model by OLS method: Assumptions; Properties of Least Square Estimators: Gauss-Markov Theorem; 

  4. Testing of regression coefficient; Test for regression as a whole: Coefficient of determination.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Multiple Linear Regression Model
 

 

  1. Multiple Regression Analysis: The problem of estimation, notation and assumptions; meaning of partial regression coefficients;

  2.  the multiple coefficients of determination: R2 and the multiple coefficients of correlation; R2 and adjusted R2; partial correlation coefficients; interpretation of multiple regression equation. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Relaxing the Assumptions of CLRM
 

 

Introduction to Multicollinearity, Heteroscedasticity & Autocorrelation: the nature of the problem; its detection and corrective measures.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Model Specification Errors
 

 

  1. Omitted Variables and test; Irrelevant Variables; Misspecification of the functional form; 

  2. Alternative functional forms; Errors of Measurement: Outliers; Leverage and Influence data

Text Books And Reference Books:

Wooldridge, J. M. (2014). Introductory Econometrics: A Modern Approach (4th ed.). New Delhi: Cengage Learning.

Bhaumik, S. K. (2015). Principles of Econometrics: A Modern Approach using EViews. New Delhi: Oxford University Press

Gujarati, D. N. (2016). Econometrics by Example (2nd ed.). New Delhi: Palgrave.

Gujarati, D. N., Porter, D.C., & Gunasekar, S. (2017). Basic Econometrics. (5th ed.). New Delhi: McGraw-Hill.

Studenmund, A. H. (2016). Using Econometrics: A Practical Guide. (7th ed.). New Delhi:  Pearson.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Dougherty, C. (2016). Introduction to Econometrics (5th ed.). New York: Oxford University Press.

Koutsoyiannis, A. (1973). Theory of Econometrics (2nd ed.). New York: Harper & Row.

 

 

Sheffrin, S. M. (1996). Rational Expectations (2nd ed.). Cambridge:  Cambridge University Press

Evaluation Pattern

 

Assessment Details

CIA

20 Marks

MSE

50 Marks

CIAII

20 Marks

ESE

50 Marks

Group

Assignment

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

Individual

Assignment

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

LIBF204-4B - CONFLICT RESOLUTION: TOOLS OF DIPLOMACY, MEDIATION AND NEGOTIATION (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

The course will provide theoretical background concerning the institutions and processes of international diplomacy, including diplomatic practice, international negotiation, conflict mediation, and public diplomacy, as well as the conduct of diplomacy in international and regional bodies. It will introduce students to international law allowing them to have an understanding of how international law informs, regulates and sometimes constrains the conduct of diplomacy.

Course Outcome

CO 1: Examine and engage with some of the critical economic, legal, ethical, and political dilemmas that face nation-states and decision makers in the aspects of conflict.

CO 2: Demonstrate an understanding of the cases, practices, successes, and challenges of conflict assessment and prevention.

CO 3: Gain a deep understanding of the processes and outcomes of international negotiation.

CO 4: Analyze trends, issues, debates, and dilemmas in mediation and negotiation processes in conflict-prone zones

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
An Overview of Conflict, and Strategies and Methods of Conflict Resolution
 

 

  1. A conceptual introduction to conflict. Looking at the curve of conflict

  2. Understanding power, culture and conflict in resolution process. 

  3. Understanding cooperation and conflict resolution  

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Negotiation, Mediation and Reconciliation
 

 

  1. Understanding negotiation, mediation, and reconciliation 

  2. Actors in Negotiation, and mediation: role of states and non-state actors  

  3. Obstacles and challenges in the process

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Track II and Track III Diplomacy
 
  1. Importance of track II and track III diplomacy 

  2. Power of people, culture, and institutions in mediation  

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Sustainable Peace
 

 

  1. Ideas around sustainable peace:  What does it take to live in peace? How to ensure that conflict resolution processes work? 

  2. Understanding the role of technology to sustain peace 

Text Books And Reference Books:

G.R.Berridge, Diplomacy: Theory and Practice, Palgrave Macmillan, Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire and New York, 2015 (chapters 2-6, 8, 11, 12)

Charles, Fred, How Nations Negotiate. New York: Harper & Row 

Lewicki, R. J., & Tomlinson, E. C. (2014). Negotiation. In Peter T. Coleman, Morton Deutsch and Eric C. Marcus (Eds.) The Handbook of Conflict Resolution: Theory and Practice (3rd Edition). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Kressel, K. (2014). The Mediation of Conflict: Context, Cognition, and Practice. In Peter T. Coleman, Morton Deutsch and Eric C. Marcus (Eds.) The Handbook of Conflict Resolution: Theory and Practice (3rd Edition). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Burgess and Burgess. 2010. Conducting Track II Peacemaking. United States Institute of Peace Washington, D.C.  

 

Busch, Dominic. 2022. The Routledge Handbook of Intercultural Mediation. Routledge

Website: The Sustaining Peace Project. http://sustainingpeaceproject.com/

Reading: Deutsch, M. and Coleman, P. T. (2012). The psychological components of sustainable peace: An introduction. In Coleman, P. T. & Deutsch, M. (Eds., July, 2012). The Psychological Components of a Sustainable Peace. Springer Books

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Andrew F.Cooper, Jorge Heine, Ramesh Thakur (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Modern Diplomacy, Oxford University Press, Oxford UK 2013 (chapters 2, 46)

 

LeBaron, M. L. (2014). The Alchemy of Change: Cultural Fluency in Conflict Resolution. In Peter T. Coleman, Morton Deutsch and Eric C. Marcus (Eds.) The Handbook of Conflict Resolution: Theory and Practice (3rd Edition). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Brigid Starkey, Mark A.Boyer, and Jonathan Wilkenfend, International Negotiation in a Complex World, Rowman & Littlefield, Lanham MD 2016 IV ed., chapters 1-6)

Michael Greig and Paul F.Diehl, International Mediation, Polity, Cambridge UK 2012

 

Coleman, P. T. and Ferguson, R. (2014). Making Conflict Work: Harnessing the Power of Disagreement. New York: Houghton-Mifflin-Harcourt. 

Esra Cuhadar, Thania Paffenholz, Transfer 2.0: Applying the Concept of Transfer from Track-Two Workshops to Inclusive Peace Negotiations, International Studies Review, Volume 22, Issue 3, September 2020, Pages 651–670, https://doi.org/10.1093/isr/viz031

 

Cohen, Raymond. 1997. Negotiating Across Cultures: International Communication in an Interdependent World

 

Wählisch, Martin, 'Parameters of Sustainable Peace: UN Frameworks and Practice', in Carsten Stahn, and Jens Iverson (eds), Just Peace After Conflict: Jus Post Bellum and the Justice of Peace (Oxford, 2020; online edn, Oxford Academic, 18 Mar. 2021), https://doi.org/10.1093/oso/9780198823285.003.0004, accessed 21 Mar. 2023.

Evaluation Pattern

 

Assessment Details:

 

Course Code and Title


Assessment Details

 

CIA

20 Marks

MSE

50 Marks

CIAII

20 Marks

ESE

50 Marks

 

Group

Assignment

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

Individual

Assignment

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

LIBF205-4B - POST-COLONIAL SOUTH ASIA (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course covers the South Asian history through the edifice of the post-colonialism till date. We proceed chronologically and cover some of the major political, social, religious, and cultural developments in late-colonial South Asia and decolonisation process. Students will be exposed to primary sources, written and documented by a diverse array of people, as well as the politics of identities in the present day. Students will also learn about the practices of postcolonial history more broadly, including how to gauge paradigm shifts and identity narratives to conduct basic research on contemporary South Asia

Course Outcome

CO 1: Acquire basic knowledge of South Asian history through the decolonisation, from 20th century to 21st century , including major political, social, religious, and cultural developments.

CO 2: Learn strategies for approaching and making sense of primary historical sources to understand and evaluate scholarly arguments.

CO 3: Formulate historical questions and identify the means of investigating those queries to assess different types of historical evidence and posit a grounded thesis.

CO 4: Appreciate the role of history and historical memory in present-day debates.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Decolonisation of South Asia
 
  1. End of the British Colonialism in Indian Sub-continent and Birth of new states - India, Pakistan - Liberation of Bangladesh - Ghosts of politics - Refugee issues - Case Study: Muhajir, Bangal, Punjabi, Sindhi, Afghani, Rohingya, ‘Stranded Pakistani’

  2. End of the British Colonialism in Sri Lanka, Myanmar - Nationalism - Identities - Refugee issues - Case Study: Tamilians in Srilanka, Bengali refugees from Burma, Rohingya issue.

  3. Peripherial States of British Indian Empire: Afghanistan, Nepal, Bhutan, Maldives - Poltical Border vs Cultural Border - Case Study: Kabulwala, Gurkha, Madhesia, Bhupali, Mali. 

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Postcolonial South Asia : Challenge, Deterrence and Stabilisation
 

 

  1. Making the Constitution and its Review: the politics of planning and rural reconstruction - Postcolonial nationalism and Conservatism

  2. Language and political identity - Caste and other Ethnic movements - Religion and politics: Rise of Majoritarian Fundamentalism.  

  3. One-party Dominance - the Emergency in India, Military Coups in Pakistan, Bangladesh, Srilanka, Myanmar - Civil Wars: Case Study: Naxalbari in India, LTT in Sri Lanka, Razakar in Bangladesh, Maoist in Nepal

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
South Asia as the Third world
 

 

  1. South Asia as a Region: Main Characteristics of the South Asian Region - Stimulators of South Asian Cooperation - South Asian Regional Identity: Composition, aspiration and Constraints

  2. Orientalism to Asian Regionalism: Anti-Colonial, Nationalist Legacy -  Afro-Asian unity and consolidation of anti-colonial movement. A Search of third-way in the cold-war divided World - Non-Alignment to SAARC

  3. Concept, Approaches and Theories of Regional Cooperation: - Cultural uniformity and Economic necessity as factors in Regional cooperation - Case study: Vietnam, Myanmar, Indonesia, Thailand

  4. Regional cooperation in the post-cold war globalized World - Emergence of Regional Economic integration in culturally uniform regions - ‘Third World’ Organizations like SAARC, OPEC, ASEAN, BIMSTEC, MGC as regional players and international stakeholders.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Globalisation and its impact in South Asia
 

 

  1.  

    1.  Globalization and Liberalization in South Asia and its impact - Multinational Companies, World Bank, IMF.

    2. Information Revolution - Emerging trends in culture, Media and consumption 

    3. Changing World: Unipolarism or multipolarism; US as a global policeman - The China Factor; Current threats confronting the South Asia - Ethnic Clashses and Cross border Terrorism 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Comparative Environmental History of South Asia: Nature, Culture and Neo-imperialism
 

 

  1. Historical Discourse of Environmentalism in South Asia - Global environmental history from Glacken to Crosby on ecological imperialism - Climate anomalies and ecological destruction in Colonial South Asia - Debates over Environmental Degradation

  2. History of the British Forest policy in South Asia - Expansion of the Railways - Forest Acts, Conservation, Law and Forest Tribes - collective resistance.; The flora and fauna – desiccation and changes in the 19th, 20th, an 21st centuries; Forest knowledge – Case Study: Nilgiri Forest in Deccan Trap, Sundarbans in Ganga Delta, Advani Forest of Kumaon, World Rain Forest Movement - Forest Politics in Contemporary South Asia.

  3. Colonial scientists, the mechanisms of a global climate and the Tropical diseases - Endemic, Epidemic and the British Indian Empire - al management of forests, and its impact on the indigenous people, 

  4. The Colonial Scientific Community and the Water Resources: Coasts, Rivers, Canals, and Dams in South Asia. - McNamara’s Big Dam Projects - ‘Big is Beautiful’ in South Asia - North-South politics of global environmental issues. 

Text Books And