CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH AND CULTURAL STUDIES

School of Arts and Humanities

Syllabus for
BA (English/Honours/Honours with Research)
Academic Year  (2023)

 
1 Semester - 2023 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BS141 COURTESY AND ETIQUETTES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
ECO142 ECONOMICS OF CORRUPTION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
ENG101-1B TEXTS AND TEXTUALITIES IN THE DIGITAL CONTEMPORARY Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
ENG102-1B BRITISH LITERATURE-I Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
ENG103-1B INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS-I Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
ENG161-1B ACADEMIC SKILLS AND LITERARY PRACTICES Skill Enhancement Courses 3 3 100
ENG184-1 ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses 2 2 50
HIS141 ENCOUNTERING HISTORIES: THE FUTURE OF THE PAST Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
MED142 UNDERSTANDING THE LANGUAGE OF CINEMA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
MED143 DEMOCRACY AND MEDIA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
POL142 GLOBAL POWER POLITICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
POL143 DEMOCRACY AND ETHICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY141 ADVERTISEMENT PSYCHOLOGY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY157 SCIENCE OF WELLBEING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
2 Semester - 2023 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BS141 GLOBAL LEADERSHIP AND CULTURE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 50
BS142 TOURISM, CULTURE AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
CSC996 VISUALIZING DATA - 2 2 50
ECO143 DEMOCRACY AND ECONOMY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
ECO144 DESIGNING POLICIES FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
ENG161-2B EDITING AND CONTENT WRITING Skill Enhancement Courses 3 3 100
ENG184-2 LANGUAGE AND CONTEMPORARY SOCIETY Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses 2 2 50
ENG201-2B BRITISH LITERATURE-II Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
ENG202-2B CANON AND ITS CONTESTATIONS Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
ENG203-2B SOCIOLINGUISTICS Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
ENG281-2B INTERNSHIP Skill Enhancement Courses 0 2 100
HIS142 RELIGION: PHILOSOPHY AND POLITICS THROUGH AGES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
MED141 INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
POL141 POLITICS IN INDIA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY142 APPRECIATING AESTHETICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY146 HUMAN ENGINEERING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
    

    

Introduction to Program:

The BA (English/ English Honours/ English Honours with Research) is a three/ four-year rigorous programme that provides an avenue for learners to acquire knowledge and skill sets in the areas of Literary Studies, Cultural Studies, and Linguistics. Over the course of three/four years, the programme enables holistic development among the learners by exposing them to the latest discourses in the field. The three-year programme is structured in such a way that it provides foundational knowledge of various theories, methodologies, and skills that are intrinsic to the discipline through innovative pedagogical and andragogical practices. The fourth year of the English Honors programme is designed to enable the learners gain an exposure to the various professional fields that aligns with the discipline through industry exposure and related activities. The fourth year of the English Honours with Research programme offers them the opportunity to involve in capstone projects which enables the learners to gain first-hand exposure to various field-based research and studies through community engagements and our NGO partners. The programme is highly learner-centric. Distinct from a traditional approach, the programme offers courses that are highly interDisciplinaryand multiDisciplinaryin nature providing an exposure to the learners in the areas of Visual Culture and Film Studies, Urban Studies, Digital Humanities, Critical Food Studies, Folklore Studies, Translation Studies, Sociolinguistics, Psycholinguistics, Semiotics, Multilingualism, Content Designing and Development, Editing and Publishing, Critical Pedagogic Studies, Gender and Intersection Studies, along with the conventional English Literature courses. The program is very dynamic in nature as it enables the learners to grow beyond academic and hone the skill sets by participating and organizing various conferences, seminars, and fests and make them professionally ready. The programme provides valueadded courses that focus on managing mental and emotional well-being of the learners to successfully manoeuvre the challenges according to the times

Programme Outcome/Programme Learning Goals/Programme Learning Outcome:

PO1: Demonstrate knowledge of key concepts, theoretical frameworks, and discourses in the field of English studies, Cultural studies, and Linguistics through academic engagements.

PO2: Utilise LSRW skills to communicate effectively to support academic endeavours by consistent and systematic involvement in collaborative peer engagements and assignments, research, and internship projects.

PO3: Apply critical thinking skills to cultural texts, socio-political contexts, movements, and events while participating in curricular, co-curricular, and extracurricular activities.

PO4: Evaluate the discourses on citizenship, nation-state, gender and diversity, hegemonic practices and sustainability within local, regional, national and global contexts by employing the frameworks and concepts introduced in various courses.

PO5: Generate research outputs by identifying and incorporating appropriate research methods and methodologies through engagements in the classroom, fieldwork, internship, and guided research.

PO6: Practise and display the skills of leadership and problem-solving by participating in and organising group assignments, national and international seminars, conferences, workshops, research projects, internships, apprenticeships, and cocurricular and extra-curricular activities.

PO7: Develop employability skills such as communication, research, translation, datalabelling and annotation, content creation and production, and editing and publishing through academic, societal and industry engagements.

PO8: Equip themselves to face the challenges of society and the professional world by practising self-awareness, personal integrity, positive attitude, and respect for peers through curricular engagements as well as HED, Skill Development, and service-learning.

Assesment Pattern

Examination Model: 

Total: 100 marks (CIA 70%+ ESE 30%)

CIA-I (20 Marks)

CIA II/MSE (50 Marks)

CIA-III (20 Marks)

ESE (50 Marks)

Attendance (5 Marks)

Submission mode.

Can be an individual assignment or a group assignment with an additional individual component.

Students will be tested on their conceptual clarity, theoretical engagements, application and analysis of given texts and contexts. 

They can be asked to work on certain issues/topics/discourses/practices that emerge from time to time.

 

Centralized Exam

 

Section A: 2x 10 marks

Section B: 1x 15 marks

Section C: 1x 15 marks

 

Students will be tested on their conceptual clarity, theoretical engagements, application and analysis of given texts and contexts. 

They can be asked to work on certain issues/topics/discourses/practices that emerge from time to time.

Submission mode.

 

Can be an individual assignment or a group assignment with an additional individual component.

Students will be tested on their conceptual clarity, theoretical engagements, application and analysis of given texts and contexts. 

They can be asked to work on certain issues/topics/discourses/practices that emerge from time to time.

Centralized Exam.

 

Section A: 2x 10 marks

Section B: 1x 15 marks

Section C: 1x 15 marks

 

Students will be tested on their conceptual clarity, theoretical engagements, application and analysis of given texts and contexts. 

They can be asked to work on certain issues/topics/discourses/practices that emerge from time to time.

 

Taken from KP

Examination And Assesments

The programme has a blend of submissions and centralized examinations. 

BS141 - COURTESY AND ETIQUETTES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course examines the relationship between language use, enormous variety of language experiences, belief systems, and behavioral patterns. On the other hand Etiquette helps smooth the path of our daily activities, whether it's meeting others in our daily interactions talking to someone on the phone, offering condolences properly or understanding how to talk to colleagues at a business conference. Being aware of the beliefs attitudes and etiquettes of individuals will help one to become more tolerant from one individual to the next and from one group to the next.

Course Objectives

  • Students will practice critical thoughts in comprehending the notion of culture, its relationship with language
  • To identify etiquettes and the key concepts of cross –cultural Communication.
  • To familiar ways to apply proper courtesy in different situations.
  • To help better understand the change that constantly undergoes in personal and social use.

Course Outcome

CO1: Practice critical thoughts in comprehending the notion of culture, its relationship with language

CO2: Identify etiquettes and the key concepts of cross ?cultural Communication.

CO3: Familiarize ways to apply proper courtesy in different situations

CO4: Understand the change that constantly undergoes in personal and social use.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction: Grace and Courtesy
 

Greeting a person, saying good bye to another person, Thank You, Excuse me, Introduction to oneself, Yawning, Coughing, Interrupting, Offering help, refusing help, requesting privacy, speaking in a low voice, waiting for help, accepting or declining an invitation, expressing admiration, The key principles of common courtesy, professional manners and the Golden Rule as they are practiced in the workplace environment, Classroom Etiquette and Student Behavior Guidelines, The guidelines for maintaining a civil classroom environment.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Manners and civility
 

Introduction to adjusting to a new culture, Theories on second language and culture acquisition, communication, National Standards, Culture acquisition through family and Homestays, Distinguish among the three main forms of communication in the workplace: verbal, nonverbal, and virtual. Proper and improper uses of workplace communication, the potential repercussions of poor listening in the workplace, the proper and improper use of technology in the workplace.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Etiquette
 

Why Etiquette Matters, identify common cultural differences, taboos, and customs that may be practiced in the workplace, discuss ways to navigate and honor cultural differences in the workplace, describe how to express an appropriate awareness of international and other customs. The Common Courtesies of Life, Polite Conversation, Telephone Etiquette, Correspondence, Basic Table Manners, Overnight Guests, Wedding Etiquette, Moments of Sorrow, Appropriate Behavior for Children, Gift Giving Guidelines.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Business Etiquette
 

Introduction to Modern Etiquette, The Rules of the Workplace, Meetings and Introductions, Conversation and Listening Skills, Telephone/Cell Phone, Texting, Emailing and Internet Etiquette, Etiquette in Public Places, Employment/Volunteer Etiquette, Dining Etiquette, Social Gathering Etiquette (Guest and Host/Hostess), School Etiquette, Confidence Without Arrogance

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Personal and professional Presentation
 

Restaurant Etiquette, Cellphone Etiquette, Voice Mail Etiquette, Air Travel Etiquette, Cocktail Party Etiquette, Office Gossip Etiquette, Business Dress Etiquette, Email Etiquette, Social Media Etiquette, Job Interview Etiquette, International Etiquette

Text Books And Reference Books:

Chaney, L. H. (2020). The essential guide to business etiquette.

Foster, D. (2002). The Global Etiquette Guide to Africa and the Middle East: everything

Holliday, A., Hyde, M., & Kullman, J. (2010). Intercultural communication: An advanced resource book for students. Routledge

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Wilkie, H. (2001). Writing, Speaking, Listening: The Essentials of Business Communication. How to books Ltd.

Martin, J. S., & Chaney, L. H. (2012). Global business etiquette: A guide to international communication and customs. ABC-CLIO.

Pramezwary, A., Lee, E., & Oktalieyadi, V. (2021). ETIQUETTE AND PROTOCOL IN HOSPITALITY. Penerbit NEM.

Evaluation Pattern

Component

 

Description

Units

Maximum marks

Weightage

Total Marks in Final Grade

CIA1 A

Quiz

1

20

100%

20

CIA1 B

Individual Assignment

3

25

100%

25

CIA2

Group Assignment

2

25

100%

25

CIA3

Group Assignment

4 and 5

25

100%

25

Attendance

 

 

5

100%

5

TOTAL

 

 

100

ECO142 - ECONOMICS OF CORRUPTION (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

This course is aimed at undergraduate students to introduce to them the prominent debates in the economics of corruption. The course discusses how corruption acts as a constraint on economic growth using the theoretical constructs in Political Economy. It allows students to delve into the causes and consequences of corruption. In particular, the course will examine how corruption affects the emerging economies. The course will consider some of the seminal papers on the economics of corruption.

Course Objectives

 1. to create an understanding of the economic issues associated with corruption

 2. to enhance the student's understanding of the effect of corruption on growth and development

 3. to provide insights into the effect of corruption on emerging countries 

Course Outcome

CO1: identify the nuances in the way corruption is defined and interpreted in different economies

CO2: investigate some impacts of corruption on emerging economies

CO3: analyse the cause and consequences of corruption and examine some of the policy reforms aimed at tackling corruption

CO4: present complex ideas through written and oral presentation

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit I: Corruption, Poor Governance and Institutional Structure
 

Causes and Consequences of Corruption: What do we know from a cross-section of countries? Democratic Institutions and Corruption: Incentives and Constraints in Politics, Bargaining for Bribes: The Role of Institutions.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit II: Corruption and the Private Sector
 

The Privatization of Rent-Generating Industries and Corruption; Corruption in Private Sector, Why the private sector is likely to lead the next stage in the global fight against corruption.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit III: Tackling Corruption
 

Corruption and Policy Reform; Anti-Corruption Authorities: An Effective Tool to Curb Corruption?  Corruption and Competition: Fair Markets as an Anti-Corruption Device.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Auriol, E., & Straub, S. (2011). Privatization of Rent-generating Industries and Corruption. In S. Rose-Ackerman & T. Søreide, (Eds.). International Handbook on the Economics of Corruption, (Vol. 2). Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Pub.

Burger, E. S., & Holland, M. S. (2006). Why the private sector is likely to lead the next stage in the global fight against corruption. Fordham International Law Journal, 30, 45.

Meschi, P. X. (2009). Government Corruption and Foreign Stakes in International Joint Ventures in Emerging Economies. Asia Pacific Journal of Management, 26(2), 241-261.

Meyer, K. E., Estrin, S., Bhaumik, S. K., & Peng, M. W. (2009). Institutions, Resources, and Entry Strategies in Emerging Economies. Strategic Management Journal, 30(1), 61-80.

Nowakowski, K. (2010). Corruption in the Private Sector. Economics and Law, 6(1), 345-360.

Uhlenbruck, K., Rodriguez, P., Doh, J., & Eden, L. (2006). The Impact of Corruption on Entry Strategy: Evidence from Telecommunication Projects in Emerging Economies. Organization Science, 17(3), 402-414.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Cartier-Bresson, J. (2000). Economics of corruption. Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. The OECD Observer, (220), 25.

Jain, A. K. (2001). Corruption: A Review. Journal of Economic Surveys, 15(1), 71-121.

Jain, A. K. (Ed.). (2012). Economics of Corruption (Vol. 65). Springer Science & Business Media.

Rose-Ackerman, S. (1975). The Economics of Corruption. Journal of Public Economics, 4(2), 187-203.

Evaluation Pattern

 

            MSE/ CIA2

 

ESE

 

Attendance

45 Marks

50 Marks

5 Marks

ENG101-1B - TEXTS AND TEXTUALITIES IN THE DIGITAL CONTEMPORARY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Reading is an essential skill in the development of one’s critical faculties. But it is also important to know

how to read, to understand the politics and nuances of ‘texts’ and the nature of ‘textualities’. This course

aims to help students grasp and negotiate with the complex set of signifying systems we have come to call

‘texts’. Through this course students will learn to read not just written literature, but also visuals, cultural

signs, films and much more by understanding that anything that one can engage with and make meaning can

function as a text to be read. The course also attempts to engage students in understanding and reading the

nuances of the digital texts and textualities and how the digital has reconfigured our ways of reading,

understanding and engaging with ‘texts’ and making meaning. The course aims to situate the English and

Cultural Studies student at the cusp of all these changes and hopes to equip the students with valuable skills

to understand the nuances of the local, regional, national and global in their everyday engagements with

digital and other ‘texts’. It aims to enable the students to understand the intersections of class, caste, gender,

environment at least at a basic level in their engagements with the physical and digital universe.

Course Outcome

CO1: Develop and demonstrate critical thinking and analytical skills in day-to-day engagements with ?texts? and their contexts through classroom discussions, debates, written assignments

CO2: Interpret the politics of language and meaning making through a critical reflection on the regional, national and global contexts in their written assignments.

CO3: Understand and analyse the functionalities of the digital as it effects meaning, the process of meaning making and the intersections of class, caste, race, gender and ecology that operate therein through classroom discussions, creative assignments, digital scrapbooks, blogs or vlogs.

CO4: Evaluate one?s position as a student of English and Cultural Studies and what it take to be such in the posthuman digital age we belong to in terms of integrity, personal and professional ethics and humanity through classroom debates and discussions, creative interpretations and written assignments.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Understanding English Studies Globally and in India
 

This unit aims to enable students to situate themselves within the domain of English and Cultural Studies and understand their role

and their possibilities, enabling them to see where they are and where they are going as a student of English. The topics and texts in this unit

enable the student to understand the role of English and Cultural Studies in a global and national context enabling them to situate their regional

and local specificities into the matrix and enables the student to understand the implications of careers within the domain in terms of skills and

values.

1. The Discipline of English and Cultural Studies

2. The role of an English and Cultural Studies student

3. The history and nature of English and Cultural Studies globally and in India

4. The need for an English and Cultural Studies student

Essential readings:

Young, Tory. “Reading: The Discipline of English.” Studying English Literature: A Practical Guide. Cambridge UP, 2008, pp. 24-26.

Young, Tory. “Reading: The New English Student.” Studying English Literature: A Practical Guide. Cambridge UP, 2008, pp. 27-35.

Poduval, Satish. “To Be in Eng. Lit., Now That… The Voyage Out.” Subject to Change: Teaching Literature in the Nineties, Orient

Blackswan, 1998, pp. 143–59.

Viswanathan, Gauri. Introduction. The Masks of Conquest. Oxford UP, 1989, pp. 1-21.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
The Literary ?Tradition?
 

This unit will attempt to enable the student to understand the literary text in terms of its aesthetics and politics. It will enable the

student to understand the nuances of what one has traditionally understood to be literature and its genres and problematize those traditional

understandings. It will enable the student to understand the global contexts of reading literary texts and their implications within the frames of

their role and continuity as a student of English and Cultural Studies.

1. Literature: Nature and Functions

2. Classics and the Canon

3. Literary Genres: Poetry, Novel, Drama

4. Reading Practices within the literary

Essential readings (Can choose 3 among these):

Eagleton, Terry. “Introduction: What is Literature?” Literary Theory: An Introduction, John Wiley & Sons, 2011, pp. 1-14.

Eco, Umberto. “On Some Functions of Literature.” On Literature. Translated by Martin MacLaughlin, Seeker and Warberg, 2002, pp. 2-5.

Calvino, Italo. “Why Read the Classics?” Why Read the Classics? Translated by Martin MacLaughlin, Vintage Book, 1991, pp. 4-7.

Excerpts on Poetry, novel and drama from Klarer, Mario. An Introduction to Literary Studies. Routledge, 2013.

Todorov, Tzvetan, and John Lyons. “What Is Literature For?” New Literary History, vol. 38, no. 1, 2007, pp. 13–32. JSTOR,

http://www.jstor.org/stable/20057987. Accessed 28 Feb. 2023.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Reading Texts and Textualities: Implications for the Student
 

This unit will enable them to understand the central idea of the “text” and textualities that determine the course. This unit will

attempt to enable students to understand what a text is and how important it is to engage with ‘texts’ and contexts within the local, regional,

national and global contextualisations that determine their existence. The student will be exposed to the processes of textuality and how the

nature and medium of a ‘text’ determine its meanings and meaning making processes, which will help them situate and equip them with basic

skills to understand how the digital produces and disseminates meanings within .

1. The nature of ‘texts’ as signifying systems

2. The processes of meaning production and its dissemination

3. The process of textualization and textuality

4. The medium is the message: Literary, Visual, Digital

Essential readings:

Excerpts from Barthes, Roland. "From Work to Text." Image Music Text. Translated by Stephen Heath, Fontana Press, 1977, pp. 155-64.

Excerpts from Barthes, Roland. “The Death of the Author”. Image Music Text. Translated by Stephen Heath, Fontana Press, 1977. pp. 142-48.

Mowitt, John. “What Is a Text Today?” PMLA, vol. 117, no. 5, 2002, pp. 1217–21. JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org/stable/823172. Accessed 28

Feb. 2023.

MacLuhan, Marshall. “The Medium is the Message”. Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man, The MIT Press, 1964, pp. 1-18.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Digital Textualities / Digitextualities: Methods and Processes
 

This unit will introduce students to the digital and the field of Digital Humanities in a very basic way. It will enable students to

interrogate the politics of the digital as a medium and how meanings are contextually produced within the digital texts and contexts. It will

look into the nature of digitality and the processes of the production, dissemination and consumption of meaning the digital entails within

glocal, national and regions determinations and the intersections of technology and the human that these texts create and operate within and

the implications of this on sustainable reading, writing and publishing.

1. Digital Texts and Textualities

2. Basic introduction to Digital humanities

3. The politics of the digital: production, dissemination, consumption

4. Meaning making in the Digital.

5. Human and Posthuman: The Digital Problematics

Essential readings:

Walter Ong. “Writing is a Technology” Christopher De Hamel. 'Illuminators, Binders and Booksellers' in Scribes and Illuminators. Toronto,

University of Toronto Press, 2013. 45-70.

Raymond Williams. “The Technology and the Society' in Television: Technology and Cultural Form. Schocken Books, 1975, pp. 9-31.

Nayar,Pramod K. “New Media, Digitextuality and Public Space: Reading ‘Cybermohalla’”. Postcolonial Text, vol. 4, no. 1, 2008.

https://www.academia.edu/368266/Cybermohalla. Accessed on 28 Feb 2023.

Peters, Michael A., and Peter Fitzsimons. “Digital Technologies in the Age of Youtube: Electronic Textualities, the Virtual Revolution and the

Democratization of Knowledge.” Geopolitics, History, and International Relations, vol. 4, no. 1, 2012, pp. 11–27. JSTOR,

https://www.jstor.org/stable/26804831. Accessed 28 Feb. 2023.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Digital Texts and Contexts: Reading Electronic Literatures
 

 This unit is intended to familiarize students with the new modes of reading and engaging available in the world today – the

world of the digital and the politics of it and what it does to meaning making. The module will

1. Electronic Literatures

2. Genres of e-litt: Performance Poetry, Instapoetry, Fanfiction and fan work, TTTs, Wattpad stories, OTT

3. Digital Storytelling and Orality

4. Reading Digital Data

Essential readings:

Hayles, Katherine N. “Electronic Literatures: What is It?”. The Electronic Literature Organisation, v1.0, 2 Jan 2007,

https://eliterature.org/pad/elp.html. Accessed on 28 Feb 2023.

Nicholas Carr. 'The Juggler's Brain' in The Shallows: How the internet is changing the way we think, read and remember. London, Atlantic

Books, 2010. 115-120; 126-129.

Hammond, Adam. “Literature in the Digital Master Medium”. In Literature in the Digital Age: An Introduction, Cambridge UP, 2016, pp.

175-197.

Dent, Alexander S. “Intellectual Property, Piracy, and Counterfeiting.” Annual Review of Anthropology, vol. 45, 2016, pp. 17–31. JSTOR,

http://www.jstor.org/stable/24811551. Accessed 28 Feb. 2023.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Texts Prescribed in the Course

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Eagleton, Terry. “The Rise of English.” Literary Theory: An Introduction, John Wiley & Sons,2011, pp. 15–46.

Klarer, Mario. An Introduction to Literary Studies. Routledge, 2013.

McDonald, Ronan. The Values of Literary Studies: Critical Institutions, Scholarly Agendas. Cambridge UP, 2015.

Adler, Mortimer J., and Charles Van Doren. “How to Be a Demanding Reader.” How to Read Book, Simon and Schuster, 2011, pp. 45–55.

Calvino, Italo. The Literature Machine: Essays. RHUK, 1997.

Eco, Umberto. On Literature. Translated by Martin MacLaughlin, Seeker and Warberg, 2002.

Eslin, Martin. An Anatomy of Drama. Hill and Wang, 1977.

Foster, Thomas C. How to Read Literature Like a Professor. Harper Perennial, 2014.

Klarer, Klarer. An Introduction to Literary Studies. Routledge, 2013.

Eagleton, Terry. How to Read a Poem. Wiley-Blackwell, 2007.

Klarer, Klarer. An Introduction to Literary Studies. Routledge, 2013.

Monaco, James. How to Read a Film. Oxford UP, 2009.

MacCaw, Neil. How to Read Texts. Continuum, 2013.

Hall, Leigh A., and Susan V. Piazza. “Critically Reading Texts: What Students Do and How Teachers Can Help.” The Reading Teacher, vol.

62, no. 1, 2008, pp. 32–41. JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org/stable/20204657. Accessed 28 Feb. 2023.

Hitchcock, Peter. “How to Read a Discipline.” Comparative Literature, vol. 66, no. 1, 2014, pp. 5–14. JSTOR,

http://www.jstor.org/stable/24694531. Accessed 28 Feb. 2023.

Williams, Abigail. “How to Read.” The Social Life of Books: Reading Together in the Eighteenth-Century Home, Yale University Press, 2017,

pp. 11–35. JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt1q1xt90.5. Accessed 28 Feb. 2023.

Vander Meulen, David L. “How to Read Book History.” Studies in Bibliography, vol. 56, 2003, pp. 171–93. JSTOR,

http://www.jstor.org/stable/40372195. Accessed 28 Feb. 2023.

Lerer, Seth, and Joseph A. Dane. “Introduction: What Is a Text?” Huntington Library Quarterly, vol. 58, no. 1, 1995, pp. 1–10. JSTOR,

https://doi.org/10.2307/3817894. Accessed 28 Feb. 2023.

Graff, Gerald. “Why How We Read Trumps What We Read.” Profession, 2009, pp. 66–74. JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org/stable/25595914.

Accessed 28 Feb. 2023.

Rao, Maithili. “How To Read a Hindi Film.” Film Comment, vol. 38, no. 3, 2002, pp. 37–40. JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org/stable/43577782.

Accessed 28 Feb. 2023.

Swearingen, C. Jan. “What Is the Text? Who Is the Reader? A Meditation on Meanderings of Meaning.” New Literary History, vol. 38, no. 1,

2007, pp. 145–61. JSTOR. http://www.jstor.org/stable/20057993. Accessed 28 Feb. 2023.

Valdés, Mario J. “What Is a Text?: Explanation and Understanding.” A Ricoeur Reader: Reflection and Imagination, University of Toronto

Press, 1991, pp. 43–64. JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.3138/9781442664883.5. Accessed 28 Feb. 2023.

Haring, Lee. “What It Is: Texts, Plural.” How to Read a Folktale: The “Ibonia” Epic from Madagascar, 1st ed., vol. 4, Open Book Publishers,

2013, pp. 5–20. JSTOR, https://doi.org/10.2307/j.ctt5vjtj7.7. Accessed 28 Feb. 2023.

Hanks, W. F. “Text and Textuality.” Annual Review of Anthropology, vol. 18, 1989, pp. 95–127. JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org/stable/2155887.

Accessed 28 Feb. 2023.

Cossar, Harper. “New Media, Digitextuality, and Widescreen.” Letterboxed: The Evolution of Widescreen Cinema, University Press of

Kentucky, 2011, pp. 225–55. JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt2jcdhv.9. Accessed 28 Feb. 2023.

Arthur, Paul Longley. “Digital Textuality, Writing, and New Media.” In “Focus on Twenty-First Century Literature,” edited by Julia Hoydis

and Chris Boge. Special issue, Anglistik 26, no. 2 (2015): 113–23.

Everett, Anna and Caldwell, John T,, (eds.). New Media: Theories and Practices of Digitextuality. 1stt edn, Routledge, 2003.

https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203953853.

Arjun Ghosh. “Censorship through Copyright: From print to digital media” in Social Scientist vol. 41. nos. 1-2 January-February 2013.

Greenspan, Brian. “Are Digital Humanists Utopian?” Debates in the Digital Humanities 2016, edited by Matthew K. Gold and Lauren F.

Klein, University of Minnesota Press, 2016, pp. 393–409. JSTOR, https://doi.org/10.5749/j.ctt1cn6thb.36. Accessed 28 Feb. 2023.

Greenspan, Brian. “The Scandal of Digital Humanities.” Debates in the Digital Humanities 2019, edited by Matthew K. Gold and Lauren F.

Klein, University of Minnesota Press, 2019, pp. 92–95. JSTOR, https://doi.org/10.5749/j.ctvg251hk.12. Accessed 28 Feb. 2023.

Linley, Margaret. “Ecological Entanglements of DH.” Debates in the Digital Humanities 2016, edited by Matthew K. Gold and Lauren F.

Klein, University of Minnesota Press, 2016, pp. 410–37. JSTOR, https://doi.org/10.5749/j.ctt1cn6thb.37. Accessed 28 Feb. 2023.

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Pattern: 

Total: 100 marks. (CIA 70%+ ESE 30%) 

 
 
 
 
 
 

CIA-I (20 Marks) 

 
 
 
 

CIA II/MSE (50 Marks) 

 
 
 
 

CIA-III (20 Marks) 

 
 
 
 

ESE (50 Marks) 

 
 
 
 

Attendance 5 Marks 

 
 
 
 

Submission mode. 

Can be an individual assignment or a group assignment with an additional individual component. 

 

 

 
 

Centralized exam. 

Section A: 2x 15 marks 

Section B: 1x 15 marks 

Section C: 1 x 15 marks 

There can be choices in Section A and B. Section C will have a compulsory question 

Students will be tested on their conceptual clarity, theoretical engagements, application and analysis of given texts and contexts.  

 
 

Submission mode. 

Can be an individual assignment or a group assignment with an additional individual component. 

 

 
 

Centralized exam. 

Section A: 2x 15 marks 

Section B: 1x 15 marks 

Section C: 1 x 15 marks 

There can be choices in Section A and B. Section C will have a compulsory question. 

Students will be tested on their conceptual clarity, theoretical engagements, application and analysis of given texts and contexts.  

 
 

Taken from KP 

ENG102-1B - BRITISH LITERATURE-I (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This paper titled ‘British Literature I’ aims to introduce students to the growth and

development of English Literature from a global perspective. It informs students how various

intersectional aspects of socio-political, cultural, and human values work towards making certain ideas, ideologies, cultural productions, and discourses. The course emphasises the importance of

critically engaging with the relationship between a text and its formative context and evaluating the

relevance of these texts and concepts in contemporary times, specifically in relation to postcolonial

studies, cultural studies, language studies, literary theory and criticism, studies on nationalism, and

gender studies.

By introducing students to these diverse perspectives, the course contributes to the

development of critical thinking and analytical skills, as well as cultural competence and global

awareness. Through the study of British literature, students gain an understanding of how socio-

political and cultural contexts shape literary texts shape and. They also develop skills to engage

critically and imaginatively with literary texts and their discursive contexts, which are essential for

success in various fields.

The course instructor may choose one drama, one novel, three prose pieces, and 8-10

poems across all five units while preparing the course plan

Course Outcome

CO1: Recall key historical periods, styles, and philosophies of British literature in written assignments, class discussions and presentations, and debates.

CO2: Identify and describe the cultural, socio-political, and human values expressed in literary texts through written assignments, class discussions and presentations, and debates.

CO3: Synthesise information from multiple literary texts and discursive contexts to form a comprehensive understanding of British literary history and present it in their written assignments, class discussions and presentations, and debates.

CO4: Create well-structured and persuasive arguments about literary texts by employing advanced writing skills in their written assignments.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
The Age of Chaucer & 16th Century English Literature
 

This unit explores the works of Chaucer and then that of the Elizabethan era, including the plays of William

Shakespeare and other notable writers. Students will gain an understanding of the historical and cultural context of this period, as

well as insights into timeless human values such as love, power, and ambition. This unit helps to develop critical reading and

analysis skills and an appreciation for the global influence of English literature. Instructors may choose any 3-5 texts of their

preference given in the essential reading list while preparing the course plan.

1. Background information on Geoffrey Chaucer as well as the Elizabethan Age

2. Major authors of the Elizabethan age and their relevance to the evolution of the English language and literature.

3. Distinct style maintained by the prose, poetry, and drama of the Elizabethan writers

Essential readings:

Bacon, Francis. "Of Studies." Eight Essayists, edited by A.S. Cairncross, Macmillan, 1978, pp. 3-4.

Chaucer, Geoffrey. General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales. Bloomsbury Publishing, 2000.

Marlowe, Christopher. Dr. Faustus. Dover Publications, 2012.

Shakespeare, W. The Comedy of Errors. 2020.

Sidney, P. and W. Jonson. Astrophel and Stella. Createspace Independent Publishing Platform, 2014.

Spenser, Edmund. "Epithalamion by Edmund Spenser | Poetry Foundation."

https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/45191/epithalamion-56d22497d00d4.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Seventeenth-Century Literature and Thought
 

 Students will examine themes pertaining to human values such as corruption, betrayal, and revenge and gain insights

into the human experience of these concepts. Through close analysis of language and form, students will develop their literary

interpretation skills and understand the global significance of these works.

1. Background information on the life and works of Jacobean writers and John Milton and his contemporaries.

2. Major authors of the age and their relevance to the evolution of the English language and literature.

3. Distinct style maintained by the prose, poetry, and drama of the Jacobean age and the Restoration Period.

Essential readings:

Donne, John. "A Valediction Forbidding Mourning." Poetry Foundation https://www.poetryfoundation.org/harriet-books/2011/07/a-

valediction-forbidding-mourning.

Dryden, John. Mac Flecknoe. F. Hall at the Clarendon Press, 1924.

Marvell, Andrew. "To His Coy Mistress." Poetry Foundation https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/44688/to-his-coy-mistress.

Milton, J. and A. Baldwin. Paradise Lost. Oxford University Press, 2008.

Shakespeare, W. Macbeth. Simon & Schuster, 2011.

Webster, J. and M. Neill. The Duchess of Malfi (Norton Critical Editions). W. W. Norton, 2015.

Congreve, William. The Way of the World. Penguin Books Limited, 2006.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Augustan Age
 

In this unit, students will study the literature of the Augustan Age. They will explore the themes of love, sexuality, and

political power and consider how these issues resonate globally today. Through analysis of various literary forms, students will

develop critical thinking and writing skills and an appreciation for the cultural and historical significance of Augustan literature.

1. Background information on the Augustan Age.

2. Major authors of the age and their relevance to the evolution of the English language and literature.

3. Distinct style maintained by the prose, poetry, and drama of the Augustan Age.

Essential readings:

Addison, Joseph. "Remarks on the English by the Indian Kings." Eight Essayists, edited by A.S. Cairncross, Macmillan, 1978, pp.

70-74.

Defoe, D. Robinson Crusoe. Aladdin, 2012.

Pope, A. and L. Damrosch. The Rape of the Lock and Other Major Writings. Penguin Books Limited, 2011.

Steele, Richard. "The Spectator Club." Eight Essayists, edited by A.S. Cairncross, Macmillan, 1978, pp. 40-45.

Swift, J. and C. Fabricant. A Modest Proposal and Other Writings. Penguin Books Limited, 2009.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Age of Sensibility
 

Students will examine themes such as morality, satire, and social order and consider how these issues relate to

contemporary global concerns. Through close reading and interpretation, students will develop their analytical and communication

skills and an understanding of the continued relevance of the Age of Sensibility.

1. Background information on the Age of Sensibility

2. Major authors of the age and their relevance to the evolution of the English language and literature.

3. Distinct style maintained by the prose, poetry, and drama of the writers of the period.

 

Essential readings:

Blake, W. Songs of Innocence and Songs of Experience. Dover Publications, 2012.

Goldsmith, Oliver. "Parliamentary Elections." Eight Essayists, edited by A.S. Cairncross, Macmillan, 1978, pp. 94-97.

Gray, Thomas. “Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard.” Poetry Foundation, Poetry Foundation,

https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/44299/elegy-written-in-a-country-churchyard.

Johnson, S. et al. The Lives of the Poets: A Selection. OUP Oxford, 2009.

Sheridan, R.B. The School for Scandal. ReadHowYouWant.com, Limited, 2009.

Walpole, H. The Castle of Otranto: A Gothic Novel. Floating Press, 2009.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Romantic Revival
 

Students will explore themes such as nature, individualism, and the supernatural and consider how these concepts are relevant to global human values today. Through analysis of various literary genres, students will develop their critical thinking and writing skills and an appreciation for the continued influence of Romantic literature.

1. Background information on the Romantic Age

2. Major authors of the age and their relevance to the evolution of the English language and literature.

3. Distinct style maintained by the prose and poetry of the Romantic writers.

Essential readings:

Coleridge, Samuel Taylor. “Kubla Khan.” Poetry Foundation, Poetry Foundation,

https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/43991/kubla-khan.

Keats, John. “La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad.” Poetry Foundation, Poetry Foundation,

https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/44475/la-belle-dame-sans-merci-a-ballad.

Shelley, Percy Bysshe. “Ode to the West Wind.” Poetry Foundation, Poetry Foundation,

https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/45134/ode-to-the-west-wind.

Shelley, M. Frankenstein. Dover Publications, 2013.

Wordsworth, William. "Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey| Poetry Foundation."

https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/45527/lines-composed-a-few-miles-above-tintern-abbey-on-revisiting-the-banks-

of-the-wye-during-a-tour-july-13-1798.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Texts prescribed in the syllabus 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Daiches, David. A Critical History of English Literature Vol 1 & 2. 2015.

Sanders, Andrew. The Short Oxford History of English Literature. Oxford Univ. Press, 2006.

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Pattern: 

Total: 100 marks. (CIA 70%+ ESE 30%) 

 
 
 
 
 
 

CIA-I (20 Marks) 

 
 
 
 

CIA II/MSE (50 Marks) 

 
 
 
 

CIA-III (20 Marks) 

 
 
 
 

ESE (50 Marks) 

 
 
 
 

Attendance 5 Marks 

 
 
 
 

Submission mode. 

Can be an individual assignment or a group assignment with an additional individual component. 

 

 

 
 

Centralized exam. 

Section A: 2x 15 marks 

Section B: 1x 15 marks 

Section C: 1 x 15 marks 

There can be choices in Section A and B. Section C will have a compulsory question 

Students will be tested on their conceptual clarity, theoretical engagements, application and analysis of given texts and contexts.  

 
 

Submission mode. 

Can be an individual assignment or a group assignment with an additional individual component. 

 

 
 

Centralized exam. 

Section A: 2x 15 marks 

Section B: 1x 15 marks 

Section C: 1 x 15 marks 

There can be choices in Section A and B. Section C will have a compulsory question. 

Students will be tested on their conceptual clarity, theoretical engagements, application and analysis of given texts and contexts.  

 

ENG103-1B - INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS-I (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course provides an introduction to the discipline of Linguistics. Students will learn the basic

concepts and methods used by linguists in the scientific study of human language. The course will

examine the material, accessible properties of language (the sounds, the words, the phrases...) to get an

understanding of its non-material, abstract ones. Given that language is intimately connected to our

cognitive and social experience, an understanding of linguistic structure can help illuminate aspects of

these domains as well. While many key aspects will be illustrated using evidence derived primarily from English and Indian languages. The course will discuss evidence from a variety of languages in

order to better demonstrate the richness of linguistic diversity.

Course Outcome

CO1: Analyse and articulate general themes about the nature of human language, and how languages work.

CO2: Discuss fundamental processes common to all languages related to the domains of morphology, phonetics, phonology, writing systems, and language in society.

CO3: Apply findings from linguistic research to address real world issues, and be able to discuss language issues in an informed way both to linguists and non-linguists.

CO4: Analyse how language varies across speakers, over time, and across dialectal regions.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Language and Evolution
 

The unit will familiarise the students with the term language and its evolution. The unit also introduce to the human

language vs animal communication. Citing examples from both global and national contexts, the unit will briefly look into language family

trees and on the studies related to it. The unit deals with human values and sustainability.

4. Introduction to the field of linguistics

5. Theories on language evolution

6. Language as a tool for communication, design features of language

7. Linguistic competence vs. linguistic performance, diachronic and synchronic linguistics

8. Pictograms and ideograms, logograms

9. Language, history and change-family tree, sound construction, sound change.

 

Essential readings: Yule, George. The study of language. George Yule. Ed. 7 New York: Cambridge University Press,2020.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
The sounds and gesture of Language
 

This unit provides a basic introduction to the phonetics and phonology of human languages. Phonetics is the study of

how the sounds of the world’s languages are produced and perceived. In this unit, we will begin with an introduction of how to

describe and identify different speech sounds by their acoustic and articulatory properties. Through the unit, the students will identify/

work with a diverse sample of the world’s languages. The unit deals with professional ethics and sustainability.

1. Articulatory Phonetics, Acoustic Phonetics and Auditory Phonetics.

2. Air stream mechanisms, places and manners of articulation, Vowels and Consonants.

3. Introduction to Indian languages.

4. Indian Sign language

 

Essential readings: Yule, George.The study of language. George Yule. Ed. 7 New York: Cambridge University Press,2020.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Morphology
 

What is a word? Do the things we put spaces around when we write correspond to anything in our mental grammars?

How are new words formed in a language and what are their structures. This unit aims to answer these questions by examining

morphological phenomena from across the world’s languages, including English as well as Indian languages. The unit deals with

professional ethics.

1. Words vs Morpheme, Morph, Allomorph, Morpheme and word.

2. Word formation process -affixes, compounding, blending, conversion, acronyms, clipping, borrowing, coinage.

3. Content and functional words, Inflectional and derivational morphology.

Essential readings: Yule, George.The study of language. George Yule. Ed. 7 New York: Cambridge University Press,2020.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Language acquisition and use
 

Variation and change are basic properties of language: All languages show variation in form across geographic space

and between social groups, and languages are always changing. The unit will introduce the students to some of the basic concepts and

cases on language variation and change among groups and sub-groups both in global and national context. Further the unit will also

look into the human language acquisition and the theories related to it. The unit will focus on the human values and professional

ethics.

4. The standard language, Accent and dialect

5. Dialectology, Regional dialects, Isoglosses and dialect boundaries, The dialect continuum

6. Bilingualism and diglossia, Pidgins and creoles

7. Language acquisition: First Language Acquisition and early vocabulary development

8. Innate hypothesis and Critical Period hypothesis

Teaching learning strategies: Class discussion, peer interaction, round table discussion, Lectures, Videos, and reading material

together in class, discussions, Q&As.

Essential readings: Yule, George.The study of language. George Yule. Ed. 7 New York: Cambridge University Press,2020.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Texts prescribed in the Course

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Ladefoged, Peter & Keith Johnson. 2014. A Course in Phonetics. Peter Ladefoged & Keith Johnson. Cengage Press. 5th edition or

late

Fromkin, Victoria, et al. An Introduction to Language. Centage Learning, 2018.

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Pattern: 

Total: 100 marks. (CIA 70%+ ESE 30%) 

 
 
 
 
 
 

CIA-I (20 Marks) 

 
 
 
 

CIA II/MSE (50 Marks) 

 
 
 
 

CIA-III (20 Marks) 

 
 
 
 

ESE (50 Marks) 

 
 
 
 

Attendance 5 Marks 

 
 
 
 

Submission mode. 

Can be an individual assignment or a group assignment with an additional individual component. 

 

 

 
 

Centralized exam. 

Section A: 2x 15 marks 

Section B: 1x 15 marks 

Section C: 1 x 15 marks 

There can be choices in Section A and B. Section C will have a compulsory question 

Students will be tested on their conceptual clarity, theoretical engagements, application and analysis of given texts and contexts.  

 
 

Submission mode. 

Can be an individual assignment or a group assignment with an additional individual component. 

 

 
 

Centralized exam. 

Section A: 2x 15 marks 

Section B: 1x 15 marks 

Section C: 1 x 15 marks 

There can be choices in Section A and B. Section C will have a compulsory question. 

Students will be tested on their conceptual clarity, theoretical engagements, application and analysis of given texts and contexts.  

 

ENG161-1B - ACADEMIC SKILLS AND LITERARY PRACTICES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Academic Skills and Literacy Practices is a course which allows students to acquire skills which

are of global importance in providing a base for their academic and professional development

through hands-on training to exercise the acquired knowledge in reasoning, reading, and writing.

Academic Skills focus on developing research skills through careful reading and critical writing

that are globally considered foundational and crucial in textual scholarship and knowledge

production. The participants of this course will determine their areas of interest in conceptualizing

their seminal work and constructing a reasoned argument. The course deals with receptive skills

(reading) and productive skills (writing). The course prompts enable the participants to take their

learning-receptive skills and productive skills in a purpose-driven and practice-oriented mode on a

contextual basis. This course facilitates the participants with varied practices, tasks, exemplars, and

sample papers to practice with context-driven reading material. The participants of this course will

exercise their textual scholarship and translate their areas of interest into meaningful writing. This

course will emphasize the aspects of professional ethics while conducting research. This course

directs the learners to produce basic academic presentations which should be career-oriented, and

of social relevance. By taking this course that provides global learning, such as Academic Skills

and Literacy Practices, etc. participants can enhance their employability and develop professional

ethics, ultimately preparing themselves to meet global needs and be successful global citizens in

today's interconnected world. The course specifically focuses on the following areas:

• Principles of Writing,

• Features of Writing,

• Essay Organization

• Academic Presentation, and

• Research Aptitude

Course Outcome

CO1: Identify various forms of academic writing through reading practices and in class presentations.

CO2: Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of academic skills, integrity and research ethics in the form of presentations and papers.

CO3: Demonstrate the ability to critically read and write academic English through various reading and writing assignments.

CO4: Apply the learnings from this course in the creation and production of various assignments across courses.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Principles of Academic Writing and Essay Organisation
 

This unit is designed to provide the learners with a first-hand knowledge of various structural and conceptual ideas

pertaining to the field of academic writing. And goes in-depth on the basics of essay writing and organisation. This unit provides

global learning and professional skills such as Academic Skills, Literacy Practices, etc. that in turn will enhance participants'

employability in the global market.

4. Cohesion, Clarity, Logical Order, Consistency, Unity, Conciseness, Completeness

5. Anchoring the context

6. Building Thesis

7. Taking a position

8. Organizing ideas

9. Developing Paragraphs

10. The Basics: What does a good essay need?

11. Basic steps in writing an essay: Characteristics/ Features, Types, Research, Formal and Informal Essays, Focus on the

writing stages

Essential readings:

Bailey, Stephen. Academic Writing: A Handbook for International Students. Routledge, 2015.

Williams, Joseph M. Style: Lessons in Clarity and Grace. 12th ed., Pearson, 2017.

Murray, Neil. Writing Essays in English Language and Linguistics: Principles, Tips and Strategies for Undergraduates. Cambridge

University Press, 2012.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Research Skills: Critical Reading and Research Writing
 

 This unit is designed to provide the learners with a first-hand knowledge of various ideas pertaining to effective

research and writing academic papers. The course emphasizes the importance of critical reading and analysis, note-taking strategies,

argument development, and proper citation. Learners are encouraged to engage in peer feedback and reflection to improve their

writing skills, and the course also addresses professional ethics and academic integrity. Overall, this unit imparts global learning

such as Research Skills, Career-Oriented writing, etc., and prepares learners to be successful academic writers and researchers

making them more employable and ready for global market needs.

1. Pre-reading.

2. Annotating.

3. Outlining.

. Summarizing.

5. Finding oppositions.

6. Identifying thesis and related arguments.

7. Three Pass Approach

8. What is research? Importance of Research, Type: Primary and Secondary Research.

9. Research Methodology.

10. Referencing: Introduction to MLA, Introduction to APA.

11. Abstract, Literature Review, Annotated Bibliography.

12. Writing Introductions, chapters, and conclusions.

13. Academic Integrity and Research Ethics: Plagiarism

 

Essential readings:

Booth, Wayne C., Gregory G. Colomb, and Joseph M. Williams. The Craft of Research. 4th ed., University of Chicago Press, 2016.

Purdue Online Writing Lab. "Introduction to APA Style." Purdue University, 2021,

owl.purdue.edu/owl/research_and_citation/apa_style/apa_formatting_and_style_guide/general_format.html.

Purdue Online Writing Lab. "Introduction to MLA Style." Purdue University, 2021,

owl.purdue.edu/owl/research_and_citation/mla_style/mla_formatting_and_style_guide/general_format.html.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Academic Presentation
 

This unit introduces learners to the field of academic presentation and provides them with hands-on exposure to the

field. Overall, this unit focuses on developing strong presentation skills that can provide learners with a range of benefits, including

global learning, enhanced employability, and improved professional ethics. Strong presentation skills are highly valued by

employers, as they demonstrate an individual's ability to communicate effectively with colleagues, clients, and stakeholders.

Developing strong presentation skills requires developing cultural sensitivity and awareness, which is a critical component of global

learning.

9. Starting a Presentation; Stating your purpose; Presentations – signposting;

10. Presentations – Survival Language; A Friendly Face; Microphones; Nerves; Stand Up.

11. Describing change – verbs; Describing change – adjectives; Describing change – giving figures;

12. Commenting on visuals; Dealing with questions; Rhetorical questions; Focusing attention; Cause and effect.

 

Essential readings:

Riedl, Rachel. "Effective Presentations: A Guide for Non-Native Speakers of English." University of Michigan Press, 2018.

Zelazny, Gene. "Say It with Presentations: How to Design and Deliver Successful Business Presentations." McGraw-Hill Education,

2011.

Ennis, Catherine D. "Oral Presentations in the Composition Course: A Brief Guide." Pearson, 2013.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Texts Prescribed in the Course

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Strunk, William, and E.B. White. The Elements of Style. 4th ed., Longman, 1999.

Hacker, Diana, and Nancy Sommers. A Writer's Reference. 9th ed., Bedford/St. Martin's, 2018.

Graff, Gerald, and Cathy Birkenstein. They Say / I Say: The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing. 4th ed., Norton, 2018.

Lunsford, Andrea A., and John J. Ruszkiewicz. Everything's an Argument with Readings. 8th ed., Bedford/St. Martin's, 2019.

Alvermann, Donna E., Stephen F. Phelps, and Michael W. Wisenbaker. Content Reading and Literacy: Succeeding in Today's

Diverse Classrooms. 7th ed., Pearson, 2017.

Lester, James D., and James D. Lester Jr. Writing Research Papers: A Complete Guide. 16th ed., Pearson, 2019. 

Andrews, Ted. "Speaking in Public: A Guide for Academics." Cambridge University Press, 2012.

Lucas, Stephen E. "The Art of Public Speaking." McGraw-Hill Education, 2018.

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Pattern: 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 

CIA-I (20 Marks) 

 
 
 
 

CIA II/MSE (50 Marks) 

 
 
 
 

CIA-III (20 Marks) 

 
 
 
 

ESE (50 Marks) 

 
 
 
 

Attendance 5 Marks 

 
 
 
 

Submission mode. 

Can be an individual assignment or a group assignment with an additional individual component. 

 

 

 
 

Submission mode. 

 

Students will be tested on their conceptual clarity, theoretical engagements, application and analysis of given texts and contexts. 

 
 

Submission mode. 

Can be an individual assignment or a group assignment with an additional individual component. 

 

 
 

Submission mode

 

Students will be tested on their conceptual clarity, theoretical engagements, application and analysis of given texts and contexts.  

 

ENG184-1 - ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is an intensive program for two semesters for all the students of the BA/BSc programmes (ENGH, ECOH, JOUH, PSYH, EPH and EMP) that introduces students to a wide range of expository works in order to develop their knowledge of rhetoric and make them aware of the power of language. The course is designed to meet the rigorous requirements of graduate-level courses and therefore includes expository, analytical, personal, and argumentative texts from a variety of authors and historical contexts. It would allow students to work with the rhetorical situation, examining the authors’ purposes as well as the audiences and subjects in texts. The course is designed to engage students with rhetoric in multiple mediums, including visual media such as photographs, films, advertisements, comic strips, music videos, and TED talks; students would develop a sense to comprehend how a resource of language operates in any given text. In the semester the course focuses on famous rhetorical pieces from across the world to familiarise the learners with various techniques and principles.

The objective of the course is to

● Introduce learners to various types of rhetorical pieces - written, oral text and visual texts.

● Provide an understanding of various rhetorical strategies in various compositional pieces

● Famarlize learners with various strategies of reading and writing by exposing them to effective and ineffective rhetorical pieces.

Course Outcome

CO1: Analyse and interpret samples of good writing by identifying and explaining an author?s use of rhetorical strategies and techniques.

CO2: Evaluate both visual and written texts and determine if it is effective or ineffective rhetoric.

CO3: Create and sustain arguments by applying effective strategies and techniques in their own writing

CO4: Demonstrate their knowledge in the form of cogent well-written report.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Language of Composition
 

The unit will focus on understanding rhetoric and various rhetorical situations. The aim is to assert the idea that rhetoric is always contextual and there is a link between the speaker, audience and what the content of the text is. This will enable students to understand the significance of context whether local, regional, national or global while analysing and composing a text. The unit deals with human values. 

1. 1. Introduction to Rhetoric and Rhetorical Situation.

a. Lou Gehrig (1939) “Farewell Speech” (Speech) https://www.lougehrig.com/farewell/

2. SOAP Analysis: Through the analysis of the text the aim is to look at the mode in which various factors like subject, occasion, audience and purpose impact rhetoric. 

a. George W. Bush (2001) “9/11 Address to the Nation” (Speech) http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/gwbush911addresstothenation.htm

b. Jawaharlal Nehru (1947) “Tryst with Destiny” (Speech) http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/jawaharlalnehrutrystwithdestiny.htm

 

3. Ethos, Pathos and Logos: Understanding Aristotle’s concept of Ethos, Pathos and Logos is significant in understanding effective rhetoric. By looking at some of the famous rhetorical works the aim is to understand how the writer’s/ orators of some of the famous rhetorical pieces have used these elements to persuade the reader/ audience.

a. Ethos: i. King George VI (1939) “The King’s Speech” (Speech, can play part of the movie) https://www.awesomestories.com/asset/view/George-VI-King-s-Speech-September-3-1939

ii. Judith Ortiz Cofer (1992) “The Myth of Latin Women: I Just met a Girl Named Maria” (Essay) https://www.quia.com/files/quia/users/amccann10/Myth_of_a_Latin_Woman

b. Logos: i. Alice Waters (2006) “Slow Food Nation” (Essay) https://www.thenation.com/article/slow-food-nation/

c. Pathos: i. Dwight D. Eisenhower (1944) “Order of the Day” (Speech) https://www.whatsoproudlywehail.org/curriculum/the-american-calendar/order-ofthe-day-6-June-19

d. Combining Ethos, Logos, and Pathos

i. Rabindranath Tagore (1941) “Crisis of Civilization” https://www.scribd.com/doc/163829907/Rabindranath-Tagore-The-Crisis-of-Civilization

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Reading Written and Visual Texts
 

This unit will focus on introducing the students to multiple ways of analysis, close reading, and usage of argumentative statements and diction. In addition to that the unit will focus on how to read visual texts from a global, national and regional perspective and the impact it has on the audience. The unit enhances the reading and comprehension skills of students and prepare them to get employed in content creation.

1. Virginia Woolf (1942) “The Death of the Moth” (Essay)

https://www.sanjuan.edu/cms/lib8/CA01902727/Centricity/Domain/3981/Death%20of%20A%20Moth-Virginia%20Woolf%20copy.pdf

2. Groucho Marx (2006) “Dear Warner Brothers” (Letter) https://archive.org/details/Groucho_Marx_Letter_to_Warner_Brothers

3. ACLU (2000) “The Man on the Left” (Advertisement) https://www.mansonblog.com/2016/10/aclu-charles-manson-martin-luther-king.html

4. R. K. Laxman Political cartoons (Cartoon)

http://webneel.com/rk-lakshman-editorial-cartoons-indian-cartoonist (Political Cartoons)

5. Times of India (2017) ISRO launch cartoon (Cartoon)

https://www.tatacliq.com/que/isro-launch-breaks-record-memes/ISROLaunch

https://indianexpress.com/article/trending/trending-in-india/times-of-india-isro-104-satellite-launch-in-response-to-new-york-times-mangalyaan-cartoon-twitter-reactions-4529893

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Determining Effective and Ineffective Rhetoric
 

The unit will engage with the questions on why few texts are effective rhetorical pieces as opposed to others. A few texts will be analysed to look at different rhetorical situations, and how it is effective and ineffective in persuading the audience/ reader. The selected texts deal with the issues of animal rights, nuclear rights, food crisis, and holocaust (human values) and help the students to engage with global scenario of the issues concerned. Any five of the suggested topics can be taken in class.

1. PETA, Feeding Kids Meat Is Child Abuse (Advertisement) https://www.peta.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/childabuseBB72.jpg

2. Anne Applebaum (2011) “If the Japanese Can’t Build a Safe Reactor, Who Can?” (Essay) https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/if-the-japanese-cant-build-a-safe-reactor-who-can/2011/03/14/ABCJvuV_story.html?utm_term=.8

3. Simon Lancaster (2016) Ted Talk: Speak Like a Leader (Speech) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bGBamfWasNQ

4. Understanding Argument: Csalexander03 (2012) Why Investing in Fast Food May Be a Good Thing by Amy Domini (Essay) https://csalexander03.wordpress.com/2012/12/04/why-investing-in-fast-food-may-be-a-good-thing-by-amy-domini/

5. The New York Times (2004) Felons and the Right to Vote (Essay) http://www.nytimes.com/2004/07/11/opinion/felons-and-the-right-to-vote.html

6. Using Visual text for Argument: Objevit.cz (2017) “Holocaust + Selfie Culture = ‘Yolocaust’” (Video) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mjjV_X5re4g

Text Books And Reference Books:

Texts prescribed for study in each unit. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Kubota, R., & Lehner, A. (2004). Toward critical contrastive rhetoric. Journal of Second Language Writing, 13(1), 7-27.

Seaboyer, J., & Barnett, T. (2019). New perspectives on reading and writing across the disciplines. Higher Education Research and Development, 38(1), 1-10.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1- 5 marks 

MSE- 10 marks 

CIA 3-  5 marks 

ESE- 25 marks

 

HIS141 - ENCOUNTERING HISTORIES: THE FUTURE OF THE PAST (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The influence and presence of the past is felt everywhere and every day in our lives. Movies, newspapers or the internet

bombard us and expose us to the past – both familiar and unfamiliar. However, the barrage of information and the forces

of globalisation have led to increasing questions on the relevance and the value of the past – indeed a denial even. This

course will engage the students with the myriad ways in which the past, though no longer present – is a presence in our

lives today. It will introduce the students to think historically, relate to their memories of their own past and make them

aware of the multiple perspectives which will enable them to read, write and reflect on the past; or in other words, make

history.

This course will introduce students to the methodological and theoretical questions that animate and inform the practice

of history. How do professional historians work? What is their goal? How do they locate and analyze source materials?

What kinds of arguments do historians try to make? How, ultimately, is history produced? This course will ask how (or

whether) historians’ particular sources – and their location in the archives – can give voice to the ordinary and of things

‘past’. Moreover, the course will address how the advent of the information age impact upon the historians’ profession by

exploring how modern technology – whether film, photography, or the internet – changed the way historians work and

address their audience.

Course Outcome

CO1: Discover how and why historians debate issues of evidence and interpretation and learn to distinguish between various schools or styles of academic history.

CO2: Critically engage with representations of the past in the present to enable them to analyze and use evidence in interrogating historical accounts.

CO3: Critically reflect and engage with the interface between the past and the present, fostering a healthy appreciation for history and its imprint on our world.

CO4: Apply how historical narratives are shaped by states, organizations, and individuals.

CO5: Analyze the interaction between history and politics when following the news and in examining historical cases.

CO6: Apply how issues of identity and memory factor into our historical understandings and how this can condition present day policies and decision-making.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
The Many Pasts (Global, National, Regional, local)
 

Level of Learning: Theory/Basic

a) Doing History - The Place of the Past.

b) Facts, Fiction and Lies: Interrogating evidence - paintings, films, novels.

Level of Learning: Practical/Application

c) Facts, Fiction and Lies: Interrogating evidence - paintings, films, novels-Students will take any work of Historical

fiction, Historical Films as case studies and analyse the element of fact and fiction

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
The Use and Abuse of History (Global, National)
 

Level of Learning: Theory/Conceptual/Interpretative

a) Voice and the Subject: Narratives and Counter-narratives – Winston Churchill, Velupillai Prabhakaran, Pirates of the

Caribbean, Tom and Jerry

b) Locating the Popular: Historical Fiction or Fictionalised History – Exploring the Fantasy Worlds of Ice Age, Hogwarts,

Narnia, Westeros and Middle-earth.

c) The Past Today: The Ayodhya Debate and the Ram Janmabhoomi issue, Dwarka, Kapilavastu.

d) Historical Monuments and their Authorship/Ownership: The Temple Mount and Taj Mahal.

Level of Learning: Practical/Application

e) Voice and the Subject: Narratives and Counter-narratives – Winston Churchill, Velupillai Prabhakaran, Pirates of

the Caribbean, Tom and Jerry

f) Locating the Popular: Historical Fiction or Fictionalised History – Exploring the Fantasy Worlds of Ice Age,

Hogwarts, Narnia, Westeros and Middle-earth.

Screening of Documentaries, Speeches and Films followed by Student led panel discussion

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Locating Sources: The Historian?s Voice (Global, National)
 

Level of Learning: Analytical

a) History and the Visual: Photography, Film and the Image – Gladiator, Schindler’s List, 300, Gone with the Wind,

Jodha Akbar and Mohenjo Daro

b) Historical Re-enactments? Light and Sound Shows at Golconda, Red Fort and Khajuraho.

c) Alternate Histories: Oral Histories, Sports Histories, Graphic Novels, Caricatures and Political Cartoons.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Memory, Commemoration, and Silence (Global, National)
 

Level of Learning: Theory/Conceptual/Interpretative

a) Memory and History: Power and the Production of History – Museums and Memorials.

b) ‘Truth’ and ‘myth’: History as Conspiracy – Insider and Outsider Perspectives – the Aryan Debate, Hindutva

Ideology and Neo-Nazis.

c) Private Lives and Public Affairs: The British Monarchy, the Nehru-Edwina Affair.

d) Suppressing the Text: State Secrets and Declassification – Wikileaks and the Netaji Files.

Level of Learning: Practical/Application

e) Private Lives and Public Affairs: The British Monarchy, the Nehru-Edwina Affair.

f) Suppressing the Text: State Secrets and Declassification – Wikileaks and the Netaji Files

g) Case study of various Print mediums which have discussed these issues to analyse how media is responsible for

creating various memory narratives.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Davis, Natalie Z. 1981. The Possibilities of the Past, Journal of Interdisciplinary History, Vol. 12, No.2, The New History:

The 1980s and beyond II, pp. 267-275.

● Gaddis, John Lewis. 2002. The Landscape of History: How Historians Map the Past, New York: Oxford Univ Press.

● Gathercole, Peter and David Lowenthal (eds.) 1994. The Politics of the Past, New York: Routledge.

● Hodder, Ian and Scott Hutson. 2003 (Third Edition). Reading the Past, New York: Cambridge Univ. Press.

● Kumar, Ravinder 1989. The Past and the Present: An Indian Dialogue, Daedalus, Vol. 118, No.4, pp. 27-49.

● Thompson, Paul. 2000. The Voice of the Past: Oral History, New York: Oxford Univ Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Banerjee, Sumanta, 2003. Ayodhya: A future bound by the past, Economic and Political Weekly, Vol. 38, No. 27, pp.

2795-2796.

● Buchli, Victor and Gavin Lucas 2001. Archaeologies of the Contemporary Past, Routledge.

● Carr, E.H. 1967. What is History, Vintage.

● Chalcraft, David et.al. 2008. Max Weber Matters: Interweaving Past and Present, Ashgate.

● Chapman, James 2005. Past and Present: National Identity and the British Historical Film, I.B.Tauris.

● Clarke, Katherine 2008. Making Time for the Past: Local History and the Polis, Oxford Univ Press.

● Damm, Charlotte 2005. Archaeology Ethno-History and Oral Traditions: approaches to the indigenous past,

Norwegian Archaeological Review, Vol. 38, No. 2, pp. 73-87.

● Fowler, Don D. 1987. Uses of the past: Archaeology in the service of the state, American Antiquity, Vol. 52, No. 2, pp.

229-248.

● Greene, Naomi 1999. Landscapes of Loss: The Nationalist Past in Postwar French Cinema, Princeton Univ Press.

● Hamilakis et. al. 2001. Art and the Re-presentation of the Past, The Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, Vol. 7,

No. 1, pp. 153-156.

● Muller, Jan-Werner 2004. Memory and Power in Post-War Europe: Studies in the presence of the past, Cambridge Univ.

Press.

● Murray, Williamson and Richard Hart Sinnreich (eds.) 2006. The Past as Prologue: The Importance of History to the

Military Profession, Cambridge Univ Press.

● Piercey, Robert 2009. The Uses of the Past from Heidegger to Rorty: Doing Philosophy Historically, Cambridge Univ. Press.

● Shrimali, K.M. 1998. A Future for the Past? Social Scientist, Vol. 26, No. 9, pp. 26-51.

● Stone, Peter G. and Philippe G. Planel 1999. the Constructed Past, Routledge.

● Walsh, Kevin 1992. The Representation of the Past: Museums and heritage in the post-modern world, Routledge

Evaluation Pattern

 Course Code  HIS141

Course Title Assessment Details :  Encountering Histories: The Place of the Past

 

CIA1 - 20 Marks  Group assignment - Submission paper

MSE CIAII - 25 Marks - Submission paper

 

ESE - 50 Marks - Individual Assignment - Submission paper

 

 

MED142 - UNDERSTANDING THE LANGUAGE OF CINEMA (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course would provide students with a thorough knowledge of the conceptual and practical aspects of digital cinematography through engagement with the works of eminent cinematographers from around the world and the equipment.

The course aims to help students to:

  • Appreciate cinematography as a combination of artistic and technological endeavors
  • Understand the basics concepts of cinematography and shot design
  • Harness the power of natural and artificial lighting to compose powerful shots
  • Explore the creative possibilities of cinematography and understand its importance in effective storytelling.

Course Outcome

CO1: Identify and describe the visual elements in cinematography.

CO2: Demonstrate understanding of different tools of cinematography.

CO3: Apply knowledge of cinematography techniques to create films.

CO4: Use cinematography skills to make films on social issues.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to the language of cinema
 

Cinematography as an art; Art of visual storytelling; Evolution of cinematography; Eminent cinematographer’s from world cinema; Cinematography and effective storytelling.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
The Cinematographer?s medium and Tools
 

Light, Camera, Lenses, Basics of Lighting; Various types of light sources and their practical application;Color temperature, Lens Choice, Lens filters, Exposure/F‐Stop/Shutter/ISO; Depth of field Camera operating; Hands-on introduction to camera equipment

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Visualising and Shot Design
 

Composition & Framing; Types of Shots; Shot design for single camera and multi camera productions

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Camera Placement and Movement
 

Camera Placement -how does it affect the meaning; Motivated Camera Movement.

Text Books And Reference Books:

  • Pro, A. P. (2010). Adobe Premiere Pro.
  • Team, A. C. (2012). Adobe Premiere Pro CS6 Classroom in a Book: Adobe Perm Pro CS6 Classro_p1. Adobe Press.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

  • Block, B. (2013). The visual story: Creating the visual structure of film, TV and digital media. CRC Press.
  • Alton, J. (2013). Painting with light. Univ of California Press.
Evaluation Pattern
  • CIA 1: Submissions for 20 marks
  • Mid-Semester Submission: 30 marks
  • CIA 3: Submissions 20 marks
  • End Semester Submission: Submission for 30 marks

MED143 - DEMOCRACY AND MEDIA (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
The course provides an overview of the complex interrelation and interdependence between media and democracy. The normative objective of this course is to
understand and critically evaluate whether the existing forms and structures of media, enable, support and promote a democratic society. It also tries to explore whether new forms of media can empower media's role within democratic societies. The course also provides a deep understanding of complexities that arise in neoliberal democracies and contemporary media systems.
Course Objectives :
  • To equip students with tools for critical consumption of media.
  • To analyze the structural deficiencies preventing the media from performing its democratic functions.
  • To understand media as an Ideological State Apparatus' to 'manufacture consent'.

Course Outcome

CO1: Discuss the significance of the fourth estate in a constitutional democracy.

CO2: Recognize media's critical function of speaking truth to power.

CO3: Identify the threats of increasing corporatization, concentration of ownership, and evolving funding models in the digital economy.

CO4: Critique the undemocratic overrepresentation of social elites in Indian newsrooms.

CO5: Discern the role of mass and social media in manufacturing public opinion and reality.

CO6: Critique various forms of censorship and curbs on press freedom in India.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Theory, Concept, and Definitions
 
  • Definition of Democracy and Democratic theory.
  • Media as the fourth estate.
  • Democratic responsibilities of media.
  • Fundamental rights and the media's role in protecting them. 
  • Media as the voice of the voiceless.
  • Media as the watchdog of democracy.
  • Media as the platform for deliberation (Media as Public Sphere).
  • Media worker as the democratic warrior.
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Media, Democracy and Capitalism
 
  • Contemporary structure of media within capitalism:
  • Advertising funding and its implications on media's democratic functions.
  • Big business and government
  • Media as Big Business.
  • Use of SLAPP on media houses and self-censorship.
  • Media concentration, conglomeration, commercialization and its effect on democracy.

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Democratic Media
 
  • Media reform and democratic media.
  • Media policy and democratic reform.
  • Alternatives to commercial media models: Case studies of BBC, NPR, and Aljazeera.
  • Critical analysis of Doordarshan and Rajya Sabha TV as possible democratic media.
  • Emergence of digital news platforms and their role in democratic communication [The Wire, Quint News Laundry, The News Minute, Scroll].
  • Representation of Caste and minorities in the media.
  • Media trials and the creation of the common enemy.

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Social Media, Alternative Media and Democracy
 
  • Social media as the new public sphere.
  • Social media democratic elections in the current era (Case studies of 2016 US elections and 2019 Indian elections).
  • Alternative media spaces: Exploring community radio, Video Volunteers and Alt News.
  • Critical examination of alternative models of media

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:2
Video Voice for Social Change Manyam Praja Video : A Community Empowerment Initiative
 
  • Participatory Video (PV).
  • Manyam Praja Video.
  • Elements of Participatory Process.
  • Teaching Process. Community Video Producer (CVP). Community Video Unit (CVU).

 

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:2
Media Trial and at the time of Trialling Media: An Indian Perspective
 
  • Media trial. Sensationalism. Some instances of media trial in India.
  • Celebrity power and PR teams. Me Too. Cancel Culture. Ethical Consideration.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:
  • Curran, J. (2011). Media and democracy. Routledge.
  • Chattarji, S., & Ninan, S. (Eds.). (2013). The hoot reader: media practice in twenty-first century India. New Delhi: Oxford
  • Ghosh, S., & Thakurta, P. G. (2016). Sue the Messenger: How Legal Harassment by Corporates is Shackling Reportage and Undermining Democracy in India. Paranjoy Guha Thakurta.
  • Hardy, J. (2014). Critical political economy of the media: An introduction. Routledge.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Herman, E. S., & Chomsky,N. (2010). Manufacturing consent: 1he political economy of the mass media, Random House.
  • McChesney, R. W. (2016). Rich media, poor democracy: Communication politics in dubious times. New Press.
  • Thomas, P. N. (2010). Political Economy of Communications in India: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1st ed.). New Delhi, India: Sage Publication.

Research Articles:

  • Biswal, S. K. (2019). Exploring the role of citizen journalism in rural India. Media Watch, 10, 43-54.
  • Curran, J. (1991). Rethinking the media as a public sphere. Communication and citizenship, 27-57.
  • Khan, U. (2015). Indian media: Crisis in the fourth estate. Kennedy School Review, 15, 70
  • Rao, S., Mudgal, V. (2015). Introduction: Democracy, Journalism and Civic Society in India. Journalism Studies. 16(5), 615-623.
  • Saeed, S. (2015). Phantom journalism governing India's proxy media owners. Journalism Studies, 16(5), 663-679,
  • Thussu, D. K. (2007). TheMurdochization'of news? The case of Star TV in India. Media, Culture & Society, 29(4), 593-611.
Evaluation Pattern

Assessment outline

  • Overall end semester  evaluation for 95 marks
  • Project I: 20 Marks 
  • Project II: 25 Marks
  • Project III: 20 Marks
  • End semester Submission Project IV: 30 Marks. Attendance 5 Marks

 

POL142 - GLOBAL POWER POLITICS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The global balance of power is changing dramatically. As the world seems to be moving away from American Hegemony, the question of where power lies in global politics is becoming ever more significant. Great powers remain as the critical actors in the international system and the nature of the international order is determined by their interactions in war and peace. This course focuses on the transformation of global power politics particularly focusing on the power shifts in the post-cold war international system. The course will also introduce students to the emergence of new powers such as China, India, Brazil and South Africa and the changing dynamics of the international system. The course will examine whether great powers can cooperate in addressing the consequential challenges in the new century; climate change, nuclear proliferation, refugee crisis, international terrorism and other issues. The course will also examine the competition among the great powers in the South and East China Sea, and the West Asian region.

 

Course Objectives

The course aims to help students to:

  •   understand the key concepts and theories of international relations.
  •  examine the key issues pertaining to great power politics in the twenty-first century.
  • outline the dynamics of strategic interaction between great powers and focus on great power competition during World Wars, Cold War period and the post-Cold War period.
  • develop an understanding of the great power dynamics, the use of power by great powers in international relations.

Course Outcome

CO1: analyse global power politics in the twenty-first century.

CO2: demonstrate the major contemporary challenges and issues in global politics.

CO3: evaluate the changing power dynamics and power shifts in international relations.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to International Relations
 

International Relations: Meaning, nature and scope of international relations; concepts and theories of International Relations.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Great Power Politics in the Cold War era
 

First World War, Second World War: causes and consequences, inter war period (multipolarity), the Cold War (bipolarity) and the post-Cold War period (unipolarity).

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Power shifts in the Post-Cold War
 

Power shifts in the post-Cold War international system, Great Powers: traditional and non-traditional security threats, emergence of new powers(rise of China as a challenge to the West)

Text Books And Reference Books:

Baylis, J. and Smith, S. (eds.) (2011), The Globalization of World Politics. An Introduction to International Relations, London: OUP.

Heywood, A (2014), Global Politics, Palgrave Foundation.

Griffiths, M and Terry O Callaghan (2002), International Relations: The Key Concepts’. Routledge London and New York.

Griffiths, M. (1999) ‘Fifty Key Thinkers in International Relations, Routledge London and New York.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Barry Buzan and Ole Weaver (2003), ‘Regions and Powers: The structure of International Security’ Cambridge.

Ikenberry, G. John, Ed. 2002. America Unrivaled: The Future of the Balance of Power, Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press. 

John J. Mearsheimer, The Tragedy of Great Power Politics, updated ed. (New York: Norton, 2014).

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Outline:

Course Code

Course Title

Assessment Details

POL142

Global Power and Politics

CIA 1

MSE

(CIA 2)

CIA 3

ESE

Attendance

20

Marks

25

Marks

20

Marks

30

Marks

05

Marks

Individual Assignment

Written Exam

Group Assignment

Written Exam

 

 

 

 

Section A:

3 x 25= 15 Marks

Section B:

2 x 10= 20 Marks

Section C:

1 x 15 = 15 Marks

 

Section A:

3 x 5 = 15 Marks

Section B:

2x 10 = 20 Marks

Section C:

1 x 15 = 15 Marks

 

 

POL143 - DEMOCRACY AND ETHICS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 The course  is designed to provide a sound working knowledge of policy-making actors and processes within the public sector at national and sub-national levels of government. In addition, the module provides an understanding of the principles of good governance in the public and corporate sectors, and knowledge and skills in the areas of professional values and ethics.

There are a large number of different forms of government, so this module focuses primarily on the actors and structures typically found in democratic states, but reference is made to other approaches where relevant. Even within democracies there is a large amount of variation, with differences such as federal or unitary arrangements, monarchies or republics, prime-ministerial or presidential systems, etc. As far as possible, this variety is reflected in the syllabus and learning materials, but inevitably there a limit to the extent to which all variations can be addressed. Where, for example, the materials focus on approaches applied in the UK, USA or EU in order to provide concrete cases that can be analysed alongside general or theoretical concepts, this is not intended to suggest that these approaches are in any way the ‘norm’. This course is designed to develop student’s capacity to critically analyze the terrain where politics and ethics intersect. It also examines some arguments for and against keeping the practice of politics separate from the sphere of ethics. It explores the problems of “dirty hands” and “many hands” in government, public organizations and public life. It discusses some of the ethical dilemmas confronting public officials and powerful institutions and organizations which have major impact on the life of ordinary citizens in a democratic polity. It offers a reflective and methodological approach to develop moral reasoning and analytical skills to evaluate ethical issues and to guide decision-making in government and public life. The rationale of the study is to make the pupils aware of the importance of democracy. What constitute democracy, what is its

importance from the point of view of the role of individual and what exactly can an individual get if he performs his role well in the society. This module also aims to make the individual understand the different aspects of democracy and its implications in the overall development of the state. The course on “Democracy and Ethics” is to introduce and discuss the moral foundations of democracy in principle, and democratic institutions, in particular. The students are initiated to various types of moral discourses in political philosophy. Further, this course looks at the development of democracy, in the global and national realm. Democracy as an ideal gets fructified in the form of a government, which in turn is based on the principles of justice, freedom, equality, and fraternity. Ethics acts as the premise on which a successful democracy rests. syllabus is introduced from the point of view that all students upon entering into the college, enroll themselves as voters and encourage and enthuse other members of the society to participate not only in election process but also electoral and political process in general.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Discover and analyse the terrain where politics and ethics intersect, based on different theoretical perspectives

CO2: Critically assess the problems of ?dirty hands? and ?many hands? in government and public organizations and evaluate by reflecting on and applying various ethical and political theories of responsibility.

CO3: Discover and critically investigate the ethical dilemmas confronting public officials in discharging their public duties, based on different ethical perspectives

CO4: Acquire and enhance skills in moral reasoning and ethical analysis to guide their personal and professional lives

CO5: Discuss and apply principles and concepts of ethical behaviour

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Foundations of Principle of Moral Philosophy - Justice between Peoples
 

 

 

1.      Nature of ethics and its relevance

2.      How ethics reinforces democratic principles

3.      Common unethical means adopted in democracy: identify and rectify

4.      Difference between Ethics, Morals and Values

 

5.      Human Rights,

 

6.       Distributive Justice,

 

7.      Decision-theoretic Consequentialism, Deontology

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:11
Political Responsibility: The Problem of Dirty Hands and Many Hands
 

                                    

1.      Platonic Concept of Virtue


2.      Aristotle’s Account of Rational Agents, Choice, Deliberation and Action


3.      Practice of Virtue and Attainment of Happiness


4.      Kant: Good Will as source of moral action


5.      Duty Ethics


6.      Sources of Utilitarianism in John Stuart Mill and Jeremy Bentham


7.      Utility as the Moral criterion

8.       Liberalism, ‘“Precommitment” and “Post commitment”

9.      Hindu Tradition: Dharma and Karma, Purusharthas

10.  Buddhist Tradition: Four Noble Truths and Eight- fold Path

11.   Indian Principles in Ethical Context: Saravana, Manana and Nidhidhyasana

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Democracy
 

1.      Principles of Democracy: Freedom, Equality and Fraternity,

2.      Government by Consent


3.      Constitutional Government and Rule of Law

4.      Democracy and Human Rights society

 

5.      Instrumentalist Conceptions of Democratic Authority

 

6.      Democratic Consent Theories of Authority

 

7.      Limits to the Authority of Democracy

 

8.      Leadership: Servant, Participative, Consensus, leaderships in Democracy

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Indian Democracy and Path to Enlightened Democracy
 

1.      History and Democratic Heritage, Freedom Struggle,


2.      The Indian Constitution: Preamble and other constitutional values


3.      Ethical Code of Conduct for Politicians


4.      Citizenship, Fundamental Rights and Fundamental Duties of Indian Citizens

 

5.      Character record of members of legislature

 

6.      Ethical use of majority in parliament

 

7.      Avoidance of ‘floor crossing’ and defection

 

8.      Respecting independence of judiciary and media

 

9.      Safeguarding national history and avoiding distortion

 

10.  Ensuring political neutrality of Universities and their syllabi

 

Judicious allocation of central funds to states Free and fair elections

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      Aristotle, (1955). Nichomachean Ethics, trans. J. A. K. Thomson, Baltimore, Maryland: Penguin Books.


2.      Christiano, T. (Ed.). (2002). Philosophy and Democracy, Oxford: Oxford University Press.


3.      Cortella, L. (2015). The Ethics of Democracy: A Contemporary Reading of Hegel's Philosophy of Right, Giacomo Donis (tr.), New York: SUNY Press.


4.      Dewey, J. (1993). Philosophy and Democracy [1919] and The Ethics of Democracy [1888] in The Political Writings, ed. D. Morris, I. Shapiro, Indianapolis: Hackett, 1993.


5.      Finnis, J. (1983). Fundamentals of Ethics. Oxford: Clarendon Press.


6.      Gandhi, M. K. (1927). An Autobiography or The Story of My Experiments with Truth. Ahemadabad: Navajivan Mudranalaya.


Granville, A. (2000). The Indian Constitution: Cornerstone of a Nation. New Delhi: Oxford University Press

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.      Jain, S. (2000). The Constitution of India: Select Issues and Perceptions. New Delhi: Taxmann.


2.      Locke, J. (Ed.). (1980). Second Treatise on Civil Government, (1690), C. B. MacPherson, Indianapolis, IN: Hackett.


3.      Kant, I. (1959). Foundations of the Metaphysics of Morals. trans. Lewis White Beck, Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merril.


4.      KANT, Immanuel, Critique of Practical Reason, translated by Lewis White Beck, Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merril, 1956.


5.      MACHIAVELLI, The Prince [1513], ed. Q. Skinner, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1988.


6.      PLATO, The Republic, revised/trans. by Desmond Lee, Harmondsworth, UK: Penguin Books, 1974.


7.      RAWLS, John, Political Liberalism, New York: Columbia University Press, 1996.


8.      SANDEL, Michael (ed.), Justice-A Reader, Oxford University Press, 2007.


9.      SINGER, Peter, Democracy and Disobedience, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1973.


10.  WALZER, Michael, "Philosophy and Democracy", Political Theory, Vol.9, No.3, 1981, 379-399.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1   25

CIA 2   25

CIA 3   45

PSY141 - ADVERTISEMENT PSYCHOLOGY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course will develop an understanding of how advertising affects the human mind by giving unique and valuable insight from the industry. The course will help in studying the relationship between advertising and human mind and also apply this learning to advertising strategy, positioning, brand, and marketing communications that prepare students for the competitive world of advertising and marketing.

Course objectives

This course aims to

  • Introduce psychological perspectives of advertisements in real life situations. 
  • Orient students towards the various functions and roles of cognitive, affective and behavioral responses in the field of advertisement.
  • Help students to identify and apply the various theories and principles of advertisement psychology in the field of marketing.

Course Outcome

CO1: Apply the psychological perspectives of advertisements in the real-life setting.

CO2: Integrate different domains such as cognitive, affective and behavioral responses in the field of advertisement.

CO3: Develop the ability to make applications based on understanding of marketing strategies.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit I: Introduction to advertisement psychology
 

 

Introduction to advertisements; Its objectives and importance; Types and forms of advertising; Effects of advertisements a psychological perspective; Classic and contemporary approaches of classifying advertisement effectiveness.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Unit II: Cognitive processing of advertisements
 

Influence of advertisements on buying behaviors; Dynamics of Attention,Comprehension,Reasoning for advertisements; Attitudes and attitude changes with the influence of advertisements;Principles of persuasion and attitude change; Achieving advertisement compliance without changing attitude.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Unit III: International Advertising and Creating Brand
 

Emergence of International Advertising; Advertising in Multicultural Environment; Ethics in Advertising; Integrated marketing communication and marketing mix.

Text Books And Reference Books:

 Fennis,B.M.,&Stroebe,W.(2015).ThePsychologyofAdvertising.NewYork:PsychologyPress.

Andrew,A.Mitchell.(1993).AdvertisingExposure,MemoryandChoice.LawrenceErlbaumAssociates.Hillsdale,NJ.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

Linda,F.Alwitt & Andrew,A.Mitchell (1985).PsychologicalProcessesandAdvertising Effects:Theory,Research,andApplications. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Hillsdale, NJ. London.

Rolloph,M.E.&Miller,G.R.(Eds)(1980).Persuasion:NewDirectionsinTheoryandResearch.Sage.N.Y.

Eddie.M.Clark,Timothy.C.Brock,&DavidW.Stewart.(1994).Attention,AttitudeandAffectinResponsetoAdvertising.LawrenceErlbaumAssociates.Hillsdale,NJ.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I

CIA II

CIA III

25

35

35

PSY157 - SCIENCE OF WELLBEING (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This multidisciplinary course will focus on those aspects that help individuals thrive. The course sheds its light on well-being and its components and also clears all the misconceptions revolving around it. The students will be exposed to certain theories, concepts and practice procedures of well-being and its components. This programme will help the students to reflect on their life experiences on these dimensions and to know how to improve them and flourish in their life. 

Course Outcome

CO1: Explain the concept of well-being and its components

CO2: Analyze the role of happiness and emotions in enhancing well-being using relevant theories

CO3: Apply various concepts of well-being on the life experiences of students

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Well-being
 

Well-being - components of well-being: subjective happiness and life satisfaction

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Well-being - components of well-being
 

subjective happiness and life satisfaction

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Happiness & Emotion
 

Happiness - Definition, Significance Misconceptions, types and interventions  Emotion - types, emotion regulation

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Happiness
 

Definition, Significance Misconceptions, types and interventions Emotion - types, emotion regulation

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Mindfulness- components
 

Mindfulness- components: gratitude, forgiveness, kindness-compassion

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:25
Mindfulness components
 

Gratitude, forgiveness, kindness-compassion

Text Books And Reference Books:

·       Carr, A. (2004). Positive Psychology. New York: Routldge.

·       Hupper, F. A., Baylis, N., & Keverne, B. (2005). The science of well-being. Oxford Scholarship.

·       Hupper, F. A., Baylis, N., & Keverne, B. (2005). The science of well-being. Oxford Scholarship.

·       Ivtzan, I. & Lomas, T.(Ed.) (2016) Mindfulness in Positive Psychology. New York: Routldge.

·       Kabat-Zinn, J. (2012). Mindfulness for beginners: reclaiming the present moment—and your life. Boulder, CO, Sounds True.

·       Linley, P. A., & Joseph, S. (Eds.). (2004). Positive psychology in practice. John Wiley & Sons, Inc.. https://doi.org/10.10 02/9780470939338

 

·       Maddux, J. E. (2018). Subjective Wellbeing and Life Satisfaction. New York: Routldge.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

.

Evaluation Pattern

 

 

CIA1

CIA2

CIA3

Class attendance & Participation

20 marks

20 marks

50 marks

10

BS142 - TOURISM, CULTURE AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The Course presents several of the operational projects implemented by, or with the support of UNESCO, to illustrate how cultural tourism policies developed in the spirit of the principles and values contained in the texts, standard-setting instruments, declarations and recommendations adopted by UNESCO, are put into practice.

To open a debate on the complex questions that surround the relations between culture and tourism, tourism and development, and tourism and dialogue among cultures.

Course Outcome

CO1: Illustrate tourism as an instrument to bring individuals and human communities into contact

CO2: Explain the role of cultures and civilizations in facilitating dialogue among cultures

CO3: Evaluate the capacity of Tourism in assisting the world?s inhabitants to live better together and thereby contribute to the construction of peace in the minds of men and women

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Introduction, Key Themes and Issues in Tourism, Culture and Development
 

Finding Meaning through Tourism, Tourism as a World of Paradoxes, The Centrality of Experiences, Changing Contexts and Emerging Challenges in the Context of Development, Culture, Heritage and Diversity as Tourism Resources, Understanding Culture and Cultural Resources in Tourism, Cultural Tourism as a Means of Economic Development, Developing the Cultural Supply Chain, Exploitation of Culture

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Tourism as a Vehicle for Inter-Cultural Dialogue
 

Tourist – Host Encounters, The Role of Routers / Intermediaries / Media, Tourism – Tourist Education, Cross Cultural Understanding

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Tourism and Environmental Protection
 

Introduction to the Natural Environment, Tourism and the Spirit of Nature, Fragile and Vulnerable Ecosystems, Cultural Implications of Mobilizing Natural Resources for Tourism, From Ecotourism to Integrated Tourism

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Issues of Governance in Tourism, Culture and Development
 

Developing Structures to Develop and Manage Tourism and Culture, Complexities and Challenges of Policy Making in Tourism and Culture, Responsibilities / Tensions and Actions, The Gender Dimension, Stakeholders and Collaborations

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Preservation and Mobilization of Cultural Resources
 

Cultural Tourism Itinerary, Raising Awareness about the Fragility of Heritage Sites, Education for Lasting Tourism

Case Studies from The Palestinian Territories, Central America, Western Africa, Mauritania and Angkor

Economic Empowerment and poverty Alleviation, Sustainable Tourism Development Strategy, Forging Innovative and Inter-Disciplinary Approaches, Indigenous Resource Management Systems, Empowering Communities through Tourism

Case Studies from The Aral Sea Basin, Local Effort in Asia and Pacific (LEAP), Mountainous Regions of Central and South Asia

Dissemination of Knowledge and Reconciliation with the Past, Local and Indigenous Knowledge Systems in a Global Society (LINKS), UNESCO’s Actions in the field of Tourism, Culture and Development

Case Studies on UNESCO’s Conventions, Seminars and Universal Declarations

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
Mobilizing Nature for Sustainable Tourism
 

Capacity Building and Youth Poverty Alleviation through Tourism and Heritage (PATH), Case Studies on Sao Paulo’s Green Belt Biosphere Reserve

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Appadurai A. (2002) Cultural Diversity: A Conceptual Platform. In K. Stenou (ed.) UNESCO Universal Declaration on Cultural Diversity. UNESCO Publishing, Paris, pp. 9-16.

Appadurai A. (2003) Modernity at Large. Cultural Dimensions of Globalization. Minneapolis, University of Minnesota Press.

Boumedine R. S. and Veirier L. (2003) Towards a Strategy for the Sustainable Development of Tourism in the Sahara in the Context of Poverty Eradication. UNESCO Publishing, Paris.

Cohen E. (2004) Contemporary Tourism. Diversity and Change. Elsevier, London.

Hemmati, M. ed. (1999) Women’s Employment and Participation in Tourism, Report for UN Commission on Sustainable Development 7th Session. UNED.

Intergovernmental Conference on Cultural Policies for Development (1998) Final Report. (Also referred to as Stockholm Action Plan). UNESCO Publishing, Paris.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

International Labour Organisation (2001) Human resources development, employment and globalization in the hotel, catering and tourism sector (Report for discussion at the Tripartite Meeting on Human Resources Development, Employment and Globalization in the Hotel, Catering and Tourism Sector, Geneva, ILO).

Komla E.E. and Veirier L. (2004) Tourism, Culture and Development in West-Africa: For a Cultural Tourism Consistent with Sustainable Development. UNESCO Publishing, Paris.

Posey D.A. (Ed) (1999) Cultural and Spiritual Values of Biodiversity. A Complementary Contribution to the Global Biodiversity Assessment. Intermediate Technology Publications, London (on behalf of United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), Nairobi).

Robertson, R. (1990) Mapping the Global Conditions: Globalization as the Central Concept. In M. Featherstone (ed.) Global Culture: Nationalism, Globalization and Modernity. Sage, London, pp. 15-30.

Steck B., Strasdas W., and Gustedt, E. (1999) Tourism in Technical Co-operation. A guide to the conception, planning and implementation of project-accompanying measures in regional rural development and nature conservation. GTZ, Eschborn.

Tour Operators’ Initiative for Sustainable Tourism Development (2004) Supply Chain Engagement for Tour Operators: Three Steps towards Sustainability. UNEP-Sustainable Tourism, Paris.

Winkin Y. (2002) Cultural Diversity: A Pool of Ideas for Implementation. In K. Stenou (ed.)

UNESCO Universal Declaration on Cultural Diversity. UNESCO Publishing, Paris, pp. 17-60.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 - Group Activity and Written Submission on “Culture and Cultural Resources in Tourism – From an Inter-Disciplinary Perspective” (20 Marks)

CIA 2 - Mid Semester Examination (25 Marks)

CIA 3 - Group Activity and Written Submission on “Integrated Tourism by Mobilizing Natural Resources” (20 Marks)

Final Submission - An Individual Activity supported by Written Submission on “Designing a Structured Plan to Develop and Manage Sustainability through Tourism and Culture; An Inter-Disciplinary Perspective” (30 Marks)

CSC996 - VISUALIZING DATA (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:15
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

 

Data visualization package for the statistical programming language R. It starts with simple datasets and then graduates to case studies about world health, economics, and infectious disease trends in the United States. This course starts with fundamental computational concepts underlying most programming languages and also the solution of small problems using a programming language.

 

Course Objectives​

 

  1. To teach students about data visualization principles

  2. To learn how to communicate data-driven findings 

  3. To teach how to use ggplot2 to create custom plots

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the applications of tableau

CO2: Apply fundamental concepts in tableau basic reports

CO3: Analyze the applications of tableau calculations and filters.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Introducing Tableau
 

 

Introduction to Tableau: What is TABLEAU? Why Data Visualization - Unique Features compared to Traditional BI Tools - TABLEAU Overview & Architecture - File Types & Extensions - Start Page,  Show Me, Connecting to Excel Files, Connecting to Text Files, Connect to Microsoft SQL Server, Connecting to Microsoft Analysis Services, Creating and Removing Hierarchies - Bins, Joining Tables, Data Blending.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Tableau Basic Reports
 

Parameters - Set - Combined Sets - Creating a First Report - Data Labels - Create Folders - Sorting Data - Add Totals, Subtotals and Grand Totals to Report. Types of charts.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Tableau Calculations & Filters
 

 

Calculated Fields - Basic Approach to Calculate Rank, Advanced Approach to Calculate Rank , Calculating Running Total  - Filters Introduction - Quick Filters - Filters on Dimensions - Conditional Filters - Top and Bottom Filters - Filters on Measures - Context Filters  - Slicing Filters - Data Source Filters  - Extract Filters 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Milligan, Joshua N., and Guillevin, Tristan. Tableau 10 Complete Reference: Transform Your Business with Rich Data Visualizations and Interactive Dashboards with Tableau 10. United Kingdom, Packt Publishing, 2018.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Milligan, Joshua N., and Guillevin, Tristan. Tableau 10 Complete Reference: Transform Your Business with Rich Data Visualizations and Interactive Dashboards with Tableau 10. United Kingdom, Packt Publishing, 2018.

Evaluation Pattern

MCQ: 25

Assignment: 15

Attendance: 10

ECO143 - DEMOCRACY AND ECONOMY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is aimed at undergraduate students to introduce to them the prominent debates on democracy and emerging issues in economies.  The course discusses how various socioeconomic factors act as constraints on economic growth and development. This basic framework allows a student to delve into the causes and consequences of various strategies/methods taken/applied by policymakers and practitioners and how it affects the overall objective of the state/economy through a trifocal analysis of the economy, society, and market keeping the central theme of ‘Democracy.’This course will introduce students to:

  • Growing crisis of wealth distribution and income inequality.
  •  Sectoral significance and state intervention in policy making.
  • Informal sector and labor market participation and rights.
  • Analyze corruption in emerging economies through various case studies.
  • Discuss the informal economy through concepts, theory, and measurement.

Course Outcome

CO1: Recognise the growing crisis of wealth and income inequality among the members of the economy.

CO2: Understand the economic crisis in different sectors and government interventions in practices.

CO3: Get familiar informal sector and labour market participation and rights.

CO4: Understand debates about transparency, competition and privatization and its relevance to corruption.

CO5: Investigate issues from various perspectives, such as, viewing challenges in economies through the lens of democracy.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Democracy, Democratization and Society
 

Theories of Democratization; Democratic and Undemocratic States; Measuring Democracy and Democratization; The Global Wave of Democratization; Causes and Dimensions of Democratization: The Political Economy of Democracy; Political Culture, Mass Beliefs and Value Change; Gender and Democratization; Social Capital and Civil Society; Social Movements and Contention in Democratization Processes: Role, impact on policy reforms and cultural change.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Democracy, Democratisation and Society
 

Theories of Democratisation; Democratic and Undemocratic States; Measuring Democracy and Democratisation; The Global Wave of Democratisation; Causes and Dimensions of Democratisation: The Political Economy of Democracy: Political Culture, Mass Beliefs, and Value Change; Gender and Democratisation; Social Capital and Civil Society; Social Movements and Contention in Democratisation Processes: Role, Impact on Policy Reforms and Cultural Change

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Actors and Institutions
 

Conventional Citizen Participation;   Institutional Design in New Democracies; Gender and Democratization; A Decade of Democratic Decline and Stagnation.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Actors and Institutions
 

Conventional Citizen Participation; Institutional Design in New Democracies; Gender and Democratisation; A Decade of Democratic Decline and Stagnation.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Democracy and Redistribution
 

A Theory of political transitions: Choice of the economic and political regime; Theoretical extensions: growth, trade, political institutions; Democracy and the public sector; the state, the treat of expropriation and the possibility of development: Social and economic wellbeing and policy reforms.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Democracy and Redistribution
 

A Theory of Political Transitions: Choice of Economic and Political Regime; Theoretical Extensions: Growth, Trade, Political Institutions; Democracy and the Public Sector; the State, the Threat of Expropriation and the Possibility of Development: Social and Economic Wellbeing and Policy Reforms

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Democracy and Economic Growth and Development
 

A Marxian theory of democracy; The Importance of Social Class in Historical Comparative Perspective; Dependency and Development; Democracy in Developing Countries; Transitions from Authoritarian Rule: Tentative Conclusions about Uncertain Democracies.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Democracy and Economic Development
 

A Marxian Theory of Democracy; The Importance of Social Class in Historical Comparative Perspective; The Case Study of India; Dependency and Development; Democracy in Developing Countries; Transitions from Authoritarian Rule: Tentative Conclusions about Uncertain Democracies

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Democracy and Economic Growth and Development Indian Experience
 

India’s Tryst with Destiny; Democracy, Inequality, and Public Reasoning; A case study on Gujarat experience of development: Approaches, impact, and outcome; Kerala experience of development: Approaches, impact, and outcome.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Democracy and Economic Development: Indian Experience
 

India's Tryst with Destiny; Democracy, Inequality and Public Reasoning, A Case Study on Gujarat's Experience of Development: Approaches, Impact and Outcome; Kerala's Experience of Development: Approaches, Impact and Outcome

Text Books And Reference Books:

Bhagwati, J. N., & Panagariya, A. (2012). India's Tryst with Destiny: Debunking Myths that Undermine Progress and Addressing New Challenges. HarperCollins Publishers.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Boix, C. (2003). Democracy and Redistribution. Cambridge University Press.

Drèze, J., & Sen, A. (2015). An Uncertain Glory: India and Its Contradictions. Economics Books.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1: 20 marks

CIA 2: 20 Marks

CIA 3: 45 Marks

Attendance: 5 Marks

ECO144 - DESIGNING POLICIES FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is aimed at undergraduate students to introduce to them the idea of sustainable development and public policies within that context. The course discusses the challenges of sustainable development. This course will equip students with the knowledge and skills necessary to design policies that promote sustainable development.

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the principles and goals of sustainable development.

CO2: Explain the interdependence of economic, social, and environmental factors and how they must be balanced to promote sustainability.

CO3: Understand problems from interdisciplinary perspective.

CO4: Think of integrated solutions to the current problems.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:17
Sustainable Development
 

Concepts; Historical roots; Measurement; Indicators of sustainable development; Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and indicators.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Challenges to Sustainable Development
 

Poverty; Population Growth; Public Health; Education; Biodiversity Conservation; Climate Change and Migration; Gender Discrimination.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:13
Constraints on Public Policy and Sustainable Approaches
 

Constraints on Public Policy -- Economic constraints; Political Feasibility: Interests and Power; Institutional Constraints; Social and Cultural Factors: Constraining and Enabling.

Sustainable Approaches -- Participatory approach to development; Inclusive growth; Gender mainstreaming; Policy Coherence and Technological Innovations.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Dreze, Jean & Amartya Sen (eds.) 1999. Indian Development Selected Regional Perspectives. Delhi: Oxford University Press.

Mulligan, Martin. 2010. An Introduction to Sustainability, Environmental, Social and Personal Perspectives. Routledge.

Sachs, J. 2015. The Age of Sustainable Development. Columbia University Press.

Moran, M., Rein, M., & Goodin, R. E. (2006). The Oxford handbook of public policy. Oxford University Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Addison, T., Harper, C., Prowse, M., Shepherd, A., Armando Barrientos, with, Braunholtz-Speight, T., Zohir, S. (2009). The Chronic Poverty Report 2008–09. Retrieved from https://www.odi.org/sites/odi.org.uk/files/odi-assets/publications-opinion-files/2566.pdf

Bellinger, W. K. (2007). The economic analysis of public policy. Routledge.

Hausman, D. M., & McPherson, M. S. (2006). Economic analysis, moral philosophy, and public policy. Cambridge University Press.

Kates, R. W., Parris, T. M., & Leiserowitz, A. A. (2005). What is sustainable development? Goals, indicators, values, and practice. Environment (Washington DC), 47(3), 8-21.

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

 

CIA I

Marks

CIA II

Marks

CIA III

Marks

Attendance

Marks

10 (conducted out of 20)

10 (conducted out of 20)

25 (conducted out of 50)

5

 

 

ENG161-2B - EDITING AND CONTENT WRITING (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is conceived as a hands-on course in content writing, editing and publishing. Writing has evolved as an indispensable skill for all media of communication. With the digital media steadily gaining the equal status to print media, writing becomes the newest skill in demand by both academia and the industry. Hence, a course in content writing for online and print that proposes to enhance the writing skills of the learners—with an aim to equip them with skills for online content development—will prove to be interesting, and useful for the employability of learners. The course will ensure that learners learn the basics of developing content and writing for print and digital media. Thus, the course aims to teach learners the skills of content generation and presentation, aiding in professional development and preparing them to meet the needs of local, national and global industries. Learners will be introduced to the basics of different kinds of editing such as copy editing, proofreading and content editing. They will be taught the nuances of each editing technique with help of authentic materials collected from different sources. The course also aims to familiarize learners with editing for different purposes such as marketing editing, retail editing, journal editing (academic and non-academic), research editing, editing policy documents, financial documents and editing for newspapers. One of the main aspects of the course will be the focus on publishing processes in print and digital media. This will also involve the development of professional ethics required for academic writing and working in the media industry. Thus, the course aims to provide learners with skills for both academic and industrial necessities, and by facilitating interactions with industry experts, explore future employment opportunities in the field of publishing.

 

This course aims to:

·     To introduce students to different writing styles and different formats of content creation

·     To introduce students to the processes of editing and proofreading

·     To enable students to conduct audience analysis and develop readership

·     To introduce students to processes and stages of publishing of books and traditional print media

·     To enable students to create effective content for digital media

Course Outcome

CO1: Identify the varied methods and styles of content creation and review them in their written assignments.

CO2: Produce engaging content on web and print platforms for local and global audiences.

CO3: Develop language skills for editing and proofreading through written assignments.

CO4: Demonstrate a flair for writing and engaging with readers through regular writing and blogging activities.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Writing as a Profession
 

This unit aims to explore writing as a profession which deals with technical writing, academic writing, creative writing and content writing. It develops professional skills and proves useful in enhancing the employability of students by introducing them to global and local standards and styles of writing professionally.

1.     Audience analysis.

2.     Differences in content and creative writing.

3.     Creative writing as an aspect in content writing

4.     Technical writing (brief overview).

Teaching learning strategies :

Lectures, workshops with industry experts, and hands-on exercises

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Content Writing, Content Generation and Development
 

This unit is about the blooming field of writing for diverse media other than print material. It develops professional skills and proves useful in enhancing the employability of students by introducing them to globally and nationally acceptable standards and styles of content writing. This unit intends to explore the process of content generation and development with special emphasis on the following topics.

1. Digital media

2. Writing for the media

3. Issues with writing for the media

4. Historical overview of digital writing

5. Rules in content writing, economy in writing

7. Writing for websites; writing for online advertisements; writing for social media (blogs, twitter etc.)

8. Travel writing for blogs and travel websites

Teaching learning strategies:

Lectures, workshops with industry experts, and hands-on exercises

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Editing and Publishing
 

 This unit introduces students with roles of editors and various skills required for the same. After having learnt the basics of content creation in the previous units, the students will get a preliminary introduction to discipline specific editing, issues in content editing for academic journals, book editing, proofreading and the like. It develops professional skills and proves useful in enhancing the employability of students by training them in global standards of editing.  The focus points of this unit are the following:

1. Introduction to editing and publishing in academia.

2. Differences in copy editing, proofreading and content editing.

3. Grammar and usage editing.

4. Editing for Academic Journals; reading academic journals to identify major arguments.

5. Placing of issues in the journal; approaches to academic journals in different disciplines.

6. Discipline specific editing.

7. Issues in content and language editing for academic journals.

8. Publishing in Print and Digital Media

9. Requirements and Ethics in publishing 

10. Plagiarism and its impact

Teaching learning strategies :

Lectures, workshops with industry experts, and hands-on exercises

Text Books And Reference Books:

Orwell, George. Why I Write. Renard Press, 2021.

Kane, Thomas S., and Thomas S. Kane. The Oxford Essential Guide to Writing. Oxford University Press, 2003.

McCool, Matthew. Writing around the World a Guide to Writing across Cultures. Continuum, 2009.

Redish, J. 2007. Letting Go of The Words: Writing Web Content that Works. KaufmannGilad, Suzanne. Copyediting & Proofreading for Dummies. Wiley Publishing, Inc., 2007.

Einsohn, Amy, et al. The Copyeditor's Handbook: A Guide for Book Publishing and Corporate Communications. University of California Press, 2019.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Carroll, Brian. Writing and Editing for Digital Media. Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, 2020.

Didion, Joan. “Why I Write.” https://lithub.com/joan-didion-why-i-write/.

26, Joan Didion January. “Joan Didion: Why I Write.” Literary Hub, 9 Mar. 2021, lithub.com/joan-didion-why-i-write/.

Kane, Thomas S. The Oxford Essential Guide to Writing. OUP.

 

Garrand, Timothy Paul. Writing for Multimedia and the Web: Content Development for Games, Web Sites, Education & More. Focal, 2006.

Truss, L. (2004). Eats, shoots & leaves: The zero tolerance approach to punctuation. Gotham Books.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-I (20 Marks)

CIA II/MSE (50 Marks)

CIA-III (20 Marks)

ESE (50 Marks)

Attendance 5 Marks

Submission mode.

Can be an individual assignment or a group assignment with an additional individual component.

 

 

Centralized exam.

Section A: 2x 10 marks

Section B: 1x 15 marks

Section C: 1 x 15 marks

There can be choices in Section A and B. Section C will have a compulsory question

Students will be tested on their conceptual clarity, theoretical engagements, application and analysis of given texts and contexts. 

Submission mode.

Can be an individual assignment or a group assignment with an additional individual component.

Centralized exam.

Section A: 2x 10 marks

Section B: 1x 15 marks

Section C: 1 x 15 marks

There can be choices in Section A and B. Section C will have a compulsory question.

Students will be tested on their conceptual clarity, theoretical engagements, application and analysis of given texts and contexts. 

Taken from KP

ENG184-2 - LANGUAGE AND CONTEMPORARY SOCIETY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description