Department of ENGLISH AND CULTURAL STUDIES

Syllabus for
Bachelor of Arts (Liberal Arts)
Academic Year  (2020)

 
1 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBLA111 PERFORMATIVE ARTS-I 3 3 100
BBLA121 ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION-I 5 5 100
BBLA131 CRITICAL THINKING 5 5 100
BBLA132 HISTORY OF IDEAS 5 5 100
BBS191 A SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT 3 3 100
BBS191 B A LIFE WORTH LIVING - FROM HEALTH TO WELL BEING 3 3 100
BBS191C MAHABHARATHA AND MODERN MANAGEMENT 3 3 100
BBS191D CYBER SECURITY FOR THE MILLENNIAL GENERATION 3 3 100
BBS191E TOURISM, CULTURE, AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT 3 3 100
BBS191F DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION AND ITS IMPACT ON SOCIETY 3 3 100
BBS191G TECHNOLOGY AND LIFE 3 3 100
BECH191A INSTITUTIONS AND INFORMAL ECONOMY 3 3 100
BECH191B ECONOMICS OF CORRUPTION 3 3 100
BENG191 B GLOBAL ETHICS FOR CONTEMPORARY SOCIETIES 3 3 100
BENG191A READING TECHNOLOGY IN/AND SCIENCE FICTION 3 3 100
BHIS191A ENCOUNTERING HISTORIES: THE FUTURE OF THE PAST 3 3 100
BMED191A MEDIA LITERACY 3 3 100
BMED191B UNDERSTANDING THE VISUAL LANGUAGE OF CINEMA 3 3 100
BPOL191A PEACE AND CONFLICT MANAGEMENT 3 3 100
BPOL191B GLOBAL POWER POLITICS 3 3 100
BPOL191C FUNDAMENTALS OF PUBLIC POLICY 3 3 100
BPSY191A SCIENCE OF WELLNESS 3 03 100
BPSY191B ADVERTISEMENT PSYCHOLOGY 3 3 100
SDEN111 SOCIAL SENSITIVITY SKILLS 2 0 50
2 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBLA221 ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION-II 5 5 100
BBLA232 READING INDIA 5 5 100
BBS291A APPLIED ETHICS-A MULTICULTURAL APPROACH 3 3 100
BBS291B GLOBAL LEADERSHIP AND CULTURE 3 3 100
BBS291C COURTESY AND ETIQUETTES 3 3 100
BBS291D MAHATMA AND MANAGEMENT 3 3 100
BBS291E SACRED GAMES AND THE RULE OF LAW 2 3 100
BBS291F CONSUMPTION AND CULTURE IN INDIA 3 3 100
BECH291A ECONOMICS AND LITERATURE 3 3 100
BECH291B DESIGNING POLICIES FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT 3 3 100
BENG291A READING CITYSCAPES: BANGALORE HISTORIES 3 3 100
BENG291B READING THE CYBERSPACE: PUBLIC AND THE PRIVATE 3 3 100
BHIS291A THE POLITICS OF MEMORY: THE MAKINGS OF GENOCIDE 3 3 100
BMED291A INTER-CULTURAL COMMUNICATION 3 3 100
BMED291B AUDIO CONSUMPTION IN EVERYDAY LIFE 3 03 100
BPOL291A POLITICS IN INDIA 3 3 100
BPOL291B STATE AND TERRORISM 3 3 100
BPSY291A APPRECIATING AESTHETICS 3 3 100
BPSY291B HUMAN ENGINEERING AND ERGONOMICS 3 3 100
SDEN211 EXPRESSIVE SKILLS 2 0 50
        

  

Assesment Pattern

CIA:70%

ESE: 30%

Examination And Assesments

A diverse nd meaningful mix of assessments are designed towards a 70: 30 Internal: ESE examination pattern

Department Overview:
The department promotes an intellectual climate of critical and creative ideation that aims to inculcate among its students a critical reading of the word and the world alike. It has geared its academic engagements towards moulding students into responsible and socially sensitive citizens through programs that are designed to facilitate holistic development. The academic programs seek to build academic, social and professional competencies along with an ethical outlook. The academic programs offered by the department are aligned with the University?s vision and mission. Offering programs at the undergraduate, postgraduate, and research levels, the core areas of enquiry range from domain in language and literature, to those in and around culture. Programs currently offered include BA English (Hons); BA (Liberal Arts); MA (English and Cultural Studies), and PhD (Cultural Studies).
Mission Statement:
Vision: To enable critical and creative reflection of the self and the world. Mission: The Department of English and Cultural Studies works towards advancement of knowledge through creative and critical modes of enquiry that would help equip the student to be socially, critically, and ethically aware.
Introduction to Program:
The BA in Liberal Arts is a cross-disciplinary degree that draws on the combined expertise of the faculties of Historical Studies, Arts, Business and Industries, Media Studies, Global Economics, Law, and Political Science. It is an interdisciplinary program stemming from the philosophy of Humanities, exploring global issues from political science, economic, sociological, and historical lens ? especially keeping the extraordinary times we live in. It is designed keeping the Sustainable Development Goals of the United Nations in mind - Building on the principle of ?leaving no one behind?, emphasizes a holistic approach to achieving sustainable development for all. The program also emphasizes a research orientation in the syllabus, pedagogy and all other initiatives. The core strength is to make students of the program, high-value candidates in the placement sector and in centers of advanced learning too. TEACHING PEDAGOGIES/METHODS: ? Lectures which will complement readings, with focus on individual aspects of special interest. ? High onus being kept on offering multiple and alternative interpretations, and exposing students to key issues of scholarly debate. ? Documentaries, films, objects and docu-dramas will be viewed, providing visual material with commentary, enriching and deepening readings and lectures. ? There will also be intensive focus on Group work/projects, small group discussion, and mock problem-solving exercises, and case study analysis.
Program Objective:
The influence and presence of the past is felt everywhere and every day in our lives. Movies, newspapers or the internet bombard us and expose us to the past ? both familiar and unfamiliar. However, the barrage of information and the forces of globalization have led to increasing questions on the relevance and the value of the past ? indeed a denial even. The Liberal Arts Program refers to the concept of globalization in all its forms ? including political, biological, digital, cultural, economic, and most importantly ? historical. This will be an interdisciplinary exploration of a set of global issues through a very comprehensive lens and will delve into people, commodities, ideas, heritage and even diseases moving around the world - with a focus shifting to integrate mathematical, logical, analytical and creative skills in higher education. The Liberal Arts Program is meant to foster innovative problem solving by providing students with a variety of methods and analytic tools. We at Christ, firmly believe that new ideas come from ?thinking outside the box? and developing new perspectives that combine diverse ways of knowing the world. And with our enabling environment, empowered leadership and governance structure, we are breaking away from the pattern of conventional and rigid program and creating student-centric, flexible learning systems, and allow students to explore and curate their own visions and aspirations ? incorporating creative expressions like

BBLA111 - PERFORMATIVE ARTS-I (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

This course is a foundation course for students of the Liberal Arts program. One of the reasons why a performing arts course was seen to be foundational in the program, is because it is seen as an important component of our educational philosophy - as we believe that performing arts teach us about our history and educate us in ways, which enable us to become well-rounded and sensitive members of society. It helps us to understand the people around us and how they might be expected to react in certain situations. 

Above all else, the performing arts are about being creative. Without a creative voice, a society may become all but dead inside, and a social group without any creativity is likely to be repressive and tyrannical rather than a force for good. The importance of having people in society who can express themselves creatively is without a doubt. It can be reasonably argued that the formation of creativity was the most important step in human development and that society cannot move forward without creative people.

Spread across two semesters, and informed by the Sustainable Development Goals of the UN, the student will accrue 6 credits throughout its administration. Designed completely as per the workshop-model, the course intends students to develop their critical, creative and analytical skills, while also honing their personal and interpersonal skills which they may carry forward into the rest of the course of their program. This amalgamation of Art, theatre, music and dance will culminate in a production at the end of the second semester, completely stage-managed by the students. 

 Course Objectives:

  • To enable students to hone their creative, critical and analytical skills
  • To help students understand the use of their body in everyday practices
  • To develop the interpersonal skills that will help them carry forward into other domains of their curriculum
  • To enable students to use theatre, dance and other performing arts as an effective way to express themselves, and to sensitise them with the possibility that it can also be a tool through which people with disabilities can communicate. 
  • Performing arts are also an extremely useful way of helping students get over hesitations and gradually become more confident as they find ways to communicate. 
  • In addition to teaching self-expression, the performing arts help society as a whole in self-knowledge and understanding. Theatre and the performing arts teach society about itself, hoping to point out the attitudes and mindsets of current society. It can be a tool used to educate people about their current conditions.
  • To provide a space for students to engage in self-reflection – a vital skill for life after school.

Learning Outcome

At the end of the two semesters, the student should be able to:

  • Demonstrate the importance performative arts has to maintain the history and understanding of a country’s citizens.
  • Critically reflect on the valuable life skills gained, by learning the importance of feedback, both positive and constructive.
  • Become effective collaborators, as Performing arts is a discipline that encourages teamwork, whether that is in writing, creating or during the act of performing. Students have the opportunity to engage in creative collaboration, a skill they have limited chance to develop outside of a rehearsal space.
  • Learn to understand the world uniquely, preparing them to navigate the challenges after school. 
  • Develop the ability to learn, and use communication skills, as students learn to use verbal and non-verbal techniques in new ways to deliver their message. 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Introduction to Performance Studies
 

Introduction and Overview: What is Performance Studies? Why study performance as part of the humanities? Why study performance as artists? What is the connection between performance and everyday life?

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Introduction to Natyashastra
 

Introduction to the treatise and brief knowledge of dramatic composition, musical scales, body movements, types of acting; dramatic composition, division of stage space, costumes, make-up, properties and musical instruments etc.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Classical and Traditional Performing Art Forms
 

These perspectives will be discussed with reference to Dance, Music and Theatre

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Practical and Theoretical Perspectives of Performance Studies I
 

This unit can be used to understand practical and theoretical aspects of Dance, Music and Theatre. (Three workshops for Dance, Music and Theatre to be conducted – 5 Hours each)

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Self-Assessment
 

Students will be guided to prepare a presentation with a set of ritual behaviors that one performs on a regular basis, whether it is getting ready for school or a work, the preparation of food, or spiritual or religious practice. They may choose something which is comfortable sharing with peers. (In this exercise the students should be encouraged to identify their preferred mode of presentation from among the various performing arts that they would be required to develop further for the second semester presentation.)

Text Books And Reference Books:

Depending on the workshop being conducted the module instructor will be assigning readings for the class to do

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Depending on the workshop being conducted the module instructor will be assigning readings for the class to do

Evaluation Pattern

The evaluation will be done at the end of the next semester, as the credits will be evaluated cumulatively (total of 6 credits)

BBLA121 - ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION-I (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:
English Language and Composition course is an intensive program for two semesters for students of BA (Liberal Arts) that introduces a wide range of expository works in order to develop their knowledge of rhetoric and make them aware of the power of language. The course is designed to meet the rigorous requirements of graduate level courses and therefore includes expository, analytical, personal, and argumentative texts from a variety of authors and historical contexts. It would provide students with the opportunity to work with the rhetorical situation, examining the authors’ purposes as well as the audiences and the subjects in texts.

The purpose of the course is to enable students to read analytically, formulate arguments based on the readings, and respond by composing articulate essays that utilize advanced elements of sentence structure, syntax, style, purpose, and tone. Thus, by the use of rhetorical principles, students will learn how to become critical thinkers, and apply that knowledge to their writing by revising and improving their essays, as well as critiquing and editing peer essays. In addition, students will be required to thoroughly research relevant topics, synthesize information from a variety of sources, and document their knowledge in a cogent well written report. Also, as the course is designed to engage students with rhetoric in multiple mediums, including visual media such as photographs, films, advertisements, comic strips, music videos, and TED talks; students would develop a sense to comprehend how a resource of language operates in any given text. While the first semester focuses on understanding principles of rhetoric through multiple texts, the second semester is more thematic in nature familiarizing students with texts from multiple disciplines, especially in the context of India.As part of the course students are expected to maintain a writing journal to monitor their progress in writing.

Course Objectives
To enable students to:

  • Enable students to become Independent critical thinkers, who are aware of the power of language.
  • Enable students to become excellent communicators of the language.
  • Equip students with necessary skills for graduate courses and for career.

Learning Outcome

  • Analyse and interpret samples of good writing by identifying and explaining an author’s use of rhetorical strategies and techniques
  • Analyze both visual and written texts.
  • Apply effective strategies and techniques in their own writing
  • Create and sustain arguments based on reading, research, and/or personal experience;
  • Demonstrate understanding and mastery of English Language as well as stylistic maturity in their own writings
  • Produce expository, analytical, and argumentative compositions that introduce a complex central idea and develop it with appropriate evidence drawn from primary and/or secondary source material, cogent explanations, and clear transitions;
  • Move effectively through the stages of the writing process with careful attention to inquiry and research, drafting, revising, editing, and review;
  • Write thoughtfully about their own process of composition
  • Revise a work to make it suitable for a different audience
  • Communicate effectively in different media by developing their LSRW skills.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Language of Composition
 

The unit will focus on understanding Rhetoric and Various Rhetoric situation. The aim is to assert the idea that rhetoric is always contextual and there is a link between the speaker, audience and what the content of the text is. This will enable students to understand the significance of context while analysing and composing a text.

1.     Introduction to Rhetoric and Rhetoric Situation.

Lou Gehrig’s Farewell Speech https://www.lougehrig.com/farewell/

2.     SOAP Analysis: Through the analysis of the text the aim to look at the mode in which various factors like subject, occasion, audience and purpose impacts rhetoric.

Letter to Einstein and Reply. http://www.lettersofnote.com/2012/05/dear-einstein-do-scientists-pray.html

George W. Bush 9/11 speech http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/gwbush911addresstothenation.htm

Tryst with Destiny by Jawaharlal Nehru

http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/jawaharlalnehrutrystwithdestiny.htm

3.     Ethos, Pathos and Logos: Understanding Aristotle’s concept of Ethos, Pathos and Logos is significant in understanding an effective rhetoric. By looking at some of the famous rhetorical works the aim is to understand how the writer’s/ orators of some of the famous rhetorical pieces have used these elements to persuade the reader/ audience.

Ethos

a)King George VI King’s Speech (Can play part of the movie)https://www.awesomestories.com/asset/view/George-VI-King-s-Speech-September-3-1939

b) The Myth of Latin Women: I Just met a Girl Named Maria https://www.quia.com/files/quia/users/amccann10/Myth_of_a_Latin_Woman

c) Quit India Speech by Gandhi

Logos

a) SlowFood Nation by Alice Watershttps://www.thenation.com/article/slow-food-nation/

b) My Vision For India by Abdul Kalam.

Pathos

a) Richard Nixon, from The Checkers Speech http://watergate.info/1952/09/23/nixon-checkers-speech.html

Dwight D. Eisenhower, Order of the Day

b) https://www.whatsoproudlywehail.org/curriculum/the-american-calendar/order-of-the-day-6-june-1944

c) Bal Gangadhar Tilak http://speakola.com/political/bal-gangadhar-tilak-freedom-is-my-birthright-1917

Combining Ethos, Logos, and Pathos

a)    Toni Morrison, Dear Senator Obama http://observer.com/2008/01/toni-morrisons-letter-to-barack-obama/

b)    Crisis of Civilization by Rabindranath Tagore

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Reading Written Texts
 

Focus of the unit would be to introduce multiple ways of analysis, close reading, and usage of argumentative statements and diction. 

 

1.     Queen Elizabeth, Speech to the Troops at Tilburyhttp://www.luminarium.org/renlit/tilbury.htm

2.     Winston Churchill, Blood, Toil, Tears, and Sweat. https://www.winstonchurchill.org/resources/speeches/1940-the-finest-hour/blood-toil-tears-and-sweat-2/

3.     Ralph Ellison, from On Bird, Bird-Watching and Jazz http://www.unz.org/Pub/SaturdayRev-1962jul28-00047

4.     Joan Didion, The Santa Ana Winds https://tywls12ela.wikispaces.com/file/view/Didion+Los+Angeles+Notebook.pdf

5.     Virginia Woolf, The Death of the Moth

6.     Groucho Marx, Dear Warner Brotherhttps://archive.org/details/Groucho_Marx_Letter_to_Warner_Brothers

7.     Christopher Morley, On Lazinesshttp://essays.quotidiana.org/morley/laziness/

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Reading Visual Texts
 

The unit will focus on how to read visual text and the impact it has on audience.

1.     ACLU, The Man on the Left (advertisement)

2.     Tom Toles, Rosa Parks (cartoon) http://thenexthurrah.typepad.com/the_next_hurrah/2005/10/rosa_parks.html

3.     http://webneel.com/rk-lakshman-editorial-cartoons-indian-cartoonist (Political Cartoons) India

4.     https://www.tatacliq.com/que/isro-launch-breaks-record-memes/ ISRO Launch (Times)

5.     Analysing Advertisements (Fair and Lovely), gender stereotypes in ads.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Determining Effective and Ineffective Rhetoric
 

The unit will engage with the questions on why few texts are effective rhetorical pieces as opposed to others.  A few texts will be analysed to look at different rhetorical situations, and how it is effective and ineffective in persuading the audience/ reader.

 

1.     Jane Austen, from Pride and Prejudice

2.     PETA, Feeding Kids Meat Is Child Abuse (advertisement) 25

3.     Anne Applebaum, If the Japanese Can’t Build a Safe Reactor,Who Can? https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/if-the-japanese-cant-build-a-safe-reactor-who-can/2011/03/14/ABCJvuV_story.html?utm_term=.8

4.     Stop for Pedestrians (advertisement)

5.     The Times, Man Takes First Steps on the Moon

6.     William Safire, In Event of Moon Disaster http://mentalfloss.com/article/57908/event-moon-disaster-white-house-speech-worst-case-scenario

7.     Herblock, Transported (cartoon)

Ted Talk: Speak Like a Leader https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bGBamfWasNQ

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
From Reading to Writing
 

By carefully reading the viewpoints of others and considering a range of ideas on an issue, one develops a clearer understanding of our own beliefs — a necessary foundation to writing effective arguments. The unit will focus on analysing elements of argument as a means of critical thinking and an essential step toward crafting argumentative essays. The unit will focus on making an argument and supporting it by synthesizing multiple sources. 

1.     Understanding Argument https://csalexander03.wordpress.com/2012/12/04/why-investing-in-fast-food-may-be-a-good-thing-by-amy-domini/

2.     http://www.nytimes.com/2004/07/11/opinion/felons-and-the-right-to-vote.html

3.     Using Visual text for Argument

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mjjV_X5re4g

4.     Using sources to inform an Argument

5.     Using Sources to Appeal to Audience.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:20
Compositions and Rhetoric for writing
 

Taking forward the discussions in the previous units, the focus here is on persuasive writing and different kinds of compositions. The works discussed earlier would be referred to explore the writing style and strategies used by the author to produce effective composition. 

1.     Essays in progress

Staking a claim - Claim of facts, claim of values. Activity to be conducted based on the writing review for products/ movies, opinionated piece for newspaper, magazine.

2.     Developing Thesis - Closed thesis statement, open thesis statement, counter argument thesis statement, culmination into this development.

3.      Presenting evidence - Relevant, accurate and sufficient evidence to support the argument. Discussion on Fallacies on Logic - Fallacies of relevance, fallacies of accuracy, fallacies of insufficiency.

4.     Types of Evidence - Writing Activities on - Personal experiences and anecdotes (samples to be given short biographical pieces, journals, diary writing, letter), Second hand Evidence - Historical information, Expert opinion, quantitative evidence. (Writing activity).

5.     Shaping an Argument - Induction and deduction and combining both. Focus on Academic and professional writing for specific situations. (Argumentative essays and responding to written essays, Editorials, Academic articles)

6.     Writing synthesis essays - Identifying the issues and complexities, formulating your position, framing quotations and integrating quotation, citing sources, translating visual text to argument.

7.     Translating visual texts to written documents - Integrating infographics to produce essays, articles, and effective writing pieces.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Different Units will have aligned Reading material (even visual ones)

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Different Units will have aligned Reading material (even visual ones)

Evaluation Pattern

This is a submission paper which requires the subject teacher to formulate the set of tasks for MSE and ESE.

  • CIA 1:  Task to be designed based on the unit and concepts on composition completed. 20 Marks
  • CIA 2: Task to be designed based on the unit and concepts on composition completed. 20 Marks
  • MSE: To be designed based on the larger learning objective of the course and should test student’s ability to produces rhetoric effectively. 50 Marks
  • ESE: To be designed based on the larger learning objective of the course and should test student’s ability to write effectively. 50 Marks

 

 

BBLA131 - CRITICAL THINKING (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

This course is a foundation course for students of the Liberal Arts program. It will explore issues about the nature and techniques of critical thought, viewed as a way to establish a reliable basis for our claims, beliefs, and attitudes about the world. We will explore multiple perspectives, placing established facts, theories, and practices in tension with alternatives to see how it could be otherwise. Views about observation and interpretation, reasoning and inference, valuing and judging, and the production of knowledge in its social context will be considered. Special attention will be given to translating what is learned into strategies, materials, and interventions for use in students' own educational and professional settings.

Course Objectives:

  • The aim of Critical Thinking is to promote independent thinking, personal autonomy and reasoned judgment in thought and action. This involves two related dimensions, and this course aims to do so: 

1.     the ability to reason well and  

2.     the disposition to do so.

  • This course will acquaint students to logic as well as creativity. It will involve inductive and deductive reasoning, analysis and problem-solving as well as creative, innovative and complex approaches to the resolution of issues and challenges.
  • One of the major objectives is to create independent centres of consciousness among the students, with the fundamental ability to determine the contours of their own minds and lives.
  • To prepare learners for self-direction and not pre-conceived roles. It is, therefore, essential that learners be prepared for thinking their way through the maze of challenges that life will present independently.
  • And finally, acquaint students to the 3 fundamentals of Critical Thought - Thinking, Reasoning and Analysis - because clear thinking, careful analysis, and reasoned deliberation are fundamental to democracy and democratic life.

Learning Outcome

By the end of the semester, the student will have:

  • a set of tools, experiences, activities, knowledge of publications, and an enhanced disposition to self­-directed lifelong inquiry around:

·       their own critical thinking, i.e., scrutinizing the assumptions, reasoning, and evidence brought to bear on an issue ­by others and by themselves, where such scrutiny is enhanced by placing ideas and practices in tension with alternatives; and

·       what is needed to teach or guide others regarding the above in ways that might depart markedly from their previous schooling and experience.

  • a critical understanding of collaborative explorations and allied approaches to project-­based learning in relation to participants re­engaging with themselves as avid learners and inquirers.
  • A basis/foundation on multidisciplinary as an approach, especially on how disciplines add value to one another in the road towards a resolution/solution.
  • Developed the ability to critically reflect on the valuable life skills gained, by learning the importance of feedback, both positive and constructive.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Critical Thought and Thinking
 

)    What is thinking – key principals of thought and thinking process? Who is a critical thinker?

b)    What is an argument and why arguments matter?

c)    Arguments: how to evaluate one (validity/soundness/tangents and repetition), how to recognise one, how to interpret one?

d)    Foundations of arguments – cognitive biases, facts vs opinions, logical fallacies and constructing an argument.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Critical Thinking - Skills
 

a)    Analysis, Interpretation, Inference, Explanation, Self-regulation, Open-mindedness, Problem solving

b)    Critical Thinking Strategies - Cognitive Dissonance, Fundamental Attribution Error, State-Dependent recall etc. (can be subject specific)

c)     Downsides of failing to think critically (Historic groupthink type cases, Student relevant examples, current events)

d)    Distinction between ability and willingness to think critically (Keith Stanovich’s notion of dysrationalia)

e)    Good thinking is more than being critical (Debates), Creative and Constructive thinking, Motivation for seeking out competing/Plausible alternatives

f)     Split Mind Strategy- Agreeing (Extending, Applying, Making Connections, refuting Criticisms) Disagreeing (Questioning, thinking of counter examples, Problems)

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Values and Ethics
 

a)    Ethics – The price that we pay

b)    Value Assumptions, Conflicts and Ethics – Ideal versus Real – decision making process

c)     Assumptions – reality of assumptions, detecting assumptions (using Case Studies)

d)    Deductive and Inductive Reasoning – usage of Ethics and Values in reasoning

e)    Evidence, truths, half-truths and distortions – stereotyping – generalizations (bringing Hume and Mill)

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:20
Power of Language
 

a)    The idea of Power and Authority – Use and Abuse

b)    Reasoning – errors of perceptions, judgement and reaction

c)     Denotation and Connotation – Reification

d)    Vagueness – Ambiguity – Weasel words – Double speak

e)    People and Meanings – Can words take on more power than in reality?

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:20
Power of Suggestion
 

a)    The idea of Suggestion – Use and Abuse

b)    Power of Media to shape information – Television and print marketing and advertising tricks

c)     Storytelling as persuasion and suggestion – citizens, consumers and relationships in the age of technology

d)    Nation and Government – policies and idea of suggestion

e)    Suggestion and the influence of Ideas - Big Data Analytics, Artificial Intelligence, Assimov’s Laws

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

·      Diestler, Sherry. 2011. Becoming a Critical Thinker, Prentice Hall.

·      Ruggiero, VR. 2009. Becoming a Critical Thinker.Boston: New York.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

Different readings will be given to the students, from time to time (mostly on a weekly basis), depending on the Case studies being discussed in class, as part of their assignments.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

 

Assignment 1

Assignment 1

Total

20

20

40

 

Mid Semester Examination

Section A

Section B

Section C

Total

3X5=15

2X10=20

1x15=15

50

 

End Semester Examination

Section A

Section B

Section C

Total

3X5=15

2X10=20

1x15=15

50

BBLA132 - HISTORY OF IDEAS (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

This course is a foundation course for students of the Liberal Arts program. Ideas shape the world we live in—from why we get married, to what we believe will happen after we die, to why we support a particular political party, to what we believe will make us more prosperous. These ideas have trajectories in the past - histories. What we believe is not the same as what other people in other places and other times have believed in. And this is where the course stems from - Why is this the case? Why have some ways of knowing come to dominate in some periods and places, and not in others? Why and how have certain notions about politics, economics, culture, and the natural world pushed aside competing claims? What roles have intellectuals played in creating and disseminating important ideas? How do particular frames of reference shape our understandings of history? What is the relationship between material conditions and the development of a robust intellectual culture? 

 

There are many ways to approach the history of ideas, ideologies, and intellectuals and in this particular course we will focus on the history of philosophy, science, religion, political and economic thought, as well as broader social ideas. Some units will focus on intellectuals and the development of particular schools of thought; others will seek to put the realm of ideas into a range of social, economic or political contexts. The course will mix discussions of theoretical approaches with practical application of the concepts and theories. As such, typical classes involve case analysis, group problem solving, analysis of relevant materials (movies, podcasts, pictures etc.) and debate.

 

Course Objectives:

  • One of the main objectives is to trace the human intellectual past – its ideological foundations and historical evolution from earliest experiences to the 21stcentury. 
  • The course’s focal point would be emphasizing discourses on communities, uniqueness and exceptionality, including the myths of origin and of cultural exclusivity, narratives of national history and even pantheons of heroes, in the creation of human memory and identity through ideas.
  • To help the students ask and evaluate questions like – What factors shape our identities? What dilemmas arise when others view us differently than we view ourselves? How do our identities influence our choices? And what role does ‘Ideas’ play in all of this?
  • To enable the students to realise that understanding the trajectory of ideas in the creation of identity is not only valuable for their own social, moral, and intellectual development, it also serves as a foundation for examining the choices made by individuals and groups in the past as well as in the present.
  • Acquaint the students with diversity of ideas and its politicization, as it becomes a topic of enormous contemporary relevance, with implications for the construction of national/international identity and responsibilities.
  • Further, to educate students on the dangers of ideas when misused in the construction of national and other group identities – especially when religion and politics are intermixed, and ‘us and them’ dichotomies of difference are created and mobilized in mass atrocities.
  • And finally, to make the student aware of the complexities in reconstructing the past of a nation on the basis of a trajectory of ‘ideas’ and to enable the learner to problematize the past as a non-monolithic entity.

Learning Outcome

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  • Critically engage with representations of the past in the present and use the evidence in interrogating historical accounts and memory.
  • Evaluate how issues of identity and memory, which are formulated through ideas, factor into our historical understandings and how this can condition present day policies and decision-making.
  • Critically reflect and engage with the interface between the past and the present, fostering a healthy appreciation for history and its imprint on our present world.
  • Analyze how ideas shape historical memory and identity and then how they in turn are shaped by states, organizations, and individuals. 
  • Trace the evolution and interaction between history, memory and politics when following the news and in examining historical cases.
  • Examine the memories of their own past and its multiple perspectives, which will enable them to read, write and reflect on the ideas of the past; or in other words, make it more difficult

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Histories of Ideas ? Whats and Whys
 

a)  An Idea - The Many Pasts; The Historiography of Ideas, Precept and Practice.

b)What Happened to An Idea: Adventures of the Dialectic – The Greeks (Nature and Value), Christianity and Historiography, threshold of Scientific notions of Idea – Romanticism, Kant, Hegel, Positivism

c)So Many Lies, So Little Time: Interrogating an Idea – Reality, Representation to Truths and Narratives through Thought, Knowledge, Imagination and Evidence.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Beginnings of the ?Idea?: Perspectives from East and the West
 

a)   The Grand Narratives: Teleologies; Evolution and Culture; Marx, Nietzsche, and Foucault

b)  Legitimization of Power and the idea of Polity: Nascent Stages and Beyond.

c)   The early ideas of Polity - Origins, monarchy, oligarchy, presto-republicanism

d) Beginnings of the Idea of Rights and Duties of Citizens: From the Cyrus Cylinder (6th Cent. BCE), Magna Carta (1215 CE), to the English Bill of Rights (1689), the French Declaration on the Rights of Man and Citizen (1789), and the US Constitution and Bill of Rights (1791) 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Idea: The Many After-lives
 

a)   Idea of the Individual – Renaissance, Enlightenment, Utilitarianism, and Logical Positivism. 

b)  Asia Imperium: Gunpowder Empires – Ottoman, Safavid, Mughals; Japan, China, and Korea.

c)     Ideas that refashioned the World: Industrial Revolution; Capitalism – Imperialism – Colonialism; The Original Manifesto. 

d)    White Man’s Burden: Clashing Visions and Consequences of Modernity; The Idea of French and British Colonial ‘Modern’ Identity.

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:20
Legacies and Memory: Ideas for Whom?
 

a)   The Idea and the experience of Liberty: Negative and Positive liberties

b)  The Idea and the experience of Equality and Rights: Absolute vs Practical equality.

c)   Naturalistic theory (Individual self-interest (evolution) vs societal interest; Humanism.

d)  Need for Revisionism of Ideas; Affecting and Effecting the Future: Justice and its Maxims; the Idea of Redistribution?

e)   The Relevance of Ideas in the Era of Deep AI

Text Books And Reference Books:

·    Lovejoy, Arthur O. 1960. Essays in the History of Ideas, Capricorn.

·    Gaddis, John Lewis. 2002. The Landscape of History: How Historians Map the Past, New York:  Oxford University Press.

·    Beker, Avi. 2008. The Chosen: The History of an Idea, and the Anatomy of an Obsession, Palgrave Macmillan.

·    Gathercole, Peter and David Lowenthal (eds.) 1994. The Politics of the Past, New York: Routledge.

·    Kumar, Ravinder 1989. The Past and the Present: An Indian Dialogue, Daedalus, Vol. 118, No.4, pp. 27-49.

·    Thapar, Romila. 2000. History and Beyond, New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

·    Thapar, Romila. 2013. The Past Before Us: Historical Traditions of Early North India, New Delhi: Permanent Black.

·    Thompson, Willie. 2000. What Happened to History. London: Pluto Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

·      Banerjee, Sumanta, 2003. Ayodhya: A future bound by the past, Economic and Political Weekly, Vol. 38, No. 27, pp. 2795-2796.

·      Carr, E.H. 1967. What is History, Vintage.

·      Chalcraft, David et.al. 2008. Max Weber Matters: Interweaving Past and Present, Ashgate.

·      Chapman, James 2005. Past and Present: National Identity and the British Historical Film, I.B.Tauris.

·      Chatterjee, Partha. 1993. The Nation and its Fragments: Colonial and Postcolonial Histories. Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press.

·      Chatterjee, Partha. 2012. The Black Hole of Empire: History of a Global Practice of Power, Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press.

·      Fawcett, Bill (ed). 2007. You Said What: Lies and Propaganda Throughout History, Harper Collins E-books.

·      Fowler, Don D. 1987. Uses of the past: Archaeology in the service of the state, American Antiquity, Vol. 52, No. 2, pp. 229-248.

·      Galgano, Michael J., J. Chris Arndt, Raymond M. Hyser. 2007. Doing History: Research and Writing in the Digital Age. Boston: Wadsworth Publishing.

·      Gardiner, Juliet (eds). 1988. What is History Today, London: Macmillan Education UK.

·      Morris, Ian. 2010. Why the West Rules – for Now: The Patterns of History, and What They Reveal About the Future, London and New York: Profile Books and Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

·      Muller, Jan-Werner 2004. Memory and Power in Post-War Europe: Studies in the presence of the past, Cambridge Univ. Press.

·      Piercey, Robert 2009. The Uses of the Past from Heidegger to Rorty: Doing Philosophy Historically, Cambridge Univ. Press.

·      Shrimali, K.M. 1998. A Future for the Past? Social Scientist, Vol. 26, No. 9, pp. 26-51.

·      Southgate, Beverley C. 2005. What is History For? New York: Routledge.

·      Thapar, Romila, Harbans Mukhia, Bipan Chandra. 1969. Communalism and the Writing of Indian History, New Delhi: People's Publishing House.

·      Thapar, Romila. 1979. Dissent in the Early Indian Tradition, Volume 7 of M.N. Roy memorial lecture, New Delhi: Indian Renaissance Institute.

·     Walsh, Kevin 1992. The Representation of the Past: Museums and heritage in the post-modern world, Routledge.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

 

Assignment 1

Assignment 1

Total

20

20

40

 

Mid Semester Examination

Section A

Section B

Section C

Total

3X5=15

2X10=20

1x15=15

50

 

End Semester Examination

Section A

Section B

Section C

Total

3X5=15

2X10=20

1x15=15

50

 

BBS191 A - SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To create a sense of ownership of issues related to CSR, Environment and sustainability of businesses.

Understand the basic concept of Sustainable Development (SD), the environmental, social and economic dimensions.

To teach how to critically analyze, evaluate and judge competing perspectives on the challenge of creating a sustainablefuture.

To understand the Sustainable development challenge for companies, their responsibility and their potentials for action.

Learning Outcome

Concern for society and nature

Ability to create sustainable organizations

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction
 

Meaning and Scope, Corporate Social Responsibility, Sustainability, Sustainability Terminologies and Meanings, why is Sustainability an Imperative, Sustainability Case Studies, Triple Bottom Line (TBL)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Sustainable Development Strategy
 

Reasons to adopt sustainable strategy by firms, tools used by the firm to implement their sustainable development strategies, evaluation of firm’s commitment to sustainable strategies by the stakeholders.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Environmental Management Systems:
 

Using Standards, Certification and other Systems to further SD goals Introduction, Global management systems exist to guide firms in establishing and implementing a strategy,how do these various approaches, including certification, encourage sustainable business practices.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Sustainable Future
 

Establishing priorities for sustainable future, Role of women in sustainability, Challenge of creating a green economy, Sustainability crisis in 21st century, failures of global capitalism, transforming global capitalism, creating a restorative economy.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Corporate Sustainability Reporting Frameworks
 

Global Reporting Initiative Guidelines, National Voluntary Guidelines on Social, Environmental and Economic Responsibilities of, Business, International Standards, Sustainability Indices, Principles of Responsible Investment, Challenges in Mainstreaming Sustainability Reporting, Sustainability Reporting Case Studies

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      Balachandran V, & Chandrashekharan V, (2011). Corporate Governance, Ethics and social responsibility, PHI.

2.      Concepts of Environmental Management for Sustainable Development

3.      Baxi C. V & Rupamanjari Sinha Ray, (2012). Corporate Social Responsibility: A Study of CSR Practices in Indian Industry, Vikas Publishing House.

4.      Corporate Goverance – Badi N. V, Vrinda Publications, 2012.

5.      Fernando A. C, (2011). Corporate Governance: principles, policies and practices, Pearson.

6.      Ghosh B. N, (2012). Business Ethics and Corporate Governance , Tata McGraw-Hill.

7.      Keshoo Prasad, Corporate Governance -, PHI.

8.      Lawrence and Weber, (2010). Business and Society, Tata McGraw-Hill.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Andrew Crane & Dirk Matten (2010). Business ethics, Oxford.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 - Written assignment on cases relating to sustainability practices followed in any country. (No country should be repeated) (20 marks)

CIA 2 - Mid sem Class exam (25 marks)

CIA 3 - Group presentation and report for pre allotted topics.(20 marks)

End sem - Class exam (30 marks)

BBS191 B - A LIFE WORTH LIVING - FROM HEALTH TO WELL BEING (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To examine health in its truest sense, one must explore beyond the limits of medicine to engage a much wider set of questions embracing social, cultural, political, economic, moral and spiritual aspects of human experience. The course focuses on the knowledge and skills that students require to lead a healthy, productive and balanced life.

 

Learning Outcome

On completing the course, students will be able to:

  • Explain health as a multi-dimensional and dynamic concept, which necessarily integrates individual, societal, biomedical, spiritual, cultural and historical influences, and how this relates to health issues encountered in everyday life.
  • Assess the inter-relatedness of health perceptions and practices across cultures.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to health
 

Health of individuals and communities – The significance of determinants of health and how these raise or lower the health of individuals and communities - Health promotion to improve health - Personal and popular attitudes and beliefs and their impact on decision making - self-management - interpersonal and key consumer health skills - Factors influencing health, and actions and strategies to protect and promote health, through investigation and inquiry processes.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Food and Values
 

Philosophy of food, Values – Three different types of values, Meat – Is it wrong to eat animals?Hunger – Do we have a duty to help starving people? - Drugs – Why is it wrong to take drugs? - GM food – How should food technology be regulated? - Capitalism – Food, globalization, and equality - Art – Can food be art? What is art? - Taste – Is taste entirely subjective? - Science – Can science explain conscious taste experiences? -Eating – Eat to live, or live to eat

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Nutrition
 

Balanced diet & Nutrition, Macro and micro nutrients – Nutritive and non nutritive components of diet – Eating for weight control – healthy weight – The pitfalls of dieting – food intolerance and food myths – Food supplements for adolescents. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Physical Education
 

Concept of physical education – Meaning – definition – aims – objectives of physical education and fitness – Need & importance of fitness – Types of fitness – Health related physical fitness – performance related physical fitness – physical activities and health benefits - Activities for developing physical fitness

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Sleep
 

What is sleep? – The phylogeny of sleep – Developmental course of sleep – Dreams- Functions of sleep – Daytime sleepiness and alertness – Sleep disorders.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
Safety education and health promotion
 

Principles of accident prevention – health and safety in daily life – health and safety at work – first aid and emergency care – common injuries and their management

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:9
Spirituality, Religion and Social Change
 

Meaning of life - Meaning of death- Indian Rituals, symbols, and myths - Spirituality, altruism and moral justice - Resources to deal with stress, temptations, disappointments and failures, social oppression, the loss of possessions and of loved ones, and with one’s own death. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Indian Journals of health and well being

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

As prescribed by the facilitator

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1, Mid sem, CIA 3, End sem - 100 Marks

BBS191C - MAHABHARATHA AND MODERN MANAGEMENT (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

The Mahabharata of the great Maharishi Veda Vyasa is a treasure trove of knowledge, principles and paradigms. It is written that what is not in the Mahabharata will not be found elsewhere. Written nearly thousands of years ago, the Mahabharata is as yet a source of knowledge, especially modern management principles.In essence it highlights the victory of Dharma in times of Adharma.This subject is a comprehensive learning on management lessons which can be inferred from the great epic. It gives a clear understanding and comparison of management Principles, practices and the various functions of management with the epic. The syllabus is structured to provide basic conceptual knowledge on the principles of management. It also deals with behavioral issues in the individual processes, group and interpersonal processes.

Course Objectives:

  •  Discuss the epic by summarizing the various parvas/units in class in accordance with the management concept
  •  Review and make a critical estimate of the epic with a focus on morals, ethics, legal and management concepts
  • To develop competencies and knowledge of students to become effective professionals

Learning Outcome

Course Learning Outcome: Students will get to know team work and group dynamics

  • Students will get to know determination and hard work and its implication on business decision
  • Students will be able to appreciate the role of general management for the success of an organization.
  • This subject will enable them to enhance their Moral, social, ethical and professional skills
  • To understand the manner in which strategic and competitive advantage is developed

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to Mahabharatha
 

The older generations-The Pandava and Kaurava princes- Lakshagraha (the house of lac)

Establishment of the kingdom-Administration and Management principles

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Marriage and Building of New city
 

Marriage to Draupadi- An event study approach.

Indraprastha-A new beginning- Pressure for change – Change process, Types of change, Factors influencing change, Resistance to change

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
The Big Game
 

The dice game- Cooperative strategies & Reasons for strategic alliances-

Exile and return- Risks and costs of strategic alliances

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
The battle at Kurukshetra
 

The battle at Kurukshetra - Strategic Planning and Management- levels at which strategy operates- Event approaches to strategic decision making,

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Post Kurukshetra
 

The end of the Pandavas- Succession Planning,Authority and Responsibility

The reunion Organizing- Choosing the organizational structure

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Stoner, Freeman, Gilbert Jr. (2014). Management (6th edition), New Delhi: Prentice Hall India.

Rao, V.S.P., & Krishna, V.H., (2011). Strategic Management: Text and Cases. New Delhi: Excel Books.

Pratap Chandra Roy ,The complete Mahabharata translated into English prose directly from the original sanskrit text.(1st Edition) oriental publishing co.

Source: Jaya - An Illustrated Retelling of the Mahabharata

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

C Rajagopalachari (2017). Mahabharata (63rdedition), Mumbai: Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 10 Marks

MSE   30 Marks

CIA 3 10 Marks

End Assesment 50 Marks

BBS191D - CYBER SECURITY FOR THE MILLENNIAL GENERATION (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Any individual can have a real-time video conversation with someone on the other side of the planet, one can send and receive money without even taking out their wallet, and even can post content online that reaches millions of people in a matter minutes. Unfortunately, the same technology that enables all this new freedom and convenience also exposes us to new security threats that we've never encountered. Malware that infects your computer and watches everything you do, phishing scams that steal private information from millions of people - today's digital world is a criminal's playground. It makes the process of stealing money or even stealing someone's entire identity way more efficient. Hence it becomes very important to protect yourself and your private data from cyber intruders. This course outlines a step-by-step roadmap that one can follow to build a tight wall of security around your digital life.

Course Objectives:

This course gives the background needed to understand basic cyber security. Students will be introduced to the world of spyware, phishing, malware, spam, social engineering, hacking and other common internet spying techniques. Students will also learn the intervention methods in securing themselves in cyber space.

Learning Outcome

  • To understand how to identify online scams.
  • To develop the right mindset and habits for securing themselves from intruders.
  • To learn how to secure their online browsing.
  • To learn how to create super passwords and how to manage them.
  • To practice cyber security skills in real world scenarios.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to Cyber security
 

Why security matters – The importance of multi-layer security – the most common security threats – The dark side of Internet – The world of malware – phishing – social engineering – scams – hacking –cyber warfare.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Mindset and Habits
 

Developing the right mindset and habits for security – the importance of skepticism – avoiding malicious sites and applications – Tools needed to browse the Internet securely - why software updates matter – knowing (and limiting yourself).

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Smartphone security
 

Why mobile security matters – setting up a passcode lock –importance of password security – best practices – using password manager- managing third-party app permissions – locating a lost or stolen smartphone.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Multi-factor authentication and Connected apps
 

Framework – types of mobile two-factor authentication – Two-Factor authentication: Google, Facebook, Twitter and other services - danger of rogue connected apps – managing connected apps on Google and Facebook – managing browser extensions/add-ons – staying secure with connected apps and extensions.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Encryption
 

Encryption definition – How SSL (HTTPS) protects your passwords and private data - encrypting your web traffic with a virtual private network (VPN) – encrypting computer's hard drive – encrypting smartphone – firewalls – antivirus.

Text Books And Reference Books:

·     Graham,James., Howard,Richard., & Olson,Ryan. (2011). Cyber Security Essentials. USA: CRC Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

·         Lalit,Gulab Chandra. (2014). Cyber security threats: An emerging challenge. New Delhi: Mohit Publications.

·        Arora, A. (2014). Information Warfare and Cyber Security. Jaipur: Book Enclave.

·       Santanam, R., Sethumadhavan, M., & Virendra, M. (2011). Cyber security, cybercrime and cyber forensics: Applications and perspectives. Hershey, PA: Information Science Reference.

·         Ahamad, F. (2013). Cyber Law and Information Security. New Delhi: Dreamtech Press.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I - 20 marks

CIA II - 25 marks

CIA III - 20 marks

End Semester - 30 marks

Attendance - 05 marks

BBS191E - TOURISM, CULTURE, AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The Course presents several of the operational projects implemented by, or with the support of UNESCO, to illustrate how cultural tourism policies developed in the spirit of the principles and values contained in the texts, standard-setting instruments, declarations and recommendations adopted by UNESCO, are put into practice.

To open a debate on the complex questions that surround the relations between culture and tourism, tourism and development, and tourism and dialogue among cultures.

Learning Outcome

  • To use Tourism as an instrument to bring individuals and human communities into contact
  • To understand the role of cultures and civilizations in facilitating dialogue among cultures
  • To recognise the capacity of Tourism in assisting the world’s inhabitants to live better together and thereby contribute to the construction of peace in the minds of men and women

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Introduction, Key Themes and Issues in Tourism, Culture and Development
 

Finding Meaning through Tourism, Tourism as a World of Paradoxes, The Centrality of Experiences, Changing Contexts and Emerging Challenges in the Context of Development

Culture, Heritage and Diversity as Tourism Resources, Understanding Culture and Cultural Resources in Tourism, Cultural Tourism as a Means of Economic Development, Developing the Cultural Supply Chain, Exploitation of Culture

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Tourism as a Vehicle for Inter-Cultural Dialogue
 

Tourist – Host Encounters, The Role of Routers / Intermediaries / Media, Tourism – Tourist Education, Cross Cultural Understanding

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Tourism and Environmental Protection
 

Introduction to the Natural Environment, Tourism and the Spirit of Nature, Fragile and Vulnerable Ecosystems, Cultural Implications of Mobilizing Natural Resources for Tourism, From Ecotourism to Integrated Tourism

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Issues of Governance in Tourism, Culture and Development
 

Developing Structures to Develop and Manage Tourism and Culture, Complexities and Challenges of Policy Making in Tourism and Culture, Responsibilities / Tensions and Actions, The Gender Dimension, Stakeholders and Collaborations

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Preservation and Mobilization of Cultural Resources
 

Cultural Tourism Itinerary, Raising Awareness about the Fragility of Heritage Sites, Education for Lasting Tourism

Case Studies from The Palestinian Territories, Central America, Western Africa, Mauritania and Angkor

Economic Empowerment and poverty Alleviation, Sustainable Tourism Development Strategy, Forging Innovative and Inter-Disciplinary Approaches, Indigenous Resource Management Systems, Empowering Communities through Tourism

Case Studies from The Aral Sea Basin, Local Effort in Asia and Pacific (LEAP), Mountainous Regions of Central and South Asia

Dissemination of Knowledge and Reconciliation with the Past, Local and Indigenous Knowledge Systems in a Global Society (LINKS), UNESCO’s Actions in the field of Tourism, Culture and Development

Case Studies on UNESCO’s Conventions, Seminars and Universal Declarations

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
Mobilizing Nature for Sustainable Tourism
 

Capacity Building and Youth Poverty Alleviation through Tourism and Heritage (PATH)

Case Studies on Sao Paulo’s Green Belt Biosphere Reserve

Text Books And Reference Books:

Appadurai A. (2002) Cultural Diversity: A Conceptual Platform. In K. Stenou (ed.) UNESCO Universal Declaration on Cultural Diversity. UNESCO Publishing, Paris, pp. 9-16.

Appadurai A. (2003) Modernity at Large. Cultural Dimensions of Globalization. Minneapolis, University of Minnesota Press.

Boumedine R. S. and Veirier L. (2003) Towards a Strategy for the Sustainable Development of Tourism in the Sahara in the Context of Poverty Eradication. UNESCO Publishing, Paris.

Cohen E. (2004) Contemporary Tourism. Diversity and Change. Elsevier, London.

Hemmati, M. ed. (1999) Women’s Employment and Participation in Tourism, Report for UN Commission on Sustainable Development 7th Session. UNED.

Intergovernmental Conference on Cultural Policies for Development (1998) Final Report. (Also referred to as Stockholm Action Plan). UNESCO Publishing, Paris.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

International Labour Organisation (2001) Human resources development, employment and globalization in the hotel, catering and tourism sector (Report for discussion at the Tripartite Meeting on Human Resources Development, Employment and Globalization in the Hotel, Catering and Tourism Sector, Geneva, ILO).

Komla E.E. and Veirier L. (2004) Tourism, Culture and Development in West-Africa: For a Cultural Tourism Consistent with Sustainable Development. UNESCO Publishing, Paris.

Posey D.A. (Ed) (1999) Cultural and Spiritual Values of Biodiversity. A Complementary Contribution to the Global Biodiversity Assessment. Intermediate Technology Publications, London (on behalf of United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), Nairobi).

Robertson, R. (1990) Mapping the Global Conditions: Globalization as the Central Concept. In M. Featherstone (ed.) Global Culture: Nationalism, Globalization and Modernity. Sage, London, pp. 15-30.

Steck B., Strasdas W., and Gustedt, E. (1999) Tourism in Technical Co-operation. A guide to the conception, planning and implementation of project-accompanying measures in regional rural development and nature conservation. GTZ, Eschborn.

Tour Operators’ Initiative for Sustainable Tourism Development (2004) Supply Chain Engagement for Tour Operators: Three Steps towards Sustainability. UNEP-Sustainable Tourism, Paris.

Winkin Y. (2002) Cultural Diversity: A Pool of Ideas for Implementation. In K. Stenou (ed.)

UNESCO Universal Declaration on Cultural Diversity. UNESCO Publishing, Paris, pp. 17-60.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 - Group Activity and Written Submission on “Culture and Cultural Resources in Tourism – From an Inter-Disciplinary Perspective” (20 Marks)

CIA 2 - Mid Semester Examination (25 Marks)

CIA 3 - Group Activity and Written Submission on “Integrated Tourism by Mobilizing Natural Resources” (20 Marks)

Final Submission - An Individual Activity supported by Written Submission on “Designing a Structured Plan to Develop and Manage Sustainability through Tourism and Culture; An Inter-Disciplinary Perspective” (30 Marks)

BBS191F - DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION AND ITS IMPACT ON SOCIETY (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course deals with interaction between technology, its transformation and the impact it has in today's society. an interdisciplinary course giving overview about the various business models, platforms companies use for creating values among the people and initiatives taken by government related to technology for nation building. This course engage the students to confront the realities brought by disruptive technologies and the change in lifestyle of society.

COURSE OBJECTIVE

 This course attempts to be more effective in dealing with digital transformation and its impact on society.

Learning Outcome

  • Understand the evolving technologies and platforms used by business
  • Analyze the impact of technology on day-day life
  • Aware about initiatives by government for nation building

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction & Platform Trends
 

Digital Transformation in the global enterprise, Digital business ecosystem, Multi-sided platform Business- Two sided platform Mediated Networks, Management challenges for Networked Business, Difference between platform and merchant models-Digital Business Models, Value co-creation, Data Business, Data Security.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Managing Disruptive Technologies
 

Disruptive innovation-Transformation enabled by business analytics, Machine learning management, Internet of Things-AI& Human Intelligence, Cloud computing, Social media and social content strategies, Digital transformation in selected industry sectors.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Operational Excellence and Customer Intimacy
 

Enterprise system-business achieving operational excellence, business achieving customer intimacy, challenges faced by enterprise application, next generation enterprise applications.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Technology & Nation Building
 

Indian government DST Agenda, Major development programs in technology in India, Contribution of technology in leveraging nation development.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
IT & Society
 

Information technology and society- an introduction, Social shaping of Technology, Globalization and domestication, Social implications of online data, IT intervention and changes in lifestyle-Baby boomers, GenX, GenY, GenZ.

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Baron, Naomi S. Always On: Language in an Online and Mobile World. 2008. New York: Oxford University Press.
  2. Gutmann, Michael (2001), Information Technology and Society, https://www.zurich.ibm.com/pdf/news/Gutmann.pdf
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Winning the Race with Ever Smarter Machines, Andrew McAfee and Erik Brynjolfsson,
  2. Sloan Management Review, Winter 2012, pp. 53-60. (HBS)
  3. Alibaba and the Future of Business (HBR, Zeng, Sept-Oct. 2018)
  4. Nintendo Game On!Ivey 2016: W16600
  5. Voice War: Hey Google vs. Alexa vs. Siri (HBS 2018: 718519)
  6. Hatsune Miku: Japanese virtual idol ignites global value co-creation (Ivey, 2015: W14631)
  7. Carolina Healthcare System: Consumer Analytics (HBS 2015: 9-515-060)
  8. Digitalization at Siemens (HBS 2017: 9-717-428)
Evaluation Pattern

CIA I - 20 marks

CIA II - 25 marks

CIA III - 20 marks

End Semester - 30 marks

Attendance - 05 marks

BBS191G - TECHNOLOGY AND LIFE (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Technological development has contributed many innovations and ease of life for the human beings. However it has also generated problems .This course is offered to provide the basic knowledge of technology and the uses of technology in different areas of life basically hospitals and banks. The course focuses on identifying the technological benefits and finding solutions to the challenges generated by the technology in daily life. The course will be offered with an intention of enabling the students to visit the different institutions and to identify the technological needs and develops .Finally the course creates awareness about the dangerous of continuous usage of technology.

Course Objectives:

·         To know the history of technological developments in the daily life.

·         To Understand the impact of technology in different areas  of society

·         To identify the technological progress in the health care centre of Bangalore City.

·         To identify the technological progress in the Financial Institutions functioning in   Bangalore.

·         To find the solutions to the tech based problems of day to day life.

Learning Outcome

·         Clear understanding of technology and its impact on daily life.

·         Practical knowledge of technological developments in the health and banking sector

·         Solution to the problems originated by the tech addiction.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Introduction to Technology and Life
 

Meaning- Definitions- evolution of technology-growth in the use of technology in daily life. Disruptive technologies transforming life, business and global economy- Disruptive technology trends in recent years. live reports and cases

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Impact of technology on daily life
 

Overview of Impact of technology on- Business-Society-Education-Agriculture-Banking-Health Care –Positive and negative impacts

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Technology and Health Care
 

Instruments requited in the field of Hospitals-Identify the different technologies used in the different hospitals –Need for new technology and the Plans of the Institutions to acquire-Identifying the affordable health services from the perspective of individuals.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Technology and Financial Services
 

Introduction to the different digital services offered by the banks and financial institution- Identify the different technologies used in the city- most demanded services-scope for introduction of new technical support by the banks and financial institutions

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:7
Future of Well-Being in a Tech-Saturated World
 

Themes about the future of well-being and digital life-The benefits of digital life

Concerns over harms-Effects on technology on the youths of today-Tech Experts big predications-Solutions to the technology driven daily life problems

Text Books And Reference Books:

The People Vs Tech: How the internet is killing democracy (and how we save it) v By by Jamie Bartlett

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

New Thinking: From Einstein to Artificial Intelligence, the Science and Technology at Transformed Our World by by Dagogo Altraide

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1, 2, 3 and End sem - 100 Marks

BECH191A - INSTITUTIONS AND INFORMAL ECONOMY (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

The primary aim of this course is to introduce students to the concept of institutions and the informal economy in a global context. The discourse examines the informal economy through the lens of institutional economics. The aim is to acquaint students to significant discourses and issues in policy design and intervention.  

 

Course Objectives

This course will:

 

  • introduce students to the institutions and institutional change through major concepts in institutional economics;

  • discuss the informal economy through concepts, theory and measurement;

  • examine the linkages of formal and informal economy;

  • train students to hone their writing and presentation skills to effectively discuss these complex ideas.

Learning Outcome

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • understand the concepts and some of the theoretical discourses in the study of institutional change and informal economy;

  • examine how the formal and informal economies are no longer separate watertight compartments but function together as an interactive system;

  • effectively communicate these complex ideas through written and oral presentation.

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Institutions and Institutional Change
 

Institutions, Economic Theory and Economic Performance; Informal Constraints; Formal Constraints; The Path of Institutional Change

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Elements of Institutional Economics
 

Contracts and Property Rights: the Concepts of Exchange and Property, Critique of the Utilitarian Calculus; Transaction Costs, Bargaining Power; Markets as Institutions; Firms and Markets

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Informality: Concepts, Theory and Measurement
 

Bureaucratic Form and the Informal Economy; Formal and Informal Enterprises: Concepts, Definition, and Measurement Issues; Linking the Formal and Informal Economy.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:13
Empirical Studies in Institutional Change and Informality
 

CASE STUDIES: The Impact of Regulation on Growth and Informality: Cross-Country Evidence; Blocking Human Potential: How Formal Policies Block the Economy in the Maputo Corridor; Enforcement and Compliance in Lima’s Street Markets: The Origins and Consequences of Policy Incoherence towards Informal Traders

Text Books And Reference Books:

Essential Readings

Alston, L. J., Eggertsson, T., & North, D. C. (Eds.). (1996). Empirical Studies in Institutional Change. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Guha-Khasnobis, B., Kanbur, R., & Ostrom, E. (Eds.). (2006). Linking the Formal and Informal Economy: Concepts and Policies. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Misztal, B. (2002). Informality: Social theory and Contemporary Practice. Routledge.

North, D. (1990). Institutions, Economic Theory and Economic PerformanceInstitutions, Institutional Change and Economic Performance. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Recommended Readings

Arias, O., Fajnzylber, P., Maloney, W., Mason, A., Perry, G., & Saavedra-Chanduvi, J. (2007). Informality: Exit and Exclusion. Washington: The World Bank.

Harris, J. (2006). Power Matters: Essays on Institutions, Politics, and Society in India. New York: Oxford University Press.

Mehta, P. B., & Kapur, D. (2005). Public Institutions in India: Performance and Design. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

Nayyar, D. (Ed.). (2002). Governing Globalization: Issues and Institutions. Oxford University Press.

Oviedo, A. M. (2009). Economic Informality: Causes, Costs, and Policies: A Literature Survey of International Experience. Country Economic Memorandum (CEM).

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

Course title

MSE (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

Attendance

Institutions and Informal Economy

45%

50%

5%

 

Mid Semester Examination

Group/Individual Assignment

45 Marks

 

End Semester Examination

Group/Individual Assignment

50 Marks

 

BECH191B - ECONOMICS OF CORRUPTION (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is aimed at undergraduate students to introduce to them the prominent debates in the economics of corruption. The course discusses how corruption acts as a constraint on economic growth using the theoretical constructs in Political Economy. It allows students to delve into the causes and consequences of corruption. In particular, the course will examine how corruption affects the emerging economies.

This course will:

  • consider some of the seminal papers on the economics of corruption
  • acquaint students to significant debates about transparency, competition and privatization and its relevance to corruption
  • analyse corruption in emerging economies through various case studies
  • discuss issues from various perspectives, such as, viewing corruption as erosion of trust and abuse of power
  • train students to hone their writing and presentation skills to effectively discuss complex ideas.

Learning Outcome

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • appreciate that nuances in the way corruption is defined and understood in different economies
  • analyse the cause and  consequences of corruption
  • examine some of the policies reforms aimed at tackling corruption
  • investigate some impacts of corruption on emerging economies
  • effectively communicate complex ideas through written and oral presentation.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Corruption, Poor Governance and Institutional Structure
 

Causes and Consequences of Corruption: What do we know from a cross-section of countries?, Democratic Institutions and Corruption: Incentives and Constraints in Politics, Bargaining for Bribes: the Role of Institutions

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Corruption and the Private Sector
 

The Privatization of Rent-Generating Industries and Corruption; Corruption in Private Sector, Why the private sector is likely to lead the next stage in the global fight against corruption.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Tackling Corruption
 

Corruption and Policy Reform; Anti-Corruption Authorities: An Effective Tool to Curb Corruption?  Corruption and Competition: Fair Markets as an Anticorruption Device

Text Books And Reference Books:

Auriol, E., & Straub, S. (2011). Privatization of Rent-generating Industries and Corruption. In S. Rose-Ackerman & T. Søreide, (Eds.). International Handbook on the Economics of Corruption, (Vol. 2). Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Pub.

Burger, E. S., & Holland, M. S. (2006). Why the private sector is likely to lead the next stage in the global fight against corruption. Fordham International Law Journal, 30, 45.

Cartier-Bresson, J. (2000). Economics of corruption. Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. The OECD Observer, (220), 25.

Jain, A. K. (2001). Corruption: A Review. Journal of Economic Surveys, 15(1), 71-121.

Jain, A. K. (Ed.). (2012). Economics of Corruption (Vol. 65). Springer Science & Business Media.

Meschi, P. X. (2009). Government Corruption and Foreign Stakes in International Joint Ventures in Emerging Economies. Asia Pacific Journal of Management, 26(2), 241-261.

Meyer, K. E., Estrin, S., Bhaumik, S. K., & Peng, M. W. (2009). Institutions, Resources, and Entry Strategies in Emerging Economies. Strategic Management Journal, 30(1), 61-80.

Nowakowski, K. (2010). Corruption in Private Sector.Economics and Law, 6(1), 345-360.

Rose-Ackerman, S. (1975). The Economics of Corruption. Journal of Public Economics, 4(2), 187-203.

Uhlenbruck, K., Rodriguez, P., Doh, J., & Eden, L. (2006). The Impact of Corruption on Entry Strategy: Evidence from Telecommunication Projects in Emerging Economies. Organization Science, 17(3), 402-414.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

The readings mentioned as essential are to be followed.

Evaluation Pattern