Department of SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

Syllabus for
Bachelor of Architecture
Academic Year  (2020)

 
1 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
ARC131 MYTH HISTORY AND ARCHITECTURE 3 3 100
ARC132 LOGIC OF STRUCTURES 3 3 100
ARC133 ART OF DESCRIPTION 3 3 100
ARC151 DISCOVERING DESIGN 6 9 300
ARC152 CREATIVE INQUIRY 5 3 100
ARC153 TECHNIQUE OF DRAWING - I 4 03 100
ARC154 MATERIAL STRATEGIES FOR PHYSICAL WORLD 5 3 100
2 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
ARC231 ARCHITECTURE TRADITIONS - FRAMES 3 03 100
ARC232 LOGIC OF STRUCTURES - FRAMES 3 3 100
ARC233 READING THE SITE 4 3 100
ARC251 DESIGNING THE FRAME 6 9 300
ARC252 ART OF JOINERY 4 3 100
ARC253 TECHNIQUE OF DRAWING - II 4 3 100
ARC254 MATERIAL STRATEGIES FOR FRAMES 5 3 100
3 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
ARC331 ARCHITECTURE TRADITIONS - MASONRY 4 3 100
ARC332 LOGIC OF STRUCTURES - MASONRY 3 3 100
ARC333 BUILDING ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS - I 3 3 100
ARC334 CLIMATE RESPONSIVE ARCHITECTURE - I 4 3 100
ARC351 DESIGNING THE MASONRY ENVELOPE 6 9 300
ARC352 TECHNIQUE OF DIGITAL REPRESENTATION I 4 3 100
ARC353 MATERIAL STRATEGIES FOR MASONRY 5 3 100
4 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
ARC431 LOGIC OF STRUCTURES - ADVANCED 3 3 100
ARC432 BUILDING ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS - II 3 3 100
ARC441A ADVANCED COMPUTING 3 3 100
ARC441B THEORY OF DESIGN 3 3 100
ARC441C ART OF PHOTOGRAPHY 3 3 100
ARC451 RURAL STUDIO 6 9 300
ARC452 TECHNIQUE OF DIGITAL REPRESENTATION - II 4 3 100
ARC453 CLIMATE RESPONSIVE ARCHITECTURE - II 4 3 100
ARC454 MATERIAL STRATEGIES FOR AN APPROPRIATE ARCHITECTURE 5 3 100
5 Semester - 2018 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
ARC531 MATERIALS AND METHODS IN BUILDING CONSTRUCTION V 5 3 100
ARC532 HISTORY AND THEORY OF ARCHITECTURE AND CULTURE IV 4 3 100
ARC533 LANDSCAPE AND SITE PLANNING 4 3 100
ARC534 BUILDING ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS - III 3 3 100
ARC551 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN V 6 9 300
ARC552 BUILDING STRUCTURES V 5 3 100
ARC553 DIGITAL GRAPHICS AND ART 4 3 100
6 Semester - 2018 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
ARC631 MATERIALS AND METHODS IN BUILDING CONSTRUCTION VI 5 3 100
ARC632 HOUSING AND HUMAN SETTLEMENT PLANNING 4 3 100
ARC633 SPECIFICATIONS, ESTIMATION AND COSTING 3 3 100
ARC634 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE - I 3 3 100
ARC641B EARTHQUAKE RESISTANT ARCHITECTURE 4 3 100
ARC641C INTERIOR DESIGN 4 3 100
ARC641G RESEARCH METHODOLOGY 4 3 100
ARC651 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN VI 6 9 300
ARC652 BUILDING STRUCTURES VI 5 3 100
7 Semester - 2017 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
ARC731 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE II 3 3 100
ARC741A ART APPRECIATION 5 3 100
ARC741B ART IN ARCHITECTURE 5 3 100
ARC741C APPLIED ART - PHOTOGRAPHY 5 3 100
ARC742A FOREIGN LANGUAGE - FRENCH 3 3 100
ARC742B MUSIC 4 3 100
ARC742C DANCE 4 3 100
ARC751 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN VII 8 12 300
ARC752 URBAN DESIGN 5 3 100
ARC753 BUILDING INFORMATION MODELLING 5 3 100
8 Semester - 2017 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
ARC831 PROJECT AND CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT 3 3 100
ARC832 ENTREPRENEURSHIP SKILLS OF ARCHITECTS 3 3 100
ARC841B GRAPHIC AND PRODUCT DESIGN 5 3 100
ARC842C GREEN BUILDINGS AND RATING SYSTEMS 5 3 100
ARC842E SUSTAINABLE CITIES AND COMMUNITIES 5 3 100
ARC843D VIRTUAL REALITY AND DIGITAL DRAWING SKILLS IN ARCHITECTURE 4 3 100
ARC843E NON VERBAL COMMUNICATION 3 3 100
ARC851 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN VIII 6 9 300
ARC852 DISSERTATION SEMINAR 5 3 100
        

  

Assesment Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50. The courses are classified into two types – Studio Courses and Theory Courses.

a.        CREDIT STRUCTURE As referred in the detailed syllabus

b.        CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

1. The students shall be continuously assessed towards their CIA which comprises of creative and innovative assignments. The CIA shall have four components of CIA 1, CIA 2, CIA 3, and Attendance (Refer to Table 2)

2. CIA 1 and 3 for Theory courses shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.

3. CIA 2 for Theory courses shall be conducted in the form of Mid Semester Examination.

4.  A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of a particular course  

The breakup of CIA marks for theory courses is given below .

CIA 1- 10 marks; CIA 2 - 15 marks (conducted out of 50 marks and converted to out of 15 marks ); CIA 3 - 20 marks; Attendance -5 Marks

5 marks for attendance is distributed as follows

 

Attendance Percentage

Marks

95% - 100%

05

90% - 94%

04

85% - 89%

03

80% - 85%

02

76% - 79%

01

 c.        END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

1. End semester examinations shall be conducted for all courses.

2. Eligibility to appear for ESE

·       A student has passed in CIAs for that course with 50% minimum marks

·       A student has at least 85% of the attendance in aggregate at the end of the semester

·       The Vice-Chancellor is satisfied with the character and conduct of the student

3. The Theory courses shall have a written exam of three-hour duration. The Studio courses shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.

d.        PASS CRITERIA

1. A student shall pass each course with a minimum aggregate (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

2. The overall aggregate of 50% and pass in all courses is required to pass the semester.

3. Students passing the semester shall be awarded different class as per Table given below

e.        GRADING PATTERN

Grading system: Grades are awarded based on absolute grading. The University follows a 4-point grading system. However, the transcripts will also show grading on a 10-point scale.

Percentage 

Grade 

Grade point

(10 point scale) 

Grade point

 (4 Point scale) 

Interpretation 

80-100 

O

10

4

Outstanding

70-79

A+

9

3.6

Excellent 

60-69

A

8

3.2

Very Good

55-59

B+

7

2.8

Good

50-54

B

6

2.4

Above Average

45-49

C

5

2

Average*

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GRADING SCHEME FOR SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE 

f.       PROMOTION POLICY

a.      Candidates who have not passed in at least 50% of the courses of the previous semesters are not promoted to the following year of the program.

b.     Should pass in all the courses of the first year to be promoted to the third year.

c.      Should  pass  in  all  the  courses  of the  first  and  second  years  to be promoted to the fourth year.

d.     Should pass in all the courses of the first, second, and third years to be promoted to the fifth year.

 

Examination And Assesments

The B Arch Programme offers theory and studio courses. The theory courses conduct periodical Continuous Internal Assessments (CIA) which includes tests, assignments, and attendance to evaluate the students' progress. Each course would culminate with an End Semester Examination (ESE) conducted centrally by the University.

The Studio courses are continuously evaluated through reviews, assignments, and time problems, which accumulate as CIA marks. The ESE will be conducted through Viva-voce reviewed and marked by an external examiner.

Department Overview:
The School of Architecture, approved by the Council of Architecture (COA) New Delhi and All India Council of Technical Education (AICTE) India, is conceived in the Academic year 2017-18. It offers a five-year Bachelor's Degree Program in Architecture aspiring to make a compelling presence in the field of Architectural education. The School's core strength of academic rigor focuses on experiential learning as a pedagogy, specialization of faculty, the best of infrastructure facilities, and the involvement of practicing architects in design teaching.
Mission Statement:
VISION: The School of Architecture CHRIST is dedicated to an architectural education through excellence and rigor in learning, research, and community engagement to nurture individuals to become ethical professionals, creative designers, and responsible citizens. MISSION We believe in responsible design thinking that is deeply sensitive to ecology, cultural diversity, and social equity. Architectural education at our School will nurture inquisitiveness, creative inquiry, and critical thin
Introduction to Program:
The Bachelor's Degree Program in Architecture, affiliated to the Christ University, is a five-year program approved by the Council of Architecture New Delhi. The Programme has two components, Studio, and Theory. The theory encompasses the current theoretical positions on Architecture, understanding historical precedents of the built environment in India and across the world, Building Sciences and Technology. Studio courses address the issues of methods in the documentation, analysis, and interpretations and design process of physical environments. The studio cycle is aimed at developing design language, tools, and skills to design sustainable built environments. The programme entails Practical training of one semester with a registered practicing architect. The Programme thus intends to render a holistic understanding of Architecture. The Board of Studies members include acclaimed academicians and leading architects; Prof Neelkant Chhaya, Former Dean of Faculty of Architecture, CEPT University; Ar. Prem Chandavarkar, Managing partner of CnT Architects. A. ADMISSION Admission to the Bachelor of Architecture to all the candidates who have passed the Qualifying Examination of an examination at the end of the 10+2 scheme of examination of Central/State Govts with at least 50% aggregate marks in Physics, Chemistry, and Mathematics and also 50% marks in aggregate of the 10+2 level examination or passed 10+3 Diploma Examination with mathematics as compulsory subject with at leas
Program Objective:
Programme Objective: The B Arch Programme intends a deep immersion in an ecosophical perspective of architecture, as part of an inspired understanding of larger discourses: environmental, social, political, artistic, and technological. Programme Outcomes: Sensitivity: a. Sensitize students to be socially and environmentally responsible and to work effectively in multi-disciplinary teams within the field of human habitat. b. Engage learners in community outreach programs and assimilate knowledge in built environment-related disciplines that are relevant to ethical practice in architecture. Knowledge: a. Nurture quality education that enables use and extension of appropriate knowledge for designing built environment. b. Stimulate and develop critical thinking to assess the existing environment in the service of the discipline of architecture. c. Offer sound knowledge in design theories and their applications, building technology, social, cultural, and environmental factors. d. Learning to apply interdisciplinary knowledge and use tools that enable it. Skilled practice: a. Inculcate skills necessary for the physical, social, and creative realms of crafting architecture. b. Prepare students to recognize and act upon opportunities and aspirations. c. Instill creative problem-solving skills by offering active and experiential learning by working with varied materials and media; d. Develop skills to demonstrate design concepts and solutions, and adopt effective

ARC131 - MYTH HISTORY AND ARCHITECTURE (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course objectives: 

To develop the ability to critically understand concepts of built environment through history.

To experience the correlation of man, nature, and their living habitat.

To understand, interpret, and analyse art history through the integrated modules ARC 131 Unit-3 Art as a Medium of Representation & Expression and ARC 133 Unit-3 De-Scribe Art.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Ability to describe the different ways Man relates to nature through time and his various ways of inhabiting it. Level: Basic 

CO2: Ability to differentiate between Myth - History and their significance to culture. Level: Basic 

CO3: Ability to conceptualize the relation between architecture and materials as integral elements of local ecology and cultural practices. Level: Basic

CO4: Ability to appreciate the ways in which art reflects or communicate social, political, economic, ideological, and religious values. Level: Basic

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Relationship between man & nature
 

1. Introduction to History of built environment and Man’s relationship with Nature through the experience gained from the Studio-On- Wheels.

2. Myth and History and their relationship to architecture.

3. Natural elements as a beginning of source, resource, ritual, society, culture, tradition & civilization and their progressive development through different ages with relevant examples.

4. Tribal art, craft, and architecture - local, regional, and global.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Material Culture
 

1. Material as an integral dimension of culture and to explore material resources through time and place with appropriate examples of Prehistoric art and architecture.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Art as a Medium of Representation, Expression & Symbolism
 

1. Introduction to Art and Craft through history.

2. Art as an important part of culture - as a form of representation, critique, and symbolism through diverse examples and illustrate.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Portfolio Development and Master classes
 

1. Master classes should focus on relevant topics.

2. Portfolio development - To organise and review all works done in the semester. Establish connections with other subjects where possible.

3. Encouraging self-learning.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Ching, F., Jarzombek, M., & Prakash, V. (2011). A global history of architecture (2nd ed.). Hoboken, N.J.: Wiley.

T2. Crouch, P. D. (1985). History of Architecture: Stonehenge to Skyscrapers. London: McGraw-Hill.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Gardner, H., Kleiner, F. S., & Mamiya, C. J. (2006). Gardner's art through the ages: The Western perspective. Belmont, CA: Thomson Wadsworth.

R2. Roa, A., Ketkar. S (2017) The History of Indian Art. (1st ed.). Jyotsna Prakashan. 

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in CIA.
  • The course shall have a written exam of three-hour duration.
  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC132 - LOGIC OF STRUCTURES (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course intends to impart the basic understanding of behaviour of structures.

Learning Outcome

CO1: To comprehend and describe the basics of structures and structural systems. Level: Basic

CO2: To describe the basic principles of mechanics. Level: Basic 

CO3: To comprehend and evaluate the loads on structures & balancing the same. Level: Intermediate

CO4: To develop an intuitive understanding of behaviuor of structure by which they can comprehend structural system of any physical object. Level: Intermediate 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
The Beginning of Architecture
 
  1. Structure in Nature: Reading Structure in Natural Forms - Plants, Animals, Insects etc.
  2. Structure of Everyday objects: Baskets, Furniture, Ladder, spectacles, bags etc.
  3. Evolution of Structures: What makes buildings stand up.  Understanding Gravity. Historical perspective and definition of structure.
  4. Structural systems overview: Geometry of forces. Introduction to Loads. Vertical/lateral systems
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Study of Materials
 
  1. Experiment with structures
  2. Structural Materials: Mechanical properties of Structural materials
  3. Loads on Structures: Dead load (DL), live load (LL), static, dynamic, impact, and thermal loads.
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Broad categorization of Structural Systems
 

1.     Differentiate broadly the Structural systems as Mass, Frame and Surface systems.

2.     States of Stress: Knowledge of basic states of stress, tension, compression, bending, shear and torsion shall beimparted.

3.     Understanding stress and its relevance with material and shaping of elements andstructures.

4.   Phenomenon of buckling and its importance in compression members shall be explained with Euler's equation.

5.   Principle of transmissibility of forces: Understanding load flow.

6.   Stress/strain relations (Hooke's Law): Modulas of Elasticity.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Basic requirements of Structures: Strength, Stability, Serviceability, Functionality, Durability, Economy and Efficiency
 

Aesthetics shall be explained in detail with reference to structural design and Architectural considerations.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Bansal, R., & Bansal, S. (2015). Engineering Mechanics. New Delhi: Laxmi Publications (P) Ltd.

T2. Salvadori, M., & Heller, R. (1985). Structure in Architecture: The Building of Buildings. Prentice Hall; 3rd Revised edition. 

T3. Salvadori, M., Hooker, S., & Ragus, C. (1980). Why buildings stand up: The strength of architecture. New York: Norton. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Schierle, G. (2008). Structure and Design. University Readers.

R2. Schodek, D., & Bechthold, M. (2013). Structures. Pearson; 7th Edition.

R3. Singer, F. (1975). Engineering Mechanics. Weatherhill: Harper & Row, 3rd Edition.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in CIA.
  • The course shall have a written exam of three-hour duration.
  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC133 - ART OF DESCRIPTION (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course is an exploration of creative writing and communication. It enhances the students ability of visual and verbal descriptions.

Course Objective

  • Introduction to different forms of communication - verbal, visual, artistic and written media, in order to discover one-self and realise one’s own potential in these forms.
  • Orientation to new forms of perceiving and expression of the self and surroundings extending beyond one’s conditioning.
  • Developing responsiveness to information for comprehension, expression and creation in a tangible manner

Learning Outcome

CO1:  Ability to express in various forms of communication of verbal, visual and written. To know more about the self and to realise the potential, strengths and challenges in each form of communication.  Level: Basic  

CO2: Ability to recognise new forms of perceiving and expression in context of self and surroundings. To learn to express one’s thoughts and attitudes through various media. Level: Basic  

CO3: Ability to see art and express as a medium of communication. Level: Intermediate  

CO4: Ability to put together a well done portfolio of what has been learnt in all courses in the semester in a coherent manner. Level: Intermediate 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Me and Nature
 

Observing, learning and appreciation of nature through various media. 

Articulation of ideas: developing vocabulary through speech writing and images - Self introduction, Mapping memories through Digital and Paper collage.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Voice of Materials
 

Listening to context and what environments say, by exploring, reading, writing and performing in a descriptive and poetical manner.

Introduction to close reading and comprehension through reading and analysis exercise. Exercises to develop public speaking. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
De-Scribe Art
 

Exploring the visual and artistic medium for appreciation, comprehension and expression.  

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Portfolio Development and Exhibition
 

Portfolio development - To organise and review all works done in the semester. To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject. Establish connections with other subjects where possible. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Sen, G. (2013). Your history gets in the way of my memory: Essays on Indian artists. India: Happer Collins.Jones, L. (2001).

T2. Jones,L. (2001). Working In English. Cambridge University Press. 

T3. Mudambadithaya, G. (2011). Communicative English for Professional Courses. Sapna Publishing House. 

T4. Taylor, G. (2011). English Conversation Practice. McGraw Hill Education; First edition.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Meuser, P., 1969-, & Pogade, D. (2010). Wayfinding and Signage: Construction and Design Manual. Berlin: DOM Publishers. 

R2. Ambrose, G., & Harris, P. (2010). Design thinking for visual communication (Second edition.). London: Bloomsbury.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in CIA.
  • The course shall have a written exam of three-hour duration.
  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC151 - DISCOVERING DESIGN (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:90
No of Lecture Hours/Week:6
Max Marks:300
Credits:9

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The Foundation Year Studio aims at introduction to the built environment in a natural setting. Orientation to the realm of architecture through an exploration of sensorial and artistic experience of natural and built environment in that setting.

Unfold through exploring art & culture, craft, material & technology.

Introduce architectural design thinking by helping students to recognize design in natural, cultural, and everyday environment.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Ability to observe and document the natural world and the built environment in sensorial, poetic and technical manner. Level: Basic  

CO2: Ability to recognise concepts in architecture related to “my space” - form, scale and anthropometry. Level: Basic  

CO3: Ability to see art in the simple details and elements of architecture. Level: Intermediate  

CO4: Ability to put together a well-done portfolio of what has been learnt in all courses in the semester in a coherent manner. Level: Intermediate 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:24
Understanding Nature
 

1. Travel to a natural setting to explore, document, and represent Nature and the local culture through its art, craft, rituals and practices.

2. Trace the relationship of the local built-environment with the ecology of the place.

3. Introduction to the discipline of architecture and the role of the architect in shaping the built-environment and its relationship with ecology and people.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:24
Shape of Space
 

1. Introduction to concepts of architecture –

a. space, form, structure, material, geometry, pattern, proportion, mass, transparency etc.

b. flexibility, modularity, strength.

c. scale and proportion

d. architectural space - enclosure, partition, stacking, interconnection, separation, accumulation, connection, floating, climbing.

2. Illustrate how these concepts are manifested in experiential and tangible ways.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:24
Architecture as Art
 

1. Appreciating the art of architecture through making and representation as a way of looking at world.

2. Undertake group and individual exercises that are sculptural and begin to suggest architectural space.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:18
Portfolio Development and Representation
 

1. Portfolio development - To organise and review all works done in the semester. To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject.

2. Establish connections with other subjects where possible.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Ching, F. D. K. (2015). Architecture: Form, Space, & Order (Fourth edition.). New Jersy: John Wiley. T2. Callender, J. (1997). Time-saver Standards for Architectural Design Data (7th Revised edition edition ed.). McGraw-Hill Inc.,US. 

T2. Chakrabarti, D. (1997). Indian Anthropometric Dimensions: For Ergonomic Design Practice. National Institute of Design.

T3. The American Institute of Architects. (2016). Architectural Graphic Standards (Ramsey/Sleeper Architectural Graphic Standards Series) (12th Revised ed.). John Wiley & Sons.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Pandya, Y. (2015). Elements of Spacemaking. Ahmedabad: Mapin Publishing Pvt Ltd. 

R2. Gill, R. (1990). Rendering with Pen and Ink. Thames & Hudson Ltd.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks. Attendance and participation in the studio would be considered in the evaluation-rubrics.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of a particular course
  • CIA -1- 25 Marks; CIA -2 - 50 Marks; CIA -3 - 75 Marks; Total - 150 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 150 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC152 - CREATIVE INQUIRY (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The studio introduces students to creative inquiry as a way of learning about the world around us. This is done through empirical, perceptive and representational exercises and techniques that -

  1. Sensitises them to the diversity and heterogeneity of our ‘local’ culture.
  2. Focuses on an aesthetical thinking through process-based techniques which can enhance the student’s aesthetic sense, creativity, responsiveness to the local ecology.
  3. Encourages a reflective and thoughtful attitude to the context and environment in which they live.
  4. Helps connect the student’s creativity and aesthetic sensibility to the local knowledge and culture of their environment. They learn and adapt from the diversity of craftsmanship and interpret local knowledge and traditions.
  5. Encourages group learning, effective communication, recognising responsibilities and cognitive coordination between social and emotional skills of the students.

Education responds to changing sensibilities, environment and scale of activity. Einstein mentions that education is not the learning of facts; rather, it is the training of the mind to think. The studio integrates activities which are process based, experience based in an open ended learning process. It aims for an:

  1. Introduction to ‘design and the environment’.
  2. Introduction to different media and rendering techniques.
  3. Introduction to principles of composition
  4. Developing a keen sensitivity to space, scale, proportion, light, wind, sound, texture.
  5. Practice of basic principles of free hand drawing and colour.
  6. Introduction to representation of human body and anthropometrics /ergonomics.
  7. Introduction to translate abstract principles of design into architectural process, forms and solutions.
  8. Explore one’s own strengths and weakness, aptitude and sensibilities, fears and insecurities.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Ability to recognize the realm of architecture and the range of ‘subjects’ that an architect needs to engage with; Level: Basic 
CO2: Ability to sensitively observe and record various aspects of the immediate environment including human relationships, visual language, aesthetic characteristics and space, elements of nature, etc. Level: Basic  
CO3: Ability to achieve skills of visualization and communication, through different mediums and processes. Understanding basic graphic design theory and the ability to put them into practice including holistic learning of color theory. Level: Basic  
CO4: Awareness of a range of materials used in making our manmade environment and a hands-on ability to make different objects and artwork using some of them. Familiarity with traditional and contemporary skills in the use and crafting of materials. Level: Basic  
CO5: The ability for critical thinking, analysis, interpretation, and communication in the context of spatial design. Level: Intermediate  
CO6: Develop the capability to understand different layers that form an urban architectural fabric, exposing them to the interconnections of architecture with other disciplines like sociology, anthropology. Level: Basic

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Orientation and Sensing Nature
 

 Orientation Week [Integrated with ARC151, ARC153 and ARC154}

The orientation programme focuses on an introduction to the B.Arch Program, the Institutional Culture and Realm of Architecture through various activities and specific exercises. It also focuses on a soft skill development program through different exploratory exercises.

Studio on Wheels: ‘Seeing’ the Natural Environment around us.

  1. Getting familiar with our immediate surroundings.
  2. Observing, experiencing, and analyzing the natural environment and how we inhabit it.
  3. Exploring and learning about human abilities like perception, intuition, observation, etc.
  4. Learning how identification, analysis, and naming are cultural processes. Engaging our senses through nature walks (seeing, hearing, touching, smelling, tasting). 
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Discovering Materials and learning to use them
 
  1. ‘Seeing’ materials around us, natural and man-made.
  2. Understanding and experiencing characteristics, general usage of materials, properties and behavior.
  3. Getting familiar with tools and their use in traditional and contemporary practice.
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Introduction to Art and Design
 
  1. Introduction to Art and basic principles.
  2. The critical role of art in culture and society.
  3. Drawing as an extension of seeing and as a basic tool towards different visualization techniques and representational techniques.
  4. Different ways of drawing and introduction to various techniques.
  5. Origin of Design and its history.
  6. Elements of design.
  7. Developing skills of analysis, synthesis, interpretation, and communication through elements and composition
  8. Introduction to the theory of visual perception through colour, form, space, light and shadow, texture and tones.
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Portfolio development
 

Portfolio development - To organise and review all works done in the semester. To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject. Establish connections with other subjects where possible.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Books:

T1. Dondis, D. A. (1973). A primer of visual literacy. Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press.

T2. Berger, J., Dibb, M., & BBC Enterprises. (1972). Ways of seeing. London: BBC Enterprises.

T 3 Ching, F. D. K. (2015). Architecture: Form, space, & order (Fourth edition.). New Jersy: John Wiley.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reference Books:

R1. Ching, F., & Juroszek, S. P. (2010). Design drawing (2nd ed.). Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley & Sons.

R2. Tanchis, A., & Munari, B. (1987). Bruno Munari: Design as art. Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press.

R3. Norman, D. A. (2002). The Design of Everyday Things (1st Basic paperback.). New York: Basic Books.

R4. Edwards, B. (1986). Drawing on the artist within: a guide to innovation, invention, imagination, and creativity. New York: Simon and Schuster.

R5. Escher, M. C., Bool, F., Locher, J. L., & Escher, M. C. (1982). M.C. Escher, his life and complete graphic work: With a fully illustrated catalogue. New York: H.N. Abrams.

R6. Albers, J. (2006). Interaction of color. New Haven [Conn.: Yale University Press.

R7. Papanek, V. J. (1984). Design for the real world: Human ecology and social change. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold Co.

 

Online Resources:

W1.www.oppenculture.comW2.www.gutenberg.org

 

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • Total CIA - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%

ARC153 - TECHNIQUE OF DRAWING - I (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:03

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To introduce the fundamental geometric principles involved in architectural drawing.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Ability to use different drawing tools and equipment. Level: Basic 

CO2: Ability to do freehand sketches/drawings following the basic principles of line drawing. Level: Basic 

CO3: Acquire skills and learn techniques of geometric drawing to represent basic shapes and forms leading to architectural graphics. Level: Basic

CO4: Ability to present in a Portfolio, the subject content, and work produced in a legible and comprehensive manner and to demonstrate its relevance in the context of other subjects in the semester. Level: Basic

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:16
Representing Nature
 
  1. Introduction to Line as a basic tool in representation. Explore the geometry found in Nature, Art and Craft.
  2. Develop drawing as a tool to represent the observations from Nature.
  3. Types of drawing.
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:16
Scale, Lettering and Geometry
 
  1. Concept of Scales.
  2. Understanding Lettering as a tool to reveal the geometry of shapes and forms.
  3. Introduction to Euclidean geometry and curves.
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Orthographic Projections
 
  1. Introduction to projections and understanding orthographic projection as the base of an architectural drawing.
  2. Sections and development of lateral surfaces of solids
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Portfolio
 

Portfolio development - To organise and review all works done in the semester. To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject. Establish connections with other subjects where possible.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Bhatt, N. D. (2014). Engineering Drawing. Anand, India: Charotar Publishing House Pvt. Ltd.

T2. Venugopal, K. (2004). Engineering Drawing and Graphics. New Age International Publishers.

T3. Cooper Douglas (2007). Drawing and Perceiving. Van Nostrand Reinhold.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Francis, D. K. Ching, (2014). Architecture: Form, Space, & Order, Wiley publishers.

R2. Francis, D. K. Ching, (2015). Architectural Graphics. Wiley publishers.

R3. Alexander, W. White, (2011). The Elements of Graphic Design, Allworth Press.

R4. Victor Perard (2006). Anatomy and Drawing. Harper Publishers.

R5. Robert W. Gill (1984).  Rendering with Pen and Ink. The Thames & Hudson Manuals.

R6. Barrington Barber (2014). The Fundamentals of Drawing. Arcturus Publishers.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • Total CIA - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%

ARC154 - MATERIAL STRATEGIES FOR PHYSICAL WORLD (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Learning about the properties and characteristics, methods of preservation and treatment of indigenous materials in a natural landscape and moving from a specific setting to the general. To learn about the techniques of using natural materials in the local context and document them in an integrated studio with all core courses.

Learning Outcome

1.      To demonstrate and learn from Nature as a resource and inspiration for art, design and architecture.

2.      Ability to explore the sensorial understanding of materials. 

3.      The skill to represent materials used in architecture through various mediums.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Handling Materials and Learning Anthropometrics
 
  1. Touching, seeing & learning the way material has been woven in the built form.
  2. Exploration of anthropometrics.
  3. Learning from everyday objects - materials and their use.
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:25
Exploring Materials Through Making
 
  1. Exploring concepts of strength, hardness, flexibility, malleability & brittleness through different materials.
  2. Introduction to mud, bamboo, brick, stone, concrete, steel and glass.
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:25
Exploring Construction Techniques of Various materials
 
  1. Understand the position of materials detailed in Unit II in the context of building construction.
  2. Introduction to Masonry –Wall as a Plane, Space maker, Divider
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Portfolio Development and Master classes
 
  1. Masterclasses emphasizing different aspects of the material. 
  2. Portfolio development - To organise and review all works done in the semester. To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject. Establish connections and integrating with other subjects of relevance.
Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Ching, F. D. 1. (1975). Building construction illustrated. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold.

T2. Mckay, W. B. (2016). Building Construction Metric (Vol - 1.). Noida: Pearson.

T3. Deplazes, A. (2005). Constructing Architecture Materials Processes Structures A Handbook. Basel, Switzerland: Birkhäuser Publishers for Architecture.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Dunkelberg, K. (1985). IL 31 Bambus Bamboo. Stuttagart: Institutes for Leichte.

R2. Semper, G., Mallgrave, H. F., Robinson, M., & Getty Research Institute. (2004). Style in the technical and tectonic arts, or, Practical aesthetics. Los Angeles: Getty Research Institute.

R3. Frampton, K., & Cava, J. (1995). Studies in tectonic culture: The poetics of construction in nineteenth and twentieth century architecture. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press.

R4. Spence R. F. and Cook D.J.( 1983)Building Materials in Developing Countries, John Wiley and sons.

R5. Minke, G., & Mahlke, F. (2005). Building with straw: Design and technology of a sustainable architecture. Basel; Boston: Birkhäuser.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • Total CIA - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC231 - ARCHITECTURE TRADITIONS - FRAMES (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:03

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To develop the ability to critically understand the built environment concepts through history.

To enable students to understand the relationship between tradition and contemporary trends, material, form and function.

To introduce the idea of architecture as craft based with a system and technology in a cultural realm through integrated learning.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Ability to comprehend and critique the integral part of craft and its relationship between the society, culture and architecture. Level: Basic

CO2: To be familiar and able to illustrate the similarities in society, culture and the architecture because of local ecology. Level: Basic

CO3: Ability to recognise wood, steel, bamboo & RCC as a material that enable a framed architecture and how they are used in different ways in national and global level. Level: Basic

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Discovering Craft
 

1. History of Craft and its importance in building communities.

2. Introduction to a craft as an experiential learning through Studio-on-wheels and understanding the craft traditions in various aspects with examples of local crafts. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Cultural History of the 'Frame'
 

Historic examples beginning from the ‘Vedic’ village, Mauryan architecture and discuss the influence of wood and bamboo framed architecture in masonry architecture through various examples across the world through the ages.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
The Modern Frame
 

1. Introduction to Modern Frame under different geographical and cultural influences.

2. Steel as a material of magical frame in the Industrial and Post-Industrial Era.

3. Discovering the versatile Reinforced Concrete and journey of the Modern Frame.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Portfolio Development and Master classes
 

Master classes should focus on relevant topics.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Ingersoll, R. And Kostof, S. (2013). World architecture: a cross-cultural history. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

T2. Ching, F., Jarzombek, M., & Prakash, V. (2011). A global history of architecture (2nd ed.). Hoboken, N.J.: Wiley. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Frampton, K. (2016). Modern architecture: A critical history (4th ed.). London; New York, N.Y.: Thames & Hudson.

R2. Diane Ghirardo. ( 1990). Architecture after Modernism, Thames & Hudson, London. 

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in CIA.
  • The course shall have a written exam of three-hour duration.
  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC232 - LOGIC OF STRUCTURES - FRAMES (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course objectives: Reinforcing the conceptual understanding by using an abstract method of analysis of frame structures.

Learning Outcome

CO1: To describe and comprehend the basic principles of mechanics of structures and structural systems. Level:Basic.

CO2: To comprehend and describe the section active system and types of supports. Level: Basic

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Concept of Centre of Gravity
 

1.      Determining the centroid of simple shapes.

2.    Moment of inertia and its application to sections subjected to rotation.

3.      Determining the Moment of Inertia of simple shapes.

4.      Resolution of forces.

5.      Classification of frame structure based on section active (system in bending) and vector active(triangulation)

6.   The concept of triangulation and its application in jointed frameworks. 

7.   Materials and their appropriateness to take bending moment and shear stress.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Types of Supports and Joints
 

1.      Hinged, Fixed, Pinned, andRigid. 

2.    Its relevance in the shaping ofmembers.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Understanding of section active system
 

1.      Bending Moment and Shear force diagram and its relevance in the shaping of members.

2.      Basic understanding of seismic forces and their resistance in frame structures.

3.      Deflection and its importance, codal provisions, the study of deflected shapes, and simple structures. 

4.      Calculations of deflections in simply supported and cantilever beams with uniformly distributed loads.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to Arch
 

1.      Arch as a curved element in a system. 

2.    Determining the reaction and bending moment in the three-hinged arch

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Bansal, R. (2017). A Textbook of Strength of Materials. Laxmi Publications; Sixth edition

T2. Prasad, I. (2002). A Textbook of Applied Mechanics: Dynamics & Statics. Khanna Publishers

T3. Salvadori, M., Hooker, S., & Ragus, C. (1990). Why buildings stand up: The strength of architecture. New York: Norton.

T4. Salvadori, M., & Heller, R. (1985). Structure in Architecture: The Building of Buildings. Prentice Hall; 3rd Revised edition.  

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Schierle, G. (2008). Structure and Design. University Readers. 

R2. Schodek, D., & Bechthold, M. (2013). Structures. Pearson; 7th Edition. 

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in CIA.
  • The course shall have a written exam of three-hour duration.
  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC233 - READING THE SITE (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Brief understanding of the changing relationship of man with nature and its ecological resources in shaping our existence. To orient the students towards factors of the natural landscape that influence local culture and its built environment with a focus on a particular site of intervention. To introduce Mapping Techniques.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Ability to conduct site analysis by establishing the relationship between site characteristics and design requirements. Level: Basic

CO2: Ability to convert relevant site information and data to legible representation. Level: Basic

CO3: Recognize the fundamental importance of the Natural Ecology in our existence and issues that affect the balance of the natural environment. Level: Basic

CO4: Ability to conduct and describe the technical surveying process and its drawing output. Level: Basic

CO5: Ability to present in a Portfolio, the subject content and work produced in a legible and comprehensive manner and to demonstrate its relevance in the context of other subjects in the semester. Level: Basic

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:16
Introduction to Mapping
 
  1. Introducing the idea of ecology and ecosystem as the combination of living things.

  2. Introduction to mapping as a way of reading and representing the site.

  3. Exploring different ways of mapping, sensorial and embodied mapping and representation.

  4. Exploring the methods and mediums in rendering the maps.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:16
Site Study & Analysis
 
  1. Understanding the physical, natural and social context of the site in shaping the architectural design process.
  2. Recognising the geographical characteristics of the  site in both macro and micro region.
  3. Introduction to topography and its characteristics.
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Introduction to Surveying
 

Introduction to Survey, principles of Surveying, Contouring and learn how to read a survey drawing.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Portfolio
 

Portfolio development - To organise and review all works done in the semester. To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject. Establish connections with other subjects where possible.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1.  Dee, C.,(2001), Form and Fabric in Landscape Architecture: A visual introduction, UK: Spon Press.

T2. Lynch, K. (1962), Site Planning, Cambridge: The MIT Press.

T3. McHarg I. (1978), Design with Nature. NY: John Wiley & Co.

T4.  Booth, N. (2011), Foundations of Landscape Architecture: Integrating Form and Space Using the Language of Site Design, John Wiley & Co.

T5. Simonds, J.O. ( 1961), Landscape Architecture: The Shaping of Man’s Natural Environment, NY: McGraw Hill Book Co. Inc.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Shaheer.M, Dua G., Pal A. (2013), Landscape Architecture In India, A Reader, LA, Journal of Landscape Architecture

Online Resources: W1. Down to Earth [Magazine] https://www.downtoearth.org.in/

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in CIA.
  • The course shall have a written exam of three-hour duration.
  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%

ARC251 - DESIGNING THE FRAME (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:90
No of Lecture Hours/Week:6
Max Marks:300
Credits:9

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Introduce architecture and the design of spaces through documentation and design exploration of framed structures and architecture. Explore the logic of shaping space, material and structure and the inspired understanding from various examples in nature and culture. Focus on “Me and my immediate environment” through documentation and design exercises. Introduce the various ways of reading and documenting a site and its context intuitively and experientially. Learn to represent these in different media.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Ability to document a context in which the craft of Framed Architecture is evident and recognizes the concept of Frame in nature and culture. Level: Intermediate

CO2: Ability to document and represent the site in an intuitive and technical manner in coordination with other relevant courses. Level: Intermediate

CO3: Ability to design in response to the context and stated intent and demonstrate through skilled representation in the appropriate media. Level: High

CO4: Ability to put together a well-done portfolio of what has been learned in all courses in the semester in a coherent manner. Level: Intermediate

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:24
Rationalising Culture Need
 
  1. Introducing the concept of Framed Architecture in the Studio-on-Wheels setting. Travel to a habitat in a cultural setting where architecture is explored in context of craft-making.  Relate the architecture and craft to the ecology and local culture.

  2. Demonstrate the concept of Frame in nature, everyday objects, music, literature and other examples.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:48
Understanding Context and Site & Design Intervention of ?Framing a Pavilion?
 
  1. Reading of the context and site intuitively and technically and initiate the design exercise of a Pavilion.
  2. Exploration of local material resources that inform architecture.
  3. Design development of a Pavilion comprising of a simple function for “Me and my environment” exploring the architecture of the Frame.

Integrate with all other courses in the semester.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:18
Portfolio Development and Presentation
 

Portfolio development - To organise and review all works done in the semester. To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject. Establish connections with other subjects where possible.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Ching, F. D. K. (2015). Architecture: Form, Space, & Order (Fourth edition.). New Jersy: John Wiley.

T2. Callender, J. (1997). Time-saver Standards for Architectural Design Data (7th Revised edition edition ed.). McGraw-Hill Inc.,US.

T3. Gill Robet W. (2003). Rendering With Pen +ink. London: Thames And Hudson.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Rasmussen, S. E. (1959). Experiencing Architecture. Cambridge: The MIT Press.

R2. Rapoport, A (1969). House Form and Culture. Prentice-Hall, Inc. Englewood Cliffs, NJ USA Pearson

R3. Clark, R. H., & Pause, M. (2012). Precedents in architecture: Analytic diagrams, formative ideas, and partis (4th ed.). Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley & Sons.

R4. Carter, R. (2012). On and By Frank Lloyd Wright: A Primer of Architectural Principles. Phaidon Press.

R5. Curtis, W. (1994). Le Corbusier: Ideas and Forms. Phaidon Press; Revised ed. edition.

R6. Mertins, D., & Lambert, P. (2014). Mies. New York: Phaidon.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks. Attendance and participation in the studio would be considered in the evaluation rubrics.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of a particular course
  • CIA -1- 25 Marks; CIA -2 - 50 Marks; CIA -3 - 75 Marks; Total - 150 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • This course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE- 150 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC252 - ART OF JOINERY (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To impart specific skills and to introduce students to the fundamental principles involved in the way materials come together.

Learn carpentry and the qualities of wood

Learn the art of bringing together other materials - techniques, details and finishes.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Ability to comprehend the different techniques of wood joinery and understand the role of joinery in different materials in architectural construction. Level: Basic

CO2: Ability to make and explore the wooden joineries used in architecture. Level: Basic

CO3: Ability to design and explore composite artistic production and craftsmanship. Level: Intermediate

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Joinery in nature and built environment
 

1.      Introduction to Joinery in nature and manmadeenvironment.

2.      Acquaint with the tools and machines used incarpentry. 

3.    Introducing Joints in carpentry and exploring variations injoinery.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:16
The logic of joinery
 

Understanding the logic of joinery with respect to different materials, the sequence of construction, location of the element - internal or external, the role of load transfers etc

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:24
Filigree construction
 

Introduction to filigree construction and architecture in wood. Understanding the principles, structural formation of filigree construction and historical processes in traditional and vernacular architecture.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Portfolio
 

Designing an artistic ensemble exploring joinery with different materials. Portfolio of ensemble illustrating the joinery details used. Can take up the design project or a significant and relevant example of Framed Structure and develop a scale model as the final project.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. American Technical Society. (2017). Cyclopedia of Architecture, Carpentry, and Building,

Vol. 4 of 10. Forgotten Books.

 

T2. Wagner, W. (2005). Modern Carpentry. Wilcox Publisher; 2nd edition

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Deplazes, A. (2005). Constructing Architecture Materials Processes Structures A Handbook.

Basel, Switzerland: Birkhäuser Publishers for Architecture.

Online Resources: W1. Tutorials on joinery.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • Total CIA - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC253 - TECHNIQUE OF DRAWING - II (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: The course explores development of drawing skills and of technical drawings as tools of design thinking, visualization and representation; through 3D drawing techniques with applicable renderings that include shades and shadows.

Course objectives: To introduce Architectural Design Language – technical drafting and presentation and impart appropriate manual skills for visualization and technical representation of built forms in different types of drawings.

Learning Outcome

CO1. A comprehensive understanding and ability to draw pictorial representation and sciography. Level: Basic 

CO2. Achieve a comprehensive understanding of the techniques and ability to draw technical drawings and architectural presentation. Level: Basic

CO3. Acquire skills to produce technical drawing for any object, design or a building. Level: Basic

CO4. Ability to present in a Portfolio, the subject content and work produced in a legible and comprehensive manner and to demonstrate its relevance in the context of other subjects in the semester. Level: Basic

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Documentation of Existing Building Pictorial Projections
 

1.Coordinate with other courses, especially, AC251 ‘Designing the Frame’ to draw architectural drawings as required.

2.Documentation and presentation of a framed architecture/ traditional building.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:24
3D Drawing
 

1.Developing pictorial representations -Isometric Projection, Axonometric projection and Perspective projections.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:16
Introduction to Sciography, Rendering and Architectural drawings
 

1.Introduction to Sciography and principles of shades and shadows.

2.Pen and Ink Rendering of pictorial projections.

3.Introduction to Architectural drawings, components and conventions in an architectural drawing.

4.Measured drawing to scale of framed objects.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Portfolio
 

Portfolio development - To organise and review all works done in the semester. To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject. Establish connections with other subjects where possible.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Bhatt, N. D. (2014). Engineering Drawing. Anand, India: Charotar Publishing House Pvt. Ltd.

T2. Venugopal, K. (2004). Engineering Drawing and Graphics. New Age International Publishers.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Ching, F. D. K. (2015). Architecture: Form, space, & order (Fourth edition.). New Jersy: John Wiley.

R2. Ching, F. D. K. (2015). Architectural graphics (Sixth edition.). New Jersy: John Wiley.

R3. Alexander W. White. (2011) The Elements of Graphic Design, Allworth Press; 2nd edition.

R4. Gill Robet W. (2003). Rendering with Pen +ink. London: Thames And Hudson.

R5. Mark A, Thomas, (2007). Exploring Elements of Design. Poppy Evans, 2ndedition.

R6. Philip Meggs, (1998). A History of Graphic Design. John Wiley & Sons, 3rd edition.

R7. Joseph D'Amelio. (2004). Perspective Drawing Handbook. Harper, New edition.

 

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • Total CIA - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC254 - MATERIAL STRATEGIES FOR FRAMES (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course objectivesTo introduce the idea of Architecture as a craft-based practice by exploring Framed Structures through experiential learning.

To learn about materials that are conducive to Framed construction.

Learning Outcome

CO1: To comprehend and apply the concept of frames in the Building-design project. Level: Intermediate 

CO2: Ability to understand the nature and properties of wood, bamboo, Steel and RCC materials and their use in framed construction. Level: Basic

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Frame Architecture
 

1.      Exploring a craft through Studio-On-Wheels and understanding the particular, techniques, material, and aesthetical elements.

2.      Introducing the idea of the framework from parts to whole, from source to resource.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:25
Materialising the Frame Wood & Bamboo
 

1. Systems and Production in Bamboo and Wood– Doors and Windows assemblies, staircases, etc. Through drawings and modelmaking.

2. Literature review of traditional timber construction.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:25
Materialising the Frame ? RCC & Steel
 

1.      Steel - Introduction to steel, its various forms and sizes and examine the way these are used in various examples.

2.      Reinforced Cement Concrete- Introduction to the concrete as a building material.

3.      Specialized applications of steel, concrete, and RCC- staircases, tanks, roofing material, etc.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Portfolio Development and Master classes
 

1. Masterclasses should emphasize on bamboo, wood, steel and RCC. 

2. Portfolio development - To organize and review all works done in the semester. To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject. Establish connections with other subjects where possible.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Ching, F. D. 1. (1975). Building construction illustrated. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold.

T2. Mckay, W. B. (2016). Building Construction Metric (Vol - 1.). Noida: Pearson.

T3. Deplazes, A. (2005). Constructing Architecture Materials Processes Structures A Handbook. Basel, Switzerland: Birkhäuser Publishers for Architecture.

T4. Lyons, A. (1997). Materials for Architects and Builders. An introduction Arnold, London.

T5. Deplazes, A. (2005). Constructing Architecture Materials Processes Structures A Handbook. Basel, Switzerland: Birkhäuser Publishers for Architecture.

T6. Preston, H. K. (1964). Prestressed concrete for Architects and Engineers. New York: McGraw Hill.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Spence R. F. and Cook D.J.(1983) Building Materials in Developing Countries, John Wiley and sons.

R2. Sinha,S. N(2002). Reinforced Concrete Design. New Delhi: Tata-McGraw Hill.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • Total CIA - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC331 - ARCHITECTURE TRADITIONS - MASONRY (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course is oriented to develop the ability to critically understand the built environment concepts through history.

To introduce the economic, political and ecological circumstances which made the craft of building Masonry in historical perspective.

To understand the idea of Masonry in built form and the historical perspective, the techniques and technology adopted in architecture.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Ability to connect geographical context, craft, and architecture culture through history. Level: Basic

CO2: Ability to recognize the role of material in development of structure, ornament, and form in architecture across different contexts. Level: Basic

CO 3: Ability to understand how social practices, cultural and political conditions influence the shape and form of architecture in a specific ecology. Level: Intermediate

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Craft of Built Form
 

1. Focus on art & science of Architecture and the craft of Masonry as a part of Studio-on-Wheels. Document and interpret the historical traditions that led to the specific kind of Masonry architecture in that specific context and examine the culture of people and activities there.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Masonry Architecture I - Mud and Brick
 

1. Early masonry architecture in different cultures and geographies.

2. The ordinary and extraordinary use of Mud and Brick in different cultures through various examples.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Masonry Architecture II - Stone and Concrete
 

1. The ordinary and extraordinary use of Stone and Concrete in different cultures and geographies. An overview - typologically and chronologically.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Portfolio Development and Master classes
 

1. Master classes should focus on relevant topics.

2. Portfolio development - To organise and review all works done in the semester. To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject. Establish connections with other subjects where possible of student’s work in the form of a portfolio and its effective compilation across courses and modules.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Francis D.K. Ching, Mark Jazombek, Vikramaditya Prakash; (2011)" A Global History of Architecture. Second Edition". John Wiley & Sons. 

2. Brown, Percy; (1983)"Indian Architecture (Islamic Period)", Taraporevala and Sons, Bombay

3. S.Lloyd and H.W.Muller;(1986)“History of World Architecture” - Series, Faber and Faber Ltd., London

4. Fergusson, James; (1876)"The History of Indian and Eastern Architecture"Cambridge University Press.

5. Khan, Sharmin; (2017)"History of Indian Architecture" CBS Publishers & Distributors

6. G.K.Hiraskar; (1988)"The Great Ages of World Architecture" Dhanpat Rai Publications

7. Hunter, Kaki; Kiffmeyer, Donald; (2004)"Earthbag Building: The tools, tricks, and techniques" New Society Publishers

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Bhatia, Gautam; (1994)"Laurie Baker: Life, Works and Writings" Penguin Books India

2. El-Shorbagy, Abdel-Moniem; (2019)"Hassan Fathy: Prophet of Earth Architecture" BookRix GmbH & Co. KG, Germany

3. White J.F, White S.J., Church Architecture: Building and Renovating for Christian worship, OSL Publications, 2008

4. Leland M Roth; Understanding Architecture: Its elements, history and meaning; Craftsman House, 1994.

5. Christopher Tadgell, The History of Architecture in India, Penguin Books (India) Ltd, New Delhi, 1990

6. El-Shorbagy, Abdel-Moniem; (2019)"Vision: Hassan Fathy in the Context od 20th Century Architecture", BookRix GmbH & Co. KG, Germany

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • This course shall have a written exam of three-hour duration.
  • Total ESE - 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC332 - LOGIC OF STRUCTURES - MASONRY (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course objectives: Reinforcing the conceptual understanding by using an abstract method of analysis of mass structures. Develop an understanding of structural system design Analysis of various RCC elements.

Learning Outcome

Course outcomes:

CO1: Ability to understand the logic of Masonry structures and their foundations. Level: Basic  

CO2: To describe the basic characteristics and mechanics of RCC materials Level: Basic.  

CO3: To understand the concept of short and long columns. Level: Intermediate

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Introduction to Masonry Structure, Foundations and RCC
 

1.      Masonry: Logic of MasonryStructure 

2.      Foundations: Different types of Foundations in masonry.

3.      RCC Materials: Basic Characteristics of Concrete & Reinforcing Steel Materials

4.    Mechanics of Reinforced Concrete: Concept of Concrete as a material.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Understanding load resisting mechanisms along with ways of transferring the load in different compression systems
 

1.      Direct and bending stresses in members.

2.      Determining the forces in rectangular or square sections subjected to combined stresses.

3.      Concept of Kern zone 

4.    Determining the stresses in members subjected to combined stresses.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Introduction of Surface System
 

1.      Introduction of the surface system as membrane-active and form-active. 

2.   Understanding of domes, vaults, or any shells as membrane structures versus tensile structures as form active systems.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Understanding Long and Short Columns
 

1.      Concept of long and short columns, slenderness ratio. 

2.    Determining the capacity of long and short columns. 

3.    The relevance of converting the long columns to short columns by altering the inertia or with bracings.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Books:

T1. Salvadori, M., & Heller, R. (1985). Structure in Architecture: The Building of Buildings. Prentice Hall; 3rd Revised edition.

T2. Schierle, G. (2008). Structure and Design. University Readers.

T3. Schodek, D., & Bechthold, M. (2013). Structures. Pearson; 7th Edition.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reference Books:

R1. Schierle, G. (2008). Structure and Design. University Readers.

R2. Schodek, D., & Bechthold, M. (2013). Structures. Pearson; 7th Edition.

R3. Singer, F. (1975). Engineering Mechanics. Weatherhill: Harper & Row, 3rd Edition.

R4. Unnikrishnan Pillai and Devdas Menon, Reinforced Concrete Design, McGraw Hill, New Delhi

R5. Subramanian, Design of Concrete structures. Oxford university Press

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in CIA.
  • The course shall have a written exam of three-hour duration.
  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC333 - BUILDING ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS - I (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course objectives:

To impart Basic and Conceptual knowledge about Water supply and Sanitation, Electricity, fire, and Life safety and skills required to integrate them into building designs.

Learning Outcome

Course outcomes:

CO1: To understand and apply alternative methods of resource management, organization, and operation of water, sanitation, waste and power supply, distribution, and disposal/renewal systems in the built environment. Level: Basic

CO2: To organize and demonstrate, through documentation (calculations and drawings) of water supply, power supply, waste management, and sanitation in a small-scale project. Level: Intermediate

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to Ecological Resources & Building Systems
 

This Unit is taught integrated with other subjects based on the knowledge from Studio-on-Wheels that includes.

1. Managing our Resources: Natural Resources - local and global. How do we manage our resources and what are the consequences.

2. The logic of Systems: What is a system? What are the systems that enable our modern built environment to exist? What role do building systems sanitation, comfort, regulations, etc. play in making our built-environment different from earlier civilizations?

3. Climate Change: Understanding Climate change and how it is affecting the place and our immediate environment.

4. Waste and its management: What waste is generated and why? How do we deal with it at the macro and micro level? Discuss the paradigm shift that is required to manage our waste.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Water Resources and Systems
 

1. Water as resource and system: Storage, Treatment - quantifying, and rationalizing for various uses. Schematic diagrams and calculations for better comprehension.

2. Rainwater Management: Managing rainwater for society in buildings - recharge, reuse, and re-fuse.

3. Water supply: Introduction to Water Supply and Modern plumbing and drainage systems.

4. Drainage and Waste - Systems and Treatment: Compare natural drainage systems and modern articulated systems. What are the ways waste can be a resource.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Introduction to Power and Energy - Resources and Systems
 

1. Introduction to Energy Resources: Hydroelectric, coal power, nuclear power, solar, wind, wave, mechanical, etc. Concepts of renewable and non-renewable energy.

2. Electrical Services: Voltage, Current, Power, Connected Load,

3. Supply and distribution of electricity to buildings: Introduction

4. Circuits, Switchgear & Protection

5. Building Electrical Distribution System: Max. Demand, Load, Diversity Factor, Power Requirement of each building

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Design for ARC-351 project, Workshops and Master classes
 

1. Architectural Design Project: the student establishes a Project Document explaining, Water and Energy Resource Management, Sanitation, and Waste management ideas for the proposed design.

2. Masterclass on topics that review the following ideas -

a. Climate Change and the role of design

b. Resource Management and Sustainable design

c. Building Systems and Energy-efficient systems

3. Introduction to Fire and Life Safety: At a conceptual level

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Books:

T1. Deshpande, R. (1963). A Text-Book of Sanitary Engineering Vol I and II Combined. Poona, United Book Corporation.

T2. Birdi, G. (2010). Water supply and Sanitary Engineering. Dhanpat. Rai & Sons Publishers. 8th. Edition.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reference Books:

R1. SP35 Handbook on Water Supply and Drainage (with Special Emphasis on Plumbing. (1996). Bureau of Indian Standards.

R2. Board, C. P. (2010). Green Book: Pollution Control Act, Rules, and Notifications Issued. CPCB.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum 50% in CIA.
  • The course shall have a written exam of three-hour duration.
  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC334 - CLIMATE RESPONSIVE ARCHITECTURE - I (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To introduce the knowledge required for understanding the influence of climate on architecture including the environmental processes which affect the building, such as thermal, daylighting, etc.

Learning Outcome

CO1: To conceptualize and apply fundamental principles of building physics in order to ensure functional efficiency in the built environments. Level: Basic

CO2: To measure and evaluate the environmental performance of buildings as a response to climate and surroundings. Level: Basic

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Reading the Site
 
  1. The Climate-built form interaction with examples. Elements of climate, concepts of climate change and its impact, measurement and representations of climatic data. Classifications and Characteristics of tropical climates.
  2. Major climatic zones of India, the macroclimate and exploring them through vernacular examples.
  3. Understanding Site Climate for the Studio-on-Wheels documentation and design exercise in ARC 351 Crafting the Masonry Envelope.
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:18
Indigenous Built Environments
 
  1. Logic of climate responsiveness of indigenous built-environments w.r.t. daylight, heat, ventilation, humidity, etc.
  2. Thermal balance of the human body, Thermal Comfort Indices. Measuring indoor air movement through various handheld and digital tools.
  3. Calculation of Overheated and Under heated period for locations in Climatic zones and their optimization in terms of solar heating and Passive cooling desired.
  4. Sun-path diagram: Solar geometry & design for orientation and use of solar charts in understanding traditional vernacular climatic design.
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:30
The Passive Design Way
 
  1. Passive design in buildings.
  2. Factors affecting the thermal performance of the building.
  3. Concepts of thermal Heat gain or loss: Steady-state and periodic heat flow concepts, Conductivity, resistivity, diffusivity, thermal capacity time lag and 'U' value. Calculation of U value for multi-layered walls and Roof.
  4. Shading devices: Optimizing Design of Shading devices.
  5. Natural ventilation: Functions of natural ventilation, thermal force and wind velocity. Concept of air movement.
  6. Day Lighting: Nature of natural light, its transmission, reflection, diffusion, glares.
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Portfolio development & Group Work Presentation
 

Master class for advances in climate-responsive architecture relevant to the studio curriculum. 

Portfolio development - To organize and review all works done in the semester. To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject. Establish connections with other subjects where possible.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Koenigsberger, O. H. (1975). Manual of Tropical Housing & Building. Orient Blackswan.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Givoni, B. (1969). Man, climate and architecture. Elsevier.

R2. Szokolay, S. V. (2014). Introduction to architectural science: the basis of sustainable design. Routledge.

R3. Evans, M. (1980). Housing, Climate and Comfort. Architectural Press.

R4. Fry, M., & Drew, J. (1964). Tropical architecture in the dry and humidzones. London: B.T. Batsford.

R5. Konya, A. (1980). Design Primer for Hot Climates. London: Architectural Press; New York: Whitney Library of Design.

R6. Krishnan, A., Baker, N., Yannas, S., & Szokolay, S. (2001). Climate Responsive Architecture: A Design Handbook for Energy Efficient Buildings. New Delhi: Tata McGraw-Hill Education Publishing Company.

R7. Majumdar, M. (2002). Energy efficient buildings: TERI India publication.

R8. Markus, T., & Morris, E. (1980). Buildings, Climate and Energy. Pitman Publishing, London.

R9. Saini, B. S. (1980). Building in Hot dry climates. NY: Wiley Interscience-John Wiley.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum 50% in CIA.
  • The course shall have a written exam of three-hour duration.
  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC351 - DESIGNING THE MASONRY ENVELOPE (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:90
No of Lecture Hours/Week:6
Max Marks:300
Credits:9

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course objectives:

Engage with more intensive architectural design thinking through documentation and design of masonry structures and architecture with emphasis on climatic responsiveness that informs the design project.

Focus on “Me and my Cultural Environment” through documentation, contextual analysis and design exercises that enhances critical- thinking and representational skills through rigorous training.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Ability to document a cultural and climatic context with a rich tradition of masonry architecture. Level: Basic

CO2: Ability to design in response to climate and cultural requirements and apply the logic of material and structure. Level: High

CO3: Ability to put together a well-done portfolio of what has been learnt in all courses in the semester in a coherent manner. Level: Intermediate

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:24
Responding to cultural, material and climatic context
 
  1. Travel curated to expose students to the culture of masonry architecture.
  2. Introduce the relationship between climate, material and the built environment.
  3. Studying, documenting and analysing the traditional, cultural and material context that enables the masonry construction.
  4. Integrate with all other courses in the semester.
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:24
Understanding Context and Site
 
  1. Reading and documenting the site intuitively and technically, the context (cultural, geographical and climatic) through the Studio-on- wheels and initiate the design exercise.
  2.  Exploration of local material resources that inform architecture. 
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:24
Shaping the Envelope
 
  1. Design development of “Me and my cultural environment” with a design project having a simple 3-4 room community/group function such as community centre, public health centre, interpretation centre etc.
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:18
Portfolio Development and Group Exhibition - 2 weeks
 

Portfolio development - To organize and review all works done in the semester. To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject. Establish connections with other subjects where possible of student’s work in the form of a portfolio and its effective compilation across courses and modules.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Ching, F. D. K. (2015). Architecture: Form, Space, & Order (Fourth edition.). New Jersy: John Wiley.

Callender, J. (1997). Time-saver Standards for Architectural Design Data (7th Revised edition edition ed.). McGraw-Hill Inc.,US.

Gill, R. (1990). Rendering with Pen and Ink. Thames & Hudson Ltd.

Carter, R. (2012). On and By Frank Lloyd Wright: A Primer of Architectural Principles. Phaidon Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Rasmussen, S. E. (1962). Experiencing Architecture. The MIT Press Cambridge

Clark, R. H., & Pause, M. (2012). Precedents in architecture: Analytic diagrams, formative ideas, and partis (4th ed.). Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley & Sons

Givoni, B. (1981). Man, Climate and Architecture (2nd ed.). New York: Applied Science Publishers, ltd.

Carter, R. (2012). On and By Frank Lloyd Wright: A Primer of Architectural Principles. Phaidon Press.

Curtis, W. (1994). Le Corbusier: Ideas and Forms. Phaidon Press; Revised ed. edition.

Mertins, D. (2014). Mies. Phaidon Press.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE).

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • The students shall be continuously assessed towards their CIA which comprises of creative and innovative assignments. The CIA shall have four components of CIA 1, CIA 2, CIA 3, and Attendance.
  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for Studio courses shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE).
  • TOTAL CIA: 150

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum 50% in CIA.
  • The Studio course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.
  • TOTAL ESE: 150 Marks

ARC352 - TECHNIQUE OF DIGITAL REPRESENTATION I (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course objectives:  

To develop basic and some advanced skills required in using digital tools to conceive, develop, and present architectural ideas.

Learning Outcome

Course outcomes:  

CO1: To learn and demonstrate the use of the basic level of 2D drafting involved in design learning and digital presentation; Level: Basic.  

CO2: To learn 3D modeling and visualization tools in explorations and communication of design ideas; Level: Basic. 

CO3: To learn and demonstrate the understanding of building performance analysis through software integration; Level: Basic. 

CO4: To learn and demonstrate design presentation and report making using digital tools. Level: Basic

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Introduction to digital tools and Architectural design representation and challenges of their usage
 

1. Introduction to AutoCAD 2014 (or relevant 2D drafting software): AutoCAD as a tool to produce Architectural Drawings

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Visualising design
 

1.      Introduction to 3d modelling: Trimble SketchUp or relevant 3D modelling

2.      software - Converting 2D project (of Unit-1) into3D.

3.      3D modelling: Creating site contours in 3D, Creating 3D presentation models.

4.      Rendering & Visualization: Generating 3d Model and introduction to concepts of visualization using rendering engines such as V-Ray/ Lumion.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Analyzing the built form
 

1.      Exploring the idea of building performance analysis in Sketchup through AD time problem. 

2.    Introduction to Photoshop – Self-study module.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Portfolio development & Group work Presentation
 

Portfolio development - To organise and review all works done in the semester. To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject. Establish connections with other subjects where possible.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Online Resources:

W1. Vast amount of CAD for architecture resources available on the Internet. W2. http://www.sketchup.com/learnivideos

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reference Books:

R1. Faulkner, A., & Chavez, C. (2017). Adobe Photoshop CC: 2017 release. Noida: Pearson India education services pvt ltd.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • Total CIA - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%. 

ARC353 - MATERIAL STRATEGIES FOR MASONRY (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course objectives:

  1. To explore the diverse characteristics of Masonry architecture in various materials.
  2. Examine the logic of form, construction and finish of Masonry architecture in detail.
  3. Draw and document Masonry construction details.
  4. Explore the relevance of construction details in influencing the architectural character.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Ability to appreciate and document architectural expression in Masonry. Level: Basic. 

CO2: Ability to recognize the logic of material in form and spatial character especially in the context of Masonry architecture. Level: Intermediate. 

CO3: Ability to detail Masonry architecture towards functional, technical, and aesthetic requirements. Level: Intermediate. 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Masonry construction
 
  1.  Exploring and understanding the craft of Masonry construction through Studio-On-Wheels.
  2. Introducing the concept of Masonry and materials such as brick, stone, mud etc. through experiential learning.
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:25
Brick and Mud Masonry construction
 
  1. Systems of material component: Brick and mud masonry terminologies; Types of masonry bonds, Skills of masonry construction
  2. Systems of building elements: Brick masonry walls, foundations, mortar type, plasters, buttresses, arches, and lintels.
  3. Systems in Architecture: Conceptual idea of brick masonry elements in different Architectural styles; the structural syntax of load-bearing construction in brick, Architectural detailing in brick masonry
  4. Floor, wall, roof finishes.
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:25
Stone Masonry construction
 
  1.  Systems of material component: Stone masonry terminologies; Types of stone masonry bonds, Skills of masonry construction
  2. Systems of building elements: Types of stone masonry walls, foundations, mortar type, plasters, buttresses, arches, and lintels.
  3. Systems in Architecture: Conceptual idea of stone masonry elements in different Architectural styles; the structural syntax of load-bearing construction in stone, Architectural detailing in stone masonry.
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Arches, Vaults and Domes
 
  1. Introduction to arches, vaults and domes in masonry.
  2. Principles and methods of construction
Text Books And Reference Books:

Ching, F. (2014). Building construction Illustrated. Wiley. T2. Mckay, W. (2012). Building Construction. Pearson India.

Chudley , R., &Greeno, R. (2005). Construction Technology. Prentice Hall, 4 edition.

Emmitt, S., & Gorse, C. (2009). Barry's Introduction to Construction of Buildings. Wiley-Blackwell.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Deplazes, A. (2005). Constructing Architecture Materials Processes Structures A Handbook. Basel, Switzerland: Birkhäuser Publishers for Architecture.

Frampton, K. (2001). Studies in Tectonic Culture. Cambridge.

Francis Mallgrave, H. (2004). Style in the Technical and Tectonic Arts; Practical Aesthetics. Los Angeles.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE).

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

    • The students shall be continuously assessed towards their CIA which comprises of creative and innovative assignments. The CIA shall have four components of CIA 1, CIA 2, CIA 3, and Attendance.
    • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for the course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for award of marks.
    • A minimum of 50% in CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE).
    • Total CIA - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

    • Eligibility to appear for ESE is score of minimum 50% in CIA.
    • The Studio course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
    • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
    • Total ESE - 50 Marks

ARC431 - LOGIC OF STRUCTURES - ADVANCED (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Reinforcing the conceptual understanding of frame structures by using the abstract method of analysis. To develop the ability to design and analyze advanced steel structural systems.

Learning Outcome

CO1: To conceptualize and evaluate advanced steel structural systems,  composite construction. Level: Intermediate  

CO2: Conceptualize and apply principles of structural behavior in withstanding gravity, lateral forces, wind & seismic forces; Level: Intermediate 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to National Building Code: IS 800:
 

Introduction to National Building Code: IS 800: Criteria & Design to satisfy Building Codes and Standards 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Determinate and Indeterminate Structures
 

1.      Analysis of indeterminatestructures.

2.      Introduction to stiffness and distributionfactors.

3.      Introduction to moment distributionmethod.

4.    Indeterminacy of the frame, comparison of post and lintel system with rigid jointedframe.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Lateral Forces
 

1.      Importance of rigid frames in resistivity of lateral forces like wind and earthquakes. 

2.    Comparative study of three common materials - masonry, reinforced concrete, and structuralsteel.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Understanding Structural Systems
 

Carrying capacity of three structural materials and different structural systems in these materials.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Schodek, D. L., & Bechthold, M. (2014). Structures. New Delhi: PHI. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Duggal, S. K. (2010). Limit State Design of Steel Structures. New Delhi: Tata Mcgraw-Hill Publishing Company.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a written exam of three-hour duration.
  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC432 - BUILDING ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS - II (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Objectives:

Explore renewable energy systems and indigenous water harvesting practices.
To impart Intermediate knowledge about water supply, sanitation, fire and life safety, and the skills required in the built environment and to integrate them into the building design.
To impart Intermediate knowledge and skills required for understanding Electricity, illumination and Ventilation, and Air-Handling services in the built environment and their integration with Architectural design.
Level of Knowledge: Basic

Learning Outcome

CO1: Ability to evaluate and conceptualize water distribution & conservation practices for different situations. Level: Advanced.

CO2: Ability to evaluate and conceptualize electrical and illumination, fire safety & protection solutions for different types of buildings. Level: Advanced.

CO3: Ability to evaluate and recommend Electrical equipment, functioning, and distribution of loads in various types of electrical systems and firefighting systems. Level: Intermediate.

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Studio on Wheels
 

1. Renewable Energy Systems and its utilization.

2. Case studies on Traditional water harvesting methods.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Water Supply, Sewerage system & Solid waste management (Guest lecture and site visits)
 

1. Water efficiency and intelligent use of water -quantifying and rationalizing for various uses.

2. Water Supply piping - hot, cold, flushing water

3. Drainage Systems and material construction.

4. Rainwater Management: Assessment & quantification

5. Sewerage System: Assessment of sewage generated, Collection of sewage / wastewater treatment and reuse or disposal

6. Solid Waste Management: Assessment of waste collection, treatment and safe disposal.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:3
Advanced Electricity and Lighting
 

1. Electrical Layout Design: Residential & Commercial Layout design, Compliance to local building codes.

2. Illumination: Lighting and Low Voltage Power Systems and High Voltage Power systems: Source and its distribution.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Advanced Fire & Life Safety system
 

1. Advanced Fire Safety: Passive and active fire safety systems.

2. Building code requirements for Fire & Life Safety

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Design for ARC451 project, Workshops and Master classes
 

1. Architectural Design Project: In coordination, the student establishes a Project Document explaining, Water and Energy Resource Management, Sanitation and Waste management ideas for the proposed design.

2. Masterclass on topics that review the following ideas -

a. Climate Change and the role of design

b. Resource Management and Sustainable design

c. Building Systems and Energy-efficient systems

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Deshpande, R. (1963). A Text-Book of Sanitary Engineering Vol I and II Combined. Poona, United Book Corporation.

T2. Birdi, G. (2010). Water supply and Sanitary Engineering. Dhanpat. Rai & Sons Publishers. 8th. Edition.

T3. Mittle, V, &Mittle, A. (2017). Basic Electrical Engineering by Anwari. McGraw Hill Education; 2 edition.

T4. Cotton, H. (2005). Electrical Technology. CBS; 7 edition

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. SP35 Handbook on Water Supply and Drainage (with Special Emphasis on Plumbing. (1996). Bureau of Indian Standards.

R2. Board, C. P. (2010). Green Book: Pollution Control Act, Rules, and Notifications Issued. CPCB.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a written exam of three-hour duration.
  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC441A - ADVANCED COMPUTING (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To Introduce the process of algorithmic architecture to the students. Course is intended to develop advanced prototyping techniques among the students.

Learning Outcome

1.To learn and demonstrate the application of algorithmic Process In Design.

2.To learn the scripting tools – (Visual Scripting) to construct Algorithm.

3.To learn the skill of proto typing through digital means.

4.To learn and Demonstrate the process Architectural Form finding with the means of Algorithmic Process.
 

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Algorithmic Design
 

1. Introduction to Algorithmic process of design with the help of physical Assignments.

       2. Introduction to Visual Scripting tool Rhino3D (Grasshopper) .  

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Data Structures
 

1.   Introduction to Data types. Various types of data and their workflow.

2.   Introduction to Data Trees. Workflow with data trees

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Prototyping:
 

1. Exploring the process of algorithmic design into architectural elements.

 

       2. Prototyping of Architectural element.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.AAD_Algorithms-Aided Design  (Arturo Tedeschi) :2014.

2.Parametric Architecture with Grasshopper: Primer (Arturo Tedeschi)2011

3.Algorithmic Architecture (Kostas Terzidis) :2006

4.Digtial Fabrications : Architectural  and Material Techniques (Architecture Brief) ( Lisa Iwamoto) : 2009

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.Computational Design thinking ( Achim MengesSean Ahlquist) 2011

2.Techniques and Technologies in Morphogenetic Design (Michael Hensel , Achim Menges, Michael Weinstock)

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1-10; CIA2-15; CIA 3 20 Attendance 5; ESE 50; Total 100 Marks

CRITERIA

Area of Evaluation

EXCELLENT

GOOD

SATISFACTORY

UNSATISFACTORY

Above 75%

75% - 60%

60% - 50%

Below 50%

Promptness &

Consistency

Submitted before deadline and complete in all respects

Submitted before deadline but incomplete

Submitted after deadline and incomplete

No Submission

Cognitive Decision making

Ability to preempt the problem and solve the issue.

Ability to identify the problem

Ability to understand the system

No ability to identify the issue.

Creative Discretion

Ability to build Generic and robust Algorithm.

Ability to build robust Algorithm.

Ability to build workable Algorithm

Cannot develop an Algorithm

Participation in class

Good references to literature, readings, experiences, and participation in the discussion

Few literature references and interacts less in the discussion

Interacts less in the discussion

No interaction

ARC441B - THEORY OF DESIGN (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: - Elective subjects have been suggested which are related to specialized areas in Architecture. The student may choose any one subject of interest. The detailed syllabus of the electives chosen and the modus operandi of teaching will be taken up by the faculty-in-charge.

Course Objective: - To expose the students to specialized areas of architecture.

Elective options: 1. Theory of Design; 2. Terracotta and Pottery; 3. Set Design; 4. Advanced Computing; 5. Urban Water Systems; 6. Art Appreciation; 7. Architectural Journalism; 8. Urban Anthropology; 9. Water and Architecture; 10. Furniture Design; 11. Art of Photography; 12. Vernacular, Tribal architecture and craft

Learning Outcome

Course Outcome: -To acquire the knowledge of the chosen area of specialization; to apply or innovate the fundamentals and details learnt, in design.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Understanding design and design in history
 

Understanding design and design in history

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Role of the designer in changing society
 

Role of the designer in changing society: classification of design; Methodologies, theories and models of the design process

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Creativity and techniques to enable creative thinking
 

Creativity and techniques to enable creative thinking; creativity in architecture; pattern language and participatory approach to design.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Lidwell William, Kritna Holden (2010); Universal Principles of Design, Rockport Publishers Inc. Rockport United States 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Lidwell William, Kritna Holden (2010); Universal Principles of Design, Rockport Publishers Inc. Rockport United States 

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a written exam of three-hour duration.
  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC441C - ART OF PHOTOGRAPHY (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To provide a choice of subjects that enhance student’s design thinking, technical skills,

specialized knowledge, professional skills, allied subjects or other craft, art or science-based subjects. The student may choose any one subject of interest that is offered by the faculty for the semester. The detailed syllabus of the electives chosen and the modus operandi of teaching will be taken up by the faculty-in-charge.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Ability to learn a new skill or body of knowledge, or strategy of thinking as related to the course.

Level: Basic

CO2: Ability to conceptualise and apply learning in relation to design process or representation.

 Level: Intermediate

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Photography
 
  • Exposure to a variety of Analog and digital photographic techniques.
  • Basic understanding of shots, sizes, and angles.
  • Technical aspects such as Exposure triangle, Composition, Framing, and Introduction to Lighting.
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Photographic Design
 
  • Introduction to contemporary and historic photographers and their works. 
  • Understanding and applying visual design elements and principles in photography.
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Appreciation of photography
 
  • Students will be exposed to multiple photographic practices such as documentary photography, fine art photography and fashion  photography, product photography and architecture photography.
  • Students will discuss many moral and theoretical issues attached to the medium, such as photography’s relationships between truth, beauty, and fact, as well as the ethics of war photography
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Print Media and Portfolio
 
  • Introduction to Print medium. 
  • Introduction of Portfolios  (Manual and digital Format)
Text Books And Reference Books:

 

  1. John P  (1992).”Basic Techniques of Photography”Boston:An Ansel Adams Guide: Little Brown and Company .

  2. Horenstein, Henry. (1977)” Beyond Basic Photography” Boston: A Technical Manual: Little Brown and Company.

  3. Craven, George M.(1990) , “Object and Image :An Introduction to Photography” New Jersey: Prentice Hall,Englewood Cliffs

  4. John Suler’s .2013.”Photographic Psychology: Image and Psyche” LosAngeles:True Center Publishing.
Evaluation Pattern

CIA I- Unit I & II - 10 Marks

CIA II- Unit I, II & III - 10 Marks

CIA III- Unit I, II, III & IV - 10 Marks

 

ARC451 - RURAL STUDIO (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:90
No of Lecture Hours/Week:6
Max Marks:300
Credits:9

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Engage in a rural outreach program through an architecture design project by adopting appropriate technology that seeks solutions to environmental, social concerns and addresses the sustainability paradigm.

Design and execution of an architectural project of a dwelling environment of a small community, with a focus on ideas of type and typology through site studies and analysis.

Study of correlation between climate-environmental parameters and social-cultural patterns as generators of an architectural space.

Construction and commissioning of the approved architectural design that is externally funded, preferred.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Ability to acquire basic knowledge and practical skills of the chosen appropriate technology. Ability to demonstrate innovation and technical expertise in the same. Level: Intermediate

CO2: Ability to interpret Design programme through contextual analysis and the ability to make an informed choice of appropriate technology in the design project. Ability to innovate and apply the study of alternative technology into the built environment through typological understanding contextually.

CO3: Ability to apply the idea of ‘contextuality’, culturally and physically, to the architectural design project. Level: High

CO4: Ability to put together a well-done portfolio of what has been learned in all courses in the semester in a coherent manner. Level: Intermediate

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:18
Appropriate Building Technology and Skill Development
 

1. Introducing the adopted appropriate technology through undertaking basic and advanced level skill development technical workshops.

2. Demonstrating understanding of the contextual (environmental, social, ethical, historical) material and functional aspects of the appropriate technology and its applications.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Site Analysis, Prototyping
 

1. Reading of the site, environment, and social context intuitively and documenting it technically.

2. Analysis of site and context, along with studying climate-environmental parameters and social-cultural patterns to arrive at a program/ project brief.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Architectural Design Project
 

1. Development of the Design Proposal through conceptual ideas and its development along with technical integration of structural principles and applying the skills of adopted appropriate building technology.

2. Exploration of concepts of modularity, sustainability and undertaking prototyping for its demonstration. 

Integrate with all other courses in the semester.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:30
Architecture Design Project: Construction, Execution and Outreach at Site
 

1. Executing and commissioning the final architectural design, by implementing the skills of the appropriate technology through outreach on-site.

2. Sponsorship of the design and construction by an agency/NGO/organization is prferred.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Portfolio Development and Presentation
 

Portfolio development - To organise and review all works done in the semester. To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject. Establish connections with other subjects where possible of student’s work in the form of a portfolio and its effective compilation across courses and modules.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Ching, F. D. K. (2015). Architecture: Form, Space, & Order (Fourth edition.). New Jersy: John Wiley.

T2. Callender, J. (1997). Time-saver Standards for Architectural Design Data (7th Revised edition edition ed.). McGraw-Hill Inc.,US.

T3. Gill, R. (1990). Rendering with Pen and Ink. Thames & Hudson Ltd.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Minke. G (2012). Building with Bamboo, Design and Technology of a Sustainable Architecture. Birkhauser, Basel Switzerland.

R2. Rapoport, A (1969). House Form and Culture. Prentice-Hall, Inc. Englewood Cliffs, NJ USA Pearson

R3. Clark, R. H., & Pause, M. (2012). Precedents in architecture: Analytic diagrams, formative ideas, and partis (4th ed.). Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley & Sons

R4. Carter, R. (2012). On and By Frank Lloyd Wright: A Primer of Architectural Principles. Phaidon Press.

R5. Curtis, W. (1994). Le Corbusier: Ideas and Forms. Phaidon Press; Revised edition. R6. Mertins, D., & Lambert, P. (2014). Mies. New York: Phaidon.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of a particular course
  • CIA 1 - 25 Marks - Evaluation would be based on the participation, creativity & comprehension and representation of the exercises based on workshops, guest lectures and studio exercises assigned; CIA 2 - 50 marks - Evaluation of the contextual study would be based on the participation, creativity & comprehension and representation of the exercises based on travel & site study, literature & case studies and studio exercises assigned, to integrate preliminary study and site study; CIA 3 - 75 Marks - Evaluation of the Exploration of architectural language would be based on the participation in the studio and creativity of the Design & its development; Total CIA - 150 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • This course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.

TOTAL MARKS - 300

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC452 - TECHNIQUE OF DIGITAL REPRESENTATION - II (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course objectives: To develop advanced skills required in using digital tools to conceive, develop and present architectural ideas.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Converting 2D drafting into 3D. Level: Intermediate  

CO2: To learn 3D modelling and visualization tools in explorations and communication of design ideas for building envelope and interiors; Level: Intermediate 

CO3: To learn and demonstrate the understanding of design presentation and report making using desktop publishing tools. Level: Intermediate 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Drawing in Virtual Space
 

1.      Introduction to virtual space and the limitations and potentials of digital representation.

2.    Introduction to advanced 3D modelling software and relevance, capabilities - for e.g. Advanced Sketchup as an Extension of Project, Autodesk Revit (Advanced) / or 3DS Max orRhino3D.

3.   Introduction to online resources, blogs, tutorials.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Visualising the Space
 

Techniques of 3D visualizations - Introduction to tool settings in 3D rendering engines. For e.g. Using V- Ray /Lumion 3D rendering   software

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Presenting the Design
 

1.      Introduction to Vector graphics editing as a tool to present architecture design studio projects -introduction to Adobe Illustrator / Corel DRAW.

2.    Introduction to Desktop publishing tools — for e.g. Adobe InDesign, CorelDraw, and Prezi as tools to create presentations and portfolios. Studio on wheel reports/ journal to be prepared in InDesign to explore desktop publishing

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Portfolio development & Group work Exhibition
 

Portfolio development - To organize and review all works done in the semester. To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject. Establish connections with other subjects where possible

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Books:

T1. Finkelstein, E. (2008). Autocad 2009 & Autocad LT 2009. New Delhi: John Wiley and Sons.

T2. Anton, K. K., & Cruise, John. (2017). Adobe InDesign CC: Classroom in a book. Noida: Pearson India education services pvt ltd.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reference Books:

R1. Adobe creative suite, Online web site of Adobe products: www.adobe.com

R2. Sketchup: Online documentation, videos: http://www.sketchup.com/learnivideos

Online Resources:

W1. https://knowledge.autodesk.com

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • Total CIA - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC453 - CLIMATE RESPONSIVE ARCHITECTURE - II (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course objectives:

To develop the knowledge required for understanding the influence of environmental science on Architecture including the environmental processes for promoting co-existence of built and the natural environment.

Learning Outcome

CO1: To describe the complex relationships between the built and natural environments, its abuse and reviving strategies; Level: Basic 

CO2: To measure and evaluate the environmental performance of buildings. Level: Basic

CO3: To have command on fundamental principles of building physics in order to ensure functional efficiency in the built environments, the art and science of efficient building design. Level: Basic

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Reading the Site
 

Introduction to complex relationships between the natural environments and built environment, causes and impacts of environmental degradation and conversations

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Indigenous Built Environments
 
  1. Sustainable Sites to meet the risks of climate change; Site Specific Design; Development Density and Community Connectivity, Alternative Transportation, Site Development, Storm water Design and Heat Island Effect with examples.
  2. Water Efficiency: Innovative Wastewater Treatment and Reuse and Water Use Reduction and Re use factors. Visit to innovative Re-use and wastewater treatment systems/sites.
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
The Passive Design Way
 

Strategies to transform the built environment

  1. Energy and Atmosphere: Optimize Energy Performance, On-site Renewable Energy, Enhanced Commissioning and Green Power. To apply the principles of Solar and other Passive Architecture to design of buildings. 
  2. Materials and Resources: Building Reuse, Maintain Existing Walls, Floors,andRoof, Construction waste management, MaterialsReuse, Recycled Content, Regional Materials and Certified Wood.
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:40
Portfolio development & Group Work Presentation
 
  1. Performance evaluation of live case study; Thermal performance of built environment; natural and artificial lighting and ventilation and wind movement which will involve measurements; documentation and recording; analysis and design using hand held and digital tools and through simulation using appropriatesoftware.
  2. Performance evaluation of Renewable Energy Systems, Fenestration, Opaque Construction, etc. as per test standards specified in NBC and ECBC, LEED,etc.
  3. Study of natural structures and processes Concepts of ecologyand landscape;
Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Givoni, B. (1969). Man, climate and architecture. Elsevier.

T2. Szokolay, S. V. (2014). Introduction to architectural science: the basis of sustainable design. Routledge.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Koenigsberger, O. H. (1975). Manual of Tropical Housing & Building. Orient Blackswan.

R2. Majumdar, M. (2002). Energy efficient buildings: TERI India publication.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum 50% in CIA.
  • This course shall have a written exam of three-hour duration.
  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC454 - MATERIAL STRATEGIES FOR AN APPROPRIATE ARCHITECTURE (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course objectives:

To introduce the architectural expression of alternative constructional composition.

To familiarize students with a market study of building materials and their applications. Explore the relevance of Alternate Materials & Techniques in influencing the architectural character; Draw and document applicable Sustainable construction details; Explore the relevance of RCC and Steel construction details in influencing the architectural character.

Learning Outcome

CO1: The ability to describe, document, and appreciate the architectural expression of alternative constructional composition. Level: Intermediate.  

CO2: Knowledge about the applications and construction details of conventional (RCC, Steel) roofing systems. Level: Advanced.  

CO3: Ability to design a structure using RCC, steel, and the details of the assembly of it to modules of columns, beams, roofs, etc. Level: Advanced

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Alternate Building Materials & Construction
 

1. Introduction to Appropriate Local Sustainable materials/Buildings, Choice/selection, benefits etc.

2. Familiarize with the building material bamboo and the Bamboo construction methods.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Alternate Roofing Systems
 

1. Alternate roofing: Jack Arch, Madras terrace, and stone slab roof

2. RCC filler slabs: Principles and methods of construction. Introduction to different filler materials, Mangalore tiles, Burnt Clay Bricks, Hollow Concrete blocks, Stabilized Hollow Mud blocks, Clay pots, Coconut shells etc. 

3. Introduction to Vaults and Domes – RCC

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
RCC Roofs
 

1. Introduction to RCC Slabs: Principles and methods of construction- one-way, two-way slabs, cantilever slabs, sloping RCC roof, one way continuous, and two ways continuous.

2. Introduction to Advanced RCC roofs: Principles and methods of construction -Moment frame, Flat slab and Flat plate, Waffle slab. 

3. RCC Staircase: Principles and methods of construction.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:20
Steel Construction
 

1. Introducing Structural steel as a building material

2. Principles and methods involved in steel construction

3. Steel Trusses (Light Gauge Steel)– Short Span, Long Span, North Light Roofs, aluminium sheet and profiled MS sheet cladding and roof fixing details. 

4. Hot Rolled and Cold Rolled Steel application in Building Construction.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Chudley , R., &Greeno, R. (2005). Construction Technology. Prentice Hall, 4 edition. T2. Emmitt , S., & Gorse, C. (2009). Barry's Introduction to Construction of Buildings. Wiley- Blackwell.

T3. Mckay, W. (2012). Building Construction. Pearson India.

T4. Deplazes, A. (2005). Constructing Architecture Materials Processes Structures A Handbook. Basel, Switzerland: Birkhäuser Publishers for Architecture.

T5. Francis Mallgrave, H. (2004). Style in the Technical and Tectonic Arts; Practical Aesthetics. Los Angeles.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Frampton, K. (2001). Studies in Tectonic Culture. Cambridge.

Online Resources:

W1. http://madeingreatlakes.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/Appropriate-Building-Materials..pdf

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • Total CIA - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC531 - MATERIALS AND METHODS IN BUILDING CONSTRUCTION V (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course objectives:   To develop the ability to describe, document and appreciate Architectural expression through use Materials and construction with Advanced Materials and technologies

Learning Outcome

Course outcomes: CO1:  To describe the properties of glass, its manufacturing methods and the assembly of it to modules of doors and windows, structural glazing and skylights. Level: Moderate 

CO2:  To describe different types of Glazing and methods of construction used in structural glazing. Level: Basic 

CO3:  To analyse and infer from documentation of a case study on sliding and folding door and innovate its construction detail. Level: Moderate 

CO4:  To describe the assembly methods of skylights, metal &aluminium cladding and panel. Level: Moderate

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Glass as a building material
 

1. Glass manufacturing in various types like plate, tinted, decorative, reinforced, laminated glass block, fiber glass, glass murals, partially       colored glass, etching of glass and its applications in building industry for both exteriors and interiors. Use and Application of different types of Glass in Life Safety Application. Glass fabrication techniques, fiber reinforced composite materials and products.

2. Frameless glass doors and windows and partitions: Fixing and fabrication details.  

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Structural Glazing and Cladding
 

1. Structural Glazing and cladding: Fixing and fabrication details 

2. Point supported glazing: Fixing and fabrication details

3. Floating Glass Walls 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Sliding and Folding Doors
 

1. Wooden sliding and folding doors and partitions: Principles and methods of construction and detailing.

2. Steel sliding and folding doors and partitions: Principles and methods of construction and detailing. 

3. Aluminum sliding and folding doors and partitions: Principles and methods of construction and detailing.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Skylight
 

1. Skylight in steel and glass: Principles and methods of construction and detailing.

2. Alternative wall & Roof technologies: Sandwich panel walls, PUF panels etc. 

3. Introduction to Aluminum cladding: ACP, Aluminum louvers; Fixing and fabrication details.

4. Metal cladding of Facades and Building envelopes: Fixing and fabrication details

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Books: 1. T1-Chudley , R., &Greeno, R. (2005). Construction Technology. Prentice Hall,  edition. 2. T2- Emmitt , S., & Gorse, C. (2009). Barry's Introduction to Construction of Buildings. Wiley-Blackwell. 3. T3- Mckay, W. (2012). Building Construction. Pearson India. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reference Books: 1. Chudley , R., & Greeno, R. (2005). Construction Technology. Prentice Hall, 4 edition. 2. Emmitt , S., & Gorse, C. (2009). Barry's Introduction to Construction of Buildings. WileyBlackwell. 3. Mckay, W. (2012). Building Construction. Pearson India. 4. Deplazes, A. (2005). Constructing Architecture Materials Processes Structures A Handbook. Basel, Switzerland: Birkhäuser Publishers for Architecture. 5. Francis Mallgrave, H. (2004). Style in the Technical and Tectonic Arts; Practical Aesthetics. Los Angeles. 6. Frampton, K. (2001). Studies in Tectonic Culture. Cambridge

Evaluation Pattern

The students shall be continuously assessed towards their CIA which comprises of creative and innovative assignments. The CIA shall have four components of CIA 1, CIA 2, CIA 3, and Attendance. CIA 1, 2, and 3 for Studio courses shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks. A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of a particular course. Toal CIA Marks is for 50.

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%; Eligibility to appear for ESE is score of minimum 50% in CIA. The Studio course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation. 

A student shall pass each course with a minimum aggregate (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.; The overall aggregate of 50% and pass in all courses is required to pass the semester. 

ARC532 - HISTORY AND THEORY OF ARCHITECTURE AND CULTURE IV (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

The course opens to four units which in overall develops the ability to appreciate architecture and compare various styles. It is an exploration of 20th century architecture - International and Indian of different time periods. The Unit 1 is covering on Modernism, International style Alternate modernism, Post modernism & Deconstruction theories, giving an oppurtunity to understand the connections between built environment and the social, political, religious, technological and environmental circumstances which shaped the modern architecture. The learning in Unit 1 can be used in Unit 2, as the influences of International architects are reflected in India. Further in unit 3 the contemporary architectural styles are introduced followed by alternate theoretical positions  in architecture which will determine the future practices in architecture. The learning involves tuning the eyes to see examples from each style and developing the ability to critically think and interpret it. Since the scope of the topic doesnt limit to a single region or a time period and as the impact of the topics discussed in the course has influenced differents parts of the world, major examples along with corresponding context are familiarized to students.

The course can be started with an art exploration of different styles from renaissance to destijl, as the concept of a search for new style has impacted all forms of art, and the trace from 2Dimensional depictions to the relevance of materiality and form, contributing to 3 deminsional functional designs giving impact on architecture can be looked at. 

Course Objectives:

  • To develop the ability to critically understand the built environment concepts through history.  
  • To introduce the connections between built environment and the social, political, religious, technological and environmental circumstances which shaped the modern architecture.  
  • To understand the idea of ornament & detail, power & politics, form & iconography etc. constantly relating it to modern life – places and practices through Studio-on-Wheels.   

Learning Outcome

CO1: Ability to understand the various dimensions of 20th Century Architecture – International & Indian in different contextual influences.  

CO2: Ability to recognise the role of technology and material in development of structure, ornament & detail, power & politics, form & iconography in architecture across different contexts.  

CO3: Ability to understand the connections between built environment and the social, political, religious, technological and environmental circumstances which shaped the modern architecture.  

CO4: Ability to critically think and interpret the styles through history.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Modernism & International Style & Alternate Modernism
 

Focus on Industrialization and the Birth of Modernism Technology, Materials and Building Styles Post Modernism & Deconstruction Theories and Architectural Style.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Topics to cover
 

Impact of Industrialization on Architecture: Bridges (Examples: Pont du Garabait, Brooklyn Bridge, Howrah Bridge), ExhibitionnSpaces (Crystal Palace),Eiffel Tower. Eclecticism: St. Pancras Station London. Chicago Style and contributions to tall buildings: Works of Louis Sullivan - Auditorium Building, Wainwright building, other works: Madnock Building, Reliance Building. Romantic Movement - Arts and crafts (Red House), Art noveau, works of Antonio Gaudi (Catalan Modernisme: Park Geull, Casa Balto). Reinforced Concrete as a material (Ford Factories and new factory architecture with rectangular aesthetics contributing to modern architecture) Movements in Germany and Italy: Expressionism - The Glass Pavilion, Einstein Tower, Concept of Futurism, Destijl - Schroder House. Waletr Gopius and Bahaus . International Style (Modern Architecture between 1910-1932) Villa Savoye, Barcelona Pavilion, Seagram Building, Farnsworth House, Modern architecture post 1950's (Alvar altos works, Ron Cham Chapel by Le corbusier)

Post Modernism: Characteristics and Elements with relevant examples. Contributions of Robert Venturi & Denise Scott Brown:Vanna Venturi house. Portland Building by Michael Graves. Deconstruction theories: Characteristics and Contributions of Peter Eismen,Zaha Hadid.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:14
Identity and Modernism in Post Independent India
 

Modernism in Post Independent India- Need and Response Technology, Materials and Building Styles- Eminent Architects.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:14
Topics to cover
 

Early Modern Architecture in India 1920-1950s (Golconde House, Pondicherry, Supporting Examples: St.Stephen’s College Delhi,) Architecture from 1945-1970: Works of CPWD, Empiricist Influence: Chidambaram House Ahmedabad, Kothari Building Chennai. Contributions of Habib Rahman (Rabindra Bhavan), Bennett Pithavadian, Achyut Kanvinde .Le corbusier and Chandigarh City. Contributions of Louis Khan (IIM Ahmedabad). CEPT. Post Nehru Modernist Architecture: Works of B.V Doshi (IIM Bangalore), Raj Rewal (Asiad Village), Charles Correa ( Kanchanjunga Apartment, LIC Building Connaught Place)  and Modern Indian Pop: Hafis Contractor. Emerging Architectural Trends in India.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:14
Contemporary Architectural Theory in Global South
 

Focus on various dimensions of 20th Century Architecture in different contextual influences. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:14
Topics to Cover
 

Introduction to Critical Regionalism: Alvar Alto's Saynatsalo Town Hall,Works of Tado Ando(Church of Light,Water Temple), Hassan Fathy(New Gourna Village,Akil Sami House), Geoffrey Bawa (Bawa Residence, Parliament House Kotte, Kandalama Hotel), Contributions of Laurie Baker, Kerry Hill.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Alternate Theoretical Positions
 

Introduction to Biomimicry, Parametric, Deconstructivism, Sustainable Approaches. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Curtis, William J R. 1983. Modern Architecture Since 1900. United States of America: Phaidon Press Limited, 1983.

Francis D.K. Ching, Mark Jarzombek, Vikramaditya Prakash. 1943. A global history of architecture. s.l. : Hoboken, N.J. : J. Wiley &​ Sons, 1943.

Lang, Jon. 2002. A Concise History of Modern Architecture in India. Delhi: Permanent Black, 2002.

S Llyod, H.W Muller. 1986. History of World Architecture - Series. London: Faber and Faber Ltd, 1986.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Corbusier, Le. 1986. Towards New Architecture. New York: Dover Publications, 1986.

Christopher Tadgell, The History of Architecture in India, Penguin Books (India) Ltd, New Delhi, 1990 

Leland M Roth; Understanding Architecture: Its elements, history, and meaning; Craftsman House, 1994

Volwahsen, Andreas, Henri Stierlin (Editor) (1995), India, Architecture of the World Series, Part 7) Paperback, Edition, Benedikt Taschen Velag GmbH, ISBN 3-8228-9301-3 

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for these courses shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of a particular course
  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum 50% in CIA.
  • This course shall have a written exam of three-hour duration.

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course with a minimum aggregate (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%

ARC533 - LANDSCAPE AND SITE PLANNING (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To introduce the fundamentals of landscape architecture and the art and science of site planning in Architectural Projects. 

Learning Outcome

CO1:  To describe the fundamentals of landscape design. Level: Basic 

CO2:  To survey and evaluate the site. Level: Basic 

CO3:  To describe parameters which affect art of site planning. Level: Basic 

CO4:  To describe and demonstrate site planning strategies in Landscape design. Level: Basic 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:16
Fundamentals of Landscape Architecture
 

1. Introduction: Fundamentals of landscape architecture

2. Relation between landscape and architectural design 

3. Theoretical and historical background of landscape design, site analysis, environmental issues, and plant materials 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:16
Landscape Elements
 

1. Landscape elements and classification; landform, plant life, microclimate; land use and land preservation.

2. Elements and methods of landscape design; study of aesthetic and functional values. 

3. Soft and Hard scape design Elements 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Site Planning
 

1. Site planning: The art of site planning, arranging structures on the land and shaping the spaces between. 

2. The parameters affecting design strategies: The site, the user and the program; the techniques of surveys – field surveys, ariel photographs; sensing landscape and its materials – managing micro climate, noise and soil, plants and ground cover; services; earth work and utilities, access to site, walkways, parking & driveways,  connectivity within the site thru Hardscapes & Softscapes, 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Portfolio
 

Portfolio development -

To organise and review all works done in the semester.

To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject.

Establish connections with other subjects where possible. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Books:

T1.  Dee, C.,(2001), Form and Fabric in Landscape Architecture: A visual introduction, UK: Spon Press.

T2. Lynch, K. (1962), Site Planning, Cambridge: The MIT Press. 

T3. McHarg I. (1978), Design with Nature. NY: John Wiley & Co. 

T4.  Booth, N. (2011), Foundations of Landscape Architecture: Integrating Form and Space Using the Language of Site Design, John Wiley & Co. 

T5. Simonds, J.O. ( 1961), Landscape Architecture: The Shaping of Man’s Natural Environment, NY: McGraw Hill Book Co. Inc

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reference Books:

R1. Shaheer.M, Dua G., Pal A. (2013), Landscape Architecture In India, A Reader, LA,Journal of Landscape Architecture

R2. Ashihara, Y. (1970). Exterior Design in Architecture. NY: Van Nostrand Reinhold Company.

R3. Burns, C., & Kahn, A. (2005). Site Matters: Design Concepts, Histories and Strategies. New York and London: Routledge. 

Online Resources:

W1. Down to Earth [Magazine] https://www.downtoearth.org.in/ 

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum 50% in CIA.
  • This course shall have a written exam of three-hour duration.

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC534 - BUILDING ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS - III (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: - The course is an introduction to mechanical ventilation systems in buildings outlining the air-conditioning methods and equipment, Architectural requirements of mechanical ventilation in different types. It also introduces the study of acoustics; Behaviour of sound in enclosed spaces and its calculations; Acoustical design requirement for different room types; Introduction to environmental noise control.

Course Objective: - To develop the knowledge and skills required for understanding the mechanical services and acoustics in building and their integration with architectural design.

Learning Outcome

Course Outcome: - CO1. To explain, calculate the requirements, and configure the mechanical ventilation systems and layouts for various building types; CO2. To suggest and discuss acoustical solutions for different types of rooms; CO3. To describe the fundamentals of environmental noise and noise control in buildings.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to Mechanical Ventilation & Air Conditioning
 
  • Introduction to Mechanical Ventilation: Need for mechanical ventilation in buildings like Basement, Kitchen, and Toilet & Parking etc. Guide lines as per NBC/ASHRAE and Types of ventilation systems.
  • Introduction to Air-conditioning: Definition, Psychometric requirements, Air & Refrigeration cycles, heating system, Load Calculations, Zoning and Air Distribution.
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Air Conditioning systems
 
  • Air Conditioning systems: Window, Split, centralized air-conditioning system with Water & Air-Cooled Chillers, Air Handling Units, Types of ducting design, preferred locations of the equipment.
  • Critical air: conditioning - Clean Rooms, Server. & Hub Rooms, UPS Rooms, Operation Theaters etc.
  • Design-1: Design of air-conditioning system for a Small Shop and a for Residential & Small Office.
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Study of acoustics
 
  • Introduction to the study of acoustics: Nature of Sound, basic terminology, decibel scale, threshold of audibility and pain, masking, sound and distance, inverse square law.
  • Introduction to Room Acoustics: History of Greek, Roman theatres. Reflection, Diffusion, Diffraction, reverberation, Absorption. Calculation of reverberation time using Sabine's and Eyring's formulae.
  • Room Acoustics defects and measurement techniques: Echoes, focusing of sound, dead spots, flutter echo. Room resonances, small enclosures, room modes, standing waves.
  • Rooms for speech and music: Effect of RT and SNR on speech and music, AI, STI, RASTI, Speech intelligibility. Sound reinforcement systems and background noise masking systems.
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:18
Acoustical Design & Materials
 
  • Acoustical Design recommendations: Halls for speech and music. Raked Seating, Use of IS code 2526 - 1963. Home theatres, recording studios, open plan offices, speech privacy issues and sound attenuation.
  • Acoustical Materials and Corrections: Absorptive materials - NRC value, porous materials, panel absorbers, membrane absorbers, diffusers, cavity or Helmholtz resonators. Adjustable acoustics and variable sound absorbers. Acoustical correction and retrofits to existing spaces.
  • Design and Detailing for Acoustics of Multipurpose halls (Site visit and studio component): Case studies of acoustically designed and treated multipurpose halls. Design of a multipurpose hall for optimum acoustics - drawings and construction details of acoustical treatment.
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:18
Noise Control
 
  • Introduction to environmental noise control - Types of noise - indoor, outdoor noise, airborne and structure-borne noise, noise transmission, Mass Law, Transmission loss. Noise from ventilating systems.
  • Means of noise control in buildings - Maximum acceptable noise levels, Enclosures, Barriers, Sound insulation, STC ratings, Sound Isolation. Noise measurement using SLM. The idea of sick building syndrome.
  • Constructional measures of noise control (studio component) - Construction details of composite walls, double walls, floating floors, wood-joist floors, plenum barriers, sound locks, etc.
  • Industrial Noise - Sources of industrial noise - impact, friction, reciprocation, air turbulence, and other noise. Methods of reduction using enclosures and barriers -A case study of industrial buildings.
  • Introduction to Urban Soundscape - Introduction to Urban noise climate, Noise sources - Air traffic, Rail traffic, Road traffic, Seashore, and inland. Traffic planning against outdoor noise. Role of architects in shaping the urban soundscape. Sustainable design strategies in building acoustics.
Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. 'Principles of Refrigeration' by Roy 3 Dosat
  2. 'Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Data Hand book' by Manohar Prasad
  3. A Text book of Refrigeration and Air conditioning" by Kurmi R S and J K Gupta
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. 'Refrigeration and Air Conditioning' by Don Kundwar
  2. "Refrigeration and Air Conditioning" by Arora C P
Evaluation Pattern
  • The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

    CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

    • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
    • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
    • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
    • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total - 50 Marks

    END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

    • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum 50% in CIA.
    • This course shall have a written exam of three-hour duration.

    PASS CRITERIA

    A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC551 - ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN V (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:90
No of Lecture Hours/Week:6
Max Marks:300
Credits:9

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: The studio would primarily interpret the idea of an institution as an interplay of contextual factors, programmatic interpretations, and the architectural language at a range of scales. Contextual factors like site, surroundings, and landscape are introduced, along with the development of an architectural language that emerges from the integration of design details with larger concepts and architectural programs. It also includes a preliminary introduction to fundamentals of working drawings as technical drawing in the process of construction

Course Objective: To integrate environmental characteristics and the principles of site planning in the process of developing an architectural program and form; To engage a process of sustainable re-development of abused landscapes in architectural education

Level of Knowledge: Basic

Learning Outcome

Course Outcome: 

1. To document, evaluate and interpret landscape through contextual analysis

2. To interpret and integrate programs for design in specific site conditions.

3. To innovate and apply the large span structure into the design

4. To develop a technical working drawing in construction

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction
 

Study on vagaries of landscape

1. Selection of site with specific landscape characteristics or environmental issues – contoured sites, abused landscapes like quarry, contested forest tracts within cities; An in-depth understanding of the landscape characteristics and its vagaries

2. Site narratives: Explore and identify landscape elements, systems, processes or parameters that structure the site – both physical and experiential across scales; Evaluate and develop natural patterns of site structure.

3. The site walks, Photo essays, and both manual and advanced tools and soft wares may be used for site data collection and analysis. Workshops and lectures suggested a holistic understanding and knowledge of current discourses on the subject.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Discourse on the idea of an institution
 

1. A critical review of the altering ideas of an institution

2. Selection of an appropriate or suitable campus premise for the context study.

3. Case visits and Literature review on Campuses; a structured analysis

4. Evolve interrelationships of functions and activity patterns, form and space, hierarchies, architectural response to site and programmatic premise of the case.  

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:30
Campus Design
 

1. The design premise – an informed integration of program and specific site conditions for the design exploration

2. Nature of Projects: Centres for environmental education and research, Social welfare, empowerment and research centers, Centre for alternative medicine and material research, Centre for liberal arts and science

3. Process, Development, and Demonstration of design through working models and drawings. Community outreach projects suggested.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:30
Working Drawing and appropriate application of large span structures
 

1. Introduction to fundamentals of Working drawings.

2. Development of a basic set of working drawings for any selected part.

3. Appropriate application of a large span structure in design

Text Books And Reference Books:

Books on principles of Design of the theory of Design to be studied – applied.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Books on principles of Design of the theory of Design to be studied – applied.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of a particular course
  • CIA -1- 25 Marks
  • CIA -2 - 50 Marks
  • CIA -3 - 75 Marks
  • Attendance- 05 Marks
  • Total - 150 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • This course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.

PASS CRITERIA

  • A student shall pass each course with a minimum aggregate (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.
  • The overall aggregate of 50% and pass in all courses is required to pass the semester.

ARC552 - BUILDING STRUCTURES V (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: The course is an introduction to design explorations on alternative structural design solutions for a given horizontal long span structure. 

Course Objective: To integrate structural design learning with architectural objectives and to test various alternatives of design for a horizontal long span structure. 

Learning Outcome

Course Outcome:  

1. To explore structural design alternatives for a horizontal long span building within a given set of parameters and for lateral loads based on IS codes. 2. To apply the learnings from structural system design for long span structures. 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Design of Portal Frame Structure System
 

Design of two-dimensional rigid frames that have a rigid joint between column and beam. General framing arrangement of Portal frame for 75M X 300M building, basic load path and total structural weight calculation. 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Structural Analysis and Design to satisfy Building Codes and Standards
 

Determine the general loads to be considered in the design of the structure, based on the type of occupancy specified for each area. a) Gravity loading: Dead and Live load calculation based on IS 875 (Part 1&2) b) Seismic loading: Seismic loading calculation based on IS 1893 Code Static Analysis Procedure c) Wind loading: Wind loading calculation based on Indian Standard I.S. 875 (Part3). 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Introduction
 

Horizontal or Long Span Structures 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Introduction to the Structural design Project
 

Design for an Airport terminal building of dimension 75M X 300M using horizontal system. Selection of Horizontal structural systems including load calculation based on Building Codes and Standards (indicative).  

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:19
Design of Dome Structures
 

Domes as polar arrays of curved structural systems in masonry, concrete, steel with glass cladding, their structural strength and properties as roofing systems of large column-free spans. Design of dome(s) for spanning 75M X 300M building, basic load path and total structural weight calculation. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:19
Design of Arch and Vault Structures
 

Design of curved structural member spanning two points, of masonry, concrete or steel and used as the roofing systems of large span buildings. Design of Arch and Vault arrangement for spanning 75M X 300M building, and basic load path and total structural weight calculation.  

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:18
Vierendeel truss design
 

Truss design with rectangular or square assembly of members with rigid joints capable of resisting bending. Moments. General framing arrangement of Vierendeel truss for 75M X 300M building, and basic load path and total structural weight calculation. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:18
Long Span Planar Truss Design
 

Triangular structural system; assembly of simple triangular planar trusses, Planar trusses in roofs and bridges. General framing arrangement of Long Span Truss for 75M X 300M building, and basic load path and total structural weight calculation. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:18
Cable and Suspension Structures
 

Design for long-span systems using Cable and suspension systems. Design cable suspended roof to span 75M X 300M building, and basic load path and total structural weight calculation. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:18
Concrete Shell structure design
 

Design of double curved surfaces formed from warped surface (e.g. hyperbolic parabolic); their properties and strength as light-weight construction for column free large spans. Design of Concrete shell roof to spanning 75M X 300M building, and basic_ load path and total structural weight calculation. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:18
Space Truss
 

Design of three dimensional trusses, their structural properties and strength due to three-dimensional triangulation. Design of Space Truss roof for spanning 75M X 300M building, and basic load path and total structural weight calculation. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:18
Fabric Structure
 

Design of membrane structures of thin flexible fabric covers that provide light-weight free--form roofing system. Design of Fabric roof to span 75M X 300M building, and basic load path and total structural weight calculation. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Bechthold, M., & Schodek, D. (2008). Structures, Prentice Hall India; 6th edition.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Works of Felix Candela, Frei Otto and Hassan Fathy  

Evaluation Pattern

CIA - 50

ESE (Viva voce) - 50

Total Marks - 100

ARC553 - DIGITAL GRAPHICS AND ART (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: - A lab-based course introducing video, image and vector editing software; scripting; synchronization of sound with patterns generated; Presentation using voice over and production of CD ROMs

Course Objective: - To develop and apply the knowledge and skills required for communication through interactive audio-visual medium in architecture.

Level of Knowledge: - Basic

Learning Outcome

Course Outcome: - [CO1] To Demonstrate a thorough understanding of the use of digital tools, techniques, and communication through interactive audio-visual medium in architecture. [CO2] To learn and demonstrate the understanding of design presentation and report making using desktop publishing tools.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
1. Introduction to Digital Graphics Technology concepts
 

Introduction to Digital Graphics and art, concepts. Exploring the Basic terminology, types of digital tools and techniques, their applications, basics of image and audio-video, their production process, and presentations; Introduction to editing and composing tools; Introduction to the production process- Pre-Production, Production, Post- Production.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
2. Photography and Video Production
 

Photography and Video Production.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
3. Production-1:
 

Demonstration of a project.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
1. Animation Techniques and Presentation Authoring
 

Introduction to animation and the related tool

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
2. Principles of Editing:
 

Animation and Video editing

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
1. Effective Communication:
 

Digital composition, 3D Animation and Special effects, Art of Story Boarding and Direction

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
2. Production-2:
 

Demonstration of a project.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Unit-4 Portfolio
 

Portfolio development - To organise and review all works done in the semester. To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject. Establish connections with other subjects where possible.

Text Books And Reference Books:

REFERENCES: Books and tutorials on principles and techniques of audio-visual digital tools to be studied and applied.

T1. Anton, K. K., & Cruise, John. (2017). Adobe InDesign CC: Classroom in a book. Noida: Pearson India education services Pvt ltd.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Identified Resources :

1. For adobe products https://learning.adobe.com/

3. https://helpx.adobe.com/in/photoshop/tutorials.html

2. https://edex.adobe.com/digital-careers-activities

Evaluation Pattern

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%; END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (VIVA-VOCE): 50%

The students shall be continuously assessed towards their CIA which comprises of creative and innovative assignments.

The CIA of 50 marks shall have three components of CIA 1-Unit 1; CIA 2- Unit 2; CIA 3- Unit 3, Unit 4 Portfolio Submission

ESE of 50 marks - Viva Voce

ARC631 - MATERIALS AND METHODS IN BUILDING CONSTRUCTION VI (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Objective: - To develop the ability to describe, document, and appreciate the architectural expression of alternative advanced constructional composition.

Learning Outcome

CO1: To describe the properties of plastics, its manufacturing methodsand assembly of the material to modules in architectural construction. Level: Basic.  

CO2: To describe the means and construction methods of metal cladding and building envelopes; Level: Basic.  

CO3: To analyse and infer from documentation of a case study of any shell roof structure, dome structure, and tensile structure describing the means and methods of its construction, functional organization. Level: Basic 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Advanced structures 1
 
1.   Detailing of Geodesic domes: Principles and methods of construction with explorations using physical models 
2.   Tensile structures and pneumatic structures: Principles and methods of construction with explorations using physical models.
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Advanced structures 2
 
1.    Detailing of hyperbolic paraboloid shell roof: Principles and methods of construction and reinforcement details. 
2.    Detailing of the folded plate and cylindrical shell roof: Principles and methods of construction and reinforcement details. 
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Large Span Roofs
 
1.   Introduction to large span roofs 
2.   Detailing of a space frame; Principles and methods of construction with explorations using physical models.
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Advanced foundation
 
  1. Introduction to Advanced foundation: Mat foundations, Pile foundations; different types of piles, precast piles, cast-in-situ piles in wood-concrete, and steel.
  2. Pile foundation construction: method of driving piles, Sheet piling, pile caps, and its application, etc.
  3. Plastics as a building material: types, properties, and uses of plastics such as polycarbonates, acrylics, PVC polymer films, and fiber-reinforced plastic. Application and details.
  4. UPVC, PVC & FRP: Doors and windows and partitions (Detailing and study of joinery)
Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      Chudley , R., & Greeno, R. (2005). Construction Technology. Prentice Hall, 4 edition.

2.      Emmitt , S., & Gorse, C. (2009). Barry's Introduction to Construction of Buildings. Wiley-Blackwell.

3.      Mckay, W. (2012). Building Construction. Pearson India.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Deplazes, A. (2005). Constructing Architecture Materials Processes Structures A Handbook. Basel, Switzerland: Birkhäuser Publishers for Architecture.

2. Francis Mallgrave, H. (2004). Style in the Technical and Tectonic Arts; Practical Aesthetics. Los Angeles. 

3. Frampton, K. (2001). Studies in Tectonic Culture. Cambridge.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a written exam of four-hour duration.
  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC632 - HOUSING AND HUMAN SETTLEMENT PLANNING (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: - The course is an introduction to Elements and characteristics of human settlements; origins; determinants and their evolution through the course of history; Settlements as an expression of political aspirations; Various planning concepts in urban, rural and regional level development plans in the context of India; a Changing scenario in the context of Globalization. The course also outlines social housing post-WW II; Issues concerning housing in the Indian Context; its production and standards the processes involve in housing project development; Case studies and post-occupancy evaluation.

Course Objective: - To give an introduction to the discipline of planning human settlements and the challenges of housing scenario in India

Learning Outcome

CO1: Ability to understand the various dimensions of 20th Century Architecture – International & Indian in different contextual influences. Level: Basic

CO2: Ability to recognise the role of technology and material in development of structure, ornament & detail, power & politics, form & iconography in architecture across different contexts. Level: Basic

CO3: Ability to understand the connections between built environment and the social, political, religious, technological and environmental circumstances which shaped the modern architecture. Level: Intermediate

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Introduction to Human Settlement
 

Types of settlement; its origin and evolution; the idea of a city with case examples.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Planning Principles in Indian Context
 

Vastushastra, Principles of Town Planning, Types of cities.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Theory of Planning
 

Planning theories enunciated by Ebenezer Howard, Patrick Geddes, Soria Y Mata, Doxiadis, Le-Corbusier, Clarence Stein, Hilberseimer – their relevance to Indian conditions.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:18
Understanding the Components of City: Physical Aspect
 

Physical and spatial characteristics of land, land use, physical infrastructure, density, population distribution, CBD.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:18
Understanding the Components of City: Economical & Social Aspects
 

Urban Fabric, Urban Node, Relation of Core and Periphery, Regional Impact.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:18
Understanding the components of City: Environment Aspects
 

Resource Utilization, Green Cover, Forest, Water, and Sanitation Issue.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:18
Introduction to Social Inclusion Through Housing
 

Inter and Intra dependency of the society, Social Networking and Typology of Housing

Social Groups and Housing

Affordable and EWS Housing

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1 Simon Eisner, Arthur Gallion & Stanley Eisner, Urban Pattern, VNR, New York, 1993

T1. Francis D.K. Ching, Mark Jazombek, Vikramaditya Prakash. A Global History of Architecture. Second Edition. John Wiley & Sons. 2011

T2. Brown Percy, Indian Architecture (Islamic Period), Taraporevala and Sons, Bombay, 1983

T3. S.Lloyd and H.W.Muller, “History of World Architecture” - Series, Faber and Faber Ltd., London, 1986

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Christopher Tadgell, The History of Architecture in India, Penguin Books (India) Ltd, New Delhi, 1990

R2. Leland M Roth; Understanding Architecture: Its elements, history and meaning; Craftsman House, 1994.

R3. Volwahsen, Andreas, Henri Stierlin (Editor) (1995),  India, Architecture of the World Series, Part 7) Paperback, Edition, Benedikt Taschen Velag GmbH, ISBN 3-8228-9301-3

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a written exam of three-hour duration.
  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC633 - SPECIFICATIONS, ESTIMATION AND COSTING (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: - The course is an introduction to estimation, writing specifications, and preparing Bill of Quantities. It involves the preparation of BOQ with abstract and detailed specifications for various materials and items of work used in various building types, infrastructure, and services.

Course Objective: - To develop the necessary skills for estimation, writing the specifications as well as prepare Bill of Quantities for various types of buildings.

Learning Outcome

CO1: To estimate and cost different types of buildings. Level: Basic

CO2: To prepare BOQ for buildings, infrastructure, and services. Level: Basic

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Estimation
 

Need for estimation, relationship between choice of materials, their specifications, Bill of Quantities (BOQ), project costing, project quality/cost/ time management. Centre line method.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Specifications
 

How to arrive at abstract and detailed specifications for various materials leading to 'items of work' used in construction. Including influence and impact of local and national building codes on specifications. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Mandatory tests & Safety Measures in Specifications
 

Procedures, frequency and submission of results as part of specifications and their inclusion in the BOQ for different materials document. Integrating workers' safety and material security into specifications.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Bill of Quantities (BOQ)
 

Why and how to build flexibility, resilience and redundancy in BOQ. Format for BOQ.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Detailed rate analysis of building
 

Basic knowledge of items as per current schedule of rates (CSR) of local PWD. Percentages (based on thumb rule calculations) of various bulk materials used in construction like cement, steel, rubble, metal, sand, brick, tiles etc.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Costing
 

Reasons for rate variation - study of government rates (CPWD/ Karnataka PWD Schedule of Rates) and market rates. Concept of inflation and its effect on costing.eg. Escalation clause, extra items, variations. Lift & lead.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to sequence of construction activity
 

Project time, Labour, Materials costing and Impact of delay in project on costing.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Project 2:
 

Detailed specifications writing and estimation of Bill of Quantities (BOQ) for an office interior work.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Project 1
 

Detailed specifications writing and estimation of Bill of Quantities (BOQ) for a Building Plan.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Billing requirements
 

Role of the architect in monitoring the specifications follow-up for quality control, the measurement book (MB), RA bills, interim and final checking and certification of works on-site based on the BOQ and terms of contracts.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Project 3
 

Detailed specifications writing and estimation of Bill of Quantities (BOQ) for Water supply and sanitary work including overhead tanks and Sump tanks.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1 "Estimating and Costing" by S K Dutta

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. "Estimating" by SC Rangawala

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum 50% in CIA.
  • This course shall have a written exam of three-hour duration.
  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC634 - PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE - I (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: The lecture course introduces to the ideas of Profession and Practice in the field of Architecture. It gives a general overview of the Building Industry, Contract Management and Tender.

Course Objective: - To understand the responsibilities & liabilities of the Profession; To understand the process of Contract management.

Learning Outcome

[CO1] To give a descriptive overview of the Architectural Profession and Practice and the building industry in general.

[CO2] To describe the types and procedures involved in tendering and contract.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Profession
 

Idea of profession and essential differences among profession, trade and business. Its essential tenets, duties and liabilities.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Profession of Architecture
 

Types and extent of services offered by architects, scale of fees, stages of payment, and contract between client and architect.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Code of Professional Conduct
 

Architects Act of 1972. Role of Council of Architecture and the Indian Institute of Architects in the functioning of the Profession.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Architectural Practice-2
 

Various means of building client base and gaining projects. Architectural competitions, guidelines of COA, procedure of conduct of such competitions.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Architectural Practice-1
 

Types of Architectural firms, proprietorship, partnership, associate ship. Advantages and disadvantages of each type of firm. Basic accounting procedures. Taxes and implications of service tax.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Building Industry
 

A general overview of the industry. Various participants and dimensions of the building industry. Finance, statutory controls, construction procedures, enforcement issues related to building industry, and the role of architect, employer, and contractor.

Project Insurance & Labor Insurance

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Tender-2
 

Architect's role in tender process. Essential characteristics of Tender Notice, Earnest Money Deposit, Security Deposit, Retention Amount, Mobilization Amount and Bonus & Penalty Clauses.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Tender-1
 

Procedure of calling for tender, documents necessary for tendering process. Tender document and its content. Types of tenders, suitability of different types to various categories of projects. Advantages and disadvantages of each type of tender. Tender notices, opening, scrutiny, process of selection and award.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Contract management & Contract Types
 

Overview of procedures in contract management with a focus on the Architect's role.

General Principles, types of contract, definitions of various terms used in the contract document. Contract document, contents, and sections dealing with various aspects of contract management. Conditions and Scope of Contract and the role of an architect in ensuring a positive completion of a contract. Architect's role in the contract and vested authority.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Tender issues
 

Various issues arising out of tendering process and the role of an architect in maintaining objectivity in the process.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Professional Practice for Architects & Engineers by Roshan Namavathi.

2. Legal and Contractual Procedures for Architects by Bob Greenstreet.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. AJ Legal Handbook

2. Professional Practice by KG Krishnamurthy and SV Ravindra, PHI Learning, India 2013

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in CIA.
  • The course shall have a written exam of three-hour duration.
  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC641B - EARTHQUAKE RESISTANT ARCHITECTURE (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: - Fundamentals of Earthquake and the basic terminology; Historical experience; Site Planning and Performance of Ground and Buildings; Seismic codes and building configuration; Seismic design and detailing of non-engineered construction; Seismic design and detailing of RC and steel buildings; Design of non-structural elements; architectural design for Seismic resistance. The detailed course plan of the elective and the modus operandi of teaching will be taken up by the faculty-in-charge.

Course Objective: - To expose the students to specialized areas of architecture.

Learning Outcome

To describe the fundamentals of Earthquake Design.

To design a seismic-resistant structure.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Fundamentals and Introduction to Earthquake Resistant Architecture
 

Fundamentals of Earthquake and the basic terminology; Historical experience; Site Planning and Performance of Ground and Buildings.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Seismic Codes and policies
 

Seismic codes and building configuration.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Seismic Design
 

Seismic design and detailing of non-engineered construction; Seismic design and detailing of RCC and steel buildings; Design of non-structural elements; architectural design for Seismic resistance.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Earthquake Resistant Design of Structures” by Aggarwal P

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Earthquake Resistant Design of Structures” by Aggarwal P

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a written exam of three-hour duration.
  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%

ARC641C - INTERIOR DESIGN (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: - An intrduction to vocabulary of interior design; Overview of interior and furniture design and design movements through history; various components of interior space and treatment and finishes; Interior lighting, Interior landscape and furniture. Design based studio exercises on ergonomics, materials and working parameters. The detailed course plan of the electives and the modus operandi of teaching will be taken up by the faculty-in-charge.

Course Objective: - To expose the students to specialized area of interior design in architecture.

Learning Outcome

Ability to design the interior of a given space using the principles of ergonomics and material sensibility

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
History of Interior Design
 

Vocabulary of interior design; Overview of interior and furniture design and design movements through history.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Components of Interior Design
 

Introduction to various components of interior space and treatment and finishes; Interior lighting, Interior landscape and furniture.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Design exercise
 

Design based studio exercises on ergonomics, materials and working parameters.

Text Books And Reference Books:

The Interior Design Reference & Specification Book: Everything Interior Designers Need to Know Every Day

Human dimension and interior space

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

The Interior Design Reference & Specification Book: Everything Interior Designers Need to Know Every Day

Human dimension and interior space

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a written exam of three-hour duration.
  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC641G - RESEARCH METHODOLOGY (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: - The Course is an introduction to Architectural Research and its methodologies. It addresses the challenges of Qualitative Research and Quantitative Research.The detailed course plan of the elective and the modus operandi of teaching will be taken up by the faculty-in-charge.

Course Objective: - To expose students to research in architecture.

Learning Outcome

Ability to define a problem and hypothesis statement.

Ability to develop a research design for a selected case.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Introduction
 

Introduction to Research Methodology, Types of Research Methodologies, Research Design in Qualitative Research

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Case Analysis
 

Reading sessions of Research Papers , Analysis of the Research  Papers to understand the Methodology adopted for writing.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Writing a Research Paper
 

An attempt to write a Research Paper on an Architecture topic.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Research Methods by Nicholas Walliman

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Research Methods by Nicholas Walliman

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in CIA.
  • The course shall have a written exam of three-hour duration.
  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC651 - ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN VI (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:90
No of Lecture Hours/Week:6
Max Marks:300
Credits:9

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: The studio would primarily introduce to the most sensitive unit of development, the neighbourhood. The course exposes the socio-cultural environmental- infrastructural aesthetic, and normative aspects of neighbourhood planning and design. Field surveys of living environments, discourses on mass housing typology, study of residential open space typology, study of indigenous resource management strategies and discussions on participatory approaches of housing design would be dealt in detail.

Course Objective:  To understand the implications of the design variable Density in Architectural design; To engage a process of sustainable resource management in neighbourhood planning; To integrate the issues of domestic ritual, form and open spaces in the design and planning of neighbourhood.

Learning Outcome

1.    To define and understand density as a design variable in neighbourhood design. 

2.    To study, innovate, and integrate typologies of housing and residential open spaces. 

3. To innovate and apply indigenous resource management strategies into neighbourhood design. 

4.    To develop necessary communication skills to conduct field surveys and participatory processes of community-based study and design.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:21
Study on indigenous resource management strategies
 

1.  Selection of a critical resource for community living such as environmental resources - water, food, waste, etc., infrastructural resources – soft mobility, waterways, etc;

2.   A detailed study, mapping, and documentation of the resource selected, collective management strategies, and derived devices.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:22
Field surveys of a selected community
 

Experience and identify critical issues with regard to people’s living environments; develop patterns and typologies of built and communal open spaces, efficiency of open spaces, needs of privacy, ideas of extended living areas, movement and accessibility.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:22
Programmatic premise
 

 Evolve interrelationships of functions and activity patterns, form and space, hierarchies, architectural response to site and programmatic premise of the case.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:22
Methods
 

Site walks, Photo essays and both manual and advanced tools and soft wares may be used for field data collection and analysis. Workshops and lectures suggested for a holistic understanding and knowledge of current discourses on the subject.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:22
Discourse on the density as a design parameter
 

1.      Density: A critical review of the ideas of density and form, density and services

2.      Normative aspects of neighbourhood planning and design.

3.    Case visits and Literature review housing projects to understand the issues of ritual and form and their relationship with culture

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:25
Neighbourhood Design
 

1.                    The design premise – an informed integration of program and specific site conditions for the design exploration; integration of services as a critical parameter.

2.                    Nature of Projects: Housing design and planning for urban context or selective communities – weavers,

3.                    Process, Development and Demonstration of design through working models and drawings. Community outreach projectssuggested.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Books on principles of Design and theory of Design to be studied – applied.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Books on principles of Design and theory of Design to be studied – applied.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks. Attendance and participation in the studio would be considered in the evaluation rubrics.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of a particular course
  • CIA -1- 25 Marks; CIA -2 - 50 Marks; CIA -3 - 75 Marks; Total CIA- 150 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE- 150 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

ARC652 - BUILDING STRUCTURES VI (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: - The course is an introduction to design explorations on alternative structural design solutions for a given high rise structure taking into consideration the lateral thrusts on it.

Course Objective: - To integrate structural design learning with architectural objectives and to test various alternatives of design for a high-rise structure.

Learning Outcome

1.     To explore structural design alternatives for a high rise building within a given set of parameters and for lateral loads based on IS codes.

2.     To apply the learnings from the structural system costs fundamentals and computer applications in structural design.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to the Structural design Project:
 

D Design for a 15-story building of dimension 30M X 30M, 60 meters height, 10X10 M column grid and with service core in the central bay. Calculation of building loads load calculation based on the IS 875 and seismic loads and wind loads and design of gravity and lateral systems.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction of vertical/lateral structures
 

Vertical/lateral structures

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Wind loading
 

Wind loading calculation based on Indian Standard I.S. 875 (Part3)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Gravity loading:
 

Dead and Live load calculation based on IS 875 (Part 1)and NBC

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Seismic loading
 

Seismic loading calculation based on IS 1893 Code; Static Analysis Procedure

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Moment resisting frame design
 

Design of Moment-resisting 2-dimensional frame assemblies of beams and columns, with the beams rigidly connected to the columns. General moment resisting framing arrangement and sizing and design of beams, columns and slabs for 30M X 30M, 60-meter-high building, and basic load path and total structural weight calculation.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Computers in Structural design
 

Introduce students to analysis and design of structures using software.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Lateral Load Resisting System
 

The structural systems of buildings designed to withstand lateral loads caused by wind and seismic activity.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Shear Wall System
 

Design of Shear walls as lateral load resistance structural systems. Application of lateral loads along the height, transference to the wall by diaphragm slabs in concrete or masonry. General Shear wall framing arrangement and sizing and design of beams, columns/ shear wall and slabs for 30M X 30M, 60 meters high building, and basic load path and total structural weight calculation.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Dual System
 

Design of twin structural system typically shear walls (RCC) and beam-column moment frames as combined resistance system to lateral forces. General Dual framing arrangement and sizing and design of beams, columns/ shear wall and slabs for 30M X 30M, 60 meters high building, and basic load path and total structural weight calculation.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Braced frame
 

Design of lateral structural system to resist lateral loads (wind and seismic). Braced frames as vertical trusses with members designed to resist in tension and compression due to triangulation in steel or RCC. General Braced frame arrangement and sizing and design of beams, columns/braced frame and slabs for 30M X 30M, 60 meters high building, and basic load path and total structural weight calculation.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Final Review & Value Engineering
 

Fundamentals of structural system costs, such as material cost, labor cost, financial feasibility and construction estimating with an emphasis on sustainability and life-cycle cost accounting.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.     Bechthold, M., & Schodek, D. (2008). Structures, Prentice Hall India; 6th edition.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bechthold, M., & Schodek, D. (2008). Structures, Prentice Hall India; 6th edition.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of a particular course
  • Total CIA - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA A student shall pass each course with a minimum aggregate (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%

ARC731 - PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE II (2017 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course objectives:

To understand the Professional responsibilities within the ambit of laws of the land, building codes, contract documents, and ethics. To gain insight into valuation, arbitration, and building bye-laws.

Self-study: Land & Building Valuation

Site/Industrial Visits: Integrated learning.

Learning Outcome

Course outcomes:

CO1: To give a descriptive overview of the of supervision, contract administration and valuation;

Level: Intermediate

CO2: To describe the types of laws of the land, building codes, contract documents, and ethics.

Level: Intermediate

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Case study & review on Quality Assessment and Auditing
 

1. Inventory, Bill checking, quality auditing, handover procedures, and final certification.

2. Supervision & contract, Site visits, site meeting, co-ordination with various agencies, site book, site instructions, clerk of works, and site office.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Case study & review on Dispute Mitigation and Arbitrator Role as an Architect
 

1. Disputes in the contract and the architect's role in resolving such disputes. Measures of mitigation.

2. Arbitration and conciliation act 1996, the importance of arbitrators in practice, umpire, the order of reference, selection of arbitrators, powers, and duties of arbitrators.

3. Architect's liability: Liability of an architect with respect to a breach of contract and negligence with respect to the standard of care.

4. Liabilities for users and employees: Safeguards in the construction industry such as. Performance bonds, insurance warranties, retention, indemnities, and estoppel, and liquidated damages.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Case study & review on Land & Building Valuation
 

1. Laws related to Property and Land: Land tenure, types of land holdings, land registration, easement rights, covenants, trespass, and nuisance, etc.

2. Introduction to valuation: Definitions and architect's role in the preparation of valuation and dilapidation reports and certifications. Essential characteristics, classifications, and purpose of classifications. Methods of valuation, standard, and cost of construction.

3. Easements: Easements, various easement rights, architect's role in protecting easement rights.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Small Scale Project- Land & Building Valuation
 

1. Land & Building valuation methods and techniques.

2. Valuation of any size of land based on the market price & current price.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Professional Practice for Architects & Engineers by Roshan Namavathi

2. Legal and Contractual Procedures for Architects by Bob Greenstreet

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. A Legal Handbook

2. Professional Practice by KG Krishnamurthy and SV Ravindra, PHI Learning, India 2013

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for these courses shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of a particular course
  • CIA -1- 10 Marks
  • CIA -2 - 15 Marks
  • CIA -3 - 20 Marks
  • Attendance- 05 Marks
  • Total - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum 50% in CIA.
  • This course shall have a written exam of three-hour duration.

PASS CRITERIA

  • A student shall pass each course with minimum aggregate (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.
  • The overall aggregate of 50% and pass in all courses is required to pass the semester.

ARC741A - ART APPRECIATION (2017 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Elective subjects have been suggested which are related to specialized areas in Architecture.

The student may choose any one subject of interest.

The detailed syllabus of the electives chosen and the modus operandi of teaching will be taken up by the faculty-in-charge.

Course Objectives

To describe and demonstrate the application of art; to critique the meaning of art and its role; to critically appreciate a work of art.

Learning Outcome

[1] To acquire the knowledge of the chosen area of specialization; to apply or innovate the fundamentals and details learned, in design.

[2] To be able to identify the types of applied arts

[3] Understand the role of art, to distinguish between art, craft and architecture

[4] Critically analyze and appreciate the different forms of art

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:25
Introduction to Art Appreciation
 

A general introduction to Visual Arts designed to create an appreciation of the vocabulory, media, technique and purposes of the creative process. students will critically interpret and evaluate works of art within formal, cultural and historical contexts.  

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:25
History of Art
 

An overview of development in Art in History - Historical Background from pre historic, modern and contemporary art. 

Students with an understanding of the diverse ways in which cultures construct and represent their realities. through thematic examination of both historical and contemporary art

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:25
Portfolio Compilation
 

 Students will acquire formal analysis skills to describe works of art and techniques of art production. further building upon formal analysis     students will critically interpret and contextualise visual art forms through a portfolio submission  

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. "Humanities through the Arts" , F. David Martin and Lee A. Jacobus., 9 th Edition, McGraw-Hill

Education, 2014.

2. "Principles of Two Dimensional Design" , Wucius Wong, Wiley, 1972.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. "Humanities through the Arts" , F. David Martin and Lee A. Jacobus., 9 th Edition, McGraw-Hill

Education, 2014.

2. "Principles of Two Dimensional Design" , Wucius Wong, Wiley, 1972.

3."Way of Seening" by John Berger

Evaluation Pattern

The students shall be continuously assessed towards their CIA which comprises of creative and innovative assignments.

The CIA of 50 marks shall have three components of CIA 1-Unit 1; CIA 2- Unit 2; CIA 3- Unit 3

ESE of 50 marks - Viva Voce

ARC741B - ART IN ARCHITECTURE (2017 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Elective subjects have been suggested which are related to specialized areas in Architecture.

The student may choose any one subject of interest.

Art in Architecture 

Role of art in history of world architecture; Symbiotic relationship of folk art and architecture;

application of different art forms in architecture; Visual communication in architecture and way finding;

Works of different artists and architects that reflect the inter relationship.

Learning Outcome

  • To acquire the knowledge of the chosen area of specialization; to apply or innovate the fundamentals and details learnt, in design.
  • Understanding the close historical relationship between art and architecture.
  • Discussion of the similarities and diffrence between art and architecture.
  • Apreciating how art and architecture inspire each other.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Introduction to Art in Architecture
 
  • what is art? what is architecture?
  • discussion on what is art.
  • discussion on what is architecture 
  • discuss the similarities and difference the two 
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Influence of art in architecture
 

Art inspired by architecture?

Architecture inspired by art?

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
analyse and appreciate art in architecture and its development
 
  • analyse the developments of form which influenced art in architecture with reference to prehistory, modern and contemporary
  • appreciating art in architecture through elements, inspiration, and its aesthetic purpose.   
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Portfolio Compilation
 

Students will compile all the unit assignments/projects into a portfolio and submit the same.

Text Books And Reference Books:

https://www.britannica.com/topic/architecture

"Introduction to Greek architecture"Khan Academy. Archived from the original on 14 October 2014. Retrieved 23 June 2017.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

"Architecture and Power"BBC Radio 4 discussion with Adrian Tinniswood, Gillian Darley and Gavin Stamp (In Our Time, Oct. 31, 2002)

Otero-Pailos, Jorge (2010). Architecture's Historical Turn: Phenomenology and the Rise of the Postmodern. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

Venturi, Robert (1966). New York: Museum of Modern Art. complexity and contradiction in architecture.

Evaluation Pattern

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%; END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (VIVA-VOCE): 50%

The students shall be continuously assessed towards their CIA which comprises of creative and innovative assignments.

The CIA of 50 marks shall have three components of CIA 1-Unit 1; CIA 2- Unit 2; CIA 3- Unit 3, Unit 4 Portfolio Submission

ESE of 50 marks - Viva Voce

ARC741C - APPLIED ART - PHOTOGRAPHY (2017 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Elective subjects have been suggested which are related to specialized areas in Architecture. The students may choose any one subject of interest. The detailed syllabus of the electives chosen and the modus operandi of teaching will be taken up by the faculty-in-charge.

Objectives: To learn about Camera Techniques and formats, Darkroom and digital printing, and alternative photographic practice. The intention is to introduce students to both Contempory practice as well as its history and to promote critical thinking and cognitive learning skills. In this course, students will learn a variety of techniques and discuss how the medium has and will continue to change. 

Learning Outcome

 To acquire the knowledge of the chosen area of specialization;

 to apply or innovate the fundamentals and details learned, in design.

Identify the types of applied arts

Describe the role of Photography, to distinguish between Digital Photography and Analog.

Critically analyze and appreciate the different forms of Photography

Relate the relevance of architecture and design to the allied fields of art.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Introduction to Photography
 

Exposure to a variety of Analog and digital photographic techniques.

Basic understanding of shots, sizes, and angles. Exposure triangle, Composition, Framing, and Introduction to Lighting.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Photographic Design
 

Introduction to contemporary and historic photographers and their works. 

Understanding and applying visual design elements and principles in photography.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Critically Analyze and Appreciation
 

Students will be exposed to multiple photographic practices, from documentary photography to fine art photography to war photography.

Students will discuss many moral and theoretical issues attached to medium, such as photography’s relationships to truth, beauty, and fact, as well as the ethics of war photography.

Students will come to understand that photography is a medium on the forefront of technology, one whose conceptual and technical standards are constantly in flux.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Print Media and Portfolio
 

Introduction to Print medium. 

Introduction of Portfolios  (Manual and digital Format)

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.Schaefer, John P., Basic Techniques of Photography, An Ansel Adams Guide: Little Brown and
   Company, Boston, 1992 

2.Horenstein, Henry, Beyond Basic Photography, A Technical Manual: Little Brown and
   Company, Boston, 1977

3.Craven, George M., Object and Image, An Introduction to Photography. Prentice Hall,
   Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, 1990

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

References:

1. Shot Sizes & Angles: John Suler’s Photographic Psychology: Image and Psyche

2. Markus Hawkins, The Exposure Triangle: aperture, shutter speed and ISO explained

3. Darren Rowse, Founder, Digital Photography School

4. Nat Coalson, Photofocus

5. Media College, The Production Process

Evaluation Pattern

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%; END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (VIVA-VOCE): 50%

The students shall be continuously assessed towards their CIA which comprises of creative and innovative assignments.

The CIA of 50 marks shall have three components of CIA 1-Unit 1; CIA 2- Unit 2; CIA 3- Unit 3, Unit 4 Portfolio Submission

ESE of 50 marks - Viva Voce

ARC742A - FOREIGN LANGUAGE - FRENCH (2017 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Open Elective subjects have been suggested from subjects of study other than Architecture which will add value to the program and enable the overall development of the student.

Foreign Language (French): Introduces students to the culture and language of the French-speaking world. Students develop an ability to communicate in real-life situations by acquiring reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills.

Course Objectives:

1. Emphasis is on the development of basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Specific vocabulary around holidays, sightseeing, accommodation, and methods of travel, Build confidence in dealing with foreign visitors and organizations. Develop cultural awareness.

2. Students should be able to comprehend and respond with grammatical accuracy to spoken and written French as well as demonstrate cultural awareness.

Learning Outcome

CO1:  It includes introduction to the cultural background of France and the Francophone world. Level: Basic

CO2: The ability to use their skills in French for a variety of purposes including research in other disciplines, and a full appreciation of the intellectual challenge of learning a foreign language and its cultures. Level: Basic  

CO3: This course is designed to develop the necessary skills for interpreting literature and for writing effectively in French. Level: Intermediate  

CO4: The course also includes a study of selected grammatical patterns and stylistic techniques. Level: Intermediate 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:21
Introduction to French Language
 

Brief on French Introduction to French Alphabets.  Numbers 1- 20 and Greetings in French

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:21
Basics in French
 

The days of the week with the video practice. The months of the years with the video. Numbers 20- 100 and Greetings in French

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:21
Conversations in French
 

Introduction to verbs, Speaking about the profession, conjugating verbs in Present tense Introduction to Articles: Definite articles and indefinite articles 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:24
Vous comprenez?
 

Grammaire: Conjugaison des  verbes, Vocabulaire: Les lieux de la ville

Discours en continu: se présentation a un group

Comprehension :Ecrits de la rue

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:24
Au travail
 

Grammaire: conjugaison verbes en « er »

Vocabulaire: l’etat civil

Discours en continu: un pays, une ville

Comprehension: Article de presse

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:24
On se detend?
 

Grammaire: futur proche Vocabulaire: les loisirs (sports, spectacles, activites)

Discours en continu: parler de ses loisirs. Comprehension : cartes et message.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:24
Racontez-moi
 

Grammaire: passe compose, la date et l’heure Vocabulaire: les moments de la journee.

Discours en continu: raconter un emploi du temps passe.

Comprehension: journal personnel

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Book: ECHO A1 – Méthode de Français , 2 e Édition, J.Girardet / J. Pecheur. 

CLE International

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Alter Ego A1 - Méthode de Français, Catherine Hugot, Veronique M.Kizirian

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I: 10 marks; CIA II: 15 marks; CIA III: 20 marks; Attendance: 5 marks

ESE: 50 marks (Vivavoce)

ARC742B - MUSIC (2017 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Music as an Open Elective subject has been suggested from subjects of study other than Architecture which will add value to the program and enable the overall development of the student.

Course Objective: To enable the overall development of the student by pursuing Music.

Level of knowledge: Basic

Learning Outcome

To acquire the knowledge of the chosen area of specialization.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
Fundamentals
 

Fundamentals of Music

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:30
Performance
 

Performance oriented sessions

Text Books And Reference Books:

As recommended by the respective faculty.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

As recommended by the respective faculty.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA Marks: 50

ESE Marks: 50

ARC742C - DANCE (2017 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Dance as an Open Elective subject has been suggested from subjects of study other than Architecture which will add value to the program and enable the overall development of the student.

Course Objective: To enable the overall development of the student by pursuing Dance.

Level of knowledge: Basic

Learning Outcome

To acquire the knowledge of the chosen area of specialization.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
Fundamentals
 

Teaching fundamentals of dance.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:30
Performance
 

Performance oriented sessions.

Text Books And Reference Books:

As recommended by the respective faculty.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

As recommended by the respective faculty.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA Marks: 50; ESE Marks: 50 (Vivavoce)

ARC751 - ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN VII (2017 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:120
No of Lecture Hours/Week:8
Max Marks:300
Credits:12

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: The studio would primarily introduce the role of urban space as a public realm and the need to create such spaces as extension of private domain in a public building shall be investigated and shall become one of the architectural goals of the project. 

Some of the prerequisites of the project shall be;

1. Multiple functions,

2. Public access to majority of the spaces,

3. Large gathering areas which are open and extendable to the immediate urban context.

Course Objective: To understand the implications various issues in urban design – socio-cultural, environmental, political and technological issues; To engage an appropriate design process towards sustainable resource management and a built environment in the city.

Learning Outcome

1. To define and identify urban issues.

2. To study, innovate and integrate typologies of public spaces and built.

3. To develop necessary communication skills to conduct field surveys and participatory processes of community-based study and design.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:24
Urban Workshop
 

Introduction to exploratory processes, productions using different media and liberal arts to identify urban issues – Using Cinema, Photography, Caricature and Literature to weave a story around various characters.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:24
Transect Mapping
 

Develop various transects through the area of study using the above productions to illustrate the challenges of urban spaces – geographical, hydrological, environmental, experiential, gender, mobility, language, normative.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:24
Field surveys and mapping of the area of study
 

Experience and identify critical issues with regard to built and public spaces using various techniques of urban design; develop patterns and typologies of built and open spaces, efficiency of open spaces, ideas of extended living areas, movement and accessibility.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:24
Programmatic Premise
 

Evolve interrelationships of functions and activity patterns, form and space, hierarchies, architectural response to site and programmatic premise of the case.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:24
Methods
 

Site walks, field surveys and both manual and advanced tools and soft wares may be used for field data collection and analysis. Workshops and lectures suggested for a holistic understanding and knowledge of current discourses on the subject.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:24
Discourse on Urban Issues and Urban Design Process
 

Discourse on any one urban issue or a process of urban design such as public participatory process or representations in urban design may be conducted through lectures, workshops or case studies; a critical review of the idea chosen; normative aspects of the same in design; Case visits and Literature review.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:48
The Urban Insert and the Public Realm
 

The Design: The design premise and demonstration: an informed integration of program and specific site conditions for the design exploration; integration of services as a critical parameter.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:48
Nature of Projects
 

The nature of projects can be on transit nodes and soft mobility, urban conservation, sociio- cultural institutions, safety and help centers; waste recycling enterprise etc.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:48
Process, Development and Demonstration of Design
 

Process, Development and Demonstration of design through working models and drawings; Conduct of public participatory meetings and Community outreach projects suggested.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Lang, Jon. (2005) “Urban Design: A Typology of Procedures and Products”. Oxford, United Kingdom: Architectural Press. 

 

2. Broadbent, Geoffrey. “Emerging Concepts of Urban Design”. 

 

3. Mostafavi Mohsen (2016). “Ecological Urbanism”. Switzerland: Lars Muller Publishers. 

 

4. Barnett, Jonathan. (1982), “Introduction to Urban Design”, Icon (Harpe); 1st edition.

 

5. ITDP and EPC (2011): “Better Streets Better Cities: A Guide to Street Design in Urban India”. Institute for Transport and Development Policy. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Nagendra, H. (2019). "Nature In The City: Bengaluru In The Past, Present, And Future." UK: Oxford University Press.

2. De, Aditi. (2008). "Multiple City - Writing on Bangalore." New Delhi: Penguin Books.

3. Sanyal, S. (2012). "Land of the Seven Rivers: A Brief History of India's Geography." New Delhi: Viking.

4. Phadke Shilpa Khan Sameera Ranade Shilpa, (2011). “Why Loiter? Women and Risk on Mumbai Streets”. India: Penguin Random House. 

5. Elkin Lauren, (2016) “Flaneuse, Women walk the city in Paris, New York, Tokyo, Venice and London”, London, Penguin Random House UK. 

6. Calvino, Italo. (1978).” Invisible Cities”. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA Marks: 150

ESE Marks: 150

ARC752 - URBAN DESIGN (2017 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The seminar-based course introduces the field of Urban Design and brings out the normative and positive theories of city form. It outlines the evolution of urban form in history while discoursing on the contemporary urban issues citing case studies. 

Course Objectives:  

The course is intended as a comprehensive survey of urban form in historical and theoretical terms. 

Level of Knowledge: Intermediate

Learning Outcome

CO 1: To define and comprehend the evolution of cities. 

CO 2: To critique the contemporary urban issues. 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Ideology and Theory in Urban Design
 

Introduction to the field of urban design and concerns of the field. Normative and positive theories of city form. Nature of City form -Cosmic, Machine and Organic Models. Descriptive and functional theories. Alternative theoretical postulations.  

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Evolution of Urban Design
 

The Early Cities, Medieval Towns, The Renaissance, Islamic cities in the Middle East. Urban Process; rise and fall of cities, destruction due to war and calamities, Haussmanization. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Urban Movements
 
  1. Form of Modern City; Early cities of capitalism,
  2. City Beautiful Movement, Modern Movement,
  3. Cities in the Garden, Cites of Theory and Sweat Equity & Highway.
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Urban Divisions and Public Spaces
 
  1. The city edge; walled edge, meeting the water, on the periphery and the open city.
  2. Urban Divisions; the Sovereign District, God in the City.
  3. Public Spaces; nature of public places, typologies and public parks. 
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Urban Movements and Urban Process
 
  1. Modern and Post-Modern Urbanism, Lynch’s ideas of Good City Form, Imageability and Memory, Public and Private domains, Suburbs and Periphery. 
  2. Privacy, Territoriality and Proxemic theory, Defensible spaces, ideas of community through design. Art, symbolic aesthetics in civic design. Current hypothesis on children and urban environment. 
  3. Post-urbanism and resource conservation. Towards an urban design manifesto on the future of Indian Cities. 
  4. Urban Economics and sociology. 
Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Bacon, E. N. (1976). “Design of Cities.” Penguin Books. 

2. Kostof, S. (1991).” The City Shaped: Urban Patterns and Meanings Through History”. Bulfinch. 

3. Kostof, S., & Castillo, G. (1999). “The City Assembled: The elements of Urban Form through History." Thames and Hudson. 

4. Lang, Jon. (2005) “Urban Design: A Typology of Procedures and Products”. Oxford, United Kingdom: Architectural Press. 

5. Lang, Jon., “Towards Creating Architectural Theory” Van-Nostrand. 

6. Broadbent, Geoffrey. “Emerging Concepts of Urban Design”. 

7. Hall Peter, “Cities of Tomorrow”; Blackwell Publications. 

8. Morris, A. E. (1994). “History of Urban Form: before the Industrial Revolutions”; Longman Scientific & Technical. 

9. Gallion Arthur (2003), “Urban Pattern”, John Wiley & Sons; 5th Edition, 2003. 

10. Cliff Moughtin, R. C. (2003). “Urban Design: Methods and techniques.” Elsevier. 

11. H.D.F.Kitto. (1951). "The Polis" The City Reader. Routledge. 

12. Kotkin, J. (2005). “The City: A Global History.” Modern Library. 

13. Spreiregen, P. D. (1965).” Urban Design: The Architecture of Towns and Cities.” McGraw-Hill. 

14. Barnett, Jonathan. (1974), “Urban Design as Public Policy”, McGraw-Hill Inc., US. 

15. Barnett, Jonathan. (1982), “Introduction to Urban Design”, Icon (Harpe); 1st edition 

16. Jacob, Alan. (1980);” Making City Planning Work”, American Planning Association. 

17. Lynch, Kevin, (1981);“A Theory of Good City Form.” MIT Press.

18. Lynch, Kevin, (1960);"The Image of the City." MIT Press.

19. Cliff Moughtin, (1992);"Urban Design:Street and Square." Butterworth Architecture

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Mostafavi Mohsen (2016). “Ecological Urbanism”. Switzerland: Lars Muller Publishers. 

2. Calvino, Italo. (1978).” Invisible Cities”. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.

3. Phadke Shilpa Khan Sameera Ranade Shilpa, (2011). “Why Loiter? Women and Risk on Mumbai Streets”. India: Penguin Random House. 

4. Elkin Lauren, (2016) “Flaneuse, Women walk the city in Paris, New York, Tokyo, Venice and London”, London, Penguin Random House UK. 

5. ITDP and EPC (2011): “Better Streets Better Cities: A Guide to Street Design in Urban India”. Institute for Transport and Development Policy. 

6. Shah Sonal, Goswami Sahana, Rangawala Lubaina, Robin King, Das Himadri, Suri Akhila (2014), “Safe Access Manual: Safe access to mass transit stations in Indian cities, Bangalore”; EMBARQ India.

7. Bally Meeda, N. P. (2007). “Graphics for Urban Design.” Thomas Telford. 

8. Castells, Manuel. (1978.) “City, Class and Power (Sociology, politics & cities)” (Palgrave Macmillan). 

9. Amoroso, N. (2010). “The Exposed City: Mapping the Urban Invisibles”. Taylor & Francis. 

10. Government of India, “URDPFI Guidelines”, 2014.  

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I: 10 marks; CIA II: 15 marks; CIA III: 20 marks; Attendance: 5 marks

ESE (Viva Voce): 50 Marks

ARC753 - BUILDING INFORMATION MODELLING (2017 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course objectives:

To be able to work in a 3-dimensional BIM environment and create 3D models of construction assemblies and buildings; to be able to use BIM compatibility-based tools to solve technical issues (fabrication, energy efficiency, lighting, structural, etc.) collaboration and managing the project workflow teams( Architecture, civil, Construction, MEP, Plant, Structural ) and automation during the planning process.

Learning Outcome

Course outcomes:

CO1: To create a parametric building information model and extract data; create construction documents, material take-off’s and building schedules, and Performance analysis.

CO2: To comprehend Autodesk Revit as an example of a parametric BIM building information modeling software.

CO3: Ability to create, process and manage BIM objects and Models, Specification Estimation, Rendering, and Presenting.

CO4: To collaborate the project workflow with the team in the building process (Architecture, civil, Construction, MEP, Plant, Structural)

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Unit-1 Detailed Study
 

Introduction of the basics of BIM and Revit

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
1.Principles of BIM and application cases.
 

Study on the principles of BIM and studying project cases 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
2.3D BIM modelling (Revit):
 

Detailed 3D modelling for Architecture planning, Engineering and construction.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:24
2.BIM Object Creation:
 

Using Revit, Recap pro and Revit Live, Formit Pro for 3D Sketching, Analysis of BIM model for various parameters Design, planning, structural, Rendering, walkthroughs / Show Reel creation.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:24
1.Working with BIM models:
 

Estimating & material take-off (the power of data and parameters in Revit; Clash detection and interoperability (Revit and Navisworks); 3D scanning and modelling from point clouds (Real works) Analysis (Insight)

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:21
BIM term project - Complete 3D modelling covering all aspects of BIM.
 

Assignment/project given as term work - Term project includes selecting a site and design development and modeling using the software learned in the course 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:18
Unit-4 Portfolio
 

Portfolio development - To organize and review all works done in the semester. To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject. Establish connections with other subjects where possible.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Books:

T1. BIM Handbook / Eastman, Teicholz, Sacks, Liston / John Wiley & Son

T2 BIM and Construction Management: Proven Tools, Methods, and Workflows / Hardin / Sybex

T3 BIM and Integrated Design – Strategies for Architectural Practice / Deutsch / John Wiley & Sons

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Commercial Design Using Autodesk Revit / Any recent edition / Daniel John Stine / SDC Publications

R2. UMass Library e-books subscriptions.

R3. Mastering Autodesk Revit Architecture / Dzambazova, Demchak, Krygiel / John Wiley & Sons

R4. Autodesk Revit Architecture for Architects & Designers / Tickoo / Cadcim

R6. Introduction to Residential Design Using Autodesk Revit / Stine / SDC PublicationsOnline

Others:

1. Design Academy by Autodesk:  This is a free course by Autodesk which offers BIM &7 Revit; https://academy.autodesk.com/curriculum/architecture  https://academy.autodesk.com/curriculum/architectural-engineering

2. Building Information Modeling BIM in Current and Future Practice Karen M. Kensek, LEED BD+C, Assoc. AIA Douglas Noble, FAIA, PhD

3. Mastering Autodesk Revit Architecture / Dzambazova, Demchak, Krygiel / John Wiley & Sons- 2016/2017 Edition.

4. Go pillar academy

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern: CIA: 50 Marks; ESE: 50 Marks (Vivavoce); The students shall be continuously assessed towards their CIA which comprises of creative and innovative assignments. CIA Evaluation to be done based on the submissions received from the students, BIM term project, and the Portfolio; Students Attendance and participation in the course (5 M)

ARC831 - PROJECT AND CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT (2017 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: - The lecture course systematically trains, aspects of phased construction; the prevalent techniques of planning, programming, and management of construction projects. It outlines the construction equipment, safety measures, and management at the site. It also introduces the use of computers for solving inventory, scheduling, and other issues related to construction and management.

Course Objective: - To provide an insight into the Management of Buildings/Construction projects involving the management of money, manpower, and machinery.

Learning Outcome

  1.   To describe the various aspects of phased construction; the prevalent techniques of planning, programming and management of construction project;

  2. To demonstrate brief exercises on techniques of project planning;

  3. To describe constructionequipment,safetymeasuresandmanagementatsite;todemonstratethe use of computers for solving inventory, scheduling and other issues related to construction andmanagement.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction
 

Role of Architect, Consultants and Contractor in decision making in project management.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
ProjectPlanning
 

Introduction to a sequence of construction activity and method of planning and programming.

Human aspects of project management.

Project planning and project scheduling and project controlling.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Elements of network & critical path method and pert analysis
 

Event,activity, dummy,network rules,graphical guidelines for network, numbering of events.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Construction problems
 

CPM network analysis & PERT time estimates, time computation & network analysis.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Project time reduction and optimization
 

Optimum duration, contracting the network for cost optimization, steps in cost-time optimization.

Managing men, money, machines and materials.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Project updating and Resource allocation
 

When to update?

Datarequiredfor updating, steps in the process of updating resource allocation, Resource usage profile.

Histogram, Resource smoothing and Resource leveling.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Project cost reduction and value engineering
 

 Project cost, Indirect project cost, direct project cost, slope of the direct cost curve, total project cost

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Types of Machinery
 

Types of equipment used in construction. JCBs, trucks, hoisting machines,RMC carriers,form work,shoring material,concrete mixers etc.

Maintenance and optimal use after purchase.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Construction safety and management
 

Safety Measures and management: Integrating workers' safety and material security into management.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Computer applications in Project Management
 

Introduction to use of computers for solving inventory, scheduling and other issues related to construction and management.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Billing requirement
 

Role of the project manager in monitoring the specifications follow-up for quality control, the measurement book (MB), RA bills, interim and final checking and certification of works on site based on the BOQ and terms of contracts.

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Dr.B.C.Punmia et al.Project planning and control with-PERT and CPM, Laxmi Publications, NewDelhi
  2.  S.P.Mukhopadyay, project management for Architect's and civil Engineers, HT, Kharagpur,1974
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Jerome D.Wiest and Ferdinand K.Levy, A Management Guide to PERT, CPM, prentice Hall of India Pub, Ltd.,New Delhi,1982
  2. R.A. Burgess and G.White, Building production and project Management, The construction press, London,1979.
Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50 Marks

The theory course CIA is conducted as CIA 1, 2, and 3.CIA 1 and 3 are conducted by the respective faculty members whereas CIA 2 is a mid-semester examination conducted centrally.

[a] The breakup of CIA marks for the course is given below.

CIA 1- 10 marks; CIA 2 - 15 marks (conducted out of 50 marks and converted to out of 15 marks); CIA 3 - 20 marks

Attendance -5 Marks

A minimum of 50% marks in the CIA is required to be eligible for the End Semester Examination (ESE). A student who fails the CIA of the course is not eligible to appear for the ESE and shall repeat CIA immediately after the announcement of the results and pass in the CIA to become eligible for the ESE in the supplementary examinations conducted in the subsequent semester.

[b] END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50 Marks

The ESE is conducted at the end of the semester by the Office of Examinations. Duration of the examination is three hours with maximum marks of 100 which is then reduced to out of 50 marks

[c] Permission for admission to the ESE is granted only if

• A student has passed in CIA of the course with 50% minimum marks

• A student has at least 85% of the attendance in aggregate at the end of the semester

• The Vice-Chancellor is satisfied with the character and conduct of the student

[d] PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course with a minimum aggregate (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and ESE score of 40%.

ARC832 - ENTREPRENEURSHIP SKILLS OF ARCHITECTS (2017 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: -

The lecture course focuses on how to sustain entrepreneurial and innovative thinking and success within the practice of Architecture. The course considers strategies to leverage limited resources for maximum effect. Emphasis is placed on the circumstances and opportunities of the professional practice of architecture: practice as profession, process, organization, business, and evolving models of practice are covered. The course provides a series of concepts, frameworks, and heuristics that enable the entrepreneur to anticipate and deal with the challenges that accompany growth of a business. Cases, exercises, lectures, and speakers are used.

Course Objective: -

To sustain entrepreneurial and innovative thinking and success within the practice of Architecture

Learning Outcome

To perform readings and give a verbal presentation to summarize content.

To research 3-4 critical, industry innovations and give a verbal and visual presentation.

To interview an entrepreneur of their choice and give a verbal and visual presentation.

To develop a business plan and give a verbal and visual presentation.

To interact in Q&A with selected, relevant, industry business-owner guest speakers.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction
 

Critical Thinking & Representation

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Skill Types
 

Communication Skills, Design Thinking Skills,

Visual Communication Skills, Investigative Skills, Use of Precedent, Applied Research

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Building Practise
 

Integrated Building Practice; Financial Considerations

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Skill Development
 

Leadership Skills

Note: Topical Outline (include percentage of time in course spent in each subject area): Entrepreneur and Innovation Discussions / Lectures(70%), Verbal and Visulal Presentation Skills (30%)

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Dr.B.C.Punmia et al.Project planning and control with-PERT and CPM, Laxmi Publications, NewDelhi

  2. Steve Jobs Commencement Address, Stanford Report, June 14,2005

  3. The Innovator’s DNA: Mastering the Five Skills of Disruptive Innovators, Jeff Dyer, Hal Gregersen and Clayton M. Christensen, Harvard Business Review, December 2009

  4. How Great Entrepreneurs Think, Leigh Buchanan, Inc. February 1, 2011

  5. Entrepreneurship as Method: Open Questions for and Entrepreneurial Future, Saras D. Sarasvathy and Sankaran Venkataraman, E T & P January 2011

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Globalization of Social Entrepreneurship Opportunities, ShakerA.Zahra,

  2. Hans N.  Rwhouser, Nachiket Bhawe, Donald O. Newbaum and James C.

  3. The Art of War, SunTzu

  4. The world at large

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50 Marks

The theory course CIA is conducted as CIA 1, 2, and 3.CIA 1 and 3 are conducted by the respective faculty members whereas CIA 2 is a mid-semester examination conducted centrally.

[a] The breakup of CIA marks for the course is given below.

CIA 1- 10 marks; CIA 2 - 15 marks (conducted out of 50 marks and converted to out of 15 marks); CIA 3 - 20 marks

Attendance -5 Marks

A minimum of 50% marks in the CIA is required to be eligible for the End Semester Examination (ESE). A student who fails the CIA of the course is not eligible to appear for the ESE and shall repeat CIA immediately after the announcement of the results and pass in the CIA to become eligible for the ESE in the supplementary examinations conducted in the subsequent semester.

[b] END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50 Marks

The ESE is conducted at the end of the semester by the Office of Examinations. Duration of the examination is three hours with maximum marks of 100 which is then reduced to out of 50 marks

[c] Permission for admission to the ESE is granted only if

• A student has passed in CIA of the course with 50% minimum marks

• A student has at least 85% of the attendance in aggregate at the end of the semester

• The Vice-Chancellor is satisfied with the character and conduct of the student

[d] PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course with a minimum aggregate (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and ESE score of 40%.

ARC841B - GRAPHIC AND PRODUCT DESIGN (2017 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: - Elective subjects have been suggested which are related to specialized areas in Architecture. The student may choose any subject of interest. The detailed syllabus of the electives chosen and the modus operandi of teaching will be taken up by the faculty-in-charge.

Course Objective: - To expose the students to specialized areas of architecture.

Level of knowledge: - Basic

Learning Outcome

To acquire the knowledge of the chosen area of specialization; to apply or innovate the fundamentals and details learnt, in design.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:75
Graphic and Product Design
 

Graphic design elements, principles, and applications; Concept of form and space in product design; Relating Form to Materials and Processes of Manufacture. Use of Computers for Form generation; Creativity techniques; product detailing and manufacture; exploratory mockup models for concept development, refinement and detailing; product design prototyping, and advanced manufacturing processes.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Graphic Design for Architects: A Manual for Visual Communication by Karen Lewis, 2015.

2. Deconstructing Product Design: Exploring the Form, Function, Usability, Sustainability by William Lidwell & Gerry Manacsa 2009.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Mastering Mental Ray Rendering Techniques for 3D and CAD Professionals by Jennifer O' Connor, 2010.

 
Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) of 150 Marks and the End Semester Examination (ESE) of 150 marks. The students shall be continuously assessed towards their CIA which comprises of creative and innovative assignments.

[a] CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50 Marks

CIA for the Studio course shall be conducted in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks. A student who fails the CIA of a course is not eligible to appear for the ESE and shall repeat CIA immediately after the announcement of the results and pass in the CIA to become eligible for the ESE in the supplementary examinations conducted in the subsequent semester.

[b] END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50 Marks

The ESE is conducted at the end of the semester as a Viva-voce. 

[c] Permission for admission to the ESE is granted only if

• A student has passed in CIA of the course with 50% minimum marks

• A student has at least 85% of the attendance in aggregate at the end of the semester

• The Vice-Chancellor is satisfied with the character and conduct of the student

[d] PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course with a minimum aggregate (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and ESE score of 40%.

ARC842C - GREEN BUILDINGS AND RATING SYSTEMS (2017 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: -Elective subjects have been suggested which are related to specialized areas in Architecture. The student may choose any one subject of interest. The detailed syllabus of the electives chosen and the modus operandi of teaching will be taken up by the faculty-in-charge.

Course Objective: - To expose the students to specialized areas of architecture.

Learning Outcome

To acquire the knowledge of the chosen area of specialization; to apply or innovate the fundamentals and details learnt, in design.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:75
Green Buildings & Rating Systems
 

Passive design considerations; active systems; design for energy-efficient building- daylighting and natural ventilation; technologies for alternative sources of energy; Net Zero buildings; software tools for the design of a building and the performance evaluation of a building with respect to energy; Rating systems: IGBC, LEED, GRIHA.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Cottrell, M. (2011). Guidebook to the LEED certification process: For LEED for New Construction, LEED for Core & Shell, and LEED for Commercial Interiors. Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons, Inc..
2. Ministry Of New and Renewable Energy. (2011). Griha Manual Volum-1 Introduction to National Rating system. New Delhi: The Energy And Resource Institute.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. https://www.grihaindia.org/manuals
2. https://www.usgbc.org/leed/v41
3. https://igbc.in/

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50 Marks

The theory course CIA is conducted as CIA 1, 2, and 3.CIA 1 and 3 are conducted by the respective faculty members whereas CIA 2 is a mid-semester examination conducted centrally.

[a] The breakup of CIA marks for the course is given below.

CIA 1- 10 marks; CIA 2 - 15 marks (conducted out of 50 marks and converted to out of 15 marks); CIA 3 - 20 marks

Attendance -5 Marks

A minimum of 50% marks in the CIA is required to be eligible for the End Semester Examination (ESE). A student who fails the CIA of the course is not eligible to appear for the ESE and shall repeat CIA immediately after the announcement of the results and pass in the CIA to become eligible for the ESE in the supplementary examinations conducted in the subsequent semester.

[b] END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50 Marks

The ESE is conducted at the end of the semester by the Office of Examinations. Duration of the examination is three hours with maximum marks of 100 which is then reduced to out of 50 marks

[c] Permission for admission to the ESE is granted only if

• A student has passed in CIA of the course with 50% minimum marks

• A student has at least 85% of the attendance in aggregate at the end of the semester

• The Vice-Chancellor is satisfied with the character and conduct of the student

[d] PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course with a minimum aggregate (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and ESE score of 40%.

ARC842E - SUSTAINABLE CITIES AND COMMUNITIES (2017 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description