CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

School of Architecture

Syllabus for
Bachelor of Architecture
Academic Year  (2021)

 
1 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
ARC131 MYTH HISTORY AND ARCHITECTURE - 3 3 100
ARC132 LOGIC OF STRUCTURES - 3 3 100
ARC133 ART OF DESCRIPTION - 3 3 100
ARC151 DISCOVERING DESIGN - 6 9 300
ARC152 CREATIVE INQUIRY - 5 3 100
ARC153 TECHNIQUE OF DRAWING - I - 4 3 100
ARC154 MATERIAL STRATEGIES FOR PHYSICAL WORLD - 5 3 100
2 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
ARC231 ARCHITECTURE TRADITIONS - FRAMES Core Courses 3 3 100
ARC232 LOGIC OF STRUCTURES - FRAMES Core Courses 3 3 100
ARC233 READING THE SITE Core Courses 4 3 100
ARC251 DESIGNING THE FRAME Core Courses 6 9 300
ARC252 ART OF JOINERY Core Courses 4 3 100
ARC253 TECHNIQUE OF DRAWING - II Core Courses 4 3 100
ARC254 MATERIAL STRATEGIES FOR FRAMES Core Courses 5 3 100
3 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
ARC331 ARCHITECTURE TRADITIONS - MASONRY - 4 3 100
ARC332 LOGIC OF STRUCTURES - MASONRY - 3 3 100
ARC333 BUILDING ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS - I - 3 3 100
ARC334 CLIMATE RESPONSIVE ARCHITECTURE - I - 4 3 100
ARC351 DESIGNING THE MASONRY ENVELOPE - 6 9 300
ARC352 TECHNIQUE OF DIGITAL REPRESENTATION I - 4 3 100
ARC353 MATERIAL STRATEGIES FOR MASONRY - 5 3 100
4 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
ARC431 LOGIC OF STRUCTURES - ADVANCED Core Courses 3 3 100
ARC432 BUILDING ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS - II Core Courses 3 3 100
ARC441C VERNACULAR ARCHITECTURE Elective 3 3 100
ARC441J FURNITURE DESIGN Elective 3 3 100
ARC451 RURAL STUDIO Core Courses 6 9 300
ARC452 TECHNIQUE OF DIGITAL REPRESENTATION - II Core Courses 4 3 100
ARC453 CLIMATE RESPONSIVE ARCHITECTURE - II Core Courses 4 3 100
ARC454 MATERIAL STRATEGIES FOR AN APPROPRIATE ARCHITECTURE Core Courses 5 3 100
5 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
ARC531 ARCHITECTURAL TRADITION AND MODERNISM - 4 3 100
ARC532 BUILDING ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS - III - 3 3 100
ARC533 LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE AND SITE PLANNING - 4 3 100
ARC551 ALTERING LANDSCAPES AND INSTITUTIONAL ARCHITECTURE - 6 9 300
ARC552 LOGIC OF STRUCTURES - FORM FINDING - 5 3 100
ARC553 DIGITAL GRAPHICS AND ART - 4 3 100
ARC554 MATERIAL STRATEGIES ADVANCED - I - 5 3 100
6 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
ARC631 HOUSING AND HUMAN SETTLEMENT PLANNING Core Courses 4 3 100
ARC632 SPECIFICATIONS ESTIMATION AND COSTING Core Courses 3 3 100
ARC633 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE - I Core Courses 3 3 100
ARC641C INTERIOR DESIGN Elective 4 3 100
ARC641G RESEARCH METHODOLOGY Elective 4 3 100
ARC642D THEATER STUDIES Elective 5 03 100
ARC642E GRAPHIC AND PRODUCT DESIGN Elective 15 03 100
ARC651 HABITAT STUDIO Core Courses 8 10 300
ARC652 MATERIAL STRATEGIES ADVANCED - II Core Courses 5 3 100
7 Semester - 2018 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
ARC731 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE II - 3 3 100
ARC741C APPLIED ART - PHOTOGRAPHY - 5 3 100
ARC742A FOREIGN LANGUAGE - FRENCH - 4 3 100
ARC742B MUSIC - 4 3 100
ARC751 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN VII - 8 12 300
ARC752 URBAN DESIGN - 5 3 100
ARC753 BUILDING INFORMATION MODELLING - 5 3 100
8 Semester - 2018 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
ARC831 PROJECT AND CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT Core Courses 3 3 100
ARC832 ENTREPRENEURSHIP SKILLS OF ARCHITECTS Add On Course 3 3 100
ARC841A ARCHITECTURAL CONSERVATION Elective 5 3 100
ARC841D BUILDING PERFORMANCE AND COMPLIANCE Elective 5 3 100
ARC842A FOREIGN LANGUAGE - II Elective 3 3 100
ARC842D VIRTUAL REALITY AND DIGITAL DRAWING SKILLS IN ARCHITECTURE Elective 3 3 100
ARC851 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN VIII Core Courses 6 9 300
ARC881 DISSERTATION SEMINAR Core Courses 5 3 100
9 Semester - 2017 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
ARC981 PRACTICAL TRAINING - 0 12 400
10 Semester - 2017 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
ARC1051 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN THESIS - 10 15 500
    

    

Introduction to Program:

The Bachelor's Degree Program in Architecture, affiliated to the Christ University, is a five-year program approved by the Council of Architecture New Delhi. The Programme has two components, Studio, and Theory. The theory encompasses the current theoretical positions on Architecture, understanding historical precedents of the built environment in India and across the world, Building Sciences and Technology. Studio courses address the issues of methods in the documentation, analysis, and interpretations and design process of physical environments. The studio cycle is aimed at developing design language, tools, and skills to design sustainable built environments. The programme entails Practical training of one semester with a registered practicing architect. The Programme thus intends to render a holistic understanding of Architecture. The Board of Studies members include acclaimed academicians and leading architects; Prof Neelkant Chhaya, Former Dean of Faculty of Architecture, CEPT University; Ar. Prem Chandavarkar, Managing partner of CnT Architects. A. ADMISSION Admission to the Bachelor of Architecture to all the candidates who have passed the Qualifying Examination of an examination at the end of the 10+2 scheme of examination of Central/State Govts with at least 50% aggregate marks in Physics, Chemistry, and Mathematics and also 50% marks in aggregate of the 10+2 level examination or passed 10+3 Diploma Examination with mathematics as compulsory subject with at least 50% marks in aggregate. And have passed the Aptitude Test with a qualified NATA score for the aptitude test conducted by the Council of Architecture OR Qualified JEE Mains Paper-II Aptitude Test in Architecture B. DURATION The Architecture course shall be of minimum duration of 5 years or 10 semesters of approximately 16 working weeks each inclusive of six months or one semester of approximately 16 working weeks of Practical training in semester IX in a professional office under a COA Registered Architect, complying to the Council of Architecture Gazetted Rules 2020.

Programme Outcome/Programme Learning Goals/Programme Learning Outcome:

PO 1: Work effectively in multi-disciplinary teams within the field of human habitat demonstrating social and environmental responsibility.

PO 2: Demonstrate engagement in community outreach programs and to apply the assimilated knowledge in built environment related disciplines that are relevant to ethical practice in architecture.

PO 3: Demonstrate and extend the appropriate knowledge for designing the built environment.

PO 4: Integrate critical thinking skills to recognize and assess existing environment in the service of the discipline of architecture.

PO 5: Apply creatively the sound knowledge in design theories and their applications, building technology, social, cultural and environmental factors.

PO 6: Demonstrate and extend the interdisciplinary knowledge and use tools that enable it.

PO 7: Practice the inculcated skills creatively for the physical, social and creative realms of crafting architecture

PO 8: Recognize and act upon opportunities and aspirations

PO 9: Demonstrate creative problem-solving skills with the skills learnt, working with varied materials and media.

PO10: Use the acquired skills to demonstrate design concepts and solutions, and adopt effective communication of those ideas to peers, clients, decision makers, and the public.

Assesment Pattern

The courses are classified into two types - Studio Courses and Theory Courses. Studio courses are further classified in to Major studio courses and Minor studio courses

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

a.        CREDIT STRUCTURE As referred in the detailed syllabus

b.        CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

1. The students shall be continuously assessed towards their CIA which comprises of creative and innovative assignments. The CIA shall have four components of CIA 1, CIA 2, CIA 3, and Attendance.

2. For Studio courses CIA is conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different assignments throughout the semester for 150 marks (Major Studio) and 50 Marks (Minor Studio).

3. CIA 1 and 3 for Theory courses shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.

4. CIA 2 for Theory courses shall be conducted in the form of Mid Semester Examination.

5.  For Theory courses minimum of 50% marks  in CIA is required  to be eligible for the End Semester Examination (ESE). For Studio courses minimum of 50% marks in CIA  is required to be eligible for VIVA VOCE which is conducted as ESE. A student who fails the CIA of a course is not eligible to appear for the ESE and shall repeat CIA  immediately after the announcement of the results and pass in the CIA to become eligible for the ESE in the supplementary examinations conducted in the subsequent semester

The breakup of CIA marks for theory courses is given below: CIA 1- 10 marks; CIA 2 - 15 marks (conducted out of 50 marks and converted to out of 15 marks); CIA 3 - 20 marks; Attendance -5 Marks

5 marks for attendance is distributed as follows

 

Attendance Percentage

Marks

95% - 100%

05

90% - 94%

04

85% - 89%

03

80% - 85%

02

76% - 79%

01

 c.        END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

1. End semester examinations shall be conducted for all courses.

2. Eligibility to appear for ESE

·       A student has passed in CIAs for that course with 50% minimum marks

·       A student has at least 85% of the attendance in aggregate at the end of the semester

·       The Vice-Chancellor is satisfied with the character and conduct of the student

3. For theory course ESE is conducted at the end of the semester by the Office of Examinations.  Duration of the examination is three hours with maximum marks of 100 which is then reduced to out of 50 marks; For studio courses ESE is in the form of VIVA VOCE and is conducted by the dept for 150 marks and 50 marks for major studio courses and minor studio courses  respectively

d.        PASS CRITERIA

1. A student shall pass each course with a minimum aggregate (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

2. The overall aggregate of 50% and pass in all courses is required to pass the semester.

3. Students passing the semester shall be awarded different class as per Table given below

e.        GRADING PATTERN

Grading system: Grades are awarded based on absolute grading. The University follows a 4-point grading system. However, the transcripts will also show grading on a 10-point scale.

Percentage 

Grade 

Grade point

(10 point scale) 

Grade point

 (4 Point scale) 

Interpretation 

80-100 

O

10

4

Outstanding

70-79

A+

9

3.6

Excellent 

60-69

A

8

3.2

Very Good

55-59

B+

7

2.8

Good

50-54

B

6

2.4

Above Average

45-49

C

5

2

Average*

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GRADING SCHEME FOR SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE 

f.       PROMOTION POLICY

a.    Candidates who have not passed in at least 50% of the courses of the previous semesters are not promoted to the following year of the program.

b.    Should pass in all the courses of the first year to be promoted to the third year.

c.   Should  pass  in  all  the  courses  of the  first  and  second  years  to be promoted to the fourth year.

d.   Should pass in all the courses of the first, second, and third years to be promoted to the fifth year.

e.  A candidate shall not be permitted to enroll for the Architectural Design course in a semester unless he has completed the Architectural Design course of the previous semester.

g.   A candidate shall not be permitted to enroll for the tenth semester Architectural Design Thesis or dissertation or project course unless he has successfully completed Practical Training or Internship.

Examination And Assesments

The B Arch Programme offers theory and studio courses. The theory courses conduct periodical Continuous Internal Assessments (CIA) which includes tests, assignments, and attendance to evaluate the students' progress. Each course would culminate with an End Semester Examination (ESE) conducted centrally by the University. The Studio courses are continuously evaluated through reviews, assignments, and time problems, which accumulate as CIA marks. The ESE will be conducted through Viva-voce reviewed and marked by an external examiner.

ARC131 - MYTH HISTORY AND ARCHITECTURE (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

1. To develop the ability to critically assimilate percepts and concepts of the built environment through history.

2. To experience the correlation of man, nature, and art with respect to their living habitat.

3. To understand, interpret and analyze art history through the integrated modules

ARC 131 Unit-3 Art as a Medium of Representation & Expression, ARC 133 Unit-3 De-Scribe Art.

Course Outcome

CO1: Ability to comprehend and critique an integral part of craft and its relationship between society, culture, and architecture. Level: Basic

CO2: Familiarize through illustrations, the similarities in societies, cultures, and architecture drawing inspirations from the local ecology. Level: Basic

CO3: Ability to recognize materials such as reed, wood, and bamboo as cardinal in the evolution of framed architecture and realize its diverse uses on a national and global scale. Level: Basic

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Relationship between man & nature
 

1. Introduction to History of built environment and Man’s relationship with Nature through the experience gained from the Studio-On- Wheels.

2. Myth and History and their relationship to architecture.

3. Natural elements as a beginning of source, resource, ritual, society, culture, tradition & civilization and their progressive development through different ages with relevant examples.

4. Tribal art, craft, and architecture - local, regional and global.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Material Culture
 

1. Material as an integral dimension of culture and to explore material resources through time and place with appropriate examples of Prehistoric art and architecture.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Art as a Medium of Representation, Expression & Symbolism
 

1. Introduction to Art and Craft through history.

2. Art as an important part of culture - as a form of representation, critique and symbolism through diverse examples and illustrate.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Portfolio Development and Master classes
 

1. Master classes should focus on relevant topics.

2. Portfolio development - To organise and review all works done in the semester. Establish connections with other subjects where possible.

3. Encouraging self-learning.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Books:

T1. Ingersoll, R. And Kostof, S. (2013). World architecture: a cross-cultural history. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

T2. Ching, F., Jarzombek, M., & Prakash, V. (2011). A global history of architecture (2nd ed.). Hoboken, N.J.: Wiley.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reference Books:

R1. Frampton, K. (2016). Modern architecture: A critical history (4th ed.). London; New York, N.Y.: Thames & Hudson.

R2. Diane Ghirardo. (1990). Architecture after Modernism, Thames & Hudson, London.

R3. Richard Harris. (1978). Discovering Timber-framed Buildings, Bloomsbury, USA.

R4. René Kolkman and Stuart H. Blackburn (2014). Tribal Architecture in Northeast India.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total - 50 Marks 

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in CIA.
  • The course shall have a written exam of a three-hour duration.
  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC132 - LOGIC OF STRUCTURES (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course intends to impart a basic understanding of behaviour of structures.

Course Outcome

CO1: To comprehend and describe the basics of structures and structural systems. Level: Basic

CO2: To describe the basic principles of mechanics. Level: Basic

CO3: To comprehend and evaluate the loads on structures & balancing the same. Level: Intermediate

CO4: To develop an intuitive understanding of behaviour of structure by which they can comprehend the structural system of any physical object. Level: Intermediate

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
The Beginning of Architecture
 

1. Structure in Nature: Reading Structure in Natural Forms - Plants, Animals, Insects etc.

2. Structure of Everyday objects: Baskets, Furniture, Ladder, spectacles, bags etc.

3. Evolution of Structures: What makes buildings stand up. Understanding Gravity. Historical perspective and definition of structure.

4. Structural systems overview: Geometry of forces. Introduction to Loads. Vertical/lateral systems

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Study of Materials
 

1. Experiment with Structures

2. Structural Materials: Mechanical properties of structural materials

3. Loads on Structures: Dead load (DL), live load (LL), static, dynamic, impact, and thermal loads.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Broad categorization of Structural Systems
 

1. Differentiate broadly the Structural systems as Mass, Frame and Surface systems.

2. States of Stress: Knowledge of basic states of stress, tension, compression, bending, shear and torsion shall be imparted.

3. Understanding stress and its relevance with material and shaping of elements and structures.

4. Phenomenon of buckling and its importance in compression members shall be explained with Euler’s equation.

5. Principle of transmissibility of forces: Understanding load flow

6. Stress/strain relations (Hooke's Law): Modulus of Elasticity.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Basic requirements of Structures: Strength, Stability, Serviceability, Functionality, Durability, Economy and Efficiency
 

Aesthetics shall be explained in detail with reference to structural design and Architectural considerations.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Books:

T1. Bansal, R., & Bansal, S. (2015). Engineering Mechanics. New Delhi: Laxmi Publications (P) Ltd.

T2. Salvadori, M., & Heller, R. (1985). Structure in Architecture: The Building of Buildings. Prentice Hall; 3rd Revised edition.

T3. Salvadori, M., Hooker, S., & Ragus, C. (1980). Why buildings stand up: The strength of architecture. New York: Norton.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reference Books:

R1. Schierle, G. (2008). Structure and Design. University Readers.

R2. Schodek, D., & Bechthold, M. (2013). Structures. Pearson; 7th Edition.

R3. Singer, F. (1975). Engineering Mechanics. Weatherhill: Harper & Row, 3rd Edition.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total -50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in CIA.
  • The course shall have a written exam of three-hour duration.
  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC133 - ART OF DESCRIPTION (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
  1. Introduction to different forms of communication - verbal, visual, artistic and written media, in order to discover one-self and realise one’s own potential in these forms.
  2. Orientation to new forms of perceiving and expression of the self and surroundings extending beyond one’s conditioning.
  3. Developing responsiveness to information for comprehension, expression and creation in a tangible manner.

Course Outcome

CO1: Ability to express in various forms of communication of verbal, visual and written. To know more about the self and to realise the potential, strengths and challenges in each form of communication. Level: Basic

CO2: Ability to recognise new forms of perceiving and expression in context of self and surroundings. To learn to express one?s thoughts and attitudes through various media. Level: Basic

CO3: Ability to see art and express as a medium of communication. Level: Intermediate

CO4: Ability to put together a well done portfolio of what has been learnt in all courses in the semester in a coherent manner. Level: Intermediate

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Me and Nature
 

Observing, learning and appreciation of nature through various media.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Voice of Materials
 

Listening to context and what environments say, by exploring, reading, writing and performing in a descriptive and poetical manner.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
De-Scribe Art
 

Exploring the visual and artistic medium for appreciation, comprehension and expression. Introduction to art movements and artists. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Portfolio Development and Exhibition
 

To organise and review all works done in the semester. To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject. Establish connections with other subjects where possible

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. T1. Jones, L. (2001). Working In English. Cambridge University Press.
  2. T2. Mudambadithaya, G. (2011). Communicative English for Professional Courses. Sapna Publishing House.
  3. T3. Taylor, G. (2011). English Conversation Practice. McGraw Hill Education; First edition.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. R1. Meuser, P., 1969-, & Pogade, D. (2010). Wayfinding and Signage: Construction and Design Manual. Berlin: DOM Publishers.
  2. R2. Ambrose, G., & Harris, P. (2010). Design thinking for visual communication (Second edition.). London: Bloomsbury.
  3. R3. Sen, G. (2013). Your history gets in the way of my memory: Essays on Indian artists. India: Happer Collins.
  4. R4.Belton, Dr Robert. 2005. History of Art: From the Middles Ages, to Renaissance, Impressionism and Modern Art (Masterworks). S.l. : Flame Tree Publishing.
  5. R5. Thuillier, Jacques. 2004. History of Art.
  6. W1. www.openculture.com/
  7. W2.http://www.ubu.com/
  8. W3.https://www.theartstory.org/
  9. W4.MOOC Courses from NPTEL/Coursera (as recommended by faculty)
Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total -50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in CIA.
  • The course shall have a written exam of three-hour duration.
  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC151 - DISCOVERING DESIGN (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:90
No of Lecture Hours/Week:6
Max Marks:300
Credits:9

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The Foundation Year Studio aims at an introduction to the built environment in a natural setting. Orientation to the realm of architecture through an exploration of the sensorial and artistic experience of natural, cultural, and built environment in that setting; Unfold the architectural realm through exploring art & culture, craft, material & technology. Introduce architectural design thinking by helping students to recognize design in the natural, cultural and everyday environment.

Course Outcome

CO1: Ability to observe and document the natural world and the built environment in a sensorial, poetic and technical manner. Level: Basic

CO2: Ability to recognize concepts in architecture related to ?my space? - form, scale, and anthropometry. Level: Basic

CO3: Ability to see art in the simple details and elements of architecture. Level: Intermediate

CO4: Ability to manifest ideas in small spaces which appreciate ?my space? & also to put together a well-done portfolio of what has been learned in all courses in the semester in a coherent manner. Level: Intermediate

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:24
Understanding Nature
 

1. Travel to a natural setting to explore, document and represent Nature and the local  culture through its art, craft, rituals and practices. The explorations could be enhanced  by tracing the material culture of a community of time period through an object  biography 

2. Trace the relationship of the local built-environment & material culture with the  ecology of the place. 

3. Introduction to the discipline of architecture and the role of the architect in shaping  the built-environment and its relationship with ecology and people

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:24
Shape of Space
 

Introduction to concepts of architecture – 

a. space, form, structure, material, geometry, pattern, proportion, mass,  transparency etc. 

b. flexibility, modularity, strength. 

c. scale and proportion, representation skills 

d. architectural space - enclosure, partition, stacking, interconnection, separation,  accumulation, connection, floating, climbing. 

e. introduction to anthropometry and how it manifests in different     cultures Illustrate how these concepts are manifested in experiential and tangible ways.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:24
Architecture as Art
 

1. Appreciating the art of architecture through making and representation as a  way of looking at the world and of communicating ideas creatively . 
2. Undertake group and individual exercises that are sculptural and begin to  suggest architectural space.  
3. Suggested small design projects which may demonstrate the understanding of  Art in architecture & principles of Space making.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:18
Portfolio Development and Representation
 

Portfolio development - To organize and review all works done in the semester.

To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject. Establish connections with other  subjects where possible

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Books: 

T1. Ching, F. D. K. (2015). Architecture: Form, Space, & Order (Fourth edition.). New Jersey: John  Wiley.  

T2. Chakrabarti, D. (1997). Indian Anthropometric Dimensions: For Ergonomic Design Practice. National Institute of Design. 

T3. The American Institute of Architects. (2016). Architectural Graphic Standards (Ramsey/Sleeper  Architectural Graphic Standards Series) (12th Revised ed.). John Wiley & Sons 

T4: Pandya, Y. (2015). Elements of Space making. Ahmedabad: Mapin Publishing Pvt Ltd.  T5: Callender, J. (1997). Time-saver Standards for Architectural Design Data (7th Revised edition  edition ed.). McGraw-Hill Inc.,US.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Gill, R. (1990). Rendering with Pen and Ink. Thames & Hudson Ltd

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks. Attendance and participation in the studio would be considered in the evaluation rubrics.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of a particular course
  • CIA -1- 25 Marks; CIA -2 - 50 Marks; CIA -3 - 75 Marks; Total - 150 Marks 

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 150 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC152 - CREATIVE INQUIRY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The studio introduces students to creative inquiry as a way of learning about the world around us. This is done through empirical, perceptive, and representational exercises and techniques that -

1. Sensitises them to the diversity and heterogeneity of our ‘local’ culture. 

2. Focuses on aesthetical thinking through process-based techniques which can enhance the student’s aesthetic sense, creativity, responsiveness to the local ecology. 

3. Encourages a reflective and thoughtful attitude to the context and environment in which they live. 

4. Helps connect the student’s creativity and aesthetic sensibility to the local knowledge and culture of their environment. They learn and adapt from the diversity of craftsmanship and interpret local knowledge and traditions. 

5. Encourages group learning, effective communication, recognizing responsibilities, and cognitive coordination between social and emotional skills of the students. 

Education responds to changing sensibilities, environment, and scale of activity. Einstein mentions that education is not the learning of facts; rather, it is the training of the mind to think. The studio integrates activities that are process-based, experience-based in an open-ended learning process. It  aims for an: 

1. Introduction to ‘design and the environment. 

2. Introduction to different media and rendering techniques. 

3. Introduction to principles of composition 

4. Developing a keen sensitivity to space, scale, proportion, light, wind, sound, texture. 5. Practice of basic principles of free-hand drawing and colour. 

6. Introduction to representation of the human body and anthropometrics /ergonomics.

7. Introduction to translate abstract principles of design into the architectural process, forms and solutions. 

8. Explore one’s own strengths and weaknesses, aptitude and sensibilities, fears, and insecurities.

Course Outcome

CO1: Ability to recognize the realm of architecture by developing the capability to understand different layers that form an urban architectural fabric, exposing them to the interconnections of architecture with other disciplines like sociology, anthropology. Level: Basic

CO2: Ability to sensitively observe, record, visualize and communicate various aspects of the immediate environment including human relationships, visual language, aesthetic characteristics and space, elements of nature, etc. Level: Basic

CO3: Awareness of a range of materials used in making our manmade environment and a hands-on ability to make different objects and artwork using some of them. Familiarity with traditional and contemporary skills in the use and crafting of materials. Level: Basic

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Orientation and Sensing Nature
 

Orientation Week [Integrated with ARC151, ARC153 and ARC154} 

The orientation programme focuses on an introduction to the B.Arch Program, the Institutional Culture and Realm of Architecture through various activities and specific  exercises. It also focuses on a soft skill development program through different  exploratory exercises

Studio on Wheels: ‘Seeing’ the Natural Environment around us. 

1. Getting familiar with our immediate surroundings. 

2. Observing, experiencing, and analyzing the natural environment and how we  inhabit it. 

3. Exploring and learning about human abilities like perception, intuition, observation, etc. 

4. Learning how identification, analysis and naming are cultural processes. Engaging  our senses through nature walks (seeing, hearing, touching, 

     smelling, tasting).

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Discovering Materials and learning to use them
 

1. ‘Seeing’ materials around us, natural and man-made. 

2. Understanding and experiencing characteristics, general usage of materials,  properties and behavior. 

3. Getting familiar with tools and their use in traditional and contemporary practices.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:25
Introduction to Art and Design
 

1. Introduction to Art and basic principles. 

2. Critical role of art in culture and society. 

3. Drawing as an extension of seeing and as a basic tool towards different visualization techniques and representational techniques. 

4. Different ways of drawing and introduction to various techniques.

5. Origin of Design and its history. 

6. Elements of design. 

7. Developing skills of analysis, synthesis, interpretation and communication through  elements and composition 

8. Introduction to theory of visual perception through colour, form, space, light and shadow, texture and tones.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Portfolio development
 

To organize and review all works done in the semester. To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject. Establish connections with other subjects where possible.

Text Books And Reference Books:
Text Books: 
T1. Dondis, D. A. (1973). A primer of visual literacy. Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press. T2. Berger, J., Dibb, M., & BBC Enterprises. (1972).
T2. Berger, J., Dibb, M., & BBC Enterprises. (1972). Ways of seeing. London: BBC Enterprises.
T 3 Ching, F. D. K. (2015). Architecture: Form, space, & order (Fourth edition.). New Jersy: John Wiley.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Ways of seeing. London: BBC Enterprises. T 3 Ching, F. D. K. (2015). Architecture: Form, space, & order (Fourth edition.). New Jersy: John  Wiley.

 

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks. Attendance and participation in the studio would be considered in the evaluation rubrics.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of a particular course
  • CIA -1- 25 Marks; CIA -2 - 50 Marks; CIA -3 - 75 Marks; Total - 150 Marks 

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 150 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC153 - TECHNIQUE OF DRAWING - I (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To introduce the fundamental geometric principles involved in architectural drawing.

Course Outcome

CO1: Ability to use different drawing tools and equipment. Level: Basic

CO2: Ability to do freehand sketches/drawings following the basic principles of line drawing. Level:Basic

CO3: Acquire skills and learn techniques of geometric drawing to represent basic shapes and forms leading to architectural graphics. Level: Basic

CO4: Ability to present in a Portfolio, the subject content and work produced in a legible and comprehensive manner and to demonstrate its relevance in the context of other subjects in the semester. Level: Basic

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:16
Representing Nature
 

1. Introduction to Line as a basic tool in representation. Explore the geometry found in Nature, Art and Craft.

2. Develop drawing as a tool to represent the observations from Nature.

3. Types of drawing.

a). Freehand drawing.

b).Basic rendering.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:16
Scale, Lettering and Geometry
 

1. Concept of Scales.

2. Understanding Lettering as a tool to reveal geometry of shapes and forms.

3. Introduction to Euclidean geometry and curves.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Orthographic Projections
 

1. Introduction to projections and understanding orthographic projection as the base of an architectural drawing.

2. Sections and development of lateral surfaces of solids

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Portfolio
 

Portfolio development - To organize and review all works done in the semester. To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject. Establish connections with other subjects where possible.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Books:

T1. Bhatt, N. D. (2014). Engineering Drawing. Anand, India: Charotar Publishing House Pvt. Ltd.

T2. Venugopal, K. (2004). Engineering Drawing and Graphics. New Age International Publishers.

T3. Cooper Douglas (2007). Drawing and Perceiving. Van Nostrand Reinhold.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reference Books:

R1. Francis, D. K. Ching, (2014). Architecture: Form, Space, & Order, Wiley publishers.

R2. Francis, D. K. Ching, (2015). Architectural Graphics. Wiley publishers.

R3. Alexander, W. White, (2011). The Elements of Graphic Design, Allworth Press.

R4. Victor Perard (2006). Anatomy and Drawing. Harper Publishers.

R5. Robert W. Gill (1984). Rendering with Pen and Ink. The Thames & Hudson Manuals. R6.

Barrington Barber (2014). The Fundamentals of Drawing. Arcturus Publishers.

Online Resources:

W1. The Complete Manual of Typography, by James Felici.

http://ptgmedia.pearsoncmg.com/images/9780321773265/samplepages/0321773268.pdf

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks. Attendance and participation in the studio would be considered in the evaluation rubrics.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of a particular course
  • CIA -1- 25 Marks; CIA -2 - 50 Marks; CIA -3 - 75 Marks; Total - 150 Marks 

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 150 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC154 - MATERIAL STRATEGIES FOR PHYSICAL WORLD (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

1. Learning about the properties and characteristics, methods of preservation and treatment of

indigenous materials in a natural landscape and moving from a specific context to the generic.

2. To learn about the techniques of using natural materials in the local context and document

them in an integrated studio with all core courses.

Course Outcome

CO1: To demonstrate and learn from Nature as a resource and inspiration for art, design and architecture. Level: Basic

CO2: Ability to explore a sensorial understanding of materials. Level: Basic

CO3: The skill to represent materials used in architecture through various mediums. Level: Basic

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Handling Materials and Investigating Anthropometrics
 

1. Touching, seeing & learning the way material has been woven in the built form.

2. Exploration of anthropometrics.

3. Learning from everyday objects - materials and their use.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:25
Exploring Materials Through Making
 

1. Exploring concepts of strength, hardness, flexibility, malleability & brittleness through different materials.

2. Introduction to mud, bamboo, brick, stone, concrete, steel and glass.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:25
Exploring Construction Techniques of Various materials
 

1. Understand the position of materials detailed in Unit II in the context of building construction.

2. Introduction to Masonry –Wall as a Plane, Space maker & Divider.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Portfolio Development and Master classes
 

1. Masterclasses emphasizing different aspects of material.

2. Portfolio development - To organize and review all works done in the semester. To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject.

3. Establish connections and integrate with other subjects of relevance.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Books:

T1. Ching, F. D. 1. (1975). Building construction illustrated. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold.

T2. Mckay, W. B. (2016). Building Construction Metric (Vol - 1.). Noida: Pearson.

T3. Deplazes, A. (2005). Constructing Architecture Materials Processes Structures A Handbook.

Basel, Switzerland: Birkhäuser Publishers for Architecture.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reference Books:

R1. Dunkelberg, K. (1985). IL 31 Bambus Bamboo. Stuttagart: Institutes for Leichte.

R2. Semper, G., Mallgrave, H. F., Robinson, M., & Getty Research Institute. (2004). Style in the

technical and tectonic arts, or, Practical aesthetics. Los Angeles: Getty Research Institute.

R3. Frampton, K., & Cava, J. (1995). Studies in tectonic culture: The poetics of construction in

nineteenth and twentieth century architecture. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press.

R4. Spence R. F. and Cook D.J.( 1983)Building Materials in Developing Countries, John Wiley and

sons.

R5. Minke, G., & Mahlke, F. (2005). Building with straw: Design and technology of a sustainable

architecture. Basel; Boston: Birkhäuser.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks. Attendance and participation in the studio would be considered in the evaluation rubrics.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of a particular course
  • CIA -1- 25 Marks; CIA -2 - 50 Marks; CIA -3 - 75 Marks; Total - 150 Marks 

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 150 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC231 - ARCHITECTURE TRADITIONS - FRAMES (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
  1. To develop the ability to critically assimilate percepts and concepts of the built environment through history.
  2. To enable students to understand the interrelation between traditional and contemporary trends in material, form and function.
  3. To introduce the systemic and technological approach of architecture as a craft based endeavor in a cultural realm through integrated learning.

Course Outcome

CO1: Ability to comprehend and critique the fundamental aspects of craft and its influence on society, culture and architecture. Level: Basic

CO2: Familiarize through illustrations, the similarities in societies, cultures and architecture drawing inspirations from the local ecology. Level: Basic

CO3: Ability to recognize materials such as reed, mud, wood, bamboo, steel & concrete as cardinal in the evolution of framed architecture and realize its diverse uses on a national and global scale. Level: Basic

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Crafting the Frame
 

1. History of Craft & Craftsmanship: Its importance in building communities.

2. Introduction to craft as an experiential learning through studio-on-wheels/ empirical methods. Understanding various aspects of traditions in craft, with examples of local crafts.

3. The Modern Frame: Journey of Craft & Craftsmanship.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Cultural History of the Frame
 

1. Historical examples beginning from the ‘Vedic’ village, Buddhist architecture and discuss the influence of wood and bamboo framed architecture. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
The Modern Frame
 

1. Introduction to the Modern Frame: Geographical and cultural influences.

2. Steel as a material of magical frame in the Industrial and Post-Industrial Era.

3. Discovering the versatile Reinforced Concrete and journey of the Modern Frame.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Portfolio Development and Master classes
 

Relevant Master classes that focus on the above units. 

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. T1. Ingersoll, R. And Kostof, S. (2013). World architecture: a cross-cultural history. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  2. T2. Ching, F., Jarzombek, M., & Prakash, V. (2011). A global history of architecture (2nd ed.). Hoboken, N.J.: Wiley. 
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. R1. Frampton, K. (2016). Modern architecture: A critical history (4th ed.). London; New York, N.Y.: Thames & Hudson.
  2. R2. Ghirardo, D. (1990) Architecture after Modernism, London: Thames & Hudson.
  3. R3. Harris, R. (1978) Discovering Timber-framed Buildings, USA: Bloomsbury.
  4. R4. Kolkman, R. & Blackburn, S. H. (2014) Tribal Architecture in Northeast India.
Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total -50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in CIA.
  • The course shall have a written exam of three-hour duration.
  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC232 - LOGIC OF STRUCTURES - FRAMES (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Reinforcing the conceptual understanding by using an abstract method of analysis of frame structures.

Course Outcome

CO 1: To describe and comprehend the basic principles of mechanics of structures and structural systems.

CO 2: To comprehend and describe the section active system and types of supports.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Concept of Centre of Gravity
 

1. Determining the centroid of simple shapes.

2. Moment of inertia and its application to sections subjected to rotation.

3. Determining Moment of Inertia of simple shapes.

4. Resolution of forces. Classification of frame structure based on section active (system in bending) and vector active (triangulation)

5. Concept of triangulation and its application in jointed frameworks.

6. Materials and their appropriateness to take a bending moment and shear stress

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Types of Supports and Joints
 

1. Hinged, Fixed, Pinned, and Rigid.

2. Its relevance in shaping members. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Understanding of section active system
 

1. Bending Moment and shear force diagram and its relevance in the shaping of members.

2. a Basic understanding of seismic forces and their resistance in frame structures.

3. Deflection and its importance, codal provisions, the study of deflected shapes, and simple structures.

4. Calculations of deflections in simply supported and cantilever beams with uniformly distributed loads.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to Arch
 

1. Arch as a curved element in a system.

2. Determining the reaction and bending moment in three-hinged arches.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Bansal, R. (2017). A Textbook of Strength of Materials. Laxmi Publications; Sixth edition

T2. Prasad, I. (2002). A Textbook of Applied Mechanics: Dynamics & Statics. Khanna Publishers

T3. Salvadori, M., Hooker, S., & Ragus, C. (1990). Why buildings stand up: The strength of architecture. New York: Norton.

T4. Salvadori, M., & Heller, R. (1985). Structure in Architecture: The Building of Buildings. Prentice-Hall; 3rd Revised edition.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Schierle, G. (2008). Structure and Design. University Readers

R2. Schodek, D., & Bechthold, M. (2013). Structures. Pearson; 7th Edition.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.  

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total- 50  

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in CIA.
  • The course shall have a written exam of a three-hour duration.
  • Total ESE- 50 Marks  

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC233 - READING THE SITE (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Brief understanding of the changing relationship of man with nature and its ecological resources in shaping our existence.

To Understand the Relevance of Nature in connection to Climate and its environment

To orient the students towards factors of the natural landscape that influence local culture and its a built environment with a focus on a particular site of intervention.

Introduction to the topography within and around the site in context and its influence in the creation of a built environment. To introduce Mapping techniques.

Level of Knowledge: - Basic

Course Outcome

CO1: Ability to conduct site analysis by establishing the relationship between site characteristics and design requirements. Level: Basic

CO2: Ability to convert relevant site information and data to legible representation. Level: Basic

CO3: Recognize the fundamental importance of Natural Ecology in our existence and issues that affect the balance of the natural environment. Level: Basic

CO4: Ability to conduct and describe the technical surveying process and its drawing output. Apply topographical influence in the creation of a built environment within and around the site in context. Level: Basic

CO5: Ability to present in a Portfolio, the subject content and work produced in a legible and comprehensive manner and to demonstrate its relevance in the context of other subjects in the semester. Level: Basic

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:16
Introduction to Mapping
 

1. Introducing the idea of ecology and ecosystem as the combination of living things.

2. Introduction to mapping as a way of reading and representing the site.

3. Exploring different ways of mapping, sensorial and embodied mapping and representation.

4. Exploring the methods and mediums in rendering the maps.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:16
Site Study & Analysis
 
  1. Understanding the physical, natural, and social context of the site in shaping the architectural design process.
  2. Recognizing the geographical characteristics of the site in both macro and micro-region.
  3. Introduction to topography and its characteristics.
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Introduction to Surveying
 
  1. Introduction to Survey, principles of Surveying, Definition of a Contour, and learn how to read a survey drawing.
  2. Introduction to the topography within and around the site in context and its influence in creation of a built environment.
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Portfolio
 

To organize and review all works done in the semester. To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject. Establish connections with other subjects where possible.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Dee, C.,(2001), Form and Fabric in Landscape Architecture: A visual introduction, UK: Spon Press.

T2. Lynch, K. (1962), Site Planning, Cambridge: The MIT Press.

T3. McHarg I. (1978), Design with Nature. NY: John Wiley & Co.

T4. Booth, N. (2011), Foundations of Landscape Architecture: Integrating Form and Space Using the Language of Site Design, John Wiley & Co.

T5. Simonds, J.O. (1961), Landscape Architecture: The Shaping of Man’s Natural Environment, NY: McGraw Hill Book Co. Inc.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Shaheer.M, Dua G., Pal A. (2013), Landscape Architecture In India, A Reader, LA, Journal of Landscape Architecture.

W1. Down to Earth [Magazine] - www.downtoearth.org.in

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total- 50

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in CIA.
  • The course shall have a written exam of a three-hour duration.
  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC251 - DESIGNING THE FRAME (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:90
No of Lecture Hours/Week:6
Max Marks:300
Credits:9

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
  1. Introduce architecture and the design of spaces through documentation and design exploration of framed structures and architecture.
  2. Explore the logic of shaping space, material and structure and the inspired understanding from various examples in nature and culture.
  3. Focus on “Me and my immediate environment” through documentation and design exercises.
  4. Introduce the various ways of reading and documenting a site and its context intuitively and experientially. Learn to represent these in different media. 

Course Outcome

CO1: Ability to document a context in which the craft of Framed Architecture is evident and recognise the concept of Frame in nature and culture. Level: Intermediate

CO2: Ability to document and represent the site in an intuitive and technical manner in coordination with other relevant courses.

CO3: Ability to design in response to the context and stated intent and demonstrate through skilled representation in appropriate media. Level: High

CO4: Ability to put together a well done portfolio of what has been learnt in all courses in the semester in a coherent manner. Level: Intermediate

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:24
Rationalising Culture Need
 

1. Introducing the concept of Framed Architecture in the Studio-on- Wheels setting. Travel to a habitat in a cultural setting where architecture is explored in context of craft-making. Relate the architecture and craft to the ecology and local culture.

2. Demonstrate the concept of Frame in nature, everyday objects, music, literature and other examples.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:48
Understanding Context and Site & Design Intervention of ?Framing a Pavilion?
 

1. Reading of the context and site intuitively and technically and initiate the design exercise of a Pavilion.

2. Exploration of local material resources that inform architecture.

3. Design development of a Pavilion comprising of a simple function for “Me and my environment” exploring the architecture of the Frame. 

Integrate with all other courses in the semester. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:18
Portfolio Development and Presentation
 
  1. To organize and review all works done in the semester.
  2. To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject.
  3. Establish connections with other subjects where possible.
Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. T1. Ching, F. D. K. (2015). Architecture: Form, Space, & Order (Fourth edition.). New Jersy: John Wiley.
  2. T2. Callender, J. (1997). Time-saver Standards for Architectural Design Data (7th Revised edition edition ed.). McGraw-Hill Inc.,US.
  3. T3. Gill Robet W. (2003). Rendering With Pen +ink. London: Thames And Hudson.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. R1. Pandya, Y. (2013). Concepts of Space in Traditional Indian Architecture, Grantha Corporation.
  2. R2. Rapoport, A (1969). House Form and Culture. Prentice-Hall, Inc. Englewood Cliffs, NJ USA Pearson
  3. R3. Clark, R. H., & Pause, M. (2012). Precedents in architecture: Analytic diagrams, formative ideas, and partis (4th ed.). Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley & Sons.
  4. R4. Rasmussen, S. E. (1959). Experiencing Architecture. Cambridge: The MIT Press.
  5. R5. Carter, R. (2012). On and By Frank Lloyd Wright: A Primer of Architectural Principles. Phaidon Press.
  6. R6. Curtis, W. (1994). Le Corbusier: Ideas and Forms. Phaidon Press; Revised ed. edition. 
  7. R7. Mertins, D., & Lambert, P. (2014). Mies. New York: Phaidon.
Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks. Attendance and participation in the studio would be considered in the evaluation rubrics.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of a particular course
  • CIA -1- 25 Marks; CIA -2 - 50 Marks; CIA -3 - 75 Marks; Total - 150 Marks 

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 150 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

 
 

ARC252 - ART OF JOINERY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To impart specific skills and to introduce students to the fundamental principles involved in the way materials come together. Learn carpentry and the qualities of wood Learn the art of bringing together other materials - techniques, details and finishes. Level of Knowledge: - Basic 

Course Outcome

CO1: Ability to comprehend the different techniques of wood joinery and understand the role of joinery in different materials in architectural construction. Level: Basic

CO2: Ability to make and explore the wooden joineries used in architecture. Level: Basic

CO3: Ability to design and explore a composite artistic production and craftsmanship. Level: Intermediate

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Joinery in nature and built environment
 

1. Introduction to Joinery in nature and manmade environment.

2. Acquaint with the tools and machines used in carpentry.

3. Introducing Joints in carpentry and exploring variations in joinery.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:16
The logic of joinery
 

Understanding the logic of joinery with respect to different materials, the the sequence of construction, location of the element - internal or external, the role of load transfers etc.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:24
Filigree construction
 

Introduction to filigree construction and architecture in wood. Understanding the principles, structural formation of filigree construction and historical processes in traditional and vernacular architecture. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Portfolio
 

Designing an artistic ensemble exploring joinery with different materials. Portfolio of ensemble illustrating the joinery details used. Can take up the design project or a significant and relevant example of Framed Structure and develop a scale model as the final project. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. American Technical Society. (2017). Cyclopedia of Architecture, Carpentry, and Building, Vol. 4 of 10. Forgotten Books.

T2. Wagner, W. (2005). Modern Carpentry. Wilcox Publisher; 2nd edition 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Deplazes, A. (2005). Constructing Architecture Materials Processes Structures A Handbook. Basel, Switzerland: Birkhäuser Publishers for Architecture. 

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of a particular course
  • Total CIA - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA A student shall pass each course with a minimum aggregate (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%

ARC253 - TECHNIQUE OF DRAWING - II (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To introduce Architectural Design Language – technical drafting and presentation and impart appropriate manual skills for visualization and technical representation of built forms in different types of drawings

Course Outcome

CO1: A comprehensive understanding and ability to draw pictorial representation and Sciography. Level: Basic

CO2: Achieve a comprehensive understanding of the techniques and ability to draw technical drawings and architectural presentation. Level: Basic

CO3: Acquire skills to produce technical drawing for any object, design or a building. Level: Basic

CO4: Ability to present in a Portfolio, the subject content and work produced in a legible and comprehensive manner and to demonstrate its relevance in the context of other subjects in the semester. Level: Basic

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Documentation of Existing Building Pictorial Projections
 

1. Coordinate with other courses, especially, AC251 ‘Designing the Frame’ to draw architectural drawings as required.

2. Documentation and presentation of a framed architecture/ traditional building. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:24
Developing pictorial representations
 

Isometric Projection, Axonometric projection, and Perspective projections.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:16
Introduction to Sciography, Rendering and Architectural drawings
 

1. Introduction to Sciography and principles of shades and shadows.

2. Pen and Ink Rendering of pictorial projections and drawing freehand Perspective sketches.

3. Introduction to Architectural drawings, components, and conventions in an architectural drawing.

4. Measured drawing to scale of framed objects.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Portfolio
 

To organize and review all works done in the semester. To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject. Establish connections with other subjects where possible.

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. T1. Bhatt, N. D. (2014). Engineering Drawing. Anand, India: Charotar Publishing House Pvt. Ltd.
  2. T2. Venugopal, K. (2004). Engineering Drawing and Graphics. New Age International Publishers.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. R1. Ching, F. D. K. (2015). Architecture: Form, space, & order (Fourth edition.). New Jersy: John Wiley.
  2. R2. Ching, F. D. K. (2015). Architectural graphics (Sixth edition.). New Jersy: John Wiley.
  3. R3. Alexander W. White. (2011) The Elements of Graphic Design, Allworth Press; 2nd edition.
  4. R4. Gill Robet W. (2003). Rendering with Pen +ink. London: Thames And Hudson. 
  5. W1. https://nptel.ac.in/courses/105/104/105104148/
  6. R5. Mark A, Thomas, (2007). Exploring Elements of Design. Poppy Evans, 2nd edition.
  7. R6. Philip Meggs, (1998). A History of Graphic Design. John Wiley & Sons, 3rd edition.
  8. R7. Joseph D'Amelio. (2004). Perspective Drawing Handbook. Harper, New edition. 
Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of a particular course
  • Total CIA - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA A student shall pass each course with a minimum aggregate (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%

ARC254 - MATERIAL STRATEGIES FOR FRAMES (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

1. To introduce the idea of Architecture as a craft-based practice by exploring Framed Structures through experiential learning.

2. To learn about materials and strategies that are conducive to Framed construction.

Course Outcome

CO1: To comprehend and apply the concept of frames in Building design project. Level: Intermediate

CO2: Ability to understand the nature and properties of wood, bamboo, steel and RCC materials and their use in framed construction. Level: Basic

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Frame Architecture
 

1. Exploring a specific craft and craftsmanship through Studio-On-Wheels and understanding particular techniques, material and aesthetical elements.

2. Introducing the idea of framework from parts to whole, from source to resource. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:25
Materializing the Frame: Wood & Bamboo
 

1. Systems and Production in Bamboo and Wood– Doors and Windows assemblies, staircases, etc. Through drawings and model making.

2. Literature review of traditional timber construction. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:25
Materializing the Frame: RCC & Steel
 

1. Steel - Introduction to steel, its various forms and sizes and examine the way these are used in various examples.

2. Reinforced Cement Concrete- Introduction to the concrete as a building material.

3. Specialised applications of steel, concrete and RCC- staircases, tanks, roofing material, etc.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Portfolio Development and Master classes
 

1. Master classes should emphasise on bamboo, wood, steel & RCC.

2. Portfolio development - To organise and review all works done in the semester. To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject.

3. Establish connections with other subjects where possible. 

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. T1. Ching, F. D. 1. (1975). Building construction illustrated. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold.
  2. T2. Mckay, W. B. (2016). Building Construction Metric (Vol - 1.). Noida: Pearson.
  3. T3. Deplazes, A. (2005). Constructing Architecture Materials Processes Structures A Handbook. Basel, Switzerland: Birkhäuser Publishers for Architecture.
  4. T4. Lyons, A. (1997). Materials for Architects and Builders. An Introduction Arnold, London.
  5. T5. Deplazes, A. (2005). Constructing Architecture Materials Processes Structures A Handbook. Basel, Switzerland: Birkhäuser Publishers for Architecture.
  6. T6. Preston, H. K. (1964). Prestressed concrete for Architects and Engineers. New York: McGraw Hill.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. R1. Spence R. F. and Cook D.J.(1983) Building Materials in Developing Countries, John Wiley and sons.
  2. R2. Sinha,S. N(2002). Reinforced Concrete Design. New Delhi: Tata-McGraw Hill.
Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of a particular course
  • Total CIA - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA A student shall pass each course with a minimum aggregate (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%

ARC331 - ARCHITECTURE TRADITIONS - MASONRY (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To develop the ability to critically understand the built environment concepts through history.

To introduce the cultural, economic, political, and ecological circumstances which made the craft of building Masonry in historical perspective.

To understand the idea of Masonry in built form and the historical perspective, the techniques and the technology adopted in architecture through Studio-on-Wheels.

Course Outcome

CO1: Ability to connect geographical context, craft and architecture culture through history. Level: Basic

CO2: Ability to recognize the role of material in development of structure, ornament and form in architecture across different contexts. Level: Basic

CO3: Ability to understand how social practices, cultural and political conditions influence the shape and form of architecture in a specific ecology. Level: Intermediate

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Craft of Built Form
 

Focus on art & science of Architecture and the craft of Masonry as a part of Studio- on-Wheels. Document and interpret the historical traditions that led to the specific kind of Masonry architecture in that specific context and examine the culture of people and activities there.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Masonry Architecture I - Mud and Brick
 

1. Early masonry architecture in different cultures and geographies.

2. The ordinary and extraordinary use of Mud and Brick in different cultures through various examples.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Masonry Architecture II - Stone and Concrete
 

The ordinary and extraordinary use of Stone and Concrete in different cultures and geographies. An overview - typologically and chronologically.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Portfolio Development and Master classes
 
  1. Master classes to enhance the knowledge of Masonry and its applications in architecture.

  2. Portfolio development - To organize and review all works done in the semester. To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject. Establish connections with other subjects where possible of student’s work in the form of a portfolio and its effective compilation across courses and modules.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Ching, F. D. K., Jazombek, M. & Prakash V. (2011) A Global History of Architecture. Second Edition. John Wiley & Sons.
T2. Percy B. (1983)
Indian Architecture (Islamic Period), Taraporevala and Sons, Bombay.
T3. Lloyd, S. & Muller, H.W. (1986)
History of World Architecture, London: Faber and Faber Ltd.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Tadgell, C. (1990) The History of Architecture in India, New Delhi: Penguin Books (India) Ltd.
R2. Roth L. M. (1994)
Understanding Architecture: Its elements, history and meaning; Craftsman House.
R3. White J.F & White S.J. (2008
) Church Architecture: Building and Renovating for Christian worship, OSL Publications.

R4. Fergusson, J. (1876) The History of Indian and Eastern Architecture, Cambridge University Press. R5. Khan, S. (2017) History of Indian Architecture, CBS Publishers & Distributors.
R6. Hiraskar G.K. (1988
) The Great Ages of World Architecture, Dhanpat Rai Publications
R7. Hunter, K. & Kiffmeyer, D. (2004)
Earthbag Building: The tools, tricks, and techniques, New Society Publishers.

R8. Pandya, Y. (2007) Elements of Spacemaking, Mapin Publication. R8. Yatin Pandya; (2007) “Elements of Spacemaking” Mapin Pub

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total - 50

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in CIA.
  • The course shall have a written exam of a three-hour duration.
  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%. 

ARC332 - LOGIC OF STRUCTURES - MASONRY (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course objectives: Reinforcing the conceptual understanding by using an abstract method of analysis of mass structures. Develop an understanding of structural system design Analysis of various RCC elements.

Course Outcome

CO1: Ability to understand the logic of Masonry structures and their foundations. Level: Basic

CO2: To describe the basic characteristics and mechanics of RCC materials Level: Basic

CO3: To understand the concept of short and long columns. Level: Intermediate

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Introduction to Masonry Structure, Foundations and RCC
 

1.      Masonry: Logic of MasonryStructure 

2.      Foundations: Different types of Foundations in masonry.

3.      RCC Materials: Basic Characteristics of Concrete & Reinforcing Steel Materials

4.    Mechanics of Reinforced Concrete: Concept of Concrete as a material.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Understanding load resisting mechanisms along with ways of transferring the load in different compression systems
 

1.      Direct and bending stresses in members.

2.      Determining the forces in rectangular or square sections subjected to combined stresses.

3.      Concept of Kern zone 

4.    Determining the stresses in members subjected to combined stresses.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Introduction of Surface System
 

1.      Introduction of the surface system as membrane-active and form-active. 

2.   Understanding of domes, vaults, or any shells as membrane structures versus tensile structures as form active systems.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Understanding Long and Short Columns
 

1. RCC Materials: Basic Characteristics of Concrete & Reinforcing Steel Materials

2. Mechanics of Reinforced Concrete: Concept of Concrete as a material.

3. Concept of long and short columns, slenderness ratio.

4. Determining the capacity of long and short columns.

5. Relevance of converting the long columns to short columns by altering the inertia or with bracings.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Books:

T1. Salvadori, M., & Heller, R. (1985). Structure in Architecture: The Building of Buildings. Prentice Hall; 3rd Revised edition.

T2. Schierle, G. (2008). Structure and Design. University Readers.

T3. Schodek, D., & Bechthold, M. (2013). Structures. Pearson; 7th Edition.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reference Books:

R1. Schierle, G. (2008). Structure and Design. University Readers.

R2. Schodek, D., & Bechthold, M. (2013). Structures. Pearson; 7th Edition.

R3. Singer, F. (1975). Engineering Mechanics. Weatherhill: Harper & Row, 3rd Edition.

R4. Unnikrishnan Pillai and Devdas Menon, Reinforced Concrete Design, McGraw Hill, New Delhi

R5. Subramanian, Design of Concrete structures. Oxford university Press

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment

(CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE

marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

 CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of

different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the

stipulated time for the award of marks.

 CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.

 A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination

(ESE) of the course

 CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total - 50

Marks (Follow the syllabus for respective course wise Marks)

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

 Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in CIA.

 The course shall have a written exam of three-hour duration.

 Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a

minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC333 - BUILDING ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS - I (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course objectives:

To impart Basic and Conceptual knowledge about Water supply and Sanitation, Electricity, fire, and Life safety and skills required to integrate them into building designs.

Course Outcome

CO1: To understand and apply alternative methods of resource management, organization, and operation of water, sanitation, waste and power supply, distribution, and disposal/renewal systems in the built environment. Level: Basic

CO2: To organize and demonstrate, through documentation (calculations and drawings) of water supply, power supply, waste management, and sanitation in a small-scale project. Level: Intermediate

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to Ecological Resources & Building Systems
 

This Unit is taught integrated with other subjects based on the knowledge from Studio-on-Wheels that includes.

1. Managing our Resources: Natural Resources - local and global. How do we manage our resources and what are the consequences.

2. The logic of Systems: What is a system? What are the systems that enable our modern built environment to exist? What role do building systems sanitation, comfort, regulations, etc. play in making our built-environment different from earlier civilizations?

3. Climate Change: Understanding Climate change and how it is affecting the place and our immediate environment.

4. Waste and its management: What waste is generated and why? How do we deal with it at the macro and micro level? Discuss the paradigm shift that is required to manage our waste.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Water Resources and Systems
 

1. Water as resource and system: Storage, Treatment - quantifying, and rationalizing for various uses. Schematic diagrams and calculations for better comprehension.

2. Rainwater Management: Managing rainwater for society in buildings - recharge, reuse, and re-fuse.

3. Water supply: Introduction to Water Supply and Modern plumbing and drainage systems.

4. Drainage and Waste - Systems and Treatment: Compare natural drainage systems and modern articulated systems. What are the ways waste can be a resource.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Introduction to Power and Energy - Resources and Systems
 

1. Introduction to Energy Resources: Hydroelectric, coal power, nuclear power, solar, wind, wave, mechanical, etc. Concepts of renewable and non-renewable energy.

2. Electrical Services: Voltage, Current, Power, Connected Load,

3. Supply and distribution of electricity to buildings: Introduction

4. Circuits, Switchgear & Protection

5. Building Electrical Distribution System: Max. Demand, Load, Diversity Factor, Power Requirement of each building

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Design for ARC-351 project, Workshops and Master classes
 

1. Architectural Design Project: the student establishes a Project Document explaining, Water and Energy Resource Management, Sanitation, and Waste management ideas for the proposed design.

2. Masterclass on topics that review the following ideas -

a. Climate Change and the role of design

b. Resource Management and Sustainable design

c. Building Systems and Energy-efficient systems

3. Introduction to Fire and Life Safety: At a conceptual level

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Books:

T1. Deshpande, R. (1963). A Text-Book of Sanitary Engineering Vol I and II Combined. Poona, United Book Corporation.

T2. Birdi, G. (2010). Water supply and Sanitary Engineering. Dhanpat. Rai & Sons Publishers. 8th. Edition.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reference Books:

R1. SP35 Handbook on Water Supply and Drainage (with Special Emphasis on Plumbing. (1996). Bureau of Indian Standards.

R2. Board, C. P. (2010). Green Book: Pollution Control Act, Rules, and Notifications Issued. CPCB.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum 50% in CIA.
  • The course shall have a written exam of three-hour duration.
  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC334 - CLIMATE RESPONSIVE ARCHITECTURE - I (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To introduce the knowledge required for understanding the influence of climate on architecture including the environmental processes which affect the building, such as thermal, daylighting, etc.

Course Outcome

CO1: To conceptualize and apply fundamental principles of building physics in order to ensure functional efficiency in the built environments. Level: Basic

CO2: To measure and evaluate the environmental performance of buildings as a response to climate and surroundings. Level: Basic

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Reading the Site
 
  1. The Climate-built form interaction with examples. Elements of climate, concepts of climate change and its impact, measurement and representations of climatic data. Classifications and Characteristics of tropical climates.
  2. Major climatic zones of India, the macroclimate and exploring them through vernacular examples in alignment with integrated studio.
  3. Site Climate: Understanding the geography, aspects of site climate through Studio-on-Wheels documentation and design exercise in ARC351 Crafting the Masonry Envelope.
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:18
Indigenous Built Environments
 

1. Understanding of indigenous built-environments w.r.t. daylight and thermal comfort. 

2. Thermal balance of the human body, Thermal Comfort Indices. Measuring indoor air movement through various hand held and digital tools.

3. Calculation of Overheated and Under heated period for locations in Climatic zones and their optimization in terms of solar heating and Passive cooling desired.

4. Sun-path diagram: Solar geometry & design for orientation and use of solar charts in understanding traditional vernacular climatic design. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:30
The Passive Design Way
 

1. Factors affecting thermal performance of building. Concepts of thermal Heat gain or loss: Steady state and periodic heat flow concepts, Conductivity, resistivity, diffusivity, thermal capacity time lag and 'U' value. Calculation of U value for multilayered walls and Roof.

2. Shading devices: Optimizing Design of Shading devices effective for overheated periods while allowing solar radiation for under heated periods for different wall orientations.

3. Natural ventilation: Functions of natural ventilation, Stack effect due to thermal force and wind velocity. Air movements around buildings, Design considerations and effects of openings and external features on internal air flow and Wind shadows.

4. Day Lighting: Nature of natural light, its transmission, reflection, diffusion, glares. Advantages and limitations in different climatic zones, North light, Day light factor, components of Day light devices.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Portfolio development & Group Work Presentation
 

Master class for advances in climate-responsive architecture relevant to the studio curriculum. 

Portfolio development - To organize and review all works done in the semester. To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject. Establish connections with other subjects where possible.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Koenigsberger, O. H. (1975). Manual of Tropical Housing & Building. Orient Blackswan.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Givoni, B. (1969). Man, climate, and architecture. Elsevier.

R2. Szokolay, S. V. (2014). Introduction to architectural science: the basis of sustainable design. Routledge.

R3. Evans, M. (1980). Housing, Climate and Comfort. Architectural Press.

R4. Fry, M., & Drew, J. (1964). Tropical architecture in the dry and humidzones. London: B.T. Batsford.

R5. Konya, A. (1980). Design Primer for Hot Climates. London: Architectural Press; New York: Whitney Library of Design.

R6. Krishnan, A., Baker, N., Yannas, S., & Szokolay, S. (2001). Climate Responsive Architecture: A Design Handbook for Energy Efficient Buildings. New Delhi: Tata McGraw-Hill Education Publishing Company.

R7. Majumdar, M. (2002). Energy efficient buildings: TERI India publication.

R8. Markus, T., & Morris, E. (1980). Buildings, Climate and Energy. Pitman Publishing, London.

R9. Saini, B. S. (1980). Building in Hot dry climates. NY: Wiley Interscience-John Wiley.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum 50% in CIA.
  • The course shall have a written exam of three-hour duration.
  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC351 - DESIGNING THE MASONRY ENVELOPE (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:90
No of Lecture Hours/Week:6
Max Marks:300
Credits:9

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Engage with more intensive architectural design thinking through documentation and design of masonry structures and architecture with emphasis on climatic responsiveness that informs the design project.

Focus on “Me and my Cultural Environment” through documentation, contextual analysis and design exercises that enhance critical thinking and representational skills through rigorous training.

Course Outcome

CO1: Ability to document a cultural and climatic context with a rich tradition of masonry architecture. Level: Basic

CO2: Ability to design in response to climate and cultural requirements and apply the logic of material and structure. Level: High

CO3: Ability to put together a well-done portfolio of what has been learned in all courses in the semester in a coherent manner. Level: Intermediate

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:24
Responding to cultural, material and climatic context
 

1. Studio on Wheels to expose students to the culture of masonry architecture.

2. Introduce the relationship between climate, material, and the built environment.

3. Studying, documenting, and analyzing the traditional, cultural and material context that enables the masonry construction.

4. Integrate with all other courses in the semester

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:24
Understanding Context and Site & Shaping the Envelope.
 

1. Reading and documenting the site intuitively and technically, the context (cultural, geographical and climatic) through the Studio-on- wheels and initiate the design exercise.

2. Exploration of local material resources that inform architecture.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:24
Understanding Context and Site & Shaping the Envelope.
 

3. Design development of “Me and my cultural environment” with a design project having community/group functions such as community centre, public health centre, interpretation centre, etc.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:18
Portfolio Development and Group Exhibition
 

Portfolio development - To organize and review all works done in the semester. To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject. Establish connections with other subjects where possible of student’s work in the form of a portfolio and its effective compilation across courses and modules.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Ching, F. D. K. (2015). Architecture: Form, Space, & Order (Fourth edition.). New Jersy: John Wiley.

T2. Callender, J. (1997). Time-saver Standards for Architectural Design Data (7th Revised edition edition ed.). McGraw-Hill Inc.,US.

T3. Gill, R. (1990). Rendering with Pen and Ink. Thames & Hudson Ltd.

T4. Carter, R. (2012). On and By Frank Lloyd Wright: A Primer of Architectural Principles. Phaidon Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Rasmussen, S. E. (1962). Experiencing Architecture. The MIT Press Cambridge

R2. Auroville Consulting.(2017) Under the Banyan: Principles for Sustainable Habitats in the Tropics. Harper India.

R3. Pandya, Y. (2013). Concepts of Space in Traditional Indian Architecture, Grantha Corporation.

R4. Kries, M.(2019).Balkrishna Doshi: Architecture for the People. Thames & Hudson. R5. Rewal, R., Frampton, K., Ozkan, S.(2013).

R5 Raj Rewal: Innovative Architecture and Tradition. Om Books International.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

 

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks. Attendance and participation in the studio would be considered in the evaluation-rubrics.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of a particular course
  • CIA -1- 25 Marks; CIA -2 - 50 Marks; CIA -3 - 75 Marks; Total - 150

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 150 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC352 - TECHNIQUE OF DIGITAL REPRESENTATION I (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To develop basic and some advanced skills required in using digital tools to conceive, develop and present architectural ideas.

Course Outcome

CO1: To learn and demonstrate the use of basic level of 2D drafting involved in design learning and digital presentation. Level: Basic

CO2: To learn 3D modelling and visualization tools in explorations and communication of design ideas; Level: Basic

CO3: To learn and demonstrate the understanding of building performance analysis through software integration. Level: Basic

CO4: To learn and demonstrate design presentation and report making using digital tools. Level: Basic

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Introduction to digital tools and Architectural design representation and challenges of their usage
 

Introduction to CAD (or relevant 2D drafting software): CAD as a tool to 20 produce Architectural Drawings

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Visualising design
 
  1. Introduction to 3D modelling: (Trimble SketchUp or relevant 3D modelling)

  2. Converting 2D project into 3D.

  3. 3D modelling: Creating site contours in 3D, Creating 3D presentation models.

  4. Rendering & Visualization:

    Generating 3d Model and introduction to concepts of visualization using rendering engines such as V-Ray/ Lumion.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Analysing the built form
 
  1. Exploring the idea of building performance analysis in Sketchup through AD time problem.

  2. Introduction to Photoshop Self-study module. M.O.O.C

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Portfolio development & Group work Presentation
 

Portfolio development - To organize and review all works done in the semester. To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject. Establish connections with other subjects where possible.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Finkelstein, E. (2008). Autocad 2009 & Autocad LT 2009. New Delhi: John Wiley and Sons. ( LATEST)

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Faulkner, A., & Chavez, C. (2017). Adobe Photoshop CC: 2017 release. Noida: Pearson India education services Pvt ltd.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course

Total CIA - 50

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%

ARC353 - MATERIAL STRATEGIES FOR MASONRY (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To explore the diverse characteristics of Masonry architecture in various materials. Examine the logic of form, construction, and finish of Masonry architecture in detail. Draw and document Masonry construction details.
Explore the relevance of construction details in influencing the architectural character.

Course Outcome

CO1: Ability to appreciate and document architectural expression in Masonry. Level: Basic

CO2: Ability to recognize the logic of material in form and spatial character especially in the context of Masonry architecture. Level: Intermediate

CO3: Ability to detail Masonry architecture towards functional, technical, and aesthetic requirements. Level: Intermediate

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Masonry construction
 
  1. Exploring and understanding the craft of Masonry construction through Studio-On-Wheels.

  2. Introducing the concept of Masonry and materials such as brick, stone, mud etc. through experiential learning.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:25
Brick and Mud Masonry construction
 
  1. Systems of material component: Brick and mud masonry terminologies; Types of masonry bonds, Skills of masonry construction

  2. Systems of building elements: Brick masonry walls, foundations, mortar type, plasters, buttresses, arches, and lintels.

  3. Systems in Architecture: Conceptual idea of brick masonry elements in different Architectural styles; the structural syntax of load-bearing construction in brick, Architectural detailing in brick masonry

  4. Floor, wall, roof finishes.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:25
Stone Masonry construction
 
  1. Systems of material component: Stone masonry terminologies; Types of stone masonry bonds, Skills of masonry construction

  2. Systems of building elements: Types of stone masonry walls, foundations, mortar type, plasters, buttresses, arches, and lintels.

  3. Systems in Architecture: Conceptual idea of stone masonry elements in different Architectural styles; the structural syntax of load-bearing construction in stone, Architectural detailing in stone masonry.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Arches, Vaults and Domes
 
  1. Introduction to arches, vaults, and domes in masonry.

  2. Principles and methods of construction

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Ching, F. (2014). Building construction Illustrated. Wiley. T2.
Mckay, W. (2012).
Building Construction. Pearson India.
T2. Chudley , R., &Greeno, R. (2005
). Construction Technology. Prentice Hall, 4 edition.
T3. Emmitt, S., & Gorse, C. (2009).
Barry's Introduction to Construction of Buildings. Wiley-Blackwell.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Deplazes, A. (2005). Constructing Architecture Materials Processes Structures A Handbook. Basel, Switzerland: Birkhäuser Publishers for Architecture.
R2. Frampton, K. (2001).
Studies in Tectonic Culture. Cambridge.
R3. Francis Mallgrave, H. (2004).
Style in the Technical and Tectonic Arts;

Practical Aesthetics. Los Angeles.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • Total CIA - 50

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%

ARC431 - LOGIC OF STRUCTURES - ADVANCED (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

- Reinforce the conceptual understanding of frame structures using abstract methods of analysis

- To develop the ability to design and analyse structural systems in steel.

- To be able to contemplate the effects of lateral forces in a structural system

Course Outcome

CO1: To conceptualize and evaluate determinate and indeterminate structures. Level: Intermediate.

CO2: Conceptualize and apply principles of structural behaviour in withstanding gravity, lateral forces, wind & seismic forces. Level: Intermediate.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
: Introduction to National Building Code: IS 800
 

 Introduction to National Building Code: IS 800: Criteria & Design to satisfy Building Codes and Standards.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Determinate and Indeterminate Structures
 

- Analysis of indeterminate structures.

- Introduction to stiffness and distribution factors.

- Introduction to moment distribution method.

- Indeterminacy of frame, comparison of post and lintel system with rigid jointed frame

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Lateral Forces
 

- Importance of rigid frames in resistivity of lateral forces like wind and earthquakes.

- Comparative study of three common materials - masonry, reinforced concrete and structural steel.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Understanding Structural Systems
 

- Carrying capacity of three structural materials and different structural systems in these materials.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Schodek, D. L., & Bechthold, M. (2014). Structures. New Delhi: PHI

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Duggal, S. K. (2010). Limit State Design of Steel Structures. New Delhi: Tata Mcgraw-Hill Publishing Company

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50% 

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.

  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.

  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course

  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total 50

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in CIA.

  • The course shall have a written exam of three-hour duration.

  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC432 - BUILDING ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS - II (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course objectives:

Explore renewable energy systems and indigenous water harvesting practices. To impart Intermediate knowledge about water supply, sanitation, fire and life safety and the skills required in built environment and to integrate them into the building design. To impart Intermediate knowledge and skills required for understanding Electricity, illumination and Ventilation and Air-Handling services in built environment and their integration with Architectural design.

Course Outcome

CO1: Ability to evaluate and conceptualize water distribution & conservation practices for different situations. Level: Advanced

CO2: Ability to evaluate and conceptualize electrical and illumination, fire safety & protection solutions for different types of buildings. Level: Advanced

CO3: Ability to evaluate and recommend Electrical equipment, functioning and distribution of loads in various types of electrical system and firefighting systems Level: Intermediate

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Studio on Wheels
 

1. Renewable Energy Systems and its utilization.

2. Case studies on Traditional water harvesting methods.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
2 Water Supply, Sewerage system & Solid waste management
 

1. Water efficiency and intelligent use of water -quantifying and rationalising for various uses.

2. Water Supply piping - hot, cold, flushing water

3. Drainage Systems and material construction.

4. Rainwater Management: Assessment & quantification

5. Sewerage System: Assessment of sewage generated, Collection of sewage / wastewater treatment and reuse or disposal

6. Solid Waste Management: Assessment of waste collection, treatment and safe disposal

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Advanced Electricity and Lighting
 

1. Electrical Layout Design: Residential & Commercial Layout design, Compliance to local building codes.

2. Illumination: Lighting and Low Voltage Power systems and High Voltage Power systems: Source and its distribution. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Advanced Fire & Life Safety system
 

1. Advanced Fire Safety: Passive and active fire safety systems.

2. Building code requirements for Fire & Life Safety

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:7
Design for ARC451 project, Workshops and Master classes
 

1. Architectural Design Project: In coordination the student establishes a Project Document explaining, Water and Energy Resource Management, Sanitation and Waste management ideas for the proposed design.

2. Masterclass on topics that review the following ideas -

a. Climate Change and the role of design

b. Resource Management and Sustainable design

c. Building Systems and Energy efficient systems

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Deshpande, R. (1963). A Text Book of Sanitary Engineering Vol I and II Combined. Poona, United Book Corporation.

T2. Birdi, G. (2010). Water supply and Sanitary Engineering. Dhanpat. Rai & Sons Publishers. 8th. Edition.

T3. Mittle, V, &Mittle, A. (2017). Basic Electrical Engineering by Anwari. McGraw Hill Education; 2 edition.

T4. Cotton, H. (2005). Electrical Technology. CBS; 7 edition

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. National Building Code of India. (1956). Part 8 - Extracts from Indian Electricity Rules, In Building Services, Section 2 Electrical. Installation.

R2. Uppal, S., & Garg, G. (1987). Electrical Wiring Estimating & Costing. Khanna; sixth edition

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.

  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.

  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course

  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total - 50

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in CIA.

  • The course shall have a written exam of three-hour duration.

  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC441C - VERNACULAR ARCHITECTURE (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course objectives: This course explores appreciation of vernacular architecture; as an expression of local identity and indigenous traditions of the culture.

To induce the understanding of relevance of Vernacular building practices.

Course Outcome

CO1: Ability to understand the evolution of architectural aspects of Vernacular architecture in relation to the culture of the region. Level: Basic

CO2: Ability to understand the evolution of vernacular in relation of climate, and natural landscape. Level: Basic

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Vernacular Architecture an Introduction
 

Introduction to vernacular architecture, history and organisation of vernacular buildings of different regions in the Indian context, forms, spatial planning, cultural aspects, symbolism, colour, art, materials of construction and construction techniques.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Cases studies of Vernacular Architecture
 

1. Study of factors that shape the architectural character and render the regional variations of vernacular architecture - geographic, climatic, social, economic, political and religious aspects, local materials and skills available in the region etc. 

Suggested: Rural Villages & Houses of Bengal, Khasi community of Meghalaya Bodo Kachari tribe, Adi Gallong folk of Sian district, Arunachal and their settlement pattern, Naga house, Communities of Manipur.
Banni Community and their Bhunga House from Rajasthan, Havelis & Castes. Tribes of Gujarat, Sociology and Planning of Rural Gujarat, Woodwork Details of Gujarat.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Vernacular Architecture through Case Study
 

1. Study on Vernacular architecture integrated through Studio-on-Wheels. Documentation of architectural aspects of the region and its link to the socio-culture and climatic conditions.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Books:

T1. Tillotsum G.H.R. (1989) The tradition of Indian Architecture Continuity, Controversy – Change since 1850, Delhi: Oxford University Press.

T2. Bary, D. & Ilay, C. (1998) Traditional Buildings of India, Thames & Hudson, ISBN-10 : 0500341613

T3. Richardson, V. (2001) New Vernacular Architecture; Laurance King Publishing.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Pandya, Y. (2007) Elements of Spacemaking; Mapin Pub.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  •  CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  •  A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  •  Total CIA - 50 Marks 

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  •  Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  •  The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%

ARC441J - FURNITURE DESIGN (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To encourage reading, and understanding of the facts, that influenced the architectural interiors,

furniture and the overall lifestyle.

To articulate the nature of design activity and design behaviour in furniture designing.

To identify critical design issues, solve design problems through rational decision making.

Level of Knowledge: - Basic

Course Outcome

CO1: Exploring multiple thinking strategies to examine real-world issues, explore creative avenues of expression, solve problems, and make consequential decisions. Level: Basic

CO2: Study of human anthropometry and ergonomics through the products, furniture and spaces, related to the Design Program and challenges on furniture design for various applications. Level: Basic

CO3: Analytical study of typical interior layouts for areas, activities, functions and needs and aesthetics Level: Basic

CO4: Design conceptualization - Form, function and space requirements of furniture in interior space Level: Basic

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
History of furniture design
 

Historic reference, relevance, and development of furniture design. Beginning of modernity: neoclassicism, needs of urbanization/industrialization, development of new materials. The influence of various art and craft movements in furniture design. Art nouveau, Vienna secession, other art movements like art deco.. etc, Works of architects and designers belonging to these movements. Reference to ‘’ design’’.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Modernism in furniture
 

Expressionism, futurism, constructivism, cubism. Bauhaus work of Gropius, Mies van der Rohe, Frank Lloyd Wright, and Loius Kahn. Growth of international style. Development and spread of international style: deconstructivism, the study of contemporary designs.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Furniture and the user
 

Human factors data such as ergonomics and anthropometrics. User interaction with the furniture, Basic design standards in furniture designing. Furniture relation to space, environment, and interior design.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Portfolio
 

Computer-generated/Manual 2D, 3D drawing and modeling to effectively communicate a design at the schematic, design development, and fabrication drawing stages (portfolio)

List of Engagements

1. Furniture design and concept 

2. Model making

3. Workshop/Guest lecture

4. Interaction with Professionals/Guest lecture

5. Industry visit

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Books:

T1. Raizman, D. (2003) History of modern design: Graphics and products since the industrial

revolution. Laurence King Publishing.

T2. Cross N. (2011) Design thinking: Understanding how designers think and work. Berg.

T3. Anderson, P.V (2007) Technical Communication – A Reader Centered Approach, Thomson

Wadsworth, Sixth Edition, New Delhi.

Reference Books:

R1. Dechiara, J., Julius, P. & Zelnik, M. (1991) Time-Saver Standards for Interior Design and Space

Planning- (second edition), US: McGraw-Hill Inc.

R2. Baiche, B. & Walliman K. (2013) Ernst & Peter Neufert - Architect’s Standards, Blackwell Science.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Online Resources:

www.nofilmschool.com

www.dezeen.com

www.film-english.com

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course

Total CIA - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC451 - RURAL STUDIO (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:90
No of Lecture Hours/Week:6
Max Marks:300
Credits:9

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

● To engage in a rural outreach program through an architectural design project by adopting an appropriate technology that seeks solutions to environmental, social concerns and addresses the sustainability paradigm.

● To design and develop execution drawings of an architectural project of a dwelling environment for a small community, with a focus on ideas of type and typology through site studies, analysis, and application of appropriate technology.

● To study the correlation between climate-environmental parameters and socio-cultural patterns as generators of an architectural space.

● To build a deeper social and environmental responsibility within students through its service-learning modules.

NOTE: Suggested construction of the approved architectural design that is externally commissioned and funded as an outreach project beyond the semester timeline. Suggested joint research publications of the studio outcomes.

Course Outcome

CO1:: Ability to acquire basic knowledge and practical skills of the chosen appropriate technology. Ability to demonstrate innovation and technical expertise in the same. Level: Intermediate

CO2:: Ability to develop a design programme through contextual analysis and ability to make an informed choice of appropriate technology in the design project. Level: Intermediate

CO3:: Ability to innovate and contextually apply the study of alternative technology into built environment through typological understanding. Thus demonstrate the idea of contextuality, culturally and physically, to the architectural design project. Level: High

CO4:: Ability to put together a well-done portfolio of what has been learnt in other courses in the semester in a coherent manner. Level: Intermediate

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:18
Appropriate Building Technology and Skill Development
 

1. Introducing the adopted appropriate technology through basic and advanced level skill development technical workshops.

2. Demonstrating understanding of the contextual (environmental, social, ethical, historical), material and functional aspects of the appropriate technology and its applications.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:30
Site Analysis, Prototyping & Architectural Design Project
 

1. Reading of the site, including its environment and social context, intuitively and documenting it technically.

2. Case Analysis to understand the tectonics of the adopted material in contemporary and traditional architecture.

3. Analysis of site and context, along with studying climate-environmental parameters and social-cultural patterns to arrive at a design program and project brief.

4. Development of the design proposal through conceptual ideas along with technical integration of structural principles and applying the acquired skills of the adopted appropriate building technology.

5. Exploration of concepts of modularity, sustainability, and undertaking of prototypes for its demonstration.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:30
Architecture Design Project ? Developing Construction Drawing fit for Execution as an Outreach at Site
 

1. Developing design drawings and a portfolio fit for execution as an outreach.

2. Developing a joint term paper that can be published NOTE: Suggest efforts for executing and commissioning the final chosen architectural design, implementing the skills of the adopted appropriate technology, as an outreach project on-site. Suggest efforts to obtain sponsorship/ external funding for the construction of the outreach project.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Portfolio Development and Presentation
 

Portfolio development - To organise and review all works done in the semester. To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject. Where possible establish connections with other subjects of student’s work in the form of a portfolio and its effective compilation across courses and modules.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Dean, A., & Hursley, T. (2002). Rural Studio: Samuel Mockbee and an Architecture of Decency. Princeton Architectural Press.

T2. Ching, F. D. K. (2015). Architecture: Form, Space, & Order (Fourth edition.). New Jersy: John Wiley.

T2. Callender, J. (1997). Time-saver Standards for Architectural Design Data (7th Revised edition ed.). McGraw-Hill Inc.,US.

T3. Gill, R. (1990). Rendering with Pen and Ink. Thames & Hudson Ltd.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Minke. G (2012). Building with Bamboo, Design and Technology of a Sustainable Architecture. Birkhauser, Basel Switzerland.

R2. Rapoport, A (1969). House Form and Culture. Prentice-Hall, Inc. Englewood Cliffs, NJ USA Pearson

R3. Clark, R. H., & Pause, M. (2012). Precedents in architecture: Analytic diagrams, formative ideas, and partis (4th ed.). Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley & Sons

R4. Carter, R. (2012). On and By Frank Lloyd Wright: A Primer of Architectural Principles. Phaidon Press.

R5. Curtis, W. (1994). Le Corbusier: Ideas and Forms. Phaidon Press; Revised edition. R6. Mertins, D., & Lambert, P. (2014). Mies. New York: Phaidon.

R6. Damluji , S. S., & Bertini, V. (2018). Hassan Fathy: Earth & Utopia. Laurence King.

R7. Dethier, J. (2020). The Art of Earth Architecture: Past, Present, Future. Princeton Architectural Press.

R8.Weismann, A., & Bryce, K. (2006). Building with COB: A Step-by-Step Guide (Sustainable Building). UIT Cambridge Ltd.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks. Attendance and participation in the studio would be considered in the evaluation-rubrics.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of a particular course
  • CIA -1- 25 Marks; CIA -2 - 50 Marks; CIA -3 - 75 Marks; 
  • Total - 150 Marks 

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 150 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC452 - TECHNIQUE OF DIGITAL REPRESENTATION - II (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course objectives: To develop advanced skills required in using digital tools to conceive, develop and present architectural ideas.

Course Outcome

CO1: Converting 2D drafting into 3D. Level: Intermediate

CO2: To learn 3D modelling and visualization tools in explorations and communication of design ideas for building envelope and interiors; Level: Intermediate

CO3: To learn and demonstrate the understanding of design presentation and report making using desktop publishing tools. Level: Intermediate

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Drawing in Virtual Space
 

1.   Introduction to virtual space and the limitations and potentials of digital representation. 

2.   Introduction to advanced 3D modelling software and relevance, capabilities - for e.g. Advanced Sketchup as an Extension of Project, Autodesk Revit (Advanced) / or 3DS Max or Rhino3D. 

3.   Introduction to online resources, blogs, tutorials.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Visualising the Space
 

Techniques of 3D visualizations - Introduction to tool settings in 3D rendering engines. For e.g. Using V- Ray /Lumion 3D rendering   software

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Presenting the Design
 

1.  Introduction to Vector graphics editing as a tool to present architecture design studio projects -introduction to Adobe Illustrator / Corel DRAW. 

2.  Introduction to Desktop publishing tools — for e.g. Adobe InDesign, CorelDraw, and Prezi as tools to create presentations and portfolios. Studio on wheel reports/ journal to be prepared in InDesign to explore desktop publishing

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Portfolio development & Group work Exhibition
 

Portfolio development - To organize and review all works done in the semester. To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject. Establish connections with other subjects where possible.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Books:

T1. Finkelstein, E. (2008). Autocad 2009 & Autocad LT 2009. New Delhi: John Wiley and Sons.

T2. Anton, K. K., & Cruise, John. (2017). Adobe InDesign CC: Classroom in a book. Noida: Pearson India education services pvt ltd.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reference Books:

R1. Adobe creative suite, Online web site of Adobe products: www.adobe.com

R2. Sketchup: Online documentation, videos: http://www.sketchup.com/learnivideos

Online Resources:

W1. https://knowledge.autodesk.com

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • Total CIA - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC453 - CLIMATE RESPONSIVE ARCHITECTURE - II (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To develop the knowledge required for understanding the influence of environmental science on Architecture including the environmental processes for promoting co-existence of built and the natural environment. 

Course Outcome

CO1: To describe the complex relationships between the built and natural environments, its abuse and reviving strategies; Level: Basic

CO2: To measure and evaluate the environmental performance of buildings. Level: Basic

CO3: To have command on fundamental principles of building physics in order to ensure functional efficiency in the built environments, the art and science of efficient building design. Level: Basic

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Reading the Site
 

Introduction to complex relationships between the natural environments and built environment, causes and impacts of environmental degradation and conversations.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Indigenous Built Environments
 

Sustainable Sites to meet the risks of climate change; Site Specific Design; Development Density and Community Connectivity, Alternative Transportation, Site Development, Storm water Design and Heat Island Effect with examples. Water Efficiency: Innovative Wastewater Treatment and Reuse and Water Use Reduction and Re use factors. Visit to innovative Re-use and wastewater treatment systems/sites

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
The Passive Design Way
 

Strategies to transform the built environment 1. Energy and Atmosphere: Optimize Energy Performance, On-site Renewable Energy, Enhanced Commissioning and Green Power. To apply the principles of Solar and other Passive Architecture to design of buildings. 2. Materials and Resources: Building Reuse: Maintain Existing Walls, Floors, and Roof, Construction Waste Management, Materials Reuse, Recycled Content, Regional Materials and Certified Wood. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:30
Portfolio development & Group Work Presentation
 

1. Performance evaluation of live case study; Thermal performance of built environment; natural and artificial lighting and ventilation and wind movement which will involve measurements; documentation and recording; analysis and design using hand held and digital tools and through simulation using appropriate software

2. Performance evaluation of Renewable Energy Systems, Fenestration, Opaque Construction, etc. as per test standards specified in NBC and ECBC, LEED, etc.

3. Study of natural structures and processes Concepts of ecology and landscape;

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Givoni, B. (1969). Man, climate and architecture. Elsevier.

T2. Szokolay, S. V. (2014). Introduction to architectural science: the basis of sustainable design. Routledge. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Koenigsberger, O. H. (1975). Manual of Tropical Housing & Building. Orient Blackswan.

R2. Majumdar, M. (2002). Energy efficient buildings: TERI India publication

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • Total CIA - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC454 - MATERIAL STRATEGIES FOR AN APPROPRIATE ARCHITECTURE (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To introduce the architectural expression of alternative constructional composition. To familiarize students with market study of building materials and their applications. Explore the relevance of Alternate Materials & Techniques in influencing the architectural character. Draw and document applicable Sustainable construction details. Explore the relevance of RCC and Steel construction details in influencing the architectural character

Course Outcome

CO1: Ability to understand how social practices, cultural and political conditions influence the shape and form of architecture in a specific ecology. Level: Intermediate

CO2: Knowledge about the applications and construction details of conventional (RCC, Steel) roofing systems. Level: Advanced

CO3: Ability to design a structure using RCC, steel and the details of assembly of it to modules of columns, beams, roofs, etc. Level: Advanced

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Alternate Building Materials & Construction
 

1. Introduction to Appropriate Local Sustainable materials/Buildings, Choice/selection, benefits etc.

2. Familiarize with the building material bamboo and the Bamboo construction methods. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Alternate Roofing Systems
 

1. Alternate roofing: Jack Arch, Madras terrace, and stone slab roof

2. RCC filler slabs: Principles and methods of construction. Introduction to different filler materials, Mangalore tiles, Burnt Clay Bricks, Hollow Concrete blocks, Stabilized Hollow Mud blocks, Clay pots, Coconut shells etc.

3. Introduction to Vaults and Domes – RCC

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
RCC Roofs
 

1. Introduction to RCC Slabs: Principles and methods of construction- one-way, two-way slabs, cantilever slabs, sloping RCC roof, one way continuous, and two ways continuous.

2. Introduction to Advanced RCC roofs: Principles and methods of construction -Moment frame, Flat slab and Flat plate, Waffle slab.

3. RCC Staircase: Principles and methods of construction

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:20
Steel Construction
 

1. Introducing Structural steel as a building material

2. Principles and methods involved in steel construction

3. Steel Trusses (Light Gauge Steel)– Short Span, Long Span, North Light Roofs, aluminium sheet and profiled MS sheet cladding and roof fixing details.

4. Hot Rolled and Cold Rolled Steel application in Building Construction. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Chudley , R., &Greeno, R. (2005). Construction Technology. Prentice Hall, 4 edition.

T2. Emmitt , S., & Gorse, C. (2009). Barry's Introduction to Construction of Buildings. WileyBlackwell.

T3. Mckay, W. (2012). Building Construction. Pearson India.

T4. Deplazes, A. (2005). Constructing Architecture Materials Processes Structures A Handbook. Basel, Switzerland: Birkhäuser Publishers for Architecture.

T5. Francis Mallgrave, H. (2004). Style in the Technical and Tectonic Arts; Practical Aesthetics. Los Angeles.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Frampton, K. (2001). Studies in Tectonic Culture. Cambridge

W1. http://madeingreatlakes.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/Appropriate-Building-Materials..pdf

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • Total CIA - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC531 - ARCHITECTURAL TRADITION AND MODERNISM (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: The course sets out from the present architectural condition in India and traces its history to pre and post-independence India by looking at significant cases and architects as well as the social-political setting they emerged from. This is then connected to the birth of modernism in Europe, to its growth into a mature and international style and further to the disruptive emergence of Postmodernism and Deconstruction in questioning meaning and symbolism. This is followed by a discussion on other contemporary approaches to the built- environment. This may be done by taking 10-15 key case examples and a few supporting cases across time, cultures, and geographies to connect, distinguish and discern concepts, issues, responses, and contexts in the shaping of architecture.

Course Objectives:

● To develop the ability to critically understand the built environment concepts through history in the 20th and 21st centuries.

● To introduce the connections between the built environment and the social, political, religious, technological, and environmental circumstances which shaped modern architecture.

● To understand the idea of ornament & detail, power & politics, form & iconography etc. constantly relating it to modern life – places and practices through Studio-on-Wheels. empirical methods

Course Outcome

CO1: Ability to understand the various dimensions of 20th and 21st Century Architecture - International & Indian in different contextual influences. Level: Basic

CO2: Ability to recognize the role of technology and material in the development of structure, ornament & detail, power & politics, form & iconography in architecture across different contexts. Level: Basic

CO3: Ability to understand the connections between the built environment and the social, political, religious, technological, and environmental circumstances which shaped modern architecture. Level: Intermediate

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Unit-1 Identity and Modernism in Post Independent India
 

Architecture walk: exploring the city architecture – modernism in India and tracing the colonial influence, adapting the Indian climatic conditions in colonial architecture. Search for a modern Indian identity in Post Independent India – role of ideology & politics, geographical & cultural contexts, economics & scale, material & technology in shaping the built-environment.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:14
Unit-2 Modernism & International Style & Alternate Modernism
 

The birth of Modernism - its socialist and technological origin in Europe represented in Art movements and architecture - Crystal Palace, Bauhaus, Constructivism, etc. against the Neo-Classical and Colonial approaches.

Growth of Modernism - How new technology, materials, and building systems led to a new approach and building style - High Modern, International Style, trickle-down modernism to alternate positions of Frank Lloyd Wright, Alvar Aalto, James Stirling, Bucky Fuller, etc.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:18
Unit-3 Contemporary Architectural Theory & Alternate Theoretical Positions
 

Disruptive positions leading to Post Modernism, Deconstruction, and Critical Regionalism. New approaches aided by critical and process-oriented design -Sustainable architecture, Biomimicry, Parametric design

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Unit-4 Portfolio Development and Master classes
 

1. Master classes to enhance the knowledge of modernism & contemporary and its

applications in architecture.

2. Portfolio development - To organise and review all works done in the semester.

To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject. Establish connections with

other subjects where possible of student’s work in the form of a portfolio and its

effective compilation across courses and modules.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Books:

T1. Curtis, W. J. R. (1983) Modern Architecture Since 1900. United States of America: Phaidon Press Limited.

T2. Frampton K. (1992) Modern Architecture, Thames and Hudson, London, 

T3: Ching, F. D.K., Jarzombek M. & Prakash V. (1943) A global history of architecture. Hoboken, N.J. : J. Wiley & Sons, 1943.

T4: Norberg-Schulz C. (1980) Genius Loci- Towards a Phenomenology of Architecture, Rizzoli International Publication, New York. ISBN: 0-8478-0287-6,

T5: Ching, F. D. K. (1943) Architecture: Form Space and Order. United States of America: Library of Congress Cataloging in Publication Data.

T6: Lang, Jon. (2002) A Concise History of Modern Architecture in India. Delhi: Permenant Black.

T7: Scriver P. & Srivastava A. (2016) India: Modern Architectures in History, Reaktion Books.

T8: Llyod, S. & Muller. H.W. (1986) History of World Architecture - Series. London: Faber and Faber Ltd.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reference Books:

R1. Corbusier, L. (1986) Towards New Architecture, New York : Dover Publications.

R2. Tadgell C. (1990) The History of Architecture in India, New Delhi: Penguin Books (India)

Ltd.

R3. Robson D. & Powers R. (2014) Beyond Bawa: Modern Masterworks of Monsoon Asia, Thames and Hudson, ISBN-10 0500342385

R4. Lefaivre L. & Tzonis, A. (2003) Critical Regionalism: Architecture and Identity in a Globalized World (Architecture in Focus), Prestel, ISBN-10 3791329723

R5. Sharr A. (2018) Modern Architecture: A Very Short Introduction, Oxford University Press.

R6. Conrads U. (1971) Programs and manifestoes on 20th -century architecture, MIT Press, Cambridge, Mass., 2nd Edition.

R7. Myers W. (2012) Bio Design: Nature, Science, Creativity. London : Thames & Hudson Ltd.

R8. Charissa N Terranova C. N. & Tromble M. (2016) The Routledge Companion to Biology in Art and Architecture, Routledge.

R9. Leland M Roth L. M. (1994) Understanding Architecture: Its elements, history and meaning; Craftsman House.

R10. Andreas, V. Stierlin H. (1995) India, Architecture of the World Series, Benedikt Taschen Velag GmbH, ISBN 3-8228-9301-3

Online Resources:

W1. https://www.theartstory.org/

W2: Eames the architect and the painter 2011 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sRElKUXH4VU

W3: CLEAN LINES, OPEN SPACES A VIEW OF MID CENTURY MODERN ARCHITECTURE - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K_YZbp-MmEo

W4: Le Corbusier Documentary - The century of Le Corbusier COMPLETE!- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qMf97Lnxx3Q

W5: The Dessau Bauhaus - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IyhrMZBWLo&list=PLABA0239EA68C47B6

W6: cHALES cORREA - vOLUME zERO - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uzK86VPXUs8

W7: Zaha Hadid - Who Dares Win - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lXvt5LQMK9M

W8: Laurie Baker - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9tT5W39FQbg

W9: Hassan Fathy - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r5QKLppxgbk

Evaluation Pattern

 

 

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total - 50 Marks 

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in CIA.
  • The course shall have a written exam of three-hour duration.
  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC532 - BUILDING ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS - III (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: The course aims to integrate active and passive ventilation strategies and systems into the design thinking of the student in the architectural environment. It also leads the student to respond specifically to needs of acoustic levels and privacy for specific parts of the architectural programme[indoor and semi-outdoor spaces] and its adjoining landscape.

Course Objectives:

● To develop a logical understanding of indoor ventilation methods, systems, and standards, and the appropriate ways that we can achieve good ventilation through active and passive means for different types of spaces.

● To develop a logical understanding of indoor acoustic methods, systems and standards, and the appropriate ways that we can achieve the necessary acoustic levels and privacy for different types of spaces.

● To be able to analyze and perceive the consequences of incorporating a particular active ventilation system and acoustic techniques in the architectural design, including energy consumption, interior design, facade, space planning, and programming.

● To creatively integrate active ventilation systems and acoustic techniques in the ongoing design project for the semester

Course Outcome

CO1: To explain the requirements and configure the Mechanical ventilation systems and layouts for various building types. To develop a logical and technical understanding of indoor ventilation methods and systems Level: Moderate

CO2: To develop a logical and technical understanding of indoor acoustic methods, systems, and standards Level: Moderate

CO3: To develop the ability to discern the consequences and integrate the appropriate ventilation, air conditioning, and acoustic systems into an architectural solution. Level: Moderate

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Unit-1 Active and Passive Ventilation Systems
 

1. Introduction to Active and Passive Ventilation methods and systems through case examples. Need for appropriate mechanical ventilation in different spaces like Basement, Kitchen, Toilet, Industrial facilities & Parking areas, etc. Guidelines as per NBC/ASHRAE and Types of ventilation systems.

2. Introduction to Air-conditioning: Definition, Psychometric requirements, Air & Refrigeration cycles, heating system, Load Calculations, Zoning and Air Distribution.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Unit-2 Types of Air Conditioning Systems and design consequences
 

1. Air Conditioning systems: Window, Split, centralized air-conditioning system with Water & Air-Cooled Chillers, Air Handling Units, Evaporative cooling, Types of ducting design, preferred locations of the equipment.

2. Consequences of air conditioning systems to the architectural design of spaces in terms of energy consumption, interior design, facade, space planning, and programming, etc.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit-3 Acoustics - need, techniques and applications
 

1. Introduction to the study of Acoustics: Nature of Sound, basic terminology, decibel scale, threshold of audibility and pain, masking, sound and distance.

2. Introduction to Room Acoustics: Reflection, Diffusion, Diffraction, reverberation, Absorption. Calculation of reverberation time using Sabine’s and Eyring's formula.

3. Room Acoustics defects, shapes and measurement techniques: Echoes, focusing of sound, dead spots, flutter echo. Room resonances, small enclosures, room modes, standing waves.

4. Rooms for speech and music: Effect of RT and SNR on speech and music, AI, STI, RASTI, Speech intelligibility. Sound reinforcement systems and background noise masking systems.

5. Acoustical Design recommendations: Halls for speech, music and other performances, Home theatres, recording studios, open plan offices, speech privacy issues and sound attenuation.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Unit-4 Integration of Ventilation and Acoustics in Architectural Design
 

1. The appropriate ventilation, air conditioning or acoustic system is integrated into the ongoing design project of the semester [ARC551] through a method of drawing, analysis and crit. This can be run in coordination with the respective faculty.

2. Acoustical Materials and Corrections: Absorptive materials - NRC value, porous materials, panel absorbers, membrane absorbers, diffusers, cavity or Helmholtz resonators. Adjustable acoustics and variable sound absorbers. Acoustical correction and retrofits to existing spaces.

3. Design and Detailing for Acoustics of Multipurpose halls (Site visit and studio component): Case studies of acoustically designed and treated multipurpose halls. Design of a multipurpose hall for optimum acoustics - drawings and construction details of acoustical treatment.

4. Introduction to environmental noise control - Types of noise - indoor, outdoor noise, airborne and structure-borne noise, noise transmission, Mass Law, Transmission loss. Noise from ventilating systems.

5. Means of noise control in buildings - Maximum acceptable noise levels, Enclosures, Barriers, Sound insulation, STC ratings of Acoustical Materials, Sound Isolation. Noise measurement using SLM. Idea of sick building syndrome.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Books:

T1. Ermann M. (2015) Architectural Acoustics Illustrated, John Wiley & Sons, ISBN-10 1118568494

T2. Wang S.K. (1993) Handbook for Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration, McGraw-Hill, ISBN 0-07-068167-8

T3. Hoskins, J.A. & Jones, P. (2000), Mechanical Ventilation in Buildings, Karger Publishers, ISBN: 978-3-8055-7189-0

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reference Books:

R1. Dossat, R. J. (2001) Principles of Refrigeration, Pearson, ISBN-10 0130272701

R2. Prasad M. (1989) Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Data Handbook, Wiley Eastern Ltd.

R3. Don Kundwar, D. Refrigeration, and Air Conditioning. 

Online Resources:

W1. https://nptel.ac.in/courses/124/105/124105004/

W2. https://nptel.ac.in/courses/112/105/112105129/

Evaluation Pattern
 

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in CIA.
  • The course shall have a written exam of three-hour duration.
  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC533 - LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE AND SITE PLANNING (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course objectives:

To introduce the fundamentals of landscape architecture, the art and science of site planning in Architectural Projects.

To understand the relevance of landscape design and its connection to the human environment

To explore planning and design strategies with responding to the context and climatic conditions.

Level of Knowledge: - Intermediate

Course Outcome

CO1: To describe the fundamentals of landscape design. Level: Basic

CO2: To survey and evaluate the site. Level: Basic

CO3: To describe parameters that affect the art of site planning. Level: Basic

CO4: To describe and demonstrate site planning strategies in Landscape design. Level: Basic

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit-1 Introduction to Fundamentals of Landscape Architecture
 

1. Introduction: Fundamentals of landscape architecture

2. Relation between landscape and architectural design

3. Theoretical and historical background of landscape design, site analysis, environmental issues, and plant materials

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Unit-2 Landscape elements
 

1. Landscape elements and classification; landform, plant life, microclimate; land use and land preservation.

2. Elements and methods of landscape design; study of aesthetic and functional values.

3. Soft and Hardscape design Elements

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit-3 Site Planning
 

1. Site planning: The art of site planning, arranging structures on the land, and shaping the spaces between.

2. The parameters affecting design strategies: The site, the user, and the program; the techniques of surveys – field surveys, aerial photographs; sensing landscape and its materials – managing microclimate, noise and soil, plants and ground cover; services; earthwork and utilities, access to the site, walkways, parking & driveways, connectivity within the site thru Hardscapes & Softscapes.

3. Ecological Impact of Landscape Design

4. Green Building Environment and Landscape

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Unit-4 Portfolio
 

Portfolio development - To organise and review all works done in the semester. To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject. Establish connections with other subjects where possible

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Books:

T1. Dee, C. (2001), Form and Fabric in Landscape Architecture: A visual introduction, UK: Spon Press.

T2. Lynch, K. (1962), Site Planning, Cambridge: The MIT Press.

T3. McHarg I. (1978), Design with Nature. NY: John Wiley & Co.

T4. Booth, N. (2011), Foundations of Landscape Architecture: Integrating Form and Space Using the Language of Site Design, John Wiley & Co.

T5. Simonds, J.O. (1961), Landscape Architecture: The Shaping of Man’s Natural Environment, NY: McGraw Hill Book Co. Inc.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reference Books:

R1. Shaheer.M, Dua G. & Pal A. (2013), Landscape Architecture In India, A Reader, LA, Journal of Landscape Architecture

R2. Ashihara, Y. (1970). Exterior Design in Architecture. NY: Van Nostrand Reinhold Company.

R3. Burns, C., & Kahn, A. (2005). Site Matters: Design Concepts, Histories and Strategies. New York and London: Routledge.

Online Resources:

W1. Down to Earth [Magazine] www.downtoearth.org.in

Evaluation Pattern
 

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in CIA.
  • The course shall have a written exam of a three-hour duration.
  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC551 - ALTERING LANDSCAPES AND INSTITUTIONAL ARCHITECTURE (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:90
No of Lecture Hours/Week:6
Max Marks:300
Credits:9

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The studio would primarily interpret the idea of an institution as an interplay of contextual factors, programmatic interpretations, and the architectural language at a range of scales. Contextual factors like site, surroundings, and landscape are introduced, along with the development of an architectural language that emerges from the integration of design details with larger concepts and architectural programme, with a total development of 3000 to 4000 sq mts (in a site area of about 3 acres). It also includes a preliminary introduction to fundamentals of working drawings as technical documents in the process of construction

Course Objectives: 

To integrate environmental characteristics and the principles of site planning and management in the process of developing an architectural programme and form.

To engage a process of sustainable re-development of abused landscapes in architectural education

Course Outcome

CO1: To document, evaluate and interpret landscape through contextual analysis. Level: Intermediate

CO2: To interpret and integrate program for design in specific site conditions. Level: Intermediate

CO3: To innovate and apply the large span structure into design. Level: Basic

CO4: To develop technical working drawing in construction. Level: Basic

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Study on vagaries of landscape
 

1. Selection of site with specific landscape characteristics or environmental issues – contoured sites, abused landscapes like quarry, contested forest tracts within cities, declining water body/water structure; An in depth understanding of the landscape characteristics and its vagaries.

2. Site narratives: Explore and identify landscape elements, systems, processes or parameters that structure the site – both physical and experiential across scales; Evaluate and develop natural patterns of site structure.

3. Site walks, Photo essays and both manual and advanced tools and soft wares may be used for site data collection, analysis and inferences. Workshops and lectures suggested for a holistic understanding and knowledge of current discourses on the subject

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Discourse on the idea of an institution
 

1. A critical review of the altering ideas of an institution.]

2. Selection of an appropriate or suitable campus premise for the context study.

3. Case visits and Literature review on Campuses; a structured analysis concluding with inferences.

4. Evolve interrelationships of functions and activity patterns, form and space, hierarchies, architectural response to site and programmatic premise of the case

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:45
Campus Design
 

1. The design premise – an informed integration of program and specific site conditions for the design exploration, with a total development of 3000 to 4000 sq mts (in a site area of about 3 acres)

2. Nature of Projects: Centres for environmental education and research, Social welfare, empowerment, and research centers, Centre for alternative medicine and material research, Centre for liberal arts and science, and Community outreach projects.

3. Process, Development, and Demonstration of design through working models and drawings. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:20
Working Drawing and appropriate application of large span structures
 

1. Introduction to fundamentals of Working drawings.

2. Development of a basic set of working drawings for any selected part.

3. Application of appropriate technology and large span structure in design.

4. Portfolio Development.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Kanvinde, A., Miller, J. H., (1969) Campus Design in India: Experience of a Developing Nation, Jostens/American Yearbook Company

T2. IS SP 7-NBC : National Building Code of India 2016, Bureau of Indian Standards 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Coulson, J., Roberts, P., Taylor, I. (2010) University Planning and Architecture: The search for perfection, Routledge

R2. Dober, R.P,(1992) Campus Design, John Wiley & Sons

R3.Mathur, A., Da Cunha, D.,(2006) Deccan Traverses: The Making of Bangalore's Terrain, Rupa Publication

R4.Mathur, A.,(2009) Soak Mumbai in an Estuary, Rupa Publication

R5.Lobell, J., Kahn, L.,(2008)Between Silence and Light: Spirit in the Architecture of Louis I. Kahn, Shambala

R6.Neufert, E. (2019) Architects' Data, Wiley-Blackwell

R7. Crosbie, M., Watson, D. Time-Saver Standards for Architectural Design,Wiley-Blackwell 

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

 CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks. Attendance and participation in the studio would be considered in the evaluation-rubrics.

  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of a particular course

  • CIA -1- 25 Marks; CIA -2 - 50 Marks; CIA -3 - 75 Marks; Total - 150 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  •  Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.

  • Total ESE - 150 Marks

ARC552 - LOGIC OF STRUCTURES - FORM FINDING (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course helps the students recognize the relationship between a particular building programme or function, its material culture, economics and its related form-structure. For a long span structure, certain materials are more appropriate. And certain techniques and technologies will enable them more easily. Some materials may make the project a bit more expensive. Conversely, some types of structure are more suitable to a particular material. But structure and material choice may also drive the form generation of the architectural design. For example, a brick roof structure can be a vaulted roof on a prayer hall, but such a form-structure deeply influences the scale and architectural character of the building. This understanding can lead to the discovery of appropriate form and structure for a particular design project based on aspirations and contextual issues.

● To recognize the relationship between materials, form and structure in shaping architecture.

● To learn to analyze from architectural cases, the logic of form, structure and material and the related influence of these on its architectural character.

● To develop a logical and intuitive design thinking on the selection of structural form for a particular architectural programme and the consequences of such a choice on the architectural character.

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will develop an intuitive understanding of behavior of structure in terms of materials, form and applied forces. Level: Basic

CO2: Students can comprehend the structural system of a physical object, especially a building. Level: Intermediate

CO3: Students will be able to analyse and select appropriate structural form for a particular architectural programme and project. Level: Intermediate

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Forms in Nature
 

1. Forms generated for materials in compression and tension.

2. Geometrical forms and appropriate materials for these forms.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Approaches in Architecture: Shape finding & Form finding
 

Discovering optimum form and dynamic adaptability, Concepts of Shape analysis algorithms, Form follows force etc. Materials & geometry: Different aspects of membrane envelopes including ETFE foil cushions, tensile membranes, and cable nets. The works of famous architects, Suggested examples, like

1. Felix Candela in Mexico, (concrete hyperbolic parabola in High Life Textile factory in Coyoacun, Mexico City, 1955)

2. Pier Luigi Nervi in Italy, (curved ribbed thin shell concrete dome in Palazzetto dello Sport, Rome for the 1960 Olympics) 

3. Frei Otto in Germany (A steel cable net with acrylic panels in Olympic Stadium, Munich in 1972)

4. Bucky Fuller in the US (tensegrity structure using discontinuous struts and cables), etc.

5. Santiago Calatrava (Walker Art Museum)

6. Zaha Hadid (the Spiraling Tower in Barcelona)

7. Adrian Smith Gordon Gill Architects (Wuhan Greenland Center in China) etc

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Behaviour of different forms for horizontal and vertical/lateral structures
 

1. Introduction to long-span structures, forms, load path and load behavior, Appropriate materials & their behavior, design procedure, and applications.

2. Types: Cable & suspension Structures, Shell structure, Fabric structure, Shear Wall System, Braced Frames, Dual System, etc Integrated exercises or workshops with ARC 551 & ARC 531.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:25
Structural Design Project
 

1. Structural Analysis and Design to satisfy Building Codes and Standards

2. Eg, Design for an Airport terminal building using horizontal structure , Design for high rise building etc

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Rudofsky, B. (1964) Architecture Without Architects, The Museum of Modern Art: Distributed by Doubleday, Garden City, N.Y.

T2. Schaur, E. (1991) Non-Planned Settlements, Institute for Lightweight Structures.

T3. Jones, P. (2006) Masterbuilder of the 20th Century, Yale University Press.

T4. Corbusier L. (1923) Vers Une Architecture(Toward an Architecture), Dover Publications, New York.

T5. Schueller, W. (1982) Horizontal-Span Building Structures, Wiley; 1st edition, ISBN-10 : 047186756X

T6. Thompson, W. D. (1917) On Growth and Form, John Wiley & Sons. ISBN-10 : 047186756X

T7. Duggal S.K. (2006), Earthquake Resistant Design of Structures, Prentice Hall India Learning Private Limited, Delhi.

T8. Raju, N. K. (1986) Advanced Reinforced Concrete Design, CBS Publishers & Distributors, Delhi. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

As per the course instructor

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  •  CIA 1, 2 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course

  • CIA Total 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in CIA.

  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation

  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%

ARC553 - DIGITAL GRAPHICS AND ART (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course objectives: To develop and apply the knowledge and skills required for communication through an interactive audio-visual medium in architecture.

Course Outcome

CO1: To Demonstrate a thorough understanding of the use of digital tools, techniques, and communication through an interactive audio-visual medium in architecture. Level: Intermediate

CO2: To learn and demonstrate the understanding of design presentation and report making using desktop publishing tools. Level: Intermediate

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Unit-1 Forms in Nature: Introduction to Digital Graphics
 

1. Technology and concepts.

2. Architectural Photography and Video Documentation.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Unit-2 Animation and editing
 

1. Animation Techniques and Presentation.

2. Principles of Editing: Animation and Video editing

3. Demonstration of a related project.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Unit-3 Effective Communication
 

1. Effective Communication: Digital composition, 3D Animation and Special effects,

Art of Story Boarding.

2. Demonstration of a related project.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Unit-4 Portfolio development & Group work Exhibition
 

Portfolio development - To organize and review all works done in the semester. To

compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject. Establish connections with other

subjects where possible.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Books:

T1. Anton, K. K., & Cruise, J. (2017). Adobe InDesign CC: Classroom in a book. Noida: Pearson India education services Pvt ltd.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reference Books: 

R1. Adobe creative suite, Online web site of Adobe products: www.adobe.com 

Online Resources:

W1. DaVinci Resolve tutorial videos

Evaluation Pattern

 

 

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • Total CIA - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%

 

ARC554 - MATERIAL STRATEGIES ADVANCED - I (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course objective: To develop the ability to describe, document and appreciate Architectural expression through the use of Materials and construction with Advanced Materials and technologies.

Course Outcome

CO1: To describe the properties of glass, its manufacturing methods, and the assembly of it to modules of doors and windows, structural glazing, and skylights. Level: Moderate

CO2: To describe different types of Glazing and methods of construction used in structural glazing. Level: Basic

CO3: To analyze and infer from documentation of a case study on sliding and folding doors and innovate its construction detail. Level: Moderate

CO4: To describe the assembly methods of skylights, metal & aluminum cladding, and panel. Level: Moderate

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
1. Glass as a building material:
 

Glass manufacturing in various types like plate, tinted, decorative, reinforced, laminated glass block, fiberglass, glass murals, partially colored glass, etching of glass, and its applications in the building industry for both exteriors and interiors. Use and Application of different types of Glass in Life Safety Application. Glass fabrication techniques, fiber-reinforced composite materials and products.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
2. Frameless glass doors, windows and partitions:
 

Fixing and fabrication details.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Unit-2 Structural Glazing and cladding
 

1. Structural Glazing and cladding: Fixing and fabrication details

2. Point supported glazing: Fixing and fabrication details.

3. Floating Glass Walls

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Unit-3 Sliding and folding doors and partitions
 

1. Wooden sliding and folding doors and partitions: Principles and methods of

construction and detailing.

2. Steel sliding and folding doors and partitions: Principles and methods of

construction and detailing.

3. Aluminum sliding and folding doors and partitions: Principles and methods of

construction and detailing

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Unit-4 Skylight
 

1.Skylight in steel and glass: Principles and methods of construction and detailing.

2.Alternative wall & Roof technologies: Sandwich panel walls, PUF panels etc.

3.Introduction to Aluminum cladding: ACP, Aluminum louvers; Fixing and fabrication

details.

4.Metal cladding of Facades and Building envelopes: Fixing and fabrication details.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Books:

T1. Chudley, R., & Greeno, R. (2005). Construction Technology. Prentice-Hall, edition.

T2. Emmitt, S., & Gorse, C. (2009). Barry's Introduction to Construction of Buildings, Wiley- Blackwell.

T3. Mckay, W. (2012). Building Construction, Pearson India.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reference Books:

R1. Chudley , R., & Greeno, R. (2005) Construction Technology, Prentice Hall, 4 edition.

R2. Emmitt, S., & Gorse, C. (2009) Barry's Introduction to Construction of Buildings, Wiley- Blackwell.

R3. Mckay, W. (2012) Building Construction, Pearson India.

R4. Deplazes, A. (2005) Constructing Architecture Materials Processes Structures A Handbook, Basel, Switzerland: Birkhäuser Publishers for Architecture.

R5. Francis Mallgrave, H. (2004). Style in the Technical and Tectonic Arts; Practical Aesthetics, Los Angeles.

R6. Frampton, K. (2001) Studies in Tectonic Culture, Cambridge.

Online Resources: As per the course instructor

Evaluation Pattern

 


 

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.

  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course

  • Total CIA - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.

  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.

  • Total ESE - 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%

ARC631 - HOUSING AND HUMAN SETTLEMENT PLANNING (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course objectives:

To give an introduction to the discipline of planning human settlements and the challenges of the housing scenario in India.

The course is an introduction to Elements and characteristics of human settlements; origins; determinants and their evolution through the course of history; Settlements as an expression of political aspirations; Various planning concepts in urban, rural, and regional level development plans in the context of India; the changing scenario in the context of Globalization. The course also outlines social housing post WW II; Issues concerning housing in the Indian Context; its production and standards the processes involve in housing project development; Case studies and post-occupancy evaluation.

Course Outcome

CO1: To illustrate the evolution of human settlements and the issues concerned. Level: Basic

CO2: Ability to understand the connections between the built environment and the social, political, religious, technological and environmental circumstances which shaped modern cities. Level: Basic

CO3: To describe the social housing scenario in India and the criteria to evaluate it. Level: Intermediate

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Planning Principles in Indian Context:
 

Vastushastra, Principles of  Town Planning, Types of cities.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Human Settlement- Origin and Evolution
 

Introduction to Human settlements: Types of settlements; its origin and evolution; the idea of a city with case examples.

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Theory of Planning:
 

Enunciated by Ebenezer Howard, Patrick Geddes, Soria Y Mata, Doxiadis, Le-Corbusier, Clarence Stein, Hilberseimer – their relevance to Indian conditions. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:18
Understanding the components of City
 

1.Physical aspects: Physical and Spatial Characteristics of land, land use, physical infrastructure, density, population distribution, CBD

2. Economical & Social aspects: Urban fabric, urban node, the relation of Core and Periphery, Regional impact.

3. Environment aspects: Resource utilization, Green cover, forest, water, and sanitation issue.

The aspects to be explored with the case examples

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:18
Introduction to Social Inclusion Through Housing
 

1. Inter and Intra dependency of the society, Social Networking and Typology of Housing

2. Social Groups and Housing.

3. Affordable and EWS Housing

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Books:

T1. A.K Lal, (1996). Handbook of Low Cost Housing

T2. Sustainable Social Housing in India, UN-HABITAT, 2017

T3. Taylor, N. (1998) Urban Planning Theory Since 1945, SAGE Publications Ltd

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reference Books:

R1. Kevin, L. (1981) A Theory of Good City Form, MIT Press

R2. Rodwin, L. (1961) Housing and Economic Progress, Harvard University Press

R3. Mumford, L. (1961) The City in History, Harcourt

Online Resources:

MOOC Courses: Nptel, Swayam, edx, Coursera

Evaluation Pattern

 


 

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.

  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.

  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course

  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in CIA.

  • The course shall have a written exam of three-hour duration.

  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC632 - SPECIFICATIONS ESTIMATION AND COSTING (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course objectives:

To develop the necessary skills for estimation, writing the specifications as well as prepare Bill of Quantities for various types of buildings. Level of Knowledge: Basic

Course Outcome

CO1: To estimate and cost different types of buildings. Level: Basic

CO2: To prepare BOQ for buildings, infrastructure, and services. Level: Basic

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to Estimation
 

Need for estimation, the relationship between choice of materials, their specifications, Bill of Quantities (BOQ), project costing, project quality/cost/ time management. Centreline method.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Specifications
 

How to arrive at abstract and detailed specifications for various materials leading to 'items of work' used in construction. Including the influence and impact of local and national building codes on specifications.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Mandatory tests & Safety Measures in Specifications:
 

Procedures, frequency, and submission of results as part of specifications and their inclusion in the BOQ for different materials document. Integrating workers' safety and material security into specifications.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Bill of Quantities (BOQ):
 

Why and how to build flexibility, resilience and redundancy in BOQ. Format for BOQ.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to Costing
 

Reasons for rate variation - the study of government rates (CPWD/ Karnataka PWD Schedule of Rates) and market rates. Concept of inflation and its effect on costing. eg. Escalation clause, extra items, variations. Lift & lead.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Detailed rate analysis of building:
 

Basic knowledge of items as per current schedule of rates (CSR) of local PWD. Percentages (based on thumb rule calculations) of various bulk materials used in construction like cement, steel, rubble, metal, sand, brick, tiles etc.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:20
4. Project 3:
 

Detailed specifications writing and estimation of Bill of Quantities (BOQ) for a typical residential layout plan

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:20
3. Project 2:
 

Detailed specifications writing and estimation of Bill of Quantities (BOQ) for an office interior work.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:20
5. Billing requirements:
 

Role of the architect in monitoring the specifications follow-up for quality control, the measurement book (MB), RA bills, interim and final checking, and certification of works on-site based on the BOQ and terms of contracts.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:20
2. Project 1:
 

Detailed specifications writing and estimation of Bill of Quantities (BOQ) for a Building Plan.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:20
1. Introduction to sequence of construction activity:
 

Project time/ labor /materials costing and impact of delay in project on costing.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Rangwala, S. C. (1990) Elements of Estimating and Costing, Charotar Books Publ.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reference Books:

R1. Dutta, B. N. (1991) Estimating and Costing, UBS Publishers' Distributors Ltd, ISBN: 9788174767295

R2. Rangwala, S. C. (2009) Estimating Costing And Valuation, Charotar Books Dist.-Anand, ISBN-10: 8185594856

Online Resources: As per the course instructor

Evaluation Pattern

 

 


 

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.

  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.

  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course

  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in CIA.

  • The course shall have a written exam of a three-hour duration.

  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC633 - PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE - I (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course objectives:

To understand the responsibilities & liabilities of the Profession; To understand the process of Contract management. Level of Knowledge: Intermediate

Course Outcome

CO1: To give a descriptive overview of the Architectural Profession and Practice and the building industry in general. Level: Intermediate

CO2: To describe the types and procedures involved in tendering and contract. Level: Intermediate

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Profession of Architecture:
 

Types and extent of services offered by architects, the scale of fees, stages of payment, and the contract between client and architect.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Profession & Code of Conduct
 

Profession: Idea of the profession and essential differences among the profession, trade, and business. Its essential tenets, duties, and liabilities.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Code of Professional Conduct:
 

Architects Act of 1972. Role of Council of Architecture and the Indian Institute of Architects in the functioning of the Profession.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Architectural Practice-2:
 

Various means of building a client base and gaining projects. Architectural competitions, guidelines of COA, procedure of conduct of such competitions.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Architectural Practice-1
 

Types of Architectural firms, proprietorship, partnership, associateship. Advantages and disadvantages of each type of firm. Basic accounting procedures. Taxes and implications of service tax.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Building Industry & Insurance
 

1. Building Industry: General overview of the industry. Various participants and dimensions of building industry. Building Finance, statutory controls, Construction procedures & phases, enforcement issues related to the building industry, and the role of architect, employer, and contractor.

2. Project Insurance & Labor Insurance

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:19
Tender, Bid process and Contract
 

1. Procedure of calling for tender, documents necessary for tendering process. Tender document and its content. Types of tenders, suitability of different types to various categories of projects. Advantages and disadvantages of each type of tender. Tender notices, opening, scrutiny, the process of selection and award.

2. Architect's role in the tender process: Essential characteristics of Tender Notice, Earnest Money Deposit, Security Deposit, Retention Amount, Mobilization Amount, and Bonus & Penalty Clauses.

3. Various issues arising out of tendering process and the role of an architect in maintaining objectivity in the process.

4. Overview of procedures in contract management with a focus on the Architect's role.

5. General Principles, types of contract, definitions of various terms used in the contract document. Contract document, contents, and sections dealing with various aspects of contract management. Conditions and Scope of Contract and the role of an architect in ensuring a positive completion of a contract. Architect's role in the contract and vested authority

Text Books And Reference Books:

RT. Namavathi R. (2016) Professional Practice: With Elements of Estimating, Valuation, Contract and Arbitration, Lakhani Book Depot, ISBN-10 9385492667

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R2. Greenstreet, B. (1981) Legal and contractual procedures for architects, Architectural Press, ISBN-10 0750654082

R3. Jenkins E. (2010) The architect's legal handbook, Taylor & Francis Ltd, ISBN 9781856176279

R4. Krishnamurthy, K. G. & Ravindra S.V. (2013) Professional Practice, India: PHI Learning.  

Online Resources: As per the course instructor

Evaluation Pattern

 


 

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.

  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.

  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course

  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in CIA.

  • The course shall have a written exam of a three-hour duration.

  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC641C - INTERIOR DESIGN (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

An introduction to the vocabulary of interior design; Overview of interior and furniture design and design movements through history; various components of interior space and treatment and finishes; Interior lighting, Interior landscape and furniture. Design based studio exercises on ergonomics, materials and working parameters. The detailed course plan of the electives and the modus operandi of teaching will be taken up by the faculty in charge.

Course Outcome

CO1: To identify, define and understand phenomenon around, as a design variable and develop a hypothesis in architectural design. Level: Intermediate

CO2: To study, innovate and integrate these variables in spatial design. Level: Intermediate CO3: To be informed and innovate indigenous knowledge and strategies. Level: Intermediate

CO3: To demonstrate necessary communication skills to conduct Market & Material surveys and Program Specific study and design. Level: Intermediate

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Identifying area of enquiry
 

1. Selection of a topic: Initiate processes to identify key areas of enquiry;

2. Defining the area of enquiry: A detailed study, mapping and documentation of the existing resources and publications on the selected area of interest; Defining the project

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Discourse on the special topic
 

A critical review of the topic chosen, its normative aspects, case visits and literature review defending the topic chosen as a critical design parameter.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Developing a Design premise and architectural program
 

1. Literature and Field surveys of a case selected: Experience and identify critical issues within the defined area of enquiry; develop patterns and typologies of spatial, experiential and historical narratives, ideas of innovation.

2. Programmatic premise: Evolve interrelationships of functions and activity patterns, form and space, hierarchies, probable spatial response to context and programmatic premise of the case.

3. Methods: define methods of conducting focused research. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Portfolio Development
 

1. Portfolio development of all the works done in the semester.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Love, M. Grimley, C. O'Shea L. (2013) The Interior Design Reference & Specification Book, Rockport Publishers, ISBN-10 1592538495.

T2. Ching, F. (1987) Interior Design Illustrated, Wiley, ISBN: 978-1-119-37720-7.

T3. Kubba S. (2003) Space Planning for Commercial & Residential Interiors, McGraw-Hill Education, ISBN-10 9780071381918

T4. Reznikoff, S. C. (1986) Interior Graphic & Design Standards, New York: Watson-Guptill Publications. ISBN-10 0823072983

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Watson, D., Crosbie, M. J., & Callender J. H. (1997) Times-Saver Standards for Architectural Design Data, McGraw-Hill Education, ISBN-10 0070685061

R2. DeChiara, J., Panero, J. & Zelnik M. (1991) Times-Saver Standards for Interior Design and Space Planning, US: McGraw-Hill Inc., ISBN-10 0070162999

R3. Baiche, B. & Walliman K. (2013) Ernst & Peter Neufert - Architect’s Standards, Blackwell Science.

R4. Hall, D. J. & Giglio, N. M. (2015) AIA-Architectural Graphic Standards, John Wiley & Sons, ISBN: 978-1-118-90950-8.

R5. National Building Code of India 2016 (NBC 2016)

R6. National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA), USA 2016

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total - 50 Marks 

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in CIA.
  • The course shall have a written exam of a three-hour duration.
  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC641G - RESEARCH METHODOLOGY (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

1. To orient the students towards research applications in Architecture by making them familiar with various research methods available.

2. To introduce them to the basic concepts for identifying the research problem, help to review literature, analyze, interpretation of results, and choose an appropriate methodology

Course Outcome

CO1: Ability to formulate research questions and develop a research design for their specific research question. Level: Basic

CO2: Identify appropriate methods for analysis. Level: Basic

CO3: Ability to comprehend and critique through research literature, data sourcing and citation, for developing a research proposal. Level: Intermediate

CO4: Ability to prepare scholarly articles, research reports and publications. Level: Intermediate

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:16
Introduction to research & Research Process
 

Aims and Characteristics of research; Criteria of good research; Basic types of research; Role of the researcher; Ethics in research, Quality criteria Research in architecture Purpose and scope; History of Architectural research; Major areas of research. Research paradigms.

Research Process – Identification of research problem, research gap. Literature review, Framing of research question/hypothesis, research methodology, research design;

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Data collection & Techniques
 

Types of Data; Sources of data: Data collection methods; Sampling for data collection, Types of sampling Data analysis – Qualitative and Quantitative methods of analysis, Arriving at conclusions-Presentation of findings.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:16
Architectural research strategies
 

Interpretative-Historical Research, Qualitative Research, Correlational Research, Experimental and Quasi-Experimental Research, Simulation and Modelling Research, Logical Argumentation, and Case Studies and Combined Strategies. Examples of architectural research Examples of seminal and recent research in architecture and related fields: Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Housing, Urban Planning, Urban Design, Environment- Behavior Studies 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:20
Scientific Writing/Research Writing
 

Preparation and structure of Research report, Research paper, Research proposal; Referencing style Peer-reviewed journals; Impact factor, Plagiarism. English for technical writing.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1: Creswell, J. W., (2009) Research Design. Third ed. s.l.:Sage.

T2: Groat, L. & Wang, D., (2013) Architectural Ressearch Methods. Second ed. Canada: John Wiley & Sons.

T3: Kothari, C., (2004) Research Methodology Methods & Techniques. Mumbai: New Age International. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1: Lucas, R., (2016) Research Methods for Architecture. United Kingdom: Laurence King.

R2: Neuman, W. L., (2014) Social Research Methods: Qualitative and Quantitative Approach. Seventh ed. United States of America: Pearson Education Limited

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total - 50 Marks 

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in CIA.
  • The course shall have a written exam of a three-hour duration.
  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC642D - THEATER STUDIES (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:03

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

This experiential elective course introduces the idea of Body and Movement, Aesthetics of Theatre and the Components of Theatre: space, time, audience, and performance. It further illustrates and critiques Contemporary Theatre, Theatre Architecture, Indian Folk & Street Theatre, and the Modern Indian Theatre are suggested.

Course Outcome

CO1: Ability to recognize the realm of film/theatre as interdisciplinary to the field of architecture.

CO2: Enhance the student?s critical thinking methods by establishing the relationship between architecture and performance arts

CO3: Ability to work in teams and develop problem solving skills

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:25
Components of a Theatre
 

Introduction to theatre. Space, Time, Audience and Performance. Visiting and Documenting Theatre settings. Explore regional Folk Theaters from various parts of the country. Identify Contemporary theatrical styles.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Script and Visualization
 

Space and Storytelling. Viewing Films to discuss and identify theatrical styles. Explore Forms and Styles in Theatre – Comedy and Tragedy; Solo performance, Mime, Melodrama, Musical theatre, Realism, Symbolism, Ballet and Dance, Street theatre, Folk theatre, etc.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Documentation
 

Student journals and video record of activities. Survey of historical and contemporary theatre architecture.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Portfolio Submission
 

Portfolio development - To organize and review all works done in the semester. To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject.

Text Books And Reference Books:

R1. Robert L. Lee (2017) Everything about Theatre! A Comprehensive Survey about the Arts and Crafts of the Stage, Pioneer Drama Service.

R2. Marvin Carlson (2014) An introduction to theatre, Oxford press.

R3. Richard Boleslavsky (2005) Acting: The first six lessons, Taylor and Francis.

R4. Brockett, Oscar Gross Hildy, Franklin J (2014) History of the theatre, Pearsons Education Ltd.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

As per the course instructor's list.

Evaluation Pattern

 

 

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • Total CIA - 50 Marks (Follow the syllabus for respective course wise Marks)

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%

ARC642E - GRAPHIC AND PRODUCT DESIGN (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:15
Max Marks:100
Credits:03

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Objectives:

1. To understand the interpretation of symbols and logos in graphic design

2. To create technical skill in developing industrial drawing for product development.

3. To understand the product-user relation and interaction based on the context.

Level of Knowledge: Intermediate

Course Outcome

CO1: Ability to understand the logic of symbols and Logos to develop a skill for conveying visual meanings. Level: Basic

CO2: Explore the systematic way to express the product details through technical drawings. Level: Intermediate

CO3: Understand the relevance of considering social aspects to develop a meaningful product based on user demand. Level: Intermediate

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to graphics
 

Concept of visual language and visual design, Concept of Symbol and Logo. Symbol and symbolism, cultural interconnection and identification on symbol, evolution and transformation of logo and symbol, Colour meanings in traditions and psychological use of colours, Graphic development and design compositions.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:25
Product study
 

Exploration of surface textures in different materials, Exploration of form to develop imagination and insight, Form exploration of products based on the context, Expressions in Form like soft, hard, warm, cold, precise, gross, strong, fragile, rugged .etc., Study of product expressions by analysing in terms of elements like form, proportion, colour, texture etc.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:25
Product and user relationship
 

Different concerns and issues in the context of design. Emerging areas of design, Relevance of design in the context of India, Importance of sustainable design practices, designing for the underserved communities, Exposure to biomimicry design, green design. Exposure to digital form development.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Portfolio
 

Product presentation in various media like pencil, ink, colour and digital, Presenting thoughts and ideas in design through sketches, perspective and exploded views, Presentation of product design concepts through simplified graphics presentation. The practice of photography/videography for documentation.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Books:

T1. Roozenburg, N. F. M. (1995) Product Design: Fundamentals and Methods, John Wiley & Sons Inc; New Ed edition.

T2. Ulrich, Karl T., Eppinger, Steven D. (2004) Product Design and Development, McGraw-Hill.

T3. Goodrich, K. (2003) Design Secrets: Products: 50 Real-Life Projects Uncovered, Industrial Designers Society of America, Rockport Publishers.

T4. Cagan, J. (2002) Creating Breakthrough Products: Innovation from Product Planning to Program Approval, Financial Times Prentice Hall.

T5. Byers, M. (1994) The Design Encyclopedia, John Wiley & Sons Publications.

T6. Lidwell, W.; Holden, K. & Butler, J. (2003) Universal Principles of Design, Rockport Publishers.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reference Books:

R1. Csikszentmihalyi, M. (1981) The Meaning of Things, Cambridge University Press.

R2. Dormer, P. (1990) The Meanings of Modern Design: Towards the Twenty-First Century, Thames & Hudson.

R3. Aicher, O. (1994) The World As Design: Writings on Design, Imprint unknown.

R4. Papanek, V. (1985) Design for the Real World: Human Ecology and Social Change, Academy Chicago Publishers.

R5. Lindinger, H. (1991) Ulm Design: The Morality of Objects, The MIT Press.

Evaluation Pattern

 

 

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • Total CIA - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%

ARC651 - HABITAT STUDIO (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:120
No of Lecture Hours/Week:8
Max Marks:300
Credits:10

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description:

The studio would primarily deal with the most sensitive unit of development, the neighborhood. The course exposes the socio-cultural environmental- infrastructural aesthetic, and normative aspects of neighborhood planning and design. Field surveys of living environments, discourses on mass housing typology, the study of residential open space typology, the study of indigenous resource management strategies and discussions on participatory approaches of housing design would be dealt in detail. The nature of projects will entail housing design and planning for urban context or selective communities.

Course objectives: To understand the implications of:

• To explore density and economics as a design generator.

• To engage with sustainable resource management in neighborhood planning.

• To integrate the issues of domestic ritual, form, and open spaces in the design and planning of

the neighborhood.

• To sensitize students to concepts of community participation, disaster rehabilitation, and cultural groups in housing.

Level of Knowledge: - Intermediate

Course Outcome

CO1: To define and understand density as a design variable in neighborhood design Level: Basic

CO2: To study, and integrate typologies of housing and residential open spaces. Level: Intermediate

CO3: To innovate and apply indigenous resource management strategies into neighborhood design. Level: Intermediate

CO4: To develop necessary communication skills to conduct field surveys and participatory processes of community-based study and design. Level: Basic

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Unit-1 Study on Neighborhood planning & Resource management strategies
 

Study on Neighborhood planning: Initial planning consideration, planning guidelines from center and state, community participation, and housing. Selection of a critical resource for community living: Environmental resources - water, food, waste, etc., infrastructural resources – soft mobility, waterways, etc.; A detailed study, mapping, and documentation of the resource selected collective management strategies and derived devices.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Unit-2 Contextual Study
 

Field surveys: Experience and identify critical issues with regard to people’s living environments; develop patterns and typologies of built and communal open spaces, the efficiency of open spaces, needs of privacy, ideas of extended living areas, movement, and accessibility. 

Programmatic premise: Evolve interrelationships of functions and activity patterns, form and space, hierarchies, architectural response to the site, and programmatic premise of the case. Mass production for housing, steel construction, Alternative Building Construction Materials.

Methods: Site walks, Photo essays, and both manual and advanced tools and soft wares may be used for field data collection and analysis. Workshops and lectures suggested for a holistic understanding and knowledge of current discourses on the subject.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Unit-3 Discourse on density, economics as a design parameter
 

Density: A critical review of the ideas of density and form, density and services.

Normative aspects: neighborhood planning and design.

Case visits and Literature review: Case visits and Literature review of housing projects to understand the issues on ritual and form and their relationship with culture

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:80
Unit-4 Neighborhood Design
 

Design Premise: An informed integration of program and specific site conditions for the design exploration; integration of services as a critical parameter.

Process, Development, and Demonstration of design: Through working models and drawings. Community outreach projects suggested.

Portfolio Development: An integrated portfolio of the research, and design projects in the course of the studio needs to be developed. It can also correlate to their learning in Housing and Human Settlements theory course.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Reference Books:

R1. Sengupta U. Shaw A. (2018) Trends and Issues in Housing in Asia: Coming of an Age, Routledge (India), ISBN-10 : 1138103497

R2. Chen Y. Shin H. B. (Eds.) (2019) Neoliberal Urbanism, Contested Cities and Housing in Asia, Palgrave Macmillan US, ISBN 978-1-137-55015-6

R3. Pfeifer G. Brauneck P. (2015) Residential Buildings: A Typology, Birkhäuser, ISBN 3035603537

R4. Chey K. (2017) Multi-Unit Housing in Urban Cities: From 1800 to Present Day, Routledge, ISBN 9781138189959

R5. Pandya Y. (2014) Elements of Spacemaking, Paperback – Touch and Feel, Vastu-Shilpa Foundation

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Online Resources:

W1. National Building Code - Bureau of Indian Standards (bis.gov.in)

W2. EIA-Manual.pdf (iisd.org)

W3. https://www.nfpa.org

W4. URDPFI Guidelines : Ministry of Urban Development (mohua.gov.in)

W5. Guidelines :: SMART CITIES MISSION, Government of India

W6. https://www.khamir.org/

W7. http://www.hunnarshala.org/

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks. Attendance and participation in the studio would be considered in the evaluation rubrics.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of a particular course
  • CIA -1- 25 Marks; CIA -2 - 50 Marks; CIA -3 - 75 Marks; Total - 150 Marks 

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 150 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

 

 

ARC652 - MATERIAL STRATEGIES ADVANCED - II (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course objectives: To develop the ability to describe, document, and appreciate Architectural expression of alternative advanced constructional composition.

Course Outcome

CO1: To describe the properties of plastics, its manufacturing methods and assembly of the material to modules in architectural construction. Level: Basic

CO2: To describe the means and construction methods of metal cladding and building envelopes. Level: Basic

CO3: To analyze and infer from documentation of a case study of any shell roof structure, dome structure, and tensile structure describing the means and methods of its construction. Level: Intermediate

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
1. Detailing of Geodesic domes:
 

Principles and methods of construction with explorations using physical models.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
2. Tensile structures and pneumatic structures:
 

Principles and methods of construction with explorations using physical models.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
2. Detailing of folded plate and cylindrical shell roof:
 

Principles and methods of construction and reinforcement details.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
1. Detailing of hyperbolic paraboloid shell roof:
 

Principles and methods of construction and reinforcement details.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
2. Detailing of a space frame;
 

Principles and methods of construction with explorations using physical models.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
1. Introduction to large span roofs
 

Large span roofs.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
2. Pile foundation construction:
 

Method of driving piles, Sheet piling, pile caps, and its application etc.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
4. UPVC, PVC & FRP:
 

Doors and windows and partitions (Detailing and study of joinery)

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
1. Introduction to Advanced foundation:
 

Mat foundations, Pile foundations; different types of piles, precast piles, cast-in-situ piles in wood concrete and steel.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
3. Plastics as a building material:
 

Types, properties, and uses of plastics such as polycarbonates, acrylics, PVC polymer films, and fiber reinforced plastic. Application and details.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Reference Books:

R1. Chudley , R., & Greeno, R. (2005). Construction Technology. Prentice-Hall, 4 edition.

R2. Emmitt, S., & Gorse, C. (2009). Barry's Introduction to Construction of Buildings. Wiley-Blackwell.

R3. Mckay, W. (2012). Building Construction. Pearson India.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R4. Deplazes, A. (2005). Constructing Architecture Materials Processes Structures A Handbook. Basel, Switzerland: Birkhäuser Publishers for Architecture.

R5. Mallgrave, F. H. (2004). Style in the Technical and Tectonic Arts; Practical Aesthetics. Los Angeles.

R6. Frampton, K. (2001). Studies in Tectonic Culture. Cambridge. 

Evaluation Pattern

 

 

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.

  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course

  • Total CIA - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.

  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.

  • Total ESE - 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%

ARC731 - PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE II (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To understand the Professional responsibilities within the ambit of laws of the land, building codes, contract documents, and ethics. To gain insight into valuation, arbitration, and building bye-laws.

Level of Knowledge: Intermediate

Course Outcome

CO1: To give a descriptive overview of supervision, contract administration, and valuation; Level: Intermediate

CO2: To describe the types of laws of the land, building codes, contract documents and ethics. Level: Intermediate

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Case study & review on Quality Assessment and Auditing
 

1. Inventory, Bill checking, quality auditing, handover procedures, and final certification.

2. Supervision & contract, Site visits, site meetings, coordination with various agencies, site book, site instructions, clerk of works, and site office.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Case study & review on Dispute Mitigation and Arbitrator Role as an Architect
 

1. Disputes in contract and architect's role in resolving such disputes. Measures of mitigation.

2. Arbitration and conciliation act 1996, importance of arbitrator in practice, umpire, order of reference, selection of arbitrators, powers and duties of arbitrators.

3. Architect's liability: Liability of an architect with respect to breach of contract and negligence with respect to standard of care.

4. Liabilities for users and employees: Safeguards in construction industry such as. Performance bonds, insurance warranties, retention, indemnities, and estoppels and liquidated damages.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Case study & review on Land & Building Valuation
 

1. Laws related to Property and Land: Land tenure, types of land holdings, land registration, easement rights, covenants, trespass and nuisance etc.

2. Introduction to valuation: Definitions and architect's role in preparation of valuation and dilapidation reports and certifications. Essential characteristics, classifications and purpose of classifications. Methods of valuation, standard and cost of construction.

3. Easements: Easements, various easement rights, architect's role in protecting easement rights.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Small Scale Project- Land & Building Valuation
 

1. Land & Building valuation methods and techniques.

2. Valuation of any size of land based on the market price & current price.

Text Books And Reference Books:

R1. Roshan, H. N. (2013) Professional Practice: With elements of Estimating, Valuation, Contract and Arbitration,

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Greenstreet , B. (1981) Legal and Contractual Procedures for Architects, Architectural Press, ISBN-10 0750654082

R2. Krishnamurthy K. G. & Ravindran, S.V. (2014) Professional Practice, PHI Learning, India.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total -50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in CIA.
  • The course shall have a written exam of three-hour duration.
  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC741C - APPLIED ART - PHOTOGRAPHY (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Develop graphic design work and concepts based on a series of professional creative approaches and techniques.

Design engaging art/film poster, magazine covers, magazine articles, book covers, and book chapter pages.

Study Market and Advertising, Study the relation between advertisement and another art form

Level of Knowledge: - Basic

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the design elements, principles and their application in design. Also able to explain the vocabulary of art and design constituted by elements and principles. Level: Basic

CO2: Able to explain visual meanings, and understand the relationship between art and design. Level: Basic

CO3: Understanding design as a discipline and its relationship to the environment/context. Level: Basic

CO4: Able to conceive an advanced level of design approach using advanced Editing and Rendering Software.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Application of Graphic Design
 

Physical and conceptual characteristics of Newspaper Ads and Magazine Ads, brochures etc. Develop Brand Concepts and Corporate Identity. Develop campaigns as well as individual advertisements. Design the ads for outdoor viewership. Understanding Graphic design inside and outside of buildings, signages etc.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:25
Photography as an art
 

Practice digital photography. Understand Advertising Photography, Industrial Photography, Fashion Photography, Wild Life Photography, Press/Journal Photography, Photo Documentation, and Photography as an Art. (Concentrate on any section according to interest and make a creative portfolio)

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:30
New Media in Art
 

Understanding the various media: Site-Specific Works, Issue-based Art, Environmental Art, Digital Art, Video Art, Documentary, Short Film, Clay Animation, Ad Film (Students can choose any one of the following and can also opt it as a group activity).

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
portfolio
 

Compilation of all works done at the studio for portfolio development

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Raizman, D. (2003) History of modern design: Graphics and products since the industrial revolution. Laurence King Publishing.

T2. Cross, N. (2011) Design thinking: Understanding how designers think and work. Berg.

T3. Anderson, P.V (2007) Technical Communication, New Delhi: Thomson Wadsworth, Sixth Edition.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

W1.www.nofilmschool.com
W2. www.dezeen.com
W3. www.film-english.com

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • Total CIA - 50 Marks 

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%

ARC742A - FOREIGN LANGUAGE - FRENCH (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course aims at developing the cultural competence of the student by introducing them to the French culture through its language. This introductory course would enable the student to read, understand and hold basic conservations in the French Language. The undertaking of certification courses in the French language is encouraged.

The objectives for this course are:

To enable the overall development of the student.

To introduce the students to the basics of the French language, speech, and culture. Emphasis is on the development of basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills.

To enable the students to comprehend and respond with grammatical accuracy to spoken and written French as well as demonstrate cultural awareness.

Course Outcome

CO1: Ability to comprehend the basics of the French language and the Francophone world. Level: Basic.

CO2: Ability to introduce oneself in the French language and understand the use of verbs. Level: Basic.

CO3: Ability to speak in French at work, and understand the conjugation of Verbs in ?er? in the French language. Level: Basic.

CO4: Ability to hold conservations about one?s hobbies and interests, and an understanding of how verbs are to be used in the future tense. Level: Basic.

CO5: Ability to speak about the daily activities, and understand how to use verbs in the past tense. Level: Basic

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Introduction to the Language
 

1. Brief on the French language, Similarities, and differences with English.

2. Introduction to French Alphabets.

3. Numbers 1- 20 & 21 – 100,

4. Greetings in French.

5. The days of the week and months of the year with the video practice.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Conversations - Level 1
 

1. Conversation en Français: Vous comprenez? ( Conversations in French: Do you understand?)

2. Grammaire: Conjugaison des verbes. ( Grammar: Conjugation of Verbs)

3. Vocabulaire: Les lieux de la ville. (Vocabulary: Places in a city)

4. Discours en continu: Se présentation a un group. (Continuous speech: Introducing yourself to a group)

5. Comprehension: Écrits de la rue. (Comprehension: Street writings)

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Conversations - Level 2
 

1. Conversations en français: Au travail. (Conversations in French: At work.)

2. Grammaire: Conjugaison verbes en « er » (Grammar: Verb conjugation in "er")

3. Vocabulaire: L’etat civil. (Vocabulary: Civil status)   

4. Discours en continu: Un pays, une ville. (Continuous speech: One country, one city )

5. Comprehension: Article de presse. (Understanding: Press article)

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Conversations - Level 3
 

1. Conversations en français: On se detend? (Conversations in French: Calm down.)

2. Grammaire: Futur proche. (Grammar: Near future) 

3. Vocabulaire: Les loisirs (sports, spectacles, activites) (Vocabulary: Leisure (sports, shows, activities)

4. Discours en continu: Parler de ses loisirs. (Continuous Speech: Talking about your hobbies.)

5. Comprehension: Cartes et message. (Understanding: Cards and messages)

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Conversations - Level 4
 

1. Conversations en français - Racontezmoi .(Conversations in French: Tell me) 

2. Grammair:: Passe compose, la date et l’heure. (Grammar: Past tense, date and time)   

3. Vocabulaire: Les moments de la journee. (Vocabulary: Moments of the day.)

4. Discours en continu: Raconter un emploi du temps passe. (Continuous speech: Telling a passing schedule)

5. Comprehension: Journal personnel. (Comprehension: Personal journal) 

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. ECHO A1 – Méthode de Français , 2 e Édition, J.Girardet / J. Pecheur, CLE International 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Alter Ego A1 - Méthode de Français, Catherine Hugot, Veronique M.Kizirian

Online Resources:

W1. https://www.thefrenchpodcast.com/

W2. http://www.bbc.co.uk/languages/french/

Evaluation Pattern

 The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks, as well as ESE marks, have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • Total CIA - 50 Marks (Follow the syllabus for respective course wise Marks)

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%

ARC742B - MUSIC (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course gives an overview of the western music through interdisciplinary means. The course aims to give the general learner a glimpse into the musical structures that underpin musical examples and generalise these into wider humanitarian themes. It is assumed that the general student has not encountered western music prior to this course.

Contextualize students to the development of the western tonal system.

Relate musical knowledge to personal and societal development.

Inform students of stylistic developments of each historical era of western tonal music.

Highlight prominent composers of any gender, creed, or nationality; outlining significant

contributions made throughout history.

 Contextualise students of the multidisciplinary aspects of western music

Course Outcome

CO1: Apply seminal insights from history to modern-day life.

CO2: Analyse the structural, cultural and thematic underpinnings of tonal music.

CO3: Analyse musical examples as reflections of non-musical concepts.

CO4: Justify meanings behind musical ideas using interdisciplinary methods.

CO5: Develop a learning portfolio featuring multidisciplinary musical connections.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:13
The Musical Phenomenon
 

1. Dimensions of Music; 2. Music, Language and Celebration

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:17
Individual Contexts
 

3. Music and the Brain; 4. Emotional Worlds: Impressionism and Expressionism; 5. Worldly Perspectives: Idealism, Realism and Extremism

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:13
Modern Musical Applications
 

6. Egalitarianism and Mathematics of Musical Structure; 7. Dissonance in Symmetry and Design

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:17
Larger Social Contexts
 

8. Roots, Community and Situated Identity; 9. Social Worlds: Folk Music, Nationalism and Globalism; 10. Global Villages: Cultural Conservation and Cross-Cultural Collaboration

Text Books And Reference Books:

Cowen, et al. (2020). What music makes us feel: At least 13 dimensions organise subjective experiences associated with music across different cultures. https://www.pnas.org/content/117/4/1924

Killin, A. (2018). The Origins of Music – Evidence, Theory and Prospects. Music and Science. Society for Education, Music and Psychology Research. Sage Publications.

Brandt, et. Al (2012). Music in Early Language Acquisition.

Beneficial Effects of Music Patterns on the Human Physiology.

Lundqvist et. Al (2009). Emotional responses to music: Experience, expression, and physiology

The relaxation effects of stimulating and sedative music on mathematics anxiety: A perception to physiology model

Psychology of Music and Language.

Ramon Fernandes, Vítor (2016). IDEALISM AND REALISM IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS: AN ONTOLOGICAL DEBATE. JANUS.NET, e-journal of International Relations, 7(2),14-25.[fecha de Consulta 2 de Julio de 2021]. https://www.redalyc.org/articulo.oa?id=413548516002

Ashton-Bell, RLT. (2019) On the Geometric Realization of Equal Tempered Music. Mapana Journal of Science. CHRIST (Deemed to be University). Bangalore: India.

Falakain, N. & Falakain, A. (2013). Study on the Relationship between Architecture and Music. J. Appl. Environ. Biol. Sci., 3(9)94-98, 2013. https://www.textroad.com/pdf/JAEBS/J.%20Appl.%20Environ.%20Biol.%20Sci.,%203(9)94-98,%202013.pdf

Singley, R L (2000). Roots: The Impact of Black Music on America and the World. Noteworthy – The Journal Blog. https://blog.usejournal.com/roots-the-impact-of-black-music-on-america-and-the-world-ed00824f7f13

Grew, S. (1921). National Music and the Folk-Song. The Musical Quarterly, 7(2), 172-185. Retrieved July 2,  2021 http://www.jstor.org/stable/738206

Kratochvil, M. (2015). “Our Song!” Nationalism in Folk Music Research and Revival in Socialist Czechoslovakia. Studia Musicologica 56. https://core.ac.uk/download/pdf/192670471.pdf

Inawat, R J. (2015). Music as Cultural Heritage: Analysis of the Means of Preventing the Exploitation of Intangible Cultural Heritage. 14 J. MARSHALL REV. INTELL. PROP. L. 228. https://repository.law.uic.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1350&context=ripl

Jacoby, et al. (2020). Cross-Cultural Work in Music Cognition: Challenges, Insights, and Recommendations. Music Perception: An Interdisciplinary Journal. 37. 185-195. 10.1525/mp.2020.37.3.185. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/339378902_Cross- Cultural_Work_in_Music_Cognition_Challenges_Insights_and_Recommendations

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1:Kanach, S. (2008). Music and Architecture – Architectural Projects, Texts, and Realizations. Boydell and Brewer.

R2: Trevarthen, Colwyn & Malloch, Stephen (Eds.) (2009). Communicative Musicality: Exploring the basis of human companionship, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Evaluation Pattern
 

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • Total CIA - 50 Marks 

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%

ARC751 - ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN VII (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:120
No of Lecture Hours/Week:8
Max Marks:300
Credits:12

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The studio would introduce the role of urban space as a public realm. It explores public space as an extension of the private domain and creates an architecture that is responsive to the urban context. The design project engages with multiple functions and stakeholders, inclusiveness, diversity, heritage and safety.

Nature of Projects: Sociocultural institutions, Urban Conservation, Safety, and help centers, Transit nodes and soft mobility, Waste recycling enterprise, etc.

The Course objectives will be:

  • To define, identify and map urban issues.
  • To understand the implications of various issues in urban design – socio-cultural, environmental, political, and technological.
  • To engage an appropriate design process towards sustainable resource management and the built environment in a city. 
  • To develop a responsive approach to the design of public space and architecture

Level of Knowledge: Intermediate

Course Outcome

CO1: Ability to observe, map and critique urban issues. Level: Intermediate

CO2: Ability to conduct field surveys and inclusive community-based study and design. Level: Basic

CO3: Ability to program ideate and develop a responsive design in the urban context. Level: Intermediate

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:16
The Urban Workshop
 

Introduction to exploratory processes, productions using different media and liberal arts to identify urban issues.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:16
Transect Mapping
 

Develop various transects through the area of study, using above productions to illustrate the challenges of urban spaces – geographical, hydrological, environmental, experiential, gender, mobility, language, normative.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:24
Urban Case Examples
 

Primary and secondary case examples that illustrate the similar scale and idea of public space in South Asia and internationally.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:24
Programmatic premise
 

Evolve interrelationships of functions and activity patterns, form and space, hierarchies, architectural response to site and programmatic premise of the case.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:24
Field surveys and mapping of the area of study
 

Experience and identify critical issues with regard to semi-public and public spaces using various techniques of mapping. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:24
Methods
 

Site walks and field surveys through both analog and software tools for field data collection and analysis. Workshops and lectures suggested for holistic understanding and knowledge of current discourses on the subject.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:24
Discourse on Urban Issues
 

Discourse on any one urban issue or a process of urban design such as public engagement or representations in urban design may be conducted through lectures, workshops or case studies; a critical review of the idea chosen; normative aspects of the same in design; Case visits and Literature review

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:24
Building based Case Studies
 

Related case studies of appropriate program which are an outcome of the public landscape study; i.e. civic, infrastructural, commercial, etc.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:56
Portfolio
 

An integrated portfolio of the research, workshop and design projects in the course of the studio needs to be developed. It can also correlate to their learning in Urban Design theory course.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:56
The Design Premise
 

An informed integration of program and specific site conditions for the design exploration; integration of services as a critical parameter.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:56
Process, Development and Demonstration of design
 

Working models and drawings; Conduct of public participatory meetings and Community outreach projects suggested.

Text Books And Reference Books:

R1. Lang J. (2017) Urban Design: A Typology of Procedures and Products, 2nd Edition, Routledge, ISBN 9781138188358

R2. Lynch K. (1971) Site Planning, MIT Press, ISBN-10 026212050X

R3. Vidiella A. S. (2016) Ephemeral architecture, Promopress, ISBN – 10 8415967705

R4. Hillier B. Hanson J. (1984) The social logic of Space, Cambridge University Press, ISBN 9780511597237, https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511597237

R5. Carmona M. Tiesdell S. Heath T. Oc T. (2012) Public Places Urban Spaces, The Dimensions of Urban Design (2nd Edition), Elsevier Ltd., ISBN–13: 978-1-85617827-3

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

W1. Urban Design Archives - Frameworks (berkeley.edu)

W2. Urban design Archives - De51gn

W3. Asia | urbanalyse

W4. URBAN DESIGN RESEARCH INSTITUTE, MUMBAI (udri.org)

W5. NIUA.org

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks. Attendance and participation in the studio would be considered in the evaluation-rubrics.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of a particular course
  • CIA -1- 25 Marks; CIA -2 - 50 Marks; CIA -3 - 75 Marks; Total - 150 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 150 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC752 - URBAN DESIGN (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The studio-based course introduces the field of Urban Design, a thorough understanding of urban form, urban & public space, and its placemaking; it delves into contemporary urban issues and challenges prevalent in the urban environment. The course introduces representation and mapping techniques, suggested by undertaking site study at any of the scales of the street, the neighborhood, the public space. The course introduces urban theories for an understanding of the urban realm.

 

        To understand the evolution of urban form in history & contemporary time, and through the study of urban morphology.

        To understand, study and analyze contemporary urban issues and their resolution through urban design and place-making through case analyses.

        To learn representation and mapping techniques of the urban realm.

        To introduce urban theories in the urban form and other aspects of the urban realm

Suggested methods of engagement through student presentations, mapping, poster, or essay paper.

Course Outcome

CO1: Ability to comprehend and analyse urban and public space design and the evolution of urban form. Level: Intermediate

CO2: Ability to comprehend and analyse urban movements; comprehend, differentiate & analyse urban morphology through mapping methods. Level: Intermediate

CO3: Ability to comprehend, appreciate, evaluate and critique urban theories and contemporary urban issues. Level: Intermediate

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:25
Introduction to Urban Design and Evolution of Urban form
 

Introduction to the field of urban design and concerns of the field. Introduction to Public Space design and placemaking, nature and typologies of public places, (through case analyses)

Evolution of urban form in history through examples of urban spaces from early & medieval towns, temple towns, renaissance, baroque, colonial towns, urban renewals and extensions of the nineteenth century such as Haussmannization. (of the western and eastern world)

Understanding urban process, rise and fall of cities, destruction due to war and calamities.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:25
Urban Movements and Urban Morphology
 

Early cities of Capitalism, City Beautiful movement, Modern Movement, Garden cities. Urban Morphology: representation and mapping techniques of the urban realm such as streets, neighbourhood, public spaces, city edge, walled edge, meeting the water, the periphery and the open city. Mapping such as figure ground, sensory and transect mapping is suggested.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:25
Introduction to Urban Theories
 

Introduction to urban theories such as, Kevin Lynch’s ideas of Image of the City, Good City Form, Normative theory and alternative theoretical postulations, Jane Jacobs, Jan Gehl.

Urbanism perspectives on gender, universally accessible and equitable spaces, childfriendly cities, participatory approaches to community design; Art, symbolic aesthetics in civic design.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Bacon, E. N. (1976) Design of Cities, Penguin Books.

T2. Kostof, S. (1991) The City Shaped: Urban Patterns and Meanings Through History. Bulfinch.

T3. Kostof, S., & Castillo, G. (1999) The City Assembled: The elements of Urban Form through History, Thames and Hudson.

T4. Morris, A. E. (1994) History of Urban Form: Before the Industrial Revolutions, Longman Scientific & Technical.

T5. Lang, Jon. (2005) Urban Design: A Typology of Procedures and Products, Oxford, United Kingdom: Architectural Press.

T6. Lynch, K. (1984). Good city form. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press.

T7. Lynch, K. (1960). The Image of The City. Cambridge: MIT Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Lang, J. (1987) Creating Architectural Theory, New York: Van-Nostrand Reinhold.

R2. Broadbent, G. (2003) Emerging concepts in urban space design, London: Taylor & Francis, ISBN 9780203362167

R3. Lynch, K. (1972). What Time Is This Place. Masschussetts: MIT Press.

R4. Hall P. (2014) Cities of Tomorrow, Wiley Blackwell Publications.

R5. Gallion A. B. (2003), Urban Pattern, John Wiley & Sons; 5th Edition.

R6. Mostafavi M. & Doherty G. (2016) Ecological Urbanism, Switzerland: Lars Muller Publishers.

R7. Calvino, I. (1978) Invisible Cities, New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.

R8. Bally Meeda, N. P. (2007) Graphics for Urban Design, Thomas Telford.

R9. Cliff Moughtin, R. C. (2003) Urban Design: Methods and techniques. Elsevier

R10. Amoroso, N. (2010) The Exposed City: Mapping the Urban Invisibles. Taylor & Francis.

R11. Kitto. H. D. F. (1951) The Polis: The City Reader. Routledge.

R12. Kotkin, J. (2005) The City: A Global History, Modern Library.

R13. Spreiregen, P. D. (1965) Urban Design: The Architecture of Towns and Cities, McGraw-Hill.

R14. Castells, M. (1978.) City, Class and Power (Sociology, politics & cities) (Palgrave Macmillan).

R15. Barnett, J. (1974), Urban Design as Public Policy, McGraw-Hill Inc., US.

R16. Barnett, J. (1982), Introduction to Urban Design, Icon (Harpe); 1st edition.

R17. Jacob, A. (1980) Making City Planning Work, American Planning Association.

R18. Phadke S. (2011). Why Loiter? Women and Risk on Mumbai Streets, India: Penguin Random House.

R19. Elkin, L. (2016) Flaneuse: Women walk the city in Paris, New York, Tokyo, Venice and London, London, Penguin Random House UK.

R20. ITDP & EPC (2011) Better Streets Better Cities: A Guide to Street Design in Urban India, Institute for Transport and Development Policy.

R21. Shah, S., Goswami, S., Rangawala L., King, R., Das H., & Suri A. (2014), Safe Access Manual: Safe access to mass transit stations in Indian cities, Bangalore; EMBARQ India.

Online Resources:

W1. Government of India, “URDPFI Guidelines”, 2014.

W2. MOOC courses on Coursera, NPTEL, Edx.

W3.  MIT Open Courseware - Theory of City Form Series (4.241J; Spring 2013) by Julian Beinart; (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k2_wuThLG6o)

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment the pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks, as well as ESE marks, have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • Total CIA - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%

ARC753 - BUILDING INFORMATION MODELLING (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To be able to work in a 3-dimensional BIM environment and create 3D models of construction assemblies and buildings; to be able to use BIM compatibility-based tools to solve technical issues (fabrication, energy efficiency, lighting, structural, etc.) collaboration and managing the project workflow teams( Architecture, civil, Construction, MEP, Plant, Structural ) and automation during the planning process.

Course Outcome

CO1: To create parametric building information model and extract data; create construction documents, material take-off?s and building schedules and Performance analysis.

CO2: To comprehend Autodesk Revit as an example of a parametric BIM building information modelling software.

CO3: Ability to create, process and manage BIM objects and Models, Specification Estimation, Rendering and Presenting.

CO4: To collaborate the project workflow with the team in building process (Architecture, civil, Construction, MEP, Plant, Structural) Level: Advanced

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Detailed Study
 

1. Principles of BIM and application cases.

2. 3D BIM modelling (Revit): Detailed 3D modelling for Architecture planning, Engineering, and construction.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:24
Working with BIM
 

1. Working with BIM models: Estimating & material take-off (the power of data and parameters in Revit; Clash detection and interoperability (Revit and Navisworks); 3D scanning and modelling from point clouds (Real works) Analysis (Insight), BIM 360 Cloud.

2. BIM Object Creation: Using Revit, Recap pro and Revit Live, Format Pro for 3D Sketching, Analysis of BIM model for various parameters Design, planning, structural, Rendering, walkthroughs / Show Reel creation.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:16
Term Work
 

BIM term project - Complete 3D modelling covering all aspects of BIM.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Portfolio
 

Portfolio development - To organize and review all works done in the semester. To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject. Establish connections with other subjects where possible.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Eastman, C. M., Liston, K., Teicholz, P. & Sacks R. (2008) BIM Handbook: A Guide to Building Information Modeling for Owners, Managers, Designers, Engineers and Contractors, John Wiley & Son.

T2. Hardin, B. & McCool D. (2009) BIM and Construction Management: Proven Tools, Methods, and Workflows, Wiley, ISBN: 978-1-118-94276-5.

T3. Deutsch, R. (2011) BIM and Integrated Design – Strategies for Architectural Practice, John Wiley & Sons, ISBN: 978-0-470-57251-1.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Stine, D. J. (2020) Commercial Design Using Autodesk Revit, SDC Publications, ISBN-10 1630572489.

R2. UMass Library e-books.

R3. Yori, R., Kim, M. & Kirby, L. (2020) Mastering Autodesk Revit Architecture, John Wiley & Sons, ISBN: 978-1-119-57022-6.

R4. Tickoo, S. (2014) Autodesk Revit Architecture for Architects & Designers, Cadcim Technologies, ISBN-10 1936646714

R6. Stine, D. J. (2019) Introduction to Residential Design Using Autodesk Revit, SDC Publications, ISBN- 10 163057256X

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks, as well as ESE marks, has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • Total CIA -50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%

ARC831 - PROJECT AND CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To Introduce the Fundamentals of Project and Construction Management in Architectural Projects. Level of Knowledge: Basic

Course Outcome

CO1: To describe the various aspects of phased construction, the prevalent techniques of planning, programming, and management of construction projects. To demonstrate the use of computers for solving inventory, scheduling, and other issues related to construction and management. Level: Advanced

CO2: To demonstrate brief exercises on techniques of project planning. To describe construction equipment, safety measures, and management at the site; Level: Intermediate.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Project and Construction Management
 

1. Role of Architect, Consultants, and Contractor in decision making in project management. Introduction to the sequence of construction activity and method of planning and programming, human aspects of the project management, Project.

2. Planning and project scheduling and project controlling. Event, activity, dummy, network rules, graphical guidelines for network, the numbering of events.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Construction problems
 

1. CPM network analysis & PERT time estimates, time computation & network analysis

2. Project optimum duration, contracting the network for cost optimization, steps in cost-time optimization. Managing men, money, machines and materials. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Project cost reduction and value engineering
 

1. Project cost, Indirect project cost, direct project cost, the slope of the direct cost curve, total project cost.

2. Project updating and Resource allocation: When to update? Data required for updating, steps in the process of updating resource allocation, Resource usage profile: Histogram, Resource smoothing, and Resource leveling.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Types of Machinery and Construction safety and management
 

1. Types of equipment used in construction. Trucks, hoisting machines, RMC carriers, formwork, shoring material, concrete mixers, etc. Maintenance and optimal use after purchase.

2. Safety Measures and management: Integrating workers' safety and material security into management.

3. Computer applications in Project Management: Introduction to use of computers for solving inventory, scheduling, and other issues related to construction and management.

4. Billing requirement: Role of the project manager in monitoring the specifications follow-up for quality control, the measurement book (MB), RA bills, interim and final checking, and certification of works on site based on the BOQ and terms of contracts 

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Chandrasekaran, A., Shasthri, S. Lakshmisekhar, G. (2009) Road to Success - Project Management: Project Management - PMP Courseware, Info career Pvt Ltd.

T2. Naik, B. M. (1984) Project Management: Scheduling and Monitoring by PERT/CPM, Vani Educational Books, ISBN 0706926315

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Punmia, B. C., Project planning and control with -PERT and CPM, New Delhi: Laxmi Publications.

R2. Mukhopadyay, S. P. (1974) Project management for Architect's and civil Engineers, HT, Kharagpur.

R3. Jerome D.Wiest J. D. & Levy, F. K. (1982) A Management Guide to PERT/CPM, with GERT/PDM/DCPM, New Delhi: Prentice-Hall India Learning Private Limited.

R4. Burgess, R.A. & White, G. (1979) Building production and project management, London: The construction press.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total - 50 Marks (Follow the syllabus for respective course wise Marks)

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in CIA.
  • The course shall have a written exam of a three-hour duration.
  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC832 - ENTREPRENEURSHIP SKILLS OF ARCHITECTS (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The lecture course focuses on providing the knowledge, skills and develops a positive attitude towards self-employment, and provides the knowledge through case studies, theories and models, and strategies that are experimented with and tested for creating real-time business models for architecture and allied fields.▪ Develops motivation, reinforces entrepreneurial traits and the spirit of enterprise as an entrepreneur.

▪ Overview of the decision-making process for setting-up of a new enterprise and entrepreneurship.

▪ Overview facilitates the successful and profitable operation of the enterprise.

Level of Knowledge: - Intermediate 

Course Outcome

CO1: To perform readings and give a verbal presentation to summarize the content.

CO2: To study critical, industry innovations and give a verbal and visual presentation.

CO3: To understand the challenges associated with the enterprise to run as an entrepreneur.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
General concept of entrepreneurship
 

1. Introduction: ▪ Describe how Entrepreneurship has developed -The general evolution of entrepreneurship, ▪ Define the term Entrepreneurship - Definition of entrepreneurship from different perspectives, Reason to entrepreneurship should be developed. ▪ Outline the importance of entrepreneurship - Enhances creativity and innovation, Builds self-confidence in people, Employment generation, Increased national production, Reinvesting national resources, etc.

2. Characteristics of entrepreneurship: Risk-taking, need to achieve, Innovation and creativity, Opportunity Orientation, etc. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Factors that affect the development of entrepreneurial spirit in people
 

▪ Factors that affect the development of entrepreneurial spirit in people - Environment (immediate family and friends), community, national, international, Financial Displacement, etc.

▪ The role of the Government, Society, Families and friends, and other stakeholders for example, financial institutions play in the development of entrepreneurship in the country.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Leadership, Social Entrepreneurship and Enterprise/ Practice
 

Leadership, Social Entrepreneurship, and Enterprise/ Practice

▪ Describe the types of social entrepreneurship in details and their importance and advantages at society and national level, describe the employment, state the advantage and disadvantage of wage and self-employment,

▪ Self-employment Regain lost image, Exercise control over the business.

▪ Comparison of social entrepreneurship and corporate entrepreneurship and advancement from small scale to a larger scale: Small business/ enterprise - State the characteristics of social enterprise/ business and corporate businesses, Characteristics of social and corporate businesses, - Labour intensive, capital outlay

▪ Challenges/problems facing social and small businesses - Financing, Access to markets, Government policies, Inadequate managerial skills, etc

▪ The major environmental factor that affects business include: Culture and tradition, Political, Economic, Technology, Competition, Natural environment, Legal

Note: Topical Outline (include a percentage of time in the course spent in each subject area): Entrepreneur and Innovation Discussions / Lectures (70%Verbal & Visual Presentation Skills (30%)

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Books: N.A.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Tabe N. & Giriappa S. (2013) Entrepreneurship Development In India: Emergence From Local To Global Business Leadership, Kalpaz Publications, ISBN: 9788178359892.

R2. APO (2007) Entrepreneurship Development for Competitive Small and Medium Enterprises. Asian Productivity Organization

R3. Audretsch, D. B., Tamvada, J. P. & Keilbach, M. C. (eds.) (2008) Sustaining Entrepreneurship and Economic Growth: Lessons in Policy and Industry Innovations from Germany and India, Spain: Springer, ISBN 978-0-387-78695-7

R4. Phan, P. H., Venkataraman, S. & Velamuri, S. R. (2008) Entrepreneurship in Emerging Regions Around the World: Theory, Evidence and Implications, Edward Elgar Publishing, ISBN: 978 1 84720 800 2

R5. Adair J. (2007) Develop your Leadership Skills, London and Philadelphia: Kogan Page Limited.

Evaluation Pattern
 

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in CIA.
  • The course shall have a written exam of a three-hour duration.
  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC841A - ARCHITECTURAL CONSERVATION (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course objectives:

● To understand architectural conservation theory, its evolution and philosophy through history of conservation.

● To analyze the value of architectural heritage.

● To have an understanding of the theoretical aspects and practical implications of architectural conservation. Suggestion: Engage in site visits/documentation of heritage & conservation projects.

Course Outcome

CO1: Sensitization towards the need to conserve architectural heritage. Level: Basic

CO2: Theoretical knowledge for research and documentation of architectural heritage. Level: Intermediate

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Conservation
 

Architectural Conservation - Definitions UNESCO, ASI, Understanding Heritage. Types of Heritage: Cultural heritage, Natural heritage, Built heritage.

History: Beginning of the Conservation movement - Contributions of John Ruskin & William Morris, - Romantic and scientific conservation. Formation of SPAB. Ethics of Conservation practice. Authenticity & Integrity in Conservation practice.

Suggested: To review State of Art theory for further inclusion.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Agencies Involved in conservation
 

Agencies involved and their role in conservation - ICCROM, ICOMOS, UNESCO- World Heritage Sites, Selection criteria, Endangered heritage and sites, ASI, State departments of Archaeology, Town Planning departments, State Art and Heritage Commission & INTACH.

Charters such as Athens charter for the Restoration of Historic Monuments (1931), International Charter for the Conservation and Restoration of Monuments and Sites (Venice Charter 1964).

Suggested: To review State of Art theory for further inclusion.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Traditional Building Construction and causes of decay in materials & structures
 

Historic building materials and construction techniques with reference to South and North of India.

Building Deterioration - Causes of decay in materials and structure – Climatic causes – Thermal movements, rain, frost, snow, moisture, and wind. Botanical, biological and microbiological causes such as Animals, birds, insects, fungi, moulds, lichens. Natural disasters – Fire, earthquakes, flood,

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:20
Technique of Conservation
 

Preparatory procedures for conservation. Identification of the ‘values’ in the object, monument or site:- ‘emotional’, ‘cultural’ and ‘use’ values. Inventories, Initial inspections - Documentation - Research, Analysis and recording (Reports). Seven Degrees of intervention - Prevention of deterioration, Preservation, Consolidation, Restoration, Rehabilitation, Reproduction, Reconstruction. Guidelines for preservation, rehabilitation and adaptive re-use of historic structures- Case studies

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1: Fielden B. M. (2003) Conservation of Historic Buildings, Architectural Press.

T2: Ashurst, J. & Dimes, F.G. (1990) Conservation of Building and Decorative Stone, London: Butterworth- Heinemann.

T3: Jokilehto, J. (1999) A History of Architectural Conservation, London: Butterworth – Heinemann.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1: Chapagain, N. K. & Silva K. D. (2013) Asian Heritage Management - Contexts, Concerns, and Prospects, 1st Edition, Routledge Contemporary Asia Series, New York, USA: Taylor & Francis Group.

R2: ICOMOS (1993) Earthen Architecture: The conservation of brick and earth structures: A handbook.

R3: John Nicola Ashurst (2012) English heritage: Practical Building Conservation: Stone Vol. I to V, Routledge, ISBN 9780754645528

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total -50

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in CIA.
  • The course shall have a written exam of three-hour duration.
  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC841D - BUILDING PERFORMANCE AND COMPLIANCE (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To introduce the knowledge required for an understanding Building performance assessment and energy simulation tools, understanding of National Building Code (NBC) and Energy Conservation Building Code (ECBC) of India to provide minimum requirements for energy-efficient design and construction of buildings. Course objectives are;

  • To understand various compliance approaches
  • Building Envelope; Comfort Systems; Lighting systems
  • Electrical and renewable energy systems

Course Outcome

CO1: Knowledge of building codes of India to provide minimum requirements for energy-efficient design and construction of buildings. Level: Basic

CO2: An understanding of tools and software currently in practice with respect to the energy-efficient building design and energy performance evaluation for buildings in India. Level: Intermediate

CO3: Knowledge of alternative energy compliance approaches and understanding of Building Envelope, Electrical, and renewable energy systems in design. Level: Basic

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Building performance assessment and energy simulation tools
 

Analyze and create a building using interactive modeling software, analyze sun path, solar exposure, building orientation, daylight, and energy calculation simulation.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Understanding NBC and ECBC of India
 

Overview and parameters for building codes of India to provide minimum requirements for energy-efficient design and construction of buildings such as the National Building Code (NBC) and Energy Conservation Building Code (ECBC) of India.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Introduction to Energy Compliance Approaches
 
  • Building Envelope
  • Comfort Systems
  • Lighting systems
  • Electrical and renewable energy systems
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Portfolio development
 
  • To organize and review all works done in the semester.
  • To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject. 
Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. BEE (2009) Energy Conservation Building Code. User Guide.

T2. IGBC (2011) LEED 2011 For India - Green Building Rating System.

T3. Watson D. (1983) Climate Design: Energy Efficient Building principles and practices”, New York: McGraw Hill Book Company,

T4. Preiser Wolfgang F. E. P. & Vischer, J. C. (2004) “Assessing Building performance, London: Elsevier limited.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1.Bansal N., K., Hauser G. & Gernot M. (1994) Passive Buildings Design: A Hand book of Natural Climatic Control”, Amsterdam: Elsevier Science.

R2.Goulding, J., R., Lewis, O. J. & Steemers, T. C. (1986) Energy in Architecture, London: Bastford Ltd.

R3. Koenigsberger, O. H. (1975). Manual of Tropical Housing & Building, Orient Blackswan.

R4. Majumdar M. (2000) Energy-efficient Building in India, TERI Press. R5. Yeang, K. & Spector, A. (2011) Green design: from theory to practice, Black Dog.

Online Resources:

W1.www. beeindia.gov.in

W2.NPTEL and edX Courses 

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total - 50 Marks.

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in CIA.
  • The course shall have a written exam of a three-hour duration.
  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC842A - FOREIGN LANGUAGE - II (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course aims to further develop the cultural competence of the student by familiarizing them further with the basics of the French language. This course would further enable the student to read, understand and hold conservations in the French Language. The undertaking of certification courses in the French language is encouraged. The objectives for this course are:

1. To enable the overall development of the student.

2. To familiarize the students further with the basics of the French language, speech, and culture. Further emphasis is on the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills.

3. To enable the students to comprehend and respond with grammatical accuracy to spoken and written French as well as demonstrate cultural awareness.

Level of Knowledge: Intermediate

Course Outcome

CO1: Ability to understand the influence of the French language, and interpret common sayings in the French language. Level: Intermediate.

CO2: Ability to speak about a trip and understand the usage of adjectives in the French Language. Level: Intermediate

CO3: Ability to have a conversation on food and understand the use of articles in the French language. Level: Intermediate

CO4: Ability to understand conjugations in the French language and speak about daily activities. Level: Intermediate

CO5: Ability to use prepositions and adverbs of place in the French language and hold conversations in describing new places. Level: Intermediate

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:3
Unit 1
 

Summarization of the French learnt thus far.

1. Numbers above 100

2. French words in other languages and words borrowed into French.

3. Common phrases and maxims in French. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Unit 2
 

1. Conversation en Français: Bon voyage! Grammaire: Comparaison, Adjectifs démonstratifs, Adjectifs possessifs. 1. Conversation in French: Have a nice trip! Grammar: Comparison, Demonstrative adjectives, Possessive adjectives;

2. Vocabulaire: Les voyages, Les transports  2. Vocabulary: Travel, Transport.

3. Discours en continu: Présenter les avantages et les inconvénients d’une activité 3. Continuous Speech: Presenting the Pros and Cons of an activity 

4. Comprehension: Article de presse Relation d’un événement; 4. Understanding: Press article Relating an event

5. Écriture: Récit des circonstances d’un voyage; 5. Writing: Account of the circumstances of a trip

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Unit 3
 

1. Conversations en français: Bon appétit! 1. Conversations in French: Enjoy your meal! 

 2. Grammaire: Articles partitifs, Emploi des articles, Interrogation 2. Grammar: Partitive articles, Use of articles, Query

3. avec inversion 3. with inversion

4. Vocabulaire: La nourriture, Les repas, La fête 4. Vocabulary: Food, Meals, Party

5. Discours en continu: Extrait de guide touristique  5. Continuous speech: Extract from tourist guide

6. Comprehension: Extrait de guide touristique: restaurants originaux à bangalore 6. Comprehension: Extract from tourist guide: Original restaurants in Bengaluru 

7. Écriture: Se présenter sur un site internet. 7. Writing: Presenting yourself on a site internet

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Unit 4
 

1. Conversations en français: Quelle journée! 1. Conversations in French: What a day!

2. Grammaire: La conjugaison Pronominale, L’impératif 2. Grammar: Pronominal conjugation, Imperative

3. Vocabulaire: Les activités quotidiennes, Les achats, l’argent 3. Vocabulary: Daily activities, Shopping, money

4. Discours en continu: Raconter sa journée. 4. Continuous speech: Telling your day.

5. Comprehension: Extrait d’un guide touristique: les activités gratuities au Inde 5. Comprehension: Extract from a tourist guide: free activities in India.

6. Écriture: Rédaction d’un bref document d’information.  6. Writing: Writing a brief information documen

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Unit 5
 

1.Conversations en français - Qu’on est bien ici! 1. Conversations in French - We are well here!

2.Grammair:: Prépositions et adverbes de lieu. 2. Grammair: Prepositions and adverbs of place.

3.Vocabulaire: Le lodgement, La localisation, L’orientation, L’état physique, Le temps qu’il fait 3. Vocabulary: Accommodation, Location, Orientation, Physical condition, The weather

4.Discours en continu: Parler d’un cadre de vie (lieu – climat – etc.), Décrire son logement 4. Continuous speech: Talk about a living environment (place - climate - etc.), Describe your accommodation 

5.Comprehension: Lettre ou carte postale (nouveau logement et nouveau cadre de vie) 5. Understanding: Letter or postcard (new housing and new living environment)

6.Écriture: Rédaction d’une carte ou d’un message de vacances. 6. Writing: Writing a holiday card or message

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. ECHO A1 – Méthode de Français , 2 e Édition, J.Girardet / J. Pecheur, CLE International 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Alter Ego A1 - Méthode de Français, Catherine Hugot, Veronique M.Kizirian

Online Resources:

W1. https://www.thefrenchpodcast.com/

W2. http://www.bbc.co.uk/languages/french/

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • Total CIA - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE a score of 40%

ARC842D - VIRTUAL REALITY AND DIGITAL DRAWING SKILLS IN ARCHITECTURE (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course objectives:

To apply knowledge of Tilt Brush in the development of artwork; To use drawing and design skill to visually communicate abstract concepts with Tilt Brush; To observe data, and transform it into graphical drawings.

Course Outcome

CO1: To repeat what has been taught that enables in constructing great designs. Level: Basic

CO2: To express their learning and creativity which will enable them to make amazing immersive artworks. Level: Basic

CO3: To practice the different elements of design in order to produce the best designs. Level: Basic

CO4: To experiment its different techniques that will equip them with the knowledge to create stunning designs and illustrations. Level: Intermediate

CO5: To design, model, and draw their own artwork using Virtual Reality Tilt Brush. Level: Basic

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to Virtual Reality
 

1. Introduction to Virtual Reality

2. History of Virtual Reality

3. Use of VR equipment Demonstration

4. Warning

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:18
Elements of Design
 

● Describing the definition of elements of design

● Demonstrating them how to creatively use the elements of design using VR tilt brush.

● Assigning them to draw with elements of design using VR tilt brush

● Giving tasks to create own work with elements of design using VR Tilt Brush

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Principles of Design
 

● Describing the definition of the principles of design

● Demonstrating them how to creatively use the principles of design using VR tilt brush. Assigning them to draw with principles of design using VR tilt brush

● Giving tasks to create own work with principles of design using VR Tilt Brush

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Final project
 

Final project

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Bertol, D. (1996). Designing digital space: an architect's guide to virtual reality. John Wiley & Sons

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Mihelj, M., Novak, D., & Beguš, S. (2014). Virtual reality technology and applications

R2. W1Jerald, J. (2015). The VR book: Human-centered design for virtual reality. Morgan & Claypool

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • Total CIA -50

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%

ARC851 - ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN VIII (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:90
No of Lecture Hours/Week:6
Max Marks:300
Credits:9

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The studio emphasizes, areas of research; program development; definition of user needs; comprehensive site analysis of the context; introducing complex projects that serve a community, towards an appropriate architectural design.

The project will be centered on an architectural design premise, which may be Type driven, Issue driven, or Process-driven project.

Type-driven projects include Urban Design, Housing, Structures in architecture, etc. Issue-driven projects surround issues regarding, environmental, socio-cultural, political, gender empowerment, etc.

Process-driven projects include explorations on materials and appropriate technologies, public participatory processes, etc.

To bring a variety of emphasis the studio could be planned around smaller groups engaging with different contexts.

The Course Objectives are:

● To research, document, and develop a complex and comprehensive architectural design project.

● To develop a design premise, process, and a detailed and comprehensive design solution. Level of Knowledge: Intermediate 

Course Outcome

CO1: Ability to identify, comprehend and define the phenomenon in the built environment, as design variables and develop an architectural programmatic premise.Level: Basic

CO2: Ability to map, communicate and conduct field surveys, analysis, participatory processes of community-based study and design, etc. Level: Intermediate

CO3: Ability to integrate the identified design variables in the design solution. Level: Intermediate

CO4: Ability to gather, innovate and apply indigenous knowledge and strategies in the design solution. Level: Basic

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:18
Identifying area of enquiry
 

Selection of a topic: Initiate processes to identify key areas of enquiry; Type, Issue and Process Defining the area of enquiry: A detailed study, mapping and documentation of the existing resources and publications on the selected area of interest; defining the project.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:27
Discourse on the special topic
 

Discourse on the special topic: A critical review of the topic chosen, it's normative aspects, case visits, and literature review defending the topic chosen as a critical design parameter

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:36
Surveys, Programmatic premise and Design
 

Literature and Field surveys of a case selected: Experience and identify critical issues within the defined area of inquiry; develop patterns and typologies of spatial, experiential, and historical narratives, ideas of innovation.

Methods: Define methods of conducting focused research.

Programmatic premise: Evolve interrelationships of functions and activity patterns, form and space, hierarchies, probable spatial response to the site, and programmatic premise of the case.

Design detail demonstration: Identification of design detail demonstration - type based; Identification of issue-based built environment definition; Identification of process-based design stages.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Portfolio Development
 

Portfolio Development: Guidelines for documentation and demonstration of addressing urban issues, types, and processes in various design stages. Design Representation, 3D design modeling, Costing, EIA mitigation, Stakeholder Identification, Presentation to the community, etc.

Text Books And Reference Books:

N.A.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Vidiella A. S. (2016) Ephemeral architecture, Promopress, ISBN – 10 8415967705

R2. Hillier B. Hanson J. (1984) The social logic of Space, Cambridge University Press, ISBN 9780511597237, https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511597237

R3. Carmona M. Tiesdell S. Heath T. Oc T. (2012) Public Places Urban Spaces, The Dimensions of Urban Design (2nd Edition), Elsevier Ltd., ISBN–13: 978-1-85617827-3

Online Resources:

W1. National Building Code - Bureau of Indian Standards (bis.gov.in)

W2. EIA-Manual.pdf (iisd.org)

W3. https://www.nfpa.org

W4. URDPFI Guidelines: Ministry of Urban Development (mohua.gov.in)

W5. Guidelines: SMART CITIES MISSION, Government of India

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks, as well as ESE marks, has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks. Attendance and participation in the studio would be considered in the evaluation rubrics.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of a particular course
  • CIA -1- 25 Marks; CIA -2 - 50 Marks; CIA -3 - 75 Marks; Total - 150 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 150 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC881 - DISSERTATION SEMINAR (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is designed to support students in developing their research project, and to assist them in defining their mode of enquiry in architecture. The course has been constructed to guide students through a range of issues and considerations, which should inform their general approach to research.

It outlines principles of research, information sources, research question, research design, and research methodology commonly employed in architecture; data collection, data analysis, presentation of research proposals, and written dissertation reports. It also outlines the use of language, use of software, plagiarism, and writing the research document.

The course will have lectures on research, followed by the studio which will frame and develop the individual research questions of students. The research question could be related to the thesis topic.

Course objectives are:

Introduction to various types of research in architecture.

To develop an individual research project of students based on their interests.

Level of Knowledge: - Intermediate

Course Outcome

CO1: Ability to comprehend the components, types, and methods adopted in architectural research; Level: Basic

CO2: Ability to write a research proposal/term paper/dissertation report/research poster to demonstrate the knowledge of research and research writing. Level: Intermediate

CO3: Ability to be aware of plagiarism, and demonstration of original writing. Level: Intermediate

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Introduction to Dissertation, Research Project, Critical Thinking and Enquiry
 

Introduction to Research: General approaches to research; principles of research; Types of research; research question.

Introduction to Dissertation: Approaches to architectural dissertation and modes of research in architecture.

Introduction to Critical thinking and enquiry (Studio): Lectures and class participatory assignments related to application of critical thinking, logical argumentation, bias identification, etc.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Introduction to Research Design, Data Collection and Analysis and Developing a research project
 

Research Design: Principles of research, information sources, research design and research methodology commonly employed in architecture. 

Data collection and data analysis (Studio): Types of data, methods of collection and analysis. Arriving at inferences and conclusion through data analysis.

Identify & Develop a Research Project/Question (Studio): Defining the research question; Defining the mode of enquiry; developing a research design for the selected enquiry based on the understanding gained from the processes involved in architectural research.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:35
Research Proposal
 

Research writing and its components; research proposal writing and its components; use of language, use of software, plagiarism, and writing the research document.

Dissertation Report/Research Poster /Term Paper Writing (Studio): Completion of compilation and writing of a research document (research report/term paper/Research Poster) for the selected topic of dissertation. Preparation of additional resources for viva voce.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Books:

T1. Groat L. & Wang D. (2002) Architectural Research Methods. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

T2. Kothari C. R. (2004) Research Methodology: Methods & Techniques, New Age International (P) Limited Publishers. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reference Books:

R1. Sommer R. & Sommer B. (2002) A Practical Guide to Behavioural Research: Tools and Techniques. New York: The Oxford University Press.

R2. Henry S. (1991) Visual Research Methods in Design. New York: Van Nostrand

R3. Reinhold, J. & Creswell, W. (2003) Research Design: Qualitative, Quantitative, and Mixed Method Approaches, 2nd Edition. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

R4. 1. Huff, D. (1954). How to Lie with Statistics. New York: W. W. Norton & Company.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks, as well as ESE marks, has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks. Attendance and participation in the studio would be considered in the evaluation rubrics.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of a particular course
  • Total - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%

ARC981 - PRACTICAL TRAINING (2017 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:0
No of Lecture Hours/Week:0
Max Marks:400
Credits:12

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course objectives:

To participate in and be exposed to the various facets of design architectural practice through internship under an architect.

Course Outcome

CO1:

To learn and practice the professional skill set required to practice as an Architect. Level: Intermediate

CO2:

To prepare and communicate the nature of professional training undergone through a practical training report.

Level: Intermediate

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:0
Training Report
 

The student is expected to be exposed to preparation of working drawing, detailing, preparation of architectural models, computer applications in design and drafting, filing system in respect of documents, drawing and preparation of tender documents. Site experience may be given in respect of supervision of the construction activity, observing the layout on site, study of the stacking methods of various building materials, study of taking measurement and recording. 

Students will have to maintain a day to day record of their engagement for the period of training. This will be recorded in an authorized diary to be counter signed by the architect at the end of each month and the same diary shall be sent to the department once in a month. At the end of the training period, a student will have to produce a certificate of experience and satisfactory performance from the concerned office in the prescribed format. 

The viva-voice marks shall be awarded based on the following works to be submitted by the student and presented during the viva.

1. Training Report: This shall contain copies of various drawings done by the student either drafted or designed. It shall also contain other works like photographs of sites visited, models done, computer output produced etc.,

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:0
Building Study
 

This shall be a detailed critical study of a building designed by the architect with whom the student has worked. It shall include the study of function, aesthetics, context, structure etc., This shall be presented through drawings, photographs, write ups etc.,

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:0
Building Material Study
 

This shall be a detailed study of a new or relatively new building material available in the marked. A study of its properties, uses, cost, maintenance etc., is expected to be done. Samples of materials shall also be obtained and presented.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:0
Detailing study
 

This shall be a study of any interesting detail done in the firm where the student has undertaken training. This shall include sketches and photographs of the detail.

Text Books And Reference Books:

R1. Namavathi R. (2016) Professional Practice : With Elements of Estimating, Valuation, Contract and Arbitration, Lakhani Book Depot, ISBN-10 9385492667

R2. Krishnamurthy, K. G. & Ravindra S.V. (2013) Professional Practice, India: PHI Learning.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Nil

Evaluation Pattern

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 100%

  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 400 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum ESE score of 45%.

ARC1051 - ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN THESIS (2017 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:150
No of Lecture Hours/Week:10
Max Marks:500
Credits:15

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

The studio engages the student to conceive and formulate a design project and provide a solution, aptly demonstrated through supporting research. The design project can be of any scale and size (in terms of built area) as long as the required rigor and depth is demonstrated by the student to merit consideration as a final project. The course encourages architectural design projects and projects at a planning scale to be avoided. It is expected that all genres of projects (study or design) would end with a design solution. The maximum weightage for the study will be 30% in the case of a Study + Design Project. All projects should be grounded in critical inquiry. The course will be conducted as a studio with individual guidance of a mentor.

At the time of the Viva examination, the student shall show to the jurors the portfolio containing the evolution of his/her design from the beginning to the final output. All the drawings and reports shall be certified by the Head of the Department as bonafide work carried out by the student during the semester.

Note:

The requirements pertaining to the handicapped, elderly people, and children are to be addressed in the design.

Course Objective:

To understand the context, issues, and opportunities of an architecture project holistically.

To demonstrate a comprehensive design project in the built environment.

Level of Knowledge: Expert

Course Outcome

CO1: Ability to demonstrate an ability to comprehend the nature of architectural problem and create a brief which sets the frame work for design.

Level: Expert

CO2: Ability to demonstrate an advanced level design ability to convert the brief set forth earlier into a speculative proposition of design.

Level: Intermediate

CO3: Ability to articulate and delineate the propositions of design into an architectural solution addressing all the dimensions.

Level: Intermediate

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:25
Pre-Project:
 

This stage should ideally be accomplished in the previous semester. The work involves students to discuss with the faculty to identify an area of interest or specific types of buildings. The pre project stage should end with a project synopsis supported by site analysis and possibly link to dissertation seminar topic.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:25
Project seminar:
 

The student shall present a seminar on the project topic which includes the following: 

. Precedents of similar projects, either actual visit to such projects or through

literature reviews.

● Cultural, contextual, historical, technological, programmatic concerns of the project.

● Prevalent or historical models of an architectural approach to such projects and a critique of such models 

A rhetorical or a speculative statement that would be the basis of further investigation. (For example Architecture in the information age: Design of libraries in the new virtual reality regime). Documentation that is a part of this presentation shall be taken as completion of the “case study” part of the final requirement.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:40
Mid Review:
 

There shall be a review to clarify the conceptual statements and assumptions of the students. Students shall present a clearly articulated response to context, programme and users. Conceptual framework and preliminary architectural scheme shall be the end products of this stage.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:60
Final Review:
 

The final review should consist of all the works which would be presented at the viva. The mode of presentation shall be tentative. Number of sheets shall be limited to a maximum of 15 plus two case study sheets. Study Models are expected to be presented. The final output shall include a report, all drawings, study models and a presentation model. The report in typed or computer printed form shall discuss the programme, site analysis, literature review, case studies, design criteria, concept and detailed design. Three copies of the reports shall be submitted along with drawing and models.

Text Books And Reference Books:

R1. Kothari, C. R. (2004) Research Methodology: Methods & Techniques, New Age International (P) Limited Publishers

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Online Resources:

W1. | CEPT Archives

W2. B-Arch Thesis Archive - ArchitectureLive!

W3. Architecture Thesis Archives - Archipedia

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks. Attendance and participation in the studio would be considered in the evaluation-rubrics.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of a particular course
  • CIA -1- 45 Marks; CIA -2 - 80 Marks; CIA -3 - 125 Marks; Total - 250 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 250 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.